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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 5, 2021 2:00pm-4:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines — borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go. we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations and that's why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly 19th. but despite the vaccination programme, some experts are urging caution over lifting all restrictions. it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs, as his wife is forced to self—isolate.
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the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished over safety fears as a tropical storm approaches florida. and can she do it? all eyes this afternoon on 18—year—old emma raducanu, as she continues her dazzling wimbledon run. good afternoon. the prime minister is to announce details of plans to ease most of the remaining coronavirus restrictions in england. the measures could include making the wearing of a face mask voluntary, ending social distancing rules, and signing in at pubs and restaurants. covid infections in england are still rising, and are expected
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to rise further if the rules are eased, but ministers think the vaccine is limiting the number of deaths. there is concern though from medical leaders, scientists, and some union leaders about making the wearing of face coverings a personal decision. plans for scotland, wales and northern ireland will be outlined later this month. here's our political correspondent helen catt. for more than a year, ministers have certain laws that have closely governed some of the smallest details of our lives. from the 19th ofjuly in england that is set to change. instead it will be up to us to decide. one metre plus distance and rules are expected to be scrapped so pubs would no longer be forced to provide table service for example. we wouldn't have to check in to visit a venue and they would not be any cap on how many people we could meet or have inside our own homes. the government says coronavirus cases will go up that is set to change.
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hospital admissions and rising as we saw in recent peaks. in december, we had 23,000 infections a day which is the rate we have seen, there were 15,000 people in hospital with covid whereas now there is only around 1700 in england. of some scientists have questioned if now is the right time. why on earth are we now changing from protecting people to vaccination to suddenly listing all the protections and going towards, if you like, achieving immunity to infection by people? it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. one of the most visible measures of the pandemic has been the facemask. it's expected wearing one in shops or on public transport won't be legally required in england after the 19th ofjuly like much else, a personal choice. i don't particularly- like wearing a facemask.
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i think that's something many people will share with me. . i also know that it's really hard for some people - particularly those hard of hearing to hear well when someone is. speaking to them in a facemask. but i will of course i follow the guidance that will be set out when people - should think of wearing one and not, i think to make a judgment to follow the guidance and the right— precautions to take. a part of wearing a facemask is about protecting others. the train drivers union aslef says it's a step too far too soon. i will be keeping my mask and i think there will be times we want to do things slightly differently from how we are at the moment, however, i put a plea and for the shop workers, people in restaurants and on the transport system, we are doing it for them as well as each other and it's really important we take into account not putting them at risk. isolation if you test positive for coronavirus will still be required and it's expected there will be a signal given on the future of the isolation policy for schools. the overall message
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from downing street, though, is although the rules may be about to disappear, the risk posed by covid won't. it's about learning to live the virus. at the rate we have 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in westminster. not for the first time, the government getting pressure in both directions. , , , , , directions. yes. it is consistently had pressure _ directions. yes. it is consistently had pressure from _ directions. yes. it is consistently had pressure from tory - directions. yes. it is consistently - had pressure from tory backbenchers, people within parliament and beyond who have argued for an acceleration of the lifting of restrictions as the vaccine roll—out has gone well. that's pressure has been maintained throughout the last few weeks. 0n the other hand, you have particularly big medical devices like the british medical association in the last day or two urging caution, particularly as a third wave of this virus rolls in, the delta variant is continuing to spread fast. there are still large number of people who have not yet been double jabbed. they are arguing that the government should wait a
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bit longer until that degree of protection is even more widespread across the country. pressures from both sides, it is clear the government is going to hit itsjuly 19 target with lifting all legal restrictions in england. that'll be confirmed next monday, in a week's time. today, we are going to get an insight of the government thinks about the guidance around social distancing, facemasks, working from home and the rest of it.— home and the rest of it. then, how much latitude _ home and the rest of it. then, how much latitude do _ home and the rest of it. then, how much latitude do companies - home and the rest of it. then, how much latitude do companies have, | much latitude do companies have, particularly transport companies in insisting on different rules from those that are laid down by law? i think they do anything, say for instance, big supermarket chain that wanted to have a mask mandate in place to say a customer should wear masks will be entitled to put a sign on front of their shop saying that. the problem is, it isn't underpinned, it was the independent
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by the legal mandate that has existed for the last 12 months and that will potentially weaken it and we compliance. the same applies to train operators who may be tempted to do the same. what really matters later for those businesses, for train operators and local leaders, andy burnham, for instance, were saying he would like to see the wearing of facemasks continue in big retail venues, wearing of facemasks continue in big retailvenues, on wearing of facemasks continue in big retail venues, on public transport. not all matter is the —— prime minister's words on what he says about the guidance and whether he thinks it would be advisable for people to wear facemasks in big crowd public places like a station concourse or in a shop. signs are he isn't going to say that but number 10 are saying the prime minister will urge caution, telling people this isn't over yet. he will be explicit that with the lifting of these restrictions of the next couple of weeks which will accelerate infection rates and there will be more deaths as a result. as
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far as number will be more deaths as a result. as faras number10 will be more deaths as a result. as far as number 10 goes go postponing this any longer with only produce a bigger wave of the virus later on and that is the balance of risk they are having to weigh up.— are having to weigh up. thank you very much- _ you can watch the prime minister's news conference from downing street this afternoon here on the bbc news channel. special coverage starts at 11.45. and at 3:30 this afternoon we'll put your questions to health experts on what the proposed changes in england might mean for you. do send in your questions using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing us at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. the queen has awarded the nhs the george cross for bravery, as the health service marks its 73rd birthday. her majesty has paid tribute to the "courage, compassion and dedication" of all nhs staff. this morning, a thanksgiving service was held at st paul's catherdral, attended by the duke of cambridge. the duchess of cambridge was due to be there but she's now self—isolating after coming into contact
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with someone who tested positive for coronavirus. our health correspondent catherine burns sent this from st paul's. some dressed up in theirfinest and others wearing their uniform with pride. today is all about the nhs staff who have worked so hard, especially during the pandemic. they reflected on their experiences, including a doctor who treated the first—ever covid patients in the uk. in the absence of treatments and vaccines, it would have been easy to lose hope. for the vision of those who pioneered our national health service. you might recognise may parsons, she read out a prayer. as the matron who gave the first vaccine outside of clinical trials, back in december, she represents one of the most hopeful moments of the pandemic, but she says at times, it felt like she was going to war. the hardest one is the amount of deaths that we've seen.
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it isjust terrifyingly big in numbers. and those are the things in my 21 years of nursing i've never come across. the duke of cambridge arriving ahead of the ceremony today without his wife, she is isolating after coming into contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus. there are more thanks from the royal family today. the queen has awarded all nhs staff past and present the george cross. this is the highest kind of award that can be given to civilians like this. and it is given for extreme heroism and courage in the face of danger. there are also patients here today remembering what the nhs has done for them. like the mum who had to give birth two months early because she and her baby both had covid. she remembers that last call to her husband before she was put on a ventilator. i just felt... it is hard to describe. it is notjust scared, it is... a feeling of utter terror inside.
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it's a feeling that i can't express in words. it is just traumatic. it all started 73 years ago today, the first time that health care became free at the point of contact. this leaflet is coming _ through your letterbox one day soon. the head of the nhs in england now says the health service is a gift that we gave ourselves, but it needs to build back better. out of adversity can come strength, if together, like those who have gone before us, we choose to confront and resolve our deepest social challenges with determination and conviction. away from the pomp and ceremony, huge challenges lie ahead — the impact of long covid, record numbers on waiting lists, exhausted staff and a row over pay in england.
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explosives have been used to demolish the remains of an apartment block near miami that partially collapsed 11 days ago. 2a people are known to have died and more than 120 others are still unaccounted for. aru na iyengar reports. loud bo0m. the remaining section of champlain towers south complex comes crashing down. demolition experts drilled small explosive charges into columns to bring the remaining unstable structure down in a controlled explosion. neighbours were advised to stay indoors and close their windows until two hours after the explosion. but some came to pray for those still missing. drones with thermal imaging were used to make sure there were no people or pets still inside the building. the approaching tropical storm elsa, which has hit cuba with winds of up to 65mph, brought forward discussions about when to demolish the remaining building.
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it's eliminated a looming threat, a dangerous threat for our rescue workers. it will potentially open up probably a third of the pile so we can all, you know, so the teams can focus not just on two—thirds of the pile but on the whole thing. crews are now hoping to be able to get into the apartment block's underground garage and get a clearer picture of any air holes that may exist in the rubble. but no survivors have been pulled out alive from the site in surfside since the first few hours after the structure's collapse. that's 11 days ago. what caused the ao—year—old building to collapse is still unclear, but a 2018 inspection warned of major flaws in the original design. aruna iyengar, bbc news. legislation on safety in high—rise buildings, drawn up in response to the grenfell tower disaster four years ago, will be presented
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to parliament this afternoon. the building safety bill will create a new regulator with powers to prosecute developers. sarah corker is in salford for us and has been telling us how significant this new legislation is. this legislation outlines major reforms to building and fire safety in england and wales. as you say, they will be a new regulator and it will have powers to prosecute developers who don't meet standards. it'll also have the ability to force them to withdraw projects from the market. this is four years since the grenfell tower fire, that tragedy exposed decades of systematic regulatory failures and safety checks on high since then have exposed problems notjust with cladding but many fire safety faults. this building here in south salford quays is having their cladding removed at the moment. there is this £5 billion government cladding removalfund, but mps
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estimate this is a £15 billion problem and leaseholders say they are the ones that are having to pay these huge costs. in this legislation this afternoon we expect they will be a legal requirement for building owners to look at alternative methods of paying to fix these buildings before passing on those costs to leaseholders. leaseholders will have 15 years to sue developers for shoddy workmanship. at the moment they've got six years. cladding campaigners say they don't have the time and money to take on these complex legal cases. it is difficult as well to prove a liability. at the moment it is estimated 700,000 people are living in flats wrapped flammable materials. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go.
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the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs — as his wife is forced to self—isolate. and can she do it? all eyes this afternoon on 18 year old emma raducanu, as she continues her dazzling wimbledon run in israel, mixed cities of arabs and jews remain on edge after some of the worst domestic unrest in the country's history earlier in the year. one of the cities is lod, about 15 miles south of tel aviv. back in may, a palestinian citizen was shot dead and a jewish israeli was killed when a rock was thrown at his car. 0ur middle correspondent yolande knell reports on the ongoing tensions in the city. the destruction left after neighbours turned on each other. it's a blessing to the house. in this house, will be joy and healthy and peace.
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0z abramovich shows me the flat of his friends, a jewish couple. theyjust fled when it was set ablaze by arab israelis. how does it make you feel, standing here? it's very, very tough. it can be my apartment and my life, this story. in may, police in lod broke up arab protests supporting gaza. hundreds went on the rampage, attacking synagogues and schools. jewish extremists came and the violent spiralled. two israeli citizens were killed, onejewish and one arab. "there's nobody better than you", this is the last message that moussa left for his father, not long before he was shot dead. a localjewish man is under arrest, but moussa's family are not reassured. they say arabs are discriminated against. translation: we have no future as lona as israel's policy is to kill arabs,
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they are forced to leave. there is no hope. across the city, the sense of calm feels fragile. a growing presence ofjewish religious nationalists here has fed arab resentment. talking to people here in lod, you realise the problems didn'tjust start with the latest violence. they are deeply rooted, going back years. now there is so much anger and distrust between people who are neighbours. now, we're just trying to get back to normal life. the government and the police did not do enough steps that it won't happen again. we still have illegal weapons going around here. since the riots, every day, we have something going on. there's an expectation things could easily erupt again. despite one being arrested, these two arab—israeli men say they're ready to return to the streets. translation: we have regained our dignity. . times have changed. we are a new generation. we want rights, we want to live.
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if anyone puts out their leg to stop us, we will break it. if the law is not for us, we will create the law. we will take the law into our hands. a new government in israel has is promising to act, but putting out this smouldering fire will be a huge challenge. yolande knell, bbc news, lod. japanese rescue teams are still searching through wrecked homes and buried roads days after a landslide hit the town of atami. at least three people are known to have died so far but around 80 are believed to be missing. the area was hit by more than a month's worth of rain injust 2a hours. pope francis has undergone successful surgery to treat a colon problem at a hospital in rome. the vatican says he is recovering well from the procedure, which was carried out under general anaesthetic yesterday. he will stay in hospital for another week. before the operation pope francis gave his sunday blessing to worshippers in st peter's square. this is the first time
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the 84—year—old has been in hospital since his election in 2013. shares in morrisons have surged by more than ten per cent this morning after news emerged of a third potential bidder for the uk's fourth largest supermarket chain. the firm's board has already accepted an offer of 254 pence per share from a consortium the rspca has received almost 100,000 reports of cruelty to animals across the uk over the last five years withjuly often being the busiest month for investigating cases. as officers prepare for another demanding summer, it's launched a new campaign to promote animal welfare. luxmy gopal reports now from north yorkshire. good boy. cuddles, treats and playtime, everything man's best friend deserves. but a year ago, max's life was different. we received a report from somebody that had overheard someone bragging they had just beaten up their dog. so they made the call
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to us and we attended the address with the police. hello, can you open the door, please, sir, it is the police? that's when we found max, terrified, covered in blood and badly injured. there's a lot of blood here, sir. on the floor. do you know what that's from? evidence at the scene suggested max had been beaten with a metal colander. he was rescued and cared for at the rspca york animal home, which oversees recovery, rehabilitation and rehoming. this was a willing act of cruelty. he wilfully submitted max to terrible injuries. and an appalling act of violence. over the past five years, the rspca has received the equivalent of 10,000 reports of intentional animal cruelty every six months, with a spike lastjuly when more than 1,500 incidents were reported in that month alone. max was left with a fractured pelvis and dislocated hip.
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over months, his health and confidence was rebuilt. we were overwhelmed, really, at how forgiving he was, mainly. an animal that's gone through what he went through really had the right to never trust people again, but he did. and he's living his best life now. dogs are always rewarding, but particularly having a dog who's and, as a special treat, a reunion with the staff who turned his life around. come on! good boy. bless him! to see him this happy is... you know, it's why we do what we do, really. itjust makes everything worthwhile. the idea of deliberate animal cruelty seems almost incomprehensible. but at least this tale has a happy ending, with max shaking off his past trauma and finding an owner worthy of his loyalty. train services are returning to normal in glasgow and edinburgh,
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after stormy weather caused flash flooding. torrential rain left some streets submerged in water, and shops were forced to close. tim muffett reports. ominous—looking clouds over glasgow yesterday and the rain that fell from them caused widespread disruption. in edinburgh, many streets were flooded. there were tricky journeys for drivers... ..and pedestrians. the train line between edinburgh waverley and haymarket station had to be closed. stjames quarter shopping centre only opened last month. naturally ventilated, it is deliberately designed to allow some rain to get in. but not this much. parts had to be cordoned off for safety reasons. many parts of the uk experienced heavy rainfall yesterday.
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sunday shopping for some turned out to be a rather soggy experience. tim muffett, bbc news. the bbc has been told that nato forces have almost completed their withdrawal from afghanistan more than two months before the deadline of the 11th of september. the taliban have warned that any foreign soldiers remaining in afghanistan beyond that date will be treated as an occupying force. but violence in the country continues to rise, with the taliban taking more territory. neighbouring tajikistan says more than a thousand afghan government soldiers have fled across the border after clashes with the insurgents. hamid karzai was afghan president between 2001 and 2014. he's been telling my colleague yalda hakim that the us and its allies had not completed what they set out to achieve. the entire mission with regard to the stated objective of the united states and its nato allies
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in defeating terrorism and extremism has failed. because let me repeat myself they did not do what they should have done. they did what they should have not done as i described earlier. the comportment of helping afghanistan in civilian areas, and education, in rebuild income in reconstruction, that was successful and you can see it clearly when you visit afghanistan that there is something to show to the world. and no doubt afghanistan... and no doubt, afghanistan has come a long way and it is not the country that was invaded by the us in 2001. before that we saw the taliban had turned the nation into. however, there are many critics now who do say afghanistan today is a failed state. afghanistan today is not a failed state. as far as the afghan people are concerned, they created a
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constitution, they went to the elections, they embrace democracy wholeheartedly. they went to school, the educated themselves, we have millions of afghan boys and girls are educated here. we did all that we could to put afghanistan on the right track and to represented well on the international scene. the failure of the state that one which is described especially in the western press is exactly where the authority and the responsibility was more with the united states and its nato allies. that is where things have failed. and that is where we, the afghan people, are also paying the price. a very heavy price. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is in kabul. 1000 afghan soldiers, we are told,
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filling two to check stand. how likely is civilians may follow? yes, it isn't a good look when you're afghan national security forces are fleeing before they fire a shot. that is a snapshot of what is happening in all too many places across afghanistan, there are bases and tech posts which are no more than a flag, where soldiers are begging the command here in kabul we are running out of food, water, we have no more ammunition, we are begging you to help us. somebody told me yesterday one base asked 70 times for assistance and that is a ringing alarm bells. the afghan national security forces who have been relying on the nato forces have to get their act together. in other districts across afghanistan, the numbers tell us which is an alarming story the situation is unravelling more quickly than anyone expected,
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some of those districts are irrelevant into —— strategic terms. some of them, the afghan national security forces retreated. they tell us a story the taliban are advancing much more quickly than expected and, yes, people are fleeing in the other direction. afghanistan, one of the poorest countries in the world, was already facing a huge and worsening humanitarian crisis. now, yet again, thousands more afghans are on the run. afghans know this isjust the beginning and it is likely to get much worse. beginning and it is likely to get much worse-— beginning and it is likely to get much worse. ., ., ., much worse. you wonder what then the nato allies have _ much worse. you wonder what then the nato allies have achieved _ much worse. you wonder what then the nato allies have achieved in _ much worse. you wonder what then the nato allies have achieved in 20 - nato allies have achieved in 20 years. how mid because i was critical as we heard in that clip. what is life likely to be like for ordinary people particularly women and young girls? long, hard questions need to be asked now as this first first
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mission outside america comes to an end. mistakes were made on all sides. when i interviewed a top american commander, he admitted may have to take along long honest look —— work—out. but mr karzai has to take a long hard look as to why his government continued to fail. afghanistan in 2021 is not the country of afghanistan in 2001. a whole new generation, an educated generation have come of age. there have been elections, there are institutions there are musicians, there is afghan films competing at there is afghan films competing at the world's film festivals. afghanistan has changed but the reports we receive from the district for the taliban are now in control tell us a story of a return of the
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dark days in the 1990s. girls not in school, men are not allowed to wear beards, they have to wear them up to a certain length, women told to stay in houses. a taliban spokesman continues to tell us that is not true, that is propaganda, we have changed, but there is a big tag question mark over the future now. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. good afternoon. so far, there has been a bit of a north—south divide with our weather story this monday. the cloud in the showers, some of them heavy and thundery across scotland, northern ireland and one or two into north west england, but there is also some sunshine further south of that. this is what is to come, though, more rain and strong winds through the night tonight. with this area of low pressure which is moving its way steadily north and east. so a spell of heavy rain overnight tonight with gale force gusts of winds across the channel coast, moving up through wales, the midlands and into
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the north of england. the rain will ease in scotland. we will have some clear skies, so here, perhaps single figures. it will be a relatively mild start, but it is all about where the rain is sitting first thing in the morning. out to the north of england, pushing across the scottish borders. the strongest of the winds are across the kent coast. a blustery day generally across the country and those temperatures well, they will peek just into the high teens if we are lucky with a few scattered showers into the southwest a little later on.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go. we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations and that is why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly the 19th.
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but despite the vaccination programme, some experts are urging caution over lifting all restrictions. it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping a safe. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs — as his wife is forced to self—isolate. the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished over safety fears — as a tropical storm approaches florida.
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wimbledon is the place to be today — on manic monday, where all fourth round matches take place. and all eyes will turn to court no one later. for 18—year—old emma raducanu's match against alja tomljanovic. let's join chetan pathak, who is at wimbledon for us... chetan, what a story for british tennis... and incredible to think that barely anyone knew who she was before the tournament started... it is an incredible story. thank you. i'm really pleased to say i am not alone appear on the roof at wimbledon. i am joined not alone appear on the roof at wimbledon. iamjoined by not alone appear on the roof at wimbledon. i am joined by sarah who is a director at bromley tennis centre. thank you for being here. you have known her since she is nine years old. what it has this past week felt like for you? it has been a world wind to be honest. we've been supporting from afar. everyone has 'ust been supporting from afar. everyone has just been — been supporting from afar. everyone hasjust been hugely _ been supporting from afar. everyone hasjust been hugely supportive. - hasjust been hugely supportive. there _ hasjust been hugely supportive. there is— hasjust been hugely supportive. there is a — hasjust been hugely supportive. there is a lot of excitement at the moment — there is a lot of excitement at the moment. . there is a lot of excitement at the moment. ,, ., ., «a ~ there is a lot of excitement at the moment. ,, ,, , �*, there is a lot of excitement at the moment. ,, ~ , �*, .,~ moment. she looks like she's taking eve hint moment. she looks like she's taking everything in — moment. she looks like she's taking everything in her— moment. she looks like she's taking everything in her stride. _ moment. she looks like she's taking everything in her stride. remember| everything in her stride. remember that match on court one. against... she was beaming and smiling and we thought, will she feel the pressure. is that what she is normally like?
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she just looks so focused when she trains_ she just looks so focused when she trains and _ she just looks so focused when she trains and she is such a polite young — trains and she is such a polite young lady and conducts herself really _ young lady and conducts herself really well and she worked so hard. i am really well and she worked so hard. lam not _ really well and she worked so hard. i am not surprised. i think you have seen _ i am not surprised. i think you have seen the _ i am not surprised. i think you have seen the real— i am not surprised. i think you have seen the real emma and all of her interviews — seen the real emma and all of her interviews to make she's having a great _ interviews to make she's having a great time — interviews to make she's having a great time-— great time. what is it about her name great time. what is it about her game that _ great time. what is it about her game that makes _ great time. what is it about her game that makes her— great time. what is it about her game that makes her stand - great time. what is it about her game that makes her stand outj great time. what is it about her. game that makes her stand out do great time. what is it about her- game that makes her stand out do you think? she game that makes her stand out do you think? ,, ., , game that makes her stand out do you think? ,, .,, ., ._ , game that makes her stand out do you think? ,, .,, ., , , ., think? she has always stood out. even before _ think? she has always stood out. even before she _ think? she has always stood out. even before she was _ think? she has always stood out. even before she was nine - think? she has always stood out. even before she was nine and - think? she has always stood out. i even before she was nine and joined us, she _ even before she was nine and joined us, she stood out as an amazing challenge — us, she stood out as an amazing challenge. she works so hard off core and — challenge. she works so hard off core and in — challenge. she works so hard off core and in the gym. she's a great athlete _ core and in the gym. she's a great athlete and — core and in the gym. she's a great athlete and she just brings more to the court _ athlete and she just brings more to the court than any other player that we have _ the court than any other player that we have seen. in the female game. she was— we have seen. in the female game. she was talking about switching her phone notification. she was watching the grand prix, tried to they focus. how do you think she will be feeling today going into this round for match? i today going into this round for match? ~ , . ~ match? i think she will take it in her stride _ match? i think she will take it in her stride like _ match? i think she will take it in her stride like the _ match? i think she will take it in her stride like the other - match? i think she will take it in l her stride like the other matches. match? i think she will take it in i her stride like the other matches. i hope _ her stride like the other matches. i houe that— her stride like the other matches. i hope that she can switch off. the buzz _ hope that she can switch off. the buzz that — hope that she can switch off. the buzz that is — hope that she can switch off. the buzz that is in the centre and in her life — buzz that is in the centre and in her life right now i'm imagining it is quite _ her life right now i'm imagining it is quite tough, but she is strong and i'm — is quite tough, but she is strong and i'm sure she will take it in her
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stride _ and i'm sure she will take it in her stride |_ and i'm sure she will take it in her stride. ~' ., and i'm sure she will take it in her stride. ~ ., , , ., stride. i know it is impossible to -redict stride. i know it is impossible to predict and _ stride. i know it is impossible to predict and we _ stride. i know it is impossible to predict and we have _ stride. i know it is impossible to predict and we have seen - stride. i know it is impossible to predict and we have seen this i stride. i know it is impossible to l predict and we have seen this with young players who are promised a big future but it doesn't quite happen. has she's been one of the people that people thought could go to the top of this game?— top of this game? certainly and can't tennis. — top of this game? certainly and can't tennis, i'm _ top of this game? certainly and can't tennis, i'm certainly - top of this game? certainly and can't tennis, i'm certainly there are girls— can't tennis, i'm certainly there are girls across the country that have _ are girls across the country that have been— are girls across the country that have been thought this way. but she stood _ have been thought this way. but she stood out _ have been thought this way. but she stood out. emma and some of her contemporaries definitely stand out. dare i_ contemporaries definitely stand out. dare i get _ contemporaries definitely stand out. dare i get ahead of myself, but we are awaiting the winner of that match. how do you feel this mitch is going to go? i match. how do you feel this mitch is going to go?— going to go? i 'ust think you never know. you — going to go? ijust think you never know. you cannot _ going to go? ijust think you never know. you cannot write _ going to go? ijust think you never know. you cannot write anything l going to go? i just think you never. know. you cannot write anything out in tennis _ know. you cannot write anything out in tennis especially the ladies game and i in tennis especially the ladies game and i think— in tennis especially the ladies game and i think emma has got a great chance _ and i think emma has got a great chance. ~ . . and i think emma has got a great chance. ~ ., ., ., ., chance. we are all looking forward to it. chance. we are all looking forward to it- thank— chance. we are all looking forward to it. thank you _ chance. we are all looking forward to it. thank you so _ chance. we are all looking forward to it. thank you so much - chance. we are all looking forward to it. thank you so much for - chance. we are all looking forward | to it. thank you so much forjoining us. we wish emma all of the best. the world number one seat awaits the winner of that match. she is currently in action on centre court
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number one. she took the first set. she the french open champion was on a 15 match run. she is 443 —— 4—3. we have already had a great story here today. the first arab woman, north african woman to get this far at the championship. she knocked out the former french winner. she said she feels like she can reach the semifinals. it is the best she will have ever done at a grand slam. a great story for her so far. very quickly, on centre court, ijust want to let you know that novak djokovic is making things look very easy at the moment. he took the first set. very easily. is a little
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bit tight against the chilean. djokovic is the overwhelming favour in the men's draw. the rain started to come down a little bit, but now it has stopped. we hope it stays away. back to you, gavin.- appreciated there. news to concern the british and irish lions on their tour of south africa — the springboks have been forced to suspend training after another coronavirus outbreak. lood dejager, the sale sharks player, tested positive — with the whole squad now having to quarantine. it puts their game against georgia on friday in some doubt. the lions first test against south africa is set to take place on july 24th. that is all the support from us for now. thank you very much, gavin. let's return to our top story. the measures could include making the wearing of a face mask voluntary, ending social distancing rules, and signing in at pubs and restaurants. let's speak to peter bone, the conservative mp for wellingborough.
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welcome. what are you looking to hear from welcome. what are you looking to hearfrom boris welcome. what are you looking to hear from borisjohnson? welcome. what are you looking to hear from boris johnson?- welcome. what are you looking to hear from boris johnson? exactly as ou hear from boris johnson? exactly as you introduced _ hear from boris johnson? exactly as you introduced it, _ hear from boris johnson? exactly as you introduced it, the _ hear from boris johnson? exactly as you introduced it, the regulation - hear from boris johnson? exactly as you introduced it, the regulation on| you introduced it, the regulation on liberties of british people will be swept away on july the 19th. and liberties of british people will be swept away onjuly the 19th. and we will go instead to a system that relies on common sense and personal responsibility. i think that is absolutely the right way to go forward. ., ., , , ., , ., forward. common sense and personal responsibility. — forward. common sense and personal responsibility, mean _ forward. common sense and personal responsibility, mean very _ forward. common sense and personal responsibility, mean very different. responsibility, mean very different things to different people, surely. at a time when we are seeing such a massive increase in the delta variant, why not wait a while until the vaccination programme is complete?— the vaccination programme is comlete? ., ., ., complete? the vaccination programme, which of course — complete? the vaccination programme, which of course is _ complete? the vaccination programme, which of course is a _ complete? the vaccination programme, which of course is a great _ complete? the vaccination programme, which of course is a great success - which of course is a great success story for the prime minister, it has been world leading and doing its job. while there are a number of cases going up, the number of hospitalisations and deaths are not going about the same rate it all. i think it is absolutely the right time to reopen our economy, our
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liberties and it is something i think perhaps a little bit overdue. i would not want to be delaying, i would want to be moving as soon as possible. would want to be moving as soon as ossible. , , ., possible. some experts point to the fact that people _ possible. some experts point to the fact that people are _ possible. some experts point to the fact that people are still _ possible. some experts point to the fact that people are still coming - fact that people are still coming down with the disease and what is also of concern is the long covid that some people are suffering. that is likely to be exacerbated surely if all these restrictions are removed in one go. i if all these restrictions are removed in one go. if all these restrictions are removed in one to. ~ , , removed in one go. i think the issue is if ou removed in one go. i think the issue is if you want _ removed in one go. i think the issue is if you want to _ removed in one go. i think the issue is if you want to try _ removed in one go. i think the issue is if you want to try and _ removed in one go. i think the issue is if you want to try and alleviate - is if you want to try and alleviate duke eliminate covid, i do not think it is possible. we will have to live with it. there will be people falling ill and going into hospital. because of the vaccination programme, people who do get the illness are not affected in the same way. at the same time, while we lock down society there are obvious problems for the economy and people's jobs and also problems with mental health for everyone. and of course, if we remove the social distancing requirements, hospitals
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can get back to full capacity and we can get back to full capacity and we can start working through the backlog of patients. i think it is notjust backlog of patients. i think it is not just one backlog of patients. i think it is notjust one issue you have to think about, it is a whole lot of issues. and i think the prime minister has made the right call.— and i think the prime minister has made the right call. what would you like to see in _ made the right call. what would you like to see in terms _ made the right call. what would you like to see in terms of _ made the right call. what would you like to see in terms of school? - like to see in terms of school? because we know hundreds of thousands of children have had to self—isolate because one or two in their bubbles that they are in with in schools get pinged by the app. i think it... i would say we should not be doing that and we should stop doing that and we are also very close to the end of the term we are just less than two weeks away. it seems to me there will be a break and some holidays and we should be absolutely back to normal in september. i think we should get rid of the regulations. there are lots of the regulations. there are lots of children staying at home that we don't —— who don't need to. hoop
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of children staying at home that we don't -- who don't need to. how big is our don't -- who don't need to. how big is your concern _ don't -- who don't need to. how big is your concern that _ don't -- who don't need to. how big is your concern that if _ don't -- who don't need to. how big is your concern that if we _ don't -- who don't need to. how big is your concern that if we do - don't -- who don't need to. how big is your concern that if we do see - is your concern that if we do see another wave, which some people are expecting with out so many hospitalisations and fewer deaths, we might have to see a reintroduction of some of these restrictions that we are maybe letting go of. i restrictions that we are maybe letting go of-— restrictions that we are maybe lettin: . of. , . , ., letting go of. i sincerely hope that is not the case, _ letting go of. i sincerely hope that is not the case, but _ letting go of. i sincerely hope that is not the case, but if _ letting go of. i sincerely hope that is not the case, but if there - letting go of. i sincerely hope that is not the case, but if there was i letting go of. i sincerely hope that is not the case, but if there was a| is not the case, but if there was a completely left—field event that we cannot possibly know about at the moment if somehow the vaccinations weren't working and there were thousands of people in hospital and thousands of people in hospital and thousands potentially dying of a new strain or something. then we would have to look at that situation again. with the vaccination programme and the fact that there seems —— it seems to be defeating the virus in the sense we are not getting people falling so seriously ill and so many people are not dying. i think this is the time to restore our freedoms because it is not... this problem is notjust
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about covid. there is a knock—on effect on economy, on jobs and people's mental well—being. it is time to reopen. we have to live with covid. if there was a pandemic from another source and it requires a lockdown because of the nature of it, of course the government would take action. there is no sight or likelihood of that. i am looking forward to the freedom day which apparently is now going to bejuly the 19th. ii apparently is now going to be july the 19th. ., , ., , ., , the 19th. if that is what people want to call— the 19th. if that is what people want to call it, _ the 19th. if that is what people want to call it, i'm _ the 19th. if that is what people want to call it, i'm sure - the 19th. if that is what people want to call it, i'm sure they i the 19th. if that is what people i want to call it, i'm sure they will. thank you very much indeed. in a speech to mark independence day in the us, the presidentjoe biden has said his country was closer than ever to declaring independence from covid—19. he said the united states was emerging from the darkness and isolation of the pandemic and although the virus wasn't yet beaten, he was optimistic. mark lobel reports. stepping forward for a dazzling display, capping a year that's been anything but.
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july 4th in america. celebrating independence day, but from what? listen to what president biden said back in may. our goal byjuly fourth is to have 70% of adult americans with at least one shot and 160 million americans fully vaccinated. but two months on, he's facing up to a more hesitant nation than he had anticipated. short of his target, 67% of americans have had a first dose with just over 149 million adults, 58% of americans, fully immunised. mission not yet accomplished. we are emerging from the darkness of years, a year of pandemic and isolation, a year of pain, fear and heartbreaking loss. and think about how far we've come. since his election, joe biden made addressing the pandemic his priority,
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but almost six months on, he concedes the virus is not yet vanquished. the more contagious delta variant means that in some cities like los angeles, even vaccinated residents are being asked to resume mask wearing indoors and hospitals are filling up again where many remain unvaccinated. the best defence against these variants is to get vaccinated. my fellow americans, it's the most patriotic thing you can do. then, reaching into his jacket pocket, the 78—year—old gets a card he says he carries with his daily schedule on it. on that card are the number of americans who have lost their lives to covid, the precise number. as of tonight, that number is 603,018 people
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have lost their lives. and that number keeps rising. it's not the end of the pandemic they're celebrating here, though they're comfortable enough to get up close and personal, strengthened by the vaccine, convinced, it seems, the darkest days are over. mark lobel, bbc news. you are watching bbc news, the headlines this afternoon... borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs — as his wife is forced to self—isolate. as his wife is forced the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished over safety fears — as a tropical storm approaches florida.
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it's six months since brexit trading rules came into play when the uk left the eu single market, and business owners have been working hard to hold on to their european customers, while seeking new markets further afield. so, how are they coping? bbc panorama has been following companies across the uk to get a sense of the impact. richard bilton reports. paperwork, paperwork. it is just madness. on the shores of loch fyne in the west of scotland, jamie mcmillan is trying to make a living. he is a shellfish wholesaler who has spent the last six months wrestling with the new brexit rules. that's three hours work every morning that we exported to the eu. his sales are down 40% since leaving the single market. jamie has abandoned the eu and turned to new asian markets. in simple terms, to export to china, hong kong or singapore, it is cheaper and quicker to export there than it is to france.
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prime minister borisjohnson had warned they would be bumps on the road ahead for uk businesses. but for some, those bumps have turned into roadblocks. robert hewitt from surrey transport concert equipment for some of the world's biggest stars. that came off a robbie williams tour. that had a dragon on it, that was the dragon basically. since january, lorries from the uk can no longer make more than two drop—offs onjourneys in the eu. even without covid, european tours would be impossible. what we're looking is the rear yard of our facility in holland. so robert has spent £3.5 million on this new depot in the netherlands. and retrained all his drivers so they have irish licenses, allowing them to work more easily between the uk and the eu. our income will actually
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now not all come into the uk, a lot of it will go into holland. the treasury will receive less money. the uk government says it is disappointed the eu didn't accept its proposals for the music industry and it is encouraging member states to be flexible. as companies readjust, there are success stories. julie anne runs a vegan snack food company with her partner. her sales are up 50%. there are so many things in the pipeline at the moment for us which is so exciting. we have got some big potential clients in the middle east and we are on the cusp of signing a deal in the us with a large distributor. most uk businesses have faced change. millions ofjobs depend on how many bumps lay ahead. and you can watch panorama —
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brexit: six months on at 7.35pm this evening on bbc one, or via the bbc iplayer. the forestry department in cyprus says a wildfire, the island's worst in decades, is now under control. around 50 square kilometres of pine and scrub in the foothills of the troodos mountains were scorched by flames. four egyptian farm workers also died in the wildfire. countries including the uk have been sending in planes to help extinguish the flames. the co—leader of the green party, jonathan bartley will step down at the end ofjuly. the party's longest—serving leader says he's "hugely proud" of what the greens have achieved in his five years of tenureship. co—leader sian berry is set to continue as acting leader while a leadership election takes place. a cybercriminal gang — thought to be behind a huge ransomware attack in the us — is demanding $70 million in cryptocurrency. the russia—linked revil group says it will unlock all the computer systems it's blocking in exchange for the payment.
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hundreds of businesses worldwide have been affected by the breach. our cyber reporter joe tidy explains. we cover these ransomware attacks and they're always devastating for victims because the way they work, hackers will spend some time trying to infiltrate the network of an organisation. that could be a school, hospital, a company, a large corporation, pretty much everyone's getting hit, these days. they will find a way into a computer network and at their point of choosing, they will press a few buttons and encrypt the entire system, which means it scrambles all the files and makes it useless for the user of that network. and then, of course, they send a ransom note, saying, "we need to be paid x amount of money in cryptocurrency," usually bitcoin. "and then we will give you back your systems." and, of course, this happening to one victim is a devastating situation for them and all their customers and people that rely on their services. but what's happened here is this cybercriminal ransom group, revil, have managed to target a company
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called kaseya, which is enormous but none of us have really heard of. they are used by lots and lots of other companies. so, by attacking one, they attack the entire supply chain. and what we've seen is some real horrendous knock on effects. for example, in sweden, 500 co—op supermarket stores have had to be closed over the weekend because their tills weren't working, their self—service checkouts and their tills just stopped working. because, of course, they use a company that uses kaseya. so, what we are seeing here is not only a ransomware attack but a supply chain attack. a service has been held to mark the 73rd anniversary of the nhs but the duchess of cambridge did not take part in any of today's events as she is having to self isolate. kate had been due to accompany price william — here, arriving at the service of thanksgiving, which took place at st paul's cathedral this morning the duchess had come into contact with someone who later
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tested positive for covid. well earlier, the queen awarded the nhs the presitgious george cross saying all staff, past and present had worked with "courage, compassion and dedication". our correspondent, frankie mccamley has been speaking to some of those attending the service. well, the service here at st paul's cathedral lasted around an hour. it was attended by the prime minister, borisjohnson, sir keir starmer, the health secretary, sajid javid and of course, prince william. he came alone because his wife the duchess of cambridge has to self—isolate after she has come into contact with someone with coronavirus. now, aside from celebrating 73 years of the nhs, there were tributes paid to those front line health workers who dealt with the pandemic first—hand. we heard from one doctor who was one of the very first health workers to deal with some of the very first cases of coronavirus here in the uk. we also heard from a lady who said nhs workers saved her life after she caught the virus when she was pregnant too. someone else who was presentjoins me now.
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thank you ever so much forjoining us. you have helped get 30,000 people vaccinated. that is a huge mammoth task. tell me why did you want to do this? i work for black country and west birmingham nhs and i wanted to get involved and help during the pandemic. we set up vaccination centre and we have been really encouraging the locals to do the vaccinations. and we were one of the first areas to do vaccinations in mass. so there were pop up clinics just to help the education of these patients to try and get them vaccinated. because there was a lot of hesitancy in some of those groups. how did you find people reacting to you going into mosques, temples and trying to encourage people to get those vaccines? yes, that was one of the reasons we went into these areas. we asked the faith leaders in these
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areas to help us with that. we wanted to get into these areas because we wanted to help people understand how important this vaccine is and it has really helped people come to these pop—up vaccination clinics and encourage them to have vaccines. they seem to have been quite receptive because you've managed to get 30,000 people vaccinated. yes, i think the link between the faith leaders and their relationships with the faith leaders helped. and also seeing faith leaders getting vaccinated in these mosques, help the local community to get vaccinated. and you were at the ceremony a little earlier on today. how did you find that listening to some of those stories? yes, they were amazing. i am honoured to be here today. and to be invited on the half of the black country and west birmingham. some of the stories and there were amazing and the last 12—18 months have been challenging for all front line health care
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workers and it is just a really proud moehne it for me individually, but also for my colleagues back in walsall and also my family. and what is next for you? 30,000 vaccinated, are you carrying on with your programme? yes, we are still going strong, we are still encouraging people. my message would be to encourage anybody who has not had the vaccine to go to your local vaccination centre and get vaccinated. the more people we get vaccinated, them more we can help beat covid together. brilliant. well, thank you ever so much forjoining us here on bbc news. well, that ceremony is well and truly over. it finished around midday, but that is not the last thing that is going to happen today. prince william is going to be hosting a tea party at buckingham palace a little later on for nhs workers. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. good afternoon. it may well be the height of summer, but it's been a bit of a nightmare to try and make plans to see friends and family outside, hasn't it? the best of the sunshine so far today has been across england and wales. and it should be a reasonable day
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if you are spending time outside, the risk of a few shower clouds developing, but there's more widespread rain further north. and we've seen some overcast skies so far across edinburgh where we had that heavy rain on sunday. this weather front still to clear away, still bringing the risk of showers, rumbles of thunder, with another area of low pressure waiting in the wings to arrive a little later on. so, so far today, the sharpest of the showers have been through scotland, one or two across the north of england and also into northern ireland. some of those showers could be heavy and thundering and bring a lot of heavy rain in a short space of time this afternoon. the best of the sunshine will be through england and wales, and any showers here will be very isolated. with the sunshine, we should see temperatures peaking at around 22 degrees, that's 72 fahrenheit. but you can't escape the fact that there's more wet weather to come down through the isle of scilly into cornwall, that arrives later on this afternoon. it's going to be accompanied by some pretty unseasonably strong winds for this time of year, particularly on the southern flank of that low, so running up through the channel
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as we go overnight. so gale force gusts of wind, a spell of heavy rain as well moving its way across wales into the midlands, further north by dawn. we keep some clearer skies into scotland, but temperatures generally staying into double figures to greet us on tuesday. that will be fairly academic, particularly if you're caught under the cloud, the wind and the rain. the strongest of the winds across the kent coast, the heaviest of the rain moving out to the north of england across the scottish borders, a trail of showers following in behind, particularly into the south west and into wales. top temperatures tuesday afternoon down a degree or so at around 18 or 19 degrees. that's because of the amount of cloud around. but it does mean, for wimbledon — which has been pretty tricky, hasn't it? — there's still the risk of some showers around on tuesday, wednesday, but thursday, friday certainly looks much better. and the reason for that is that we finally say goodbye to the low pressure, and an area of high pressure starts to build in from the south west, quietening things down. there'll be a good deal of dry weather, some lighter winds, and temperatures once again back up
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into the low 20s.
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this is bbc news, i'm maxine croxall. the headlines — borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go. we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations and that's why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly19th. but despite the vaccination programme, some experts are urging caution over lifting all restrictions. it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. and at 3.30pm we'll be putting your questions on what the changes might mean for you to two health experts
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in your questions answered. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs, as his wife is forced to self—isolate. the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished over safety fears as a tropical storm approaches florida. and can she do it? all eyes this afternoon on 18—year—old emma raducanu, as she continues her dazzling wimbledon run. good afternoon. the prime minister is to announce details of plans to ease most of the remaining coronavirus restrictions in england. the measures could include making
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the wearing of a face mask voluntary, ending social distancing rules, and ending signing in at pubs and restaurants. covid infections in england are still rising, and are expected to rise further if the rules are eased, but ministers think the vaccine is limiting the number of deaths. there is concern though from medical leaders, scientists, and some union leaders about making the wearing of face coverings a personal decision. plans for scotland, wales and northern ireland will be outlined later this month. here's our political correspondent helen catt. for more than a year, ministers have set laws that have closely governed some of the smallest details of our lives. from the 19th ofjuly in england that is set to change. instead, it will be up to us to decide. one metre plus distancing rules are expected to be scrapped so pubs would no longer be forced to provide table service for example. we wouldn't have to check in to visit a venue and there would not be any cap on how many people we could meet or have inside our own
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homes. the government says coronavirus cases will go up but the vaccine programme means fewer people are ending up in hospital. although infection rates are rising, hospital admissions are not rising at the rate we have seen in previous peaks. if we look back to december for instance, when we had around 23,000 infections, per day, which is the rate that we've seen in the last few days, there were nearly 15,000 people with covid in hospital whereas now there is only around 1,700 in england. but some scientists have questioned if now is the right time. why on earth are we now changing from protecting people through vaccination to suddenly lifting all the protections and going towards, if you like, achieving immunity through infection by people? it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. one of the most visible measures of the pandemic has been the facemask. it's expected wearing one in shops or on
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public transport won't be legally required in england after the 19th ofjuly, like much else, a personal choice. i don't particularly- like wearing a facemask. i think that's something many people will share with me. . i also know that it's really hard for some people - particularly those who are hard - of hearing to hear well when someone is speaking to them in a facemask. but i will of course i follow the guidance that will be set out when people - should think of wearing one and not, i think, to make a common sense judgment to follow l the guidance and the right precautions to take. - but part of wearing a facemask is about protecting others. the train drivers union aslef says it's a step too far too soon. i will be keeping my mask and i think there will be times when we want to do things slightly differently from how we are at the moment, however, i put a plea in for the shop workers, people in restaurants and on the transport system, we are doing it for them as well as each other and it's really important we take into account not putting them at risk.
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isolation if you test positive for coronavirus will still be required and it's expected there will be a signal given on the future of the isolation policy for schools. the overall message from downing street, though, is although the rules may be about to disappear, the risk posed by covid won't. it's about learning to live with the virus. our political correspondent ben wright is in westminster. our political correspondent damian grammaticas is in westminster a lot of tensions about what should happen next. a lot of tensions about what should happen next-— a lot of tensions about what should happen next. absolutely, they have been under — happen next. absolutely, they have been under enormous _ happen next. absolutely, they have been under enormous pressure - happen next. absolutely, they have| been under enormous pressure from businesses, in parliament, from some mps and more broadly to push ahead with the opening up. it has been delayed a bit and the reason for that delay was the arrival of the
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new variant, the delta variant and that in itself, the fact that is spreading and spreading quite fast now is the reason for the pressure the other way, which is also coming from some scientists, from some of the independent scientists who are putting out reports on the spread of the pandemic from health organisations like the bma and from other politicians as well. we have seenin other politicians as well. we have seen in manchester, andy burnham in london sadik khan, the mat as well, little bit about the impacts. they are worried about the impacts of relaxing the final restriction now and accelerating the spread. those are the tensions, pulling in different ways. but what we understand is that are signals today that borisjohnson, downing street, i going to march ahead and that is what they are going to lay out later
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this afternoon, to go ahead to the ending of all of those final legal restrictions.— ending of all of those final legal restrictions. �* , ., .. ., ., restrictions. beside the vaccination programme — restrictions. beside the vaccination programme being _ restrictions. beside the vaccination programme being one _ restrictions. beside the vaccination programme being one of _ restrictions. beside the vaccination programme being one of the - programme being one of the mitigations that ministers pointed to, the fact that it is the big summer holidays coming up soon. that is art of summer holidays coming up soon. that is part of the — summer holidays coming up soon. trust is part of the reason for waiting for some of the school —related measures, to let schools finish and then the children will go home. the idea is that might slow the decision through schools. you can wait until next school year to change the policies in schools. the measures for schools we expect indications a little bit later. what will be interesting will be some of the messaging that we here which is this idea that it seems people will be encouraged to take their own personal decisions. what sort of leader of the give? they may indicate there will be a guidance to
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keep using facemasks in interior crowded interior places. perhaps, public transport, things like that. it won't necessarily be a legal restriction at that point. it will be down to individuals. at the same time, as a government warning they understand this will lead to an acceleration in the spread of the virus and therefore more deaths. what we are being told this, they believe it is better to do it now than later in the year when you might get a bigger wave. the concern from the independent scientists is we have a third wave now and this will push it faster. for we have a third wave now and this will push it faster.— we have a third wave now and this will push it faster. for the moment, thank ou will push it faster. for the moment, thank you very _ will push it faster. for the moment, thank you very much. _ angela eagle is the labour mp for wallasey. shejoins us now. thank you she joins us now. thank you for joining us this afternoon. you are critical of what we think we are going to be hearing this afternoon. why? we all want to get rid of restrictions but we need to do it
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safely and with caution. it is all very well people saying you have to take personal responsibility but those who don't put at risk those people who may be more vulnerable. there is a collective issue to this as well as an individual choice issue. 188,000 infections of the delta variant has happened since sajid javid came health minister. we had two people in hospital last week with coronavirus, this week it is 18. infection rates are rising rapidly. perhaps now isn't the time to completely take of all of the restrictions. perhaps a little bit of caution while we get more people vaccinated would have been in order. i am surprised and worried that the government, if they do make this announcement, have decided to end everything precipitously in two
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weeks. it is being more incautious than i would have liked to have seen. people with pay with their lives. , ., ., ., , lives. they want to do it in summer when people _ lives. they want to do it in summer when people are — lives. they want to do it in summer when people are less _ lives. they want to do it in summer when people are less and _ lives. they want to do it in summer when people are less and less - lives. they want to do it in summer when people are less and less of i when people are less and less of things like flu. —— less at risk. norway have just decided they are going to delay easing their restrictions because the delta variant is arriving. we have got the delta variant and we have got infections that are higher level in the uk than they have been since january of this year. thankfully, the vaccination programme is breaking that definite link between infection and hospitalisation. but, we know we've only gotjust over 50% of people with both vaccinations. we know with the delta variant, having only one vaccination gives you 30%
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protection. there are issues here that the government should be more cautious with. what we have seen is the ending of the career of one health minister and the arrival of one who seems to be anti—lockdown and wants rid of all of these protections for public health. if you are in a transport setting, or if you are a bus driver, many of them died during the first peak, are you meant to accept people on your boss who expressing their views they are not going to be wearing a mask? you have got to accept them. it puts your health at risk. there are issues that the government needs to come clean about. reading the newspapers over the holidays are not coming clean about facts. some airlines during _ coming clean about facts. some airlines during the _ coming clean about facts. some airlines during the pandemic- coming clean about facts. some i airlines during the pandemic have insisted on particular types of face coverings or you don't get on the plane. what sort of latitude do you
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think transport companies should have, will have to protect their employees? a bus company could say, we will only allow you on our buses if you wear a face covering because we want to protect everyone else? the government have said they are going to leave it to individual choice. for people who are in settings where they will be exposed to the more infectious delta variant, all those who are vulnerable and are required to go back to work and don't have an option but to go on public transport, one individual was my choice of whether they wear a mask or not may spell real trouble for them. the government should be giving much more of a lead about this instead of saying, we are libertarians, we never wanted these restrictions on the first place and really it is up to you. i think the government should come clean. that's what level of weekly deaths are acceptable to them to remove all of
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these health restrictions? they are protecting people from what is a very nasty disease.— protecting people from what is a very nasty disease. thank you very much. you can watch the prime minister's news conference from downing street this afternoon here on the bbc news channel. special coverage starts at 4:45pm. and at 3:30pm this afternoon, we'll put your to health experts on what the proposed changes in england might mean for you. do send in your questions using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing us at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. the queen has awarded the nhs the george cross for bravery, as the health service marks its 73rd birthday. her majesty has paid tribute to the "courage, compassion and dedication" of all nhs staff. this morning, a thanksgiving service was held at st paul's catherdral, attended by the duke of cambridge. the duchess of cambridge was due to be there but she's now self—isolating after coming into contact with someone who tested positive for coronavirus. our health correspondent catherine burns sent this from st paul's.
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some dressed up in theirfinest, and others wearing their uniforms with pride. today is all about the nhs staff who've worked so hard, especially during the pandemic. they reflected on their experiences, including a doctor who treated the first ever covid patients in the uk. in the absence of treatments and vaccines, it would have been easy to lose hope. for the vision of those who pioneered our national health service. you might recognise mae parsons, she read out a prayer. as the matron who gave the first vaccine outside of clinical trials back in december, she represents one of the most hopeful moments during the pandemic. but she says, at times, it felt like she was going to war. the hardest one is the amount of deaths we have seen, it'sjust terrifyingly big in numbers. and those are the things that
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in my 21 years of nursing i've never come across. the duke of cambridge arriving alone today ahead of the ceremony, his wife is isolating after testing positive for coronavirus. more thanks too for the royal family because the queen has awarded all nhs staff past and present the george cross. this is given for extreme heroism or courage in the face of danger. there are also patients here today remembering what the nhs has done for them, like the mum who had to give birth two months early because she and her baby both had covid. she remembers that last call to her husband before she was put on a ventilator. ijust felt...it�*s hard to describe, it's notjust scared, it's a feeling of utter terror inside. it's a feeling that i can't express in words. it was traumatic.
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it all started 73 years ago today. the first time that health care became free at the point of contact. this leaflet is coming through your letterbox one day soon. the head of the nhs in england now says the health service is a gift that we gave ourselves, but it needs to build back better. out of adversity can come strength. if together, like those who have gone before us, we choose to confront and resolve our deepest social challenges with determination and conviction. away from the pomp and ceremony, huge challenges lie ahead. the impact of long covid, record numbers on waiting lists, exhausted staff and a row over pay in england. the headlines on bbc news. borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england.
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social distancing and face coverings, could go. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs as his wife is forced to self—isolate. the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami has been demolished over safety fears as a tropical storm approaches florida. 24 people are known to have died and more than 120 others are still unaccounted for. aru na iyengar reports. loud bo0m the remaining section of champlain towers south complex comes crashing down. demolition experts drilled small explosive charges into columns to bring the remaining unstable structure down in a controlled explosion. neighbours were advised to stay indoors and close their windows until two hours after the explosion.
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but some came to pray for those still missing. drones with thermal imaging were used to make sure there were no people or pets still inside the building. the approaching tropical storm elsa, which has hit cuba with winds of up to 65mph, brought forward discussions about when to demolish the remaining building. it's eliminated a looming threat, a dangerous threat for our rescue workers. it will potentially open up probably a third of the pile so we can all, you know, so the teams can focus not just on two—thirds of the pile but on the whole thing. crews are now hoping to be able to get into the apartment block's underground garage and get a clearer picture of any air holes that may exist in the rubble. but no survivors have been pulled out alive from the site in surfside since the first few hours after the structure's collapse. that's 11 days ago. what caused the 40—year—old building
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to collapse is still unclear, but a 2018 inspection warned of major flaws in the original design. aruna iyengar, bbc news. legislation on safety in high—rise buildings, drawn up in response to the grenfell tower disaster four years ago, will be presented to parliament this afternoon. the building safety bill will create a new regulator with powers to prosecute developers. our correspondent sarah corker has been telling us how significant this new legislation is. this legislation outlines major reforms to building and fire safety in england and wales. as you say, there will be a new regulator and it will have powers to prosecute developers who don't meet standards. it'll also have the ability to force them to withdraw products from the market. this is four years since the grenfell tower fire, that tragedy exposed decades of systematic regulatory failures, and safety checks on high since then have exposed problems notjust with
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cladding but many other fire safety faults too. this building here in south salford quays is having their cladding removed at the moment. there is this £5 billion government cladding removalfund, but mps estimate this is a £15 billion problem and leaseholders say they are the ones that are having to pay these huge costs. in this legislation this afternoon we expect there will be a legal requirement for building owners to look at alternative methods of paying to fix these buildings before passing on those costs to leaseholders. leaseholders will have 15 years to sue developers for shoddy workmanship. at the moment they've got six years. cladding campaigners say they don't have the time and the money to take on these complex legal cases. it is difficult as well to prove liability. at the moment it is estimated 700,000 people are
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living in flats wrapped in flammable materials. the bbc has been told that nato forces have almost completed their withdrawal from afghanistan — more than two months before the deadline of the 11th of september. the taliban have warned that any foreign soldiers remaining in afghanistan beyond that date will be treated as an occupying force. but violence in the country continues to rise, with the taliban taking more territory. neighbouring tajikistan says more than a thousand afghan government soldiers have fled across the border after clashes with the insurgents. hamid karzai was afghan president between 2001 and 2014. he's been telling my colleague yalda hakim that the us and its allies had not completed what they set out to achieve. the entire mission with regard to the stated objective of the united states and its nato allies in defeating terrorism and extremism has failed. because when we repeat myself they did not do what they
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should have done. they did what they should have not done as i described earlier. the comportment of helping afghanistan in civilian areas, and education come in rebuild income in reconstruction, that was successful and you can see it clearly when you visit afghanistan that there is something to show to the world. and no doubt afghanistan... and no doubt, afghanistan has come a long way and it is not the country that was invaded by the us in 2001. before that we saw the taliban had turned the nation into. however, there are many critics now who do say afghanistan today is a failed state. afghanistan today is not a failed state. as far as the afghan people are concerned, they created a constitution, they went to the elections, they embrace
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democracy wholeheartedly. they went to school, they educated themselves, we have millions of afghan boys and girls are educated here. we did all that we could to put afghanistan on the right track and to represented well on the international scene. the failure of the state that one which is described especially in the western press is exactly where the authority and the responsibility was more with the united states and its nato allies. that is where things have failed. and that is where we, the afghan people, are also paying the price. a very heavy price. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is in kabul. she described the precarious state of the afghan national security forces. it is not a good look, is it, if your afghan forces are fleeing before they even fire a shot? that is a snapshot of what is happening in all too many
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places across afghanistan. there are bases and sometimes checkpoints with no more than a flag. where soldiers are begging the command here in kabul saying, "we are running out of food, a lot of water, we have no more "ammunition, we are begging you to help us." someone told me yesterday, that one base asked 70 times for assistance. and that is ringing alarm bells that the afghan national security forces, who have been relying on nato forces for the supply chain, have to get their act together. but in other districts across afghanistan, although the numbers tell us what is for many afghans a very alarming story, that the situation is unraveling more quickly than anyone expected, some of those districts are irrelevant in strategic terms. some of them, the afghan national forces retreated to protect more important gains, but they do tell us a story that the taliban are advancing much more quickly than expected. and, yes, people are fleeing in
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the other direction. afghanistan, one of the poorest countries in the world, was already facing a huge and worsening humanitarian crisis, now yet again, thousands more afghans are on the run. and afghans know that this is just the beginning and it is likely to get much worse. pope francis has undergone successful surgery to treat a colon problem at a hospital in rome. the vatican says he is recovering well from the procedure, which was carried out under general anaesthetic yesterday. he will stay in hospital for another week. before the operation pope francis gave his sunday blessing to worshippers in st peter's square. this is the first time the 84—year—old has been in hospital since his election in 2013. shares in morrisons have surged by more than 10% this morning, after news emerged of a third potential bidder for the uk's fourth largest supermarket chain. the firm's board has already accepted an offer of 254 pence per share from a consortium
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japanese rescue teams are still searching through wrecked homes and buried roads days after a landslide hit the town of atami. at least three people are known to have died so far but around 80 are believed to be missing. the area was hit by more than a month's worth of rain injust 24 hours. (pres)train services are returning to normal in glasgow and edinburgh, train services are returning to normal in glasgow and edinburgh, after stormy weather caused flash flooding. torrential rain left some streets submerged in water, and shops were forced to close. tim muffett reports. ominous—looking clouds over glasgow yesterday and the rain that fell from them caused widespread disruption. in edinburgh, many streets were flooded. there were tricky journeys for drivers... ..and pedestrians. the train line between edinburgh waverley and haymarket station had to be closed.
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stjames quarter shopping centre only opened last month. naturally ventilated, it is deliberately designed to allow some rain to get in. but not this much. parts had to be cordoned off for safety reasons. many parts of the uk experienced heavy rainfall yesterday. sunday shopping for some turned out to be a rather soggy experience. tim muffett, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. good afternoon. so far, there has been a bit of a north—south divide with our weather story this monday. the cloud in the showers, some of them heavy and thundery across scotland, northern ireland and one or two into north west england, but there is also some sunshine further south of that. this is what is to come, though, more rain and strong winds through the night tonight. with this area of low pressure which is moving its way
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steadily north and east. so a spell of heavy rain overnight tonight with gale force gusts of winds across the channel coast, moving up through wales, the midlands and into the north of england. the rain will ease in scotland. we will have some clear skies, so here, perhaps single figures. it will be a relatively mild start, but it is all about where the rain is sitting first thing in the morning. out to the north of england, pushing across the scottish borders. the strongest of the winds are across the kent coast. a blustery day generally across the country and those temperatures well, they will peek just into the high teens if we are lucky with a few scattered showers into the southwest a little later on.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go.
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we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations and that is why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly the 19th. but despite the vaccination programme, some experts are urging caution over lifting all restrictions. it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping a safe. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs — as his wife is forced to self—isolate. the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished over safety fears — as a tropical storm approaches florida. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. here is gavin. hello.
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not long to wait now, until emma raducanu continues her fairytale story at wimbledon. the 18—year—old, who entered the championships as a wildcard, is in fourth round action — against alja tomljanovic, later this afternoon. raducanu is the only british player left standing singles competition. the world number 338 is set to shoot up the rankings after her run at wimbledon — all the more incredible given that she only played her first ever women's tour match last month. she's the highlight on court no one today... if she gets through that, her opponent could be ash barty — who was in devastating form earlier. the world number one won in straight sets win over barbora krejcikova. it's the first time barty has made the quarter finals at wimbledon. another one to keep your eye on is tunisian ons jabeur... she came from a set down to make the quarters — beating seventh seed iga switek 5—7, 6—1, 6—1. jabeur will meet second seed aryna sabalenka next. novak djokovic cruised into the last eight with a straight sets win
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over cristian garin — and looks in good shape to secure a record equalling 20th grand slam. he won 6—2, 6—4, 6—2 on centre court. let's take you live action on court no1 now. it's the match before emma raducanu's alex zverev against felix augur—aliassime. you can catch on on the bbc sports website. well, from wimbledon to wembley now as euro 2020 reaches its conclusion this week. we've got two huge semi—finals to look forward to on tuesday and wednesday. before the final at wembley on sunday, john watson has been covering it all for us. john, great to see you. england seem pretty relaxed, going into a match of such magnitude. it is indeed. hello, film a very windy wembley stadium here where we have seen england returned to their training base at saint george's park
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ahead of their big game here to come against denmark on wednesday. the good news for gareth southgate is there are no major injuries after there are no major injuries after the emphatic victory over ukraine. back to back semi finals now for the england manager. the first england manager to do that since back in 1968. it is all going very well for england at the moment. harry kane backin england at the moment. harry kane back in and the goals. two. raheem sterling has been one of the go to players. gareth southgate it makes seems to be getting these major decisions right on and off the pitch, but it is the collective effort that seems to be stronger than any individual performance so far. the fans, 60,000 of them, we'll be packing in here on wednesday night to see england against denmark. they are hugely excited as are the players and harry maguire
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speaking at the press conference today knows the impact they will have on his side's performance. {lti have on his side's performance. of course we are aware of it. it is brilliant — course we are aware of it. it is brilliant to _ course we are aware of it. it is brilliant to see you make that is what _ brilliant to see you make that is what social media should be there for. what social media should be there for~ and _ what social media should be there for~ and it— what social media should be there for. and it is what it is therefore at the _ for. and it is what it is therefore at the moment. we see the positive vibes— at the moment. we see the positive vibes and _ at the moment. we see the positive vibes and all that going around. it is a great — vibes and all that going around. it is a great atmosphere to be involved in. is a great atmosphere to be involved in winning — is a great atmosphere to be involved in. winning football matches enables that. in. winning football matches enables that we _ in. winning football matches enables that. we are on thisjourney together~ _ that. we are on thisjourney together. staff, players, fans. we are all— together. staff, players, fans. we are all in— together. staff, players, fans. we are all in this together. we all want — are all in this together. we all want to— are all in this together. we all want to go as far as we can. and at the moment— want to go as far as we can. and at the moment everything is good. talk about the the moment everything is good. ma; about the collective being the moment everything is good. i:i«; about the collective being stronger than any individual, that is certainly the case for denmark. england's opponents, when you consider how they have handled themselves and played in the absence of christian erickson following his collapse. it is going to be a fascinating contest on wednesday as it will be tomorrow when we see italy here against european heavyweights spain who of course won
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this title in 2008 and 2012 around their world cup when. it is going to be very hard, i think to split those two. ., ., , be very hard, i think to split those two. ., ., . two. you are absolutely correct john. two. you are absolutely correct john- thank — two. you are absolutely correct john. thank you _ two. you are absolutely correct john. thank you very _ two. you are absolutely correct john. thank you very much. - news to concern the british and irish lions on their tour of south africa — the springboks have been forced to suspend training after another coronavirus outbreak. lood dejager, the sale sharks player, tested positive — with the whole squad now having to quarantine. it puts their game against georgia on friday in some doubt. the lions first test against south africa is set to take place on july 24th. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. we will see you then. today, we're expecting the government to give the latest guidelines on the lifting of coronavirus restrictions in england, so we've been asking you to send in your questions. with me is professor karol sikora, chief medical officer
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at rutherford health. also i'm joined by drjulian tang of clinical microbiology at the university of leicester. welcome to you both. before we address the questions that have come in, ijust wondered if i could get a broad idea from each of you what your review is about the lifting of the restrictions that we are expecting to hear this afternoon. —— what is your view? i expecting to hear this afternoon. -- what is your view?— what is your view? i think there is no choice- — what is your view? i think there is no choice- we _ what is your view? i think there is no choice. we have _ what is your view? i think there is no choice. we have to _ what is your view? i think there is no choice. we have to do - what is your view? i think there is i no choice. we have to do something on the 19th and is all about non—pharmacological interventions, social distancing, mask wearing. the public have been psychologically damaged by what has gone on. getting back into normal is much more difficult than where we are. i'm really looking forward to hearing from my colleague here to tell us about masks. he is the expert. i
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think the relaxation is necessary for getting back into normal education and the economy. i think the individual risk assessment is important — the individual risk assessment is important. if you live with elderly parents _ important. if you live with elderly parents or— important. if you live with elderly parents or elderly housemates, you might— parents or elderly housemates, you might want to take precautions to protect— might want to take precautions to protect them. if you are double vaccinated, that might not be necessary. even if you are living with _ necessary. even if you are living with lots — necessary. even if you are living with lots of— necessary. even if you are living with lots of young students, you might _ with lots of young students, you might choose not to wear a mask when you go— might choose not to wear a mask when you go out, _ might choose not to wear a mask when you go out, but if you're going to visit _ you go out, but if you're going to visit elderly parents on break, you might— visit elderly parents on break, you might want— visit elderly parents on break, you might want to be careful the week before _ might want to be careful the week before you go to make sure you don't bring _ before you go to make sure you don't bring anything home. yes, before you go to make sure you don't bring anything home.— bring anything home. yes, it is about different _ bring anything home. yes, it is about different circumstances l bring anything home. yes, it is. about different circumstances and bring anything home. yes, it is- about different circumstances and i guess he will come onto looking at personal responsibility in a moment. doctor tang, sally asked, we are wondering how to protect immune suppressed people if all restrictions are lifted. what would your advice be?—
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your advice be? that is difficult. i think the carers _ your advice be? that is difficult. i think the carers will _ your advice be? that is difficult. i think the carers will have - your advice be? that is difficult. i think the carers will have to - your advice be? that is difficult. i| think the carers will have to mask when _ think the carers will have to mask when they— think the carers will have to mask when they go to crowded indoor areas like supermarkets to bring back provisions — like supermarkets to bring back provisions for the ones they are caring _ provisions for the ones they are caring for~ _ provisions for the ones they are caring for. of course, the immunosuppressive need to get out into outdoor spaces like parks, open air walks, _ into outdoor spaces like parks, open air walks, that would be safer than being _ air walks, that would be safer than being indoors like going to a movie at the _ being indoors like going to a movie at the cinema or concert or even going _ at the cinema or concert or even going shopping. it is really whether they can _ going shopping. it is really whether they can tolerate that kind of restriction to some extent or they could _ restriction to some extent or they could actually wear and and 95 mask. -- barbora— could actually wear and and 95 mask. —— barbora krejcikova —— n95 mask. outdoors _ —— barbora krejcikova —— n95 mask. outdoors is — —— barbora krejcikova —— n95 mask. outdoors is safe. indoors is never going to be safer people who want to avoid viruses even well ventilated ones. there's nothing we can do about that. stay outdoors. avoid crowds. people may respect your
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individual wage, crowds. people may respect your individualwage, but... it might crowds. people may respect your individual wage, but... it might be unavoidable, a busy train for example, you just cannot avoid it. it is up to you what you do. i think it is very much individual choices forward into the new era. staying with ou. forward into the new era. staying with you- will— forward into the new era. staying with you. will under _ forward into the new era. staying | with you. will under 50-year-olds with you. will under 50—year—olds who won't be automatically offered a free winter booster vaccination be able to pay to get a booster vaccination? do we know that yet? we don't vaccination? do we know that yet? - don't know that. it is unlikely because it would be a precedent that has not been done before throughout the whole covid business. there are a lot of people at the beginning trying to pay for it, in fact people travel to india, specifically, to get a vaccine locally. a vaccine holiday sort of at the very beginning. you know, people that travel around in private jets beginning. you know, people that travel around in privatejets expect to be able to pay for things. while the nhs came into its own and went rigidly down a series of age group
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starting with over—70s and then going right down to 18—year—olds. without any payment possible. you could notjump the line if you wanted to pay £200 or something. that is probably the right way to go. i think if it was needed for the under 50 euros, we would get it there in the end quite quickly. another person asks, shall we continue wearing masks? i suppose should we? ., , ., continue wearing masks? i suppose should we? . , ., ., , should we? that is related to my answer on _ should we? that is related to my answer on the _ should we? that is related to my answer on the first _ should we? that is related to my answer on the first question. - should we? that is related to my answer on the first question. it l answer on the first question. it depends— answer on the first question. it depends on the individual circumstance. if you are living with vulnerable — circumstance. if you are living with vulnerable people not passing on the virus is _ vulnerable people not passing on the virus is the _ vulnerable people not passing on the virus is the important thing. may be due social— virus is the important thing. may be due social distancing while you're wearing _ due social distancing while you're wearing a — due social distancing while you're wearing a mask as a warning to other people _ wearing a mask as a warning to other people to _ wearing a mask as a warning to other people to stay away. this
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wearing a mask as a warning to other people to stay away-— wearing a mask as a warning to other people to stay away. this comes back to what you — people to stay away. this comes back to what you are _ people to stay away. this comes back to what you are saying _ people to stay away. this comes back to what you are saying a _ people to stay away. this comes back to what you are saying a moment - people to stay away. this comes back| to what you are saying a moment ago. a person says i am 70, i have mild asthma, i have had both vaccines, if i decide to continue maintaining social distancing, how do i enforce that on the people around me? you can get yourselves into a bit of an argument sometimes with people who have a different view, can't you? that is the main problem. really, if someone wants to be rigid about avoiding people, it is their responsibility to stay away. just avoid going. part of civil liberties and freedom is that you joe have to obey any rules any more after this. at the moment, it is against the law to do these sort of thing, but from july 19th, they won't be. individual citizens cannot force others to behave in a certain way. all they can do is not go to a football match, not go on a crowded train or bus and so on. obviously with their families and friends, they can persuade them and communicate. with
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the general public they cannot. it is a matter of basically trying to avoid certain circumstances that you don't have control. gard; avoid certain circumstances that you don't have control.— don't have control. gary waters asked, don't have control. gary waters asked. why _ don't have control. gary waters asked. why is — don't have control. gary waters asked, why is the _ don't have control. gary waters asked, why is the government. don't have control. gary waters i asked, why is the government so fixating on lifting restrictions while casings are still rising so rapidly? we've got the delta variant, you can't necessarily answer for the government and i would not ask you to, but in your view should they be lifting all these restrictions all in one go? ii these restrictions all in one go? if you ask me, i would probably have a more _ you ask me, i would probably have a more phased reduction of the restriction. the number of 20,000, 30,000 _ restriction. the number of 20,000, 30,000 a _ restriction. the number of 20,000, 30,000 a day is not a small number. that allows _ 30,000 a day is not a small number. that allows for the mutation of variance — that allows for the mutation of variance. along with vaccination immunity — variance. along with vaccination immunity i_ variance. along with vaccination immunity. i don't think we are out of the _ immunity. i don't think we are out of the woods yet. i think relaxing everything at the same time is a bit risky _ everything at the same time is a bit ris . ~ ., everything at the same time is a bit ris .. ., ., everything at the same time is a bit ris .~ . ., everything at the same time is a bit risky. what about you? do you think there should —
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risky. what about you? do you think there should be _ risky. what about you? do you think there should be more _ risky. what about you? do you think there should be more of _ risky. what about you? do you think there should be more of a _ risky. what about you? do you think there should be more of a phased i risky. what about you? do you think i there should be more of a phased way of doing it? they are using the vaccine as mitigation and the fact that we've got school holidays coming up. there will not be large number of children congregating under one roof. has number of children congregating under one roof.— under one roof. as long as the health care — under one roof. as long as the health care system _ under one roof. as long as the health care system can - under one roof. as long as the health care system can cope i under one roof. as long as the i health care system can cope with what is happening and at the moment it is coping well. although the cases are rising every day. it is very interesting amongst doctor. doctor tang is an infectious virology background and understands about infection, i'm an oncologist and we are much more gung ho to get back to normal because the adverse effects on covid on non—covid related health care sectors such as cancer, strokes, heart attacks, mental health, all these things are adversely affected by what is going on. we really want to get the system going, so we are much more keen than his colleagues in his speciality are. of course it can go wrong, but we think it is worth taking a pond on it to get going simply because we
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are going to lose more alive from other illnesses if we do not. it is a fine balance. of course there is the economy and the whole mental health and the bigger society, getting the feeders back in cinemas back, getting back to some sort of serious normality. this back, getting back to some sort of serious normality.— serious normality. this next question — serious normality. this next question is _ serious normality. this next question is definitely - serious normality. this next question is definitely for - serious normality. this next. question is definitely for you. should i ask, does the vaccine work on people with blood cancer and if not, how can we protect them? that is a very profound — not, how can we protect them? trust is a very profound question. the problem is what you do with someone who is profoundly immunosuppressed as a treat me? there are immune system won't necessarily mount the antibody to give you a good immune response to virus if you get it. there are ways of measuring the immune response, but we are finding it difficult to do. the answer is, it difficult to do. the answer is, it is worth having the vaccine anyway, but it is also worth, if you are immunosuppressed, taking precautions to avoid crowds,
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unventilated spaces and so off. —— and so on. unventilated spaces and so off. -- and so on-— and so on. will lifting restriction and so on. will lifting restriction and shop and — and so on. will lifting restriction and shop and public _ and so on. will lifting restriction and shop and public transport i and so on. will lifting restriction - and shop and public transport mean that people will be afraid to go out because others might no longer be considerate? this is a psychology and cultural, social question, i know. but i suppose, there might be ways for transport networks to have certain areas which are for people wearing masks and those who choose not to. , ., , ~ wearing masks and those who choose not to. , ., ~ ., ,., not to. yes, i was thinking about this earlier. _ not to. yes, i was thinking about this earlier. if _ not to. yes, i was thinking about this earlier. if you _ not to. yes, i was thinking about this earlier. if you look _ not to. yes, i was thinking about this earlier. if you look out - not to. yes, i was thinking about this earlier. if you look out blind | this earlier. if you look out blind person— this earlier. if you look out blind person with a white stick, you tend to give _ person with a white stick, you tend to give some space in some respect and consideration, going forward if you see _ and consideration, going forward if you see an— and consideration, going forward if you see an elderly person who was wearing _ you see an elderly person who was wearing a — you see an elderly person who was wearing a mask or somebody who is clearly, _ wearing a mask or somebody who is clearly, perhaps affected in some way, _ clearly, perhaps affected in some way with — clearly, perhaps affected in some way, with down syndrome, etc, then you may— way, with down syndrome, etc, then you may want to give them some consideration and a wider birth and
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more _ consideration and a wider birth and more space — consideration and a wider birth and more space around them for example. that is— more space around them for example. that is also— more space around them for example. that is also down to individual choice — that is also down to individual choice it— that is also down to individual choice. it is very hard to get people _ choice. it is very hard to get people to _ choice. it is very hard to get people to do what —— it is hard to .et people to do what —— it is hard to get you _ people to do what —— it is hard to get you to — people to do what —— it is hard to get you to do something like this. it is possible to read body language sometime. and it is easier says sometimes take a step away. alan smith asks would you both agree that the withdrawal of the restrictions is worthwhile given the fact that we are seeing increased numbers of the delta variant and also there is the risk of long covid, which can be a very, very unpleasant experience and also a few people, thankfully not so many, are still dying. professor, i can kind of guess what you might say, but you think the risks are were fit —— worth it given that long covid is still a possibility? probably so. i am a great
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libertarian anyway and i think we should try and get out of it, we've got to at some point. loan covid is going to be with us for a long time. and it is going to be difficult. —— long covid. and how much more damage you will get with long covid by going out quickly as opposed to going out quickly as opposed to going in a phased way, is not clear. i think it is inevitable. it is inevitable that whatever decision is made, some people are going to suffer more than others. whether it is cancer patients not getting diagnosed or people with long covid having to suffer long—term symptoms for a year or two years or even longer. i think we just have to make a decision and go with it. the decision to get out on the 19th of july is partly political, to back down now would really not make sense, i think. down now would really not make sense, ithink. we down now would really not make sense, i think. we have to go and see what happens. monitoring everything very closely and i'm sure doctor tang would agree, there are
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not some —— there are some parameters we can measure to see including hospitalisations. also where the virus is going after this. doctor ten, where the virus is going after this. doctorten, i where the virus is going after this. doctor ten, i will let you answer that as well, but there are lots of measures and metrics that can be gathered, but the government is not going to want to have to reintroduce things very readily, is it? i was thinkin: things very readily, is it? i was thinking about _ things very readily, is it? i was thinking about what _ things very readily, is it? i was thinking about what measures| things very readily, is it? i was thinking about what measures you might— thinking about what measures you might want to measure. going forward, — might want to measure. going forward, you might want to look at the incidences of long covid and also immunosuppressed patients being expressed _ also immunosuppressed patients being expressed to covid because as you open _ expressed to covid because as you open up. _ expressed to covid because as you open up, you will have more of an encounter— open up, you will have more of an encounter with people when covid and those _ encounter with people when covid and those with _ encounter with people when covid and those with immunosuppressed systems. may be _ those with immunosuppressed systems. may be some of the different parameters be close monitoring to actually _ parameters be close monitoring to actually see what is going on. would
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ou auree, actually see what is going on. would you agree. l — actually see what is going on. would you agree. l have — actually see what is going on. would you agree, i have asked _ actually see what is going on. would you agree, i have asked you - actually see what is going on. would you agree, i have asked you that. i you agree, i have asked you that. mickey moore says is there another reason a fully vaccinated adult arriving with a negative covid—19 test cannot be allowed to quarantine at home having returned from a red list country? doctor tang i will put that to you. coming back with a negative covid—19 test, should you be allowed to quarantine at home even though you are coming back from a red listed country and you are fully vaccinated? i a red listed country and you are fully vaccinated?— a red listed country and you are fully vaccinated? i think the daily test that you _ fully vaccinated? i think the daily test that you do _ fully vaccinated? i think the daily test that you do at _ fully vaccinated? i think the daily test that you do at home - fully vaccinated? i think the daily test that you do at home might i fully vaccinated? i think the daily l test that you do at home might be one way— test that you do at home might be one way to — test that you do at home might be one way to monitor whether you are infected _ one way to monitor whether you are infected and also when you might actually— infected and also when you might actually be allowed to be released after the _ actually be allowed to be released after the full incubation period which — after the full incubation period which is — after the full incubation period which is anything from two to 14 days _ which is anything from two to 14 days i— which is anything from two to 14 days. i think the test is good insensitive and that will be one way out of _ insensitive and that will be one way out of this — insensitive and that will be one way out of this i— insensitive and that will be one way out of this. i think a blind quarantine without testing is going to waste _ quarantine without testing is going to waste a —
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quarantine without testing is going to waste a lot of people's time and they will— to waste a lot of people's time and they will not stick to it as we have seen _ they will not stick to it as we have seen in _ they will not stick to it as we have seen in the — they will not stick to it as we have seen in the past.— seen in the past. thank you, the last question. — seen in the past. thank you, the last question, says _ seen in the past. thank you, the last question, says the - seen in the past. thank you, the last question, says the 19th i seen in the past. thank you, the last question, says the 19th of. last question, says the 19th of july, and of locked on me in the end of travel restrictions abroad? this is all being kept under review. so many people are keen to be able to get away. {lti many people are keen to be able to net awa . . ., . many people are keen to be able to retawa. , many people are keen to be able to .etawa _ , 4' ., get away. of course, you know, the real problem _ get away. of course, you know, the real problem and _ get away. of course, you know, the real problem and i _ get away. of course, you know, the real problem and i have _ get away. of course, you know, the real problem and i have worked i get away. of course, you know, the real problem and i have worked for| real problem and i have worked for the who in the past, it has been relatively weak in imposing any restrictions on their member countries. you would think it would be able to come up with a country that they would take a leadership role advising. most countries are just making it up as they go. some of it has no... even our traffic light system, it is reasonable, but is it really appropriate because things change faster than we can get the edicts out. we should have an international planner that can somehow co—ordinate this. it will
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come to an end, when, we don't know. it will screw up holidays this summer, i'm pretty sure that. no one is going to go to a red country and have to stay in heathrow hotel for the holidays. things have got to get better and there must be better ways of doing it by having an international agency that makes decisions. i5 international agency that makes decisions. , ., international agency that makes decisions. . . ., decisions. is that what we need, doctor tang. _ decisions. is that what we need, doctor tang, another _ decisions. is that what we need, doctor tang, another agency? i decisions. is that what we need, i doctor tang, another agency? this is supposed to be freedom day, july 19 according to some people. it is tric . according to some people. it is tricky- l'm _ according to some people. it is tricky- l'm one _ according to some people. it is tricky. i'm one of— according to some people. it is tricky. i'm one of the _ according to some people. it is tricky. i'm one of the advisers and it is quite — tricky. i'm one of the advisers and it is quite difficult to get everyone together to agree on the same _ everyone together to agree on the same thing even in one advisement group _ same thing even in one advisement group i_ same thing even in one advisement group. i don't know what the solution _ group. i don't know what the solution is to this because different countries take different views _ different countries take different views. like some countries wanting to ban— views. like some countries wanting to ban uk_ views. like some countries wanting to ban uk travelling completely. i don't _ to ban uk travelling completely. i don't know how this is going to
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develop — don't know how this is going to develo -. ., ., ., develop. know, we will find out a little bit more _ develop. know, we will find out a little bit more at _ develop. know, we will find out a little bit more at five _ develop. know, we will find out a little bit more at five o'clock- develop. know, we will find out a | little bit more at five o'clock when we hear from the little bit more at five o'clock when we hearfrom the prime minister. thank you both for being here. very glad to have you here this afternoon. as we've been hearing, borisjohnson will confirm this afternoon details of plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. one key element will be the relaxation of the rules on masks. it's expected to be announced that it will no longer be a legal requirement for people to wear mask on public transport. london mayor sadiq khan — who is responsible for the london underground and the capital's transport network was asked what would happen in the city. i will be watching and listening very carefully to what the prime minister and health secretary announce today. i think it is important when you are in a crisis, which is what this pandemic is,
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for there to be clarity around communications. we also in london, there are some trains that we are responsible for, so what i wouldn't want to do is have confusion where there is one set of rules and the government has another. so let's wait and see what the government announces. but if they did announce they were going to scrap them, would you be pushing for some sort of bylaw for the tube and the bus network? what we do know is where there are instances where you cannot keep social distance, wearing a facemask can make a big difference because it is possible for you to have the virus, have no symptoms and by wearing a facemask, you reduce the chances of it being passed on. let's wait and see what the government announces. we are keen to make sure that public transport continues to be as safe as it possibly is. it is important that our passengers are safe, make sure londoners are safe, but also our staff as well. so will you be pushing for it then to keep them? look, i think the government knows my view. i was someone who has advocated for wearing face back last march and april. it is only a few months later that the government finally ceded to our request. i think it is important to make sure public transport is safe,
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but also gives public confidence in relation to using transport. i want a lot of people are returning to the tubes and buses as soon as possible. i want the west end to be busy and thriving. one way to do that is to give people confidence on public transport. so let's wait and see what the government announces. that was the mayor of london. labour's kim leadbeater has been sworn in as the new mp for batley and spen. speaking before the ceremony in the house of commons she said she was honoured and proud to have been elected. last week she retained the seat for labour in a hard—fought by—election. the constituency was previously held by her older sisterjo cox who was murdered five years ago by a far—right activist. the rspca has received almost 100,000 reports of cruelty to animals across the uk over the last five years — withjuly often being the busiest month for investigating cases. as officers prepare for another demanding summer, it's launched a new campaign to promote animal welfare. luxmy gopal reports now from north yorkshire. good boy. cuddles, treats and playtime,
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everything man's best friend deserves. but a year ago, max's life was different. we received a report from somebody that had overheard someone bragging they had just beaten up their dog. so they made the call to us and we attended the address with the police. hello, can you open the door, please, sir, it is the police? that's when we found max, terrified, covered in blood and badly injured. there's a lot of blood here, sir. on the floor. do you know what that's from? evidence at the scene suggested max had been beaten with a metal colander. he was rescued and cared for at the rspca york animal home, which oversees recovery, rehabilitation and rehoming. this was a willing act of cruelty. he wilfully submitted max to terrible injuries. and an appalling act of violence. over the past five years, the rspca has received the equivalent of 10,000 reports of intentional animal cruelty every six months,
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with a spike lastjuly when more than 1,500 incidents were reported in that month alone. max was left with a fractured pelvis and dislocated hip. over months, his health and confidence was rebuilt. we were overwhelmed, really, at how forgiving he was, mainly. an animal that's gone through what he went through really had the right to never trust people again, but he did. and he's living his best life now. and, as a special treat, a reunion with the staff who turned his life around. come on! good boy. bless him! to see him this happy is... you know, it's why we do what we do, really. itjust makes everything worthwhile. the idea of deliberate animal cruelty seems almost incomprehensible. but at least this tale has a happy
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ending, with max shaking off his past trauma and finding an owner worthy of his loyalty. luxmy gopal, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. good afternoon. it may well be the height of summer, but it's been a bit of a nightmare to try and make plans to see friends and family outside, hasn't it? the best of the sunshine so far today has been across england and wales. and it should be a reasonable day if you are spending time outside, the risk of a few shower clouds developing, but there's more widespread rain further north. and we've seen some overcast skies so far across edinburgh where we had that heavy rain on sunday. this weather front still to clear away, still bringing the risk of showers, rumbles of thunder, with another area of low pressure waiting in the wings to arrive a little later on. so, so far today, the sharpest of the showers have been through scotland, one or two across the north of england and also into northern ireland. some of those showers could be heavy and thundering and bring a lot of heavy rain in a short space of time this afternoon.
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the best of the sunshine will be through england and wales, and any showers here will be very isolated. with the sunshine, we should see temperatures peaking at around 22 degrees, that's 72 fahrenheit. but you can't escape the fact that there's more wet weather to come down through the isle of scilly into cornwall, that arrives later on this afternoon. it's going to be accompanied by some pretty unseasonably strong winds for this time of year, particularly on the southern flank of that low, so running up through the channel as we go overnight. so gale force gusts of wind, a spell of heavy rain as well moving its way across wales into the midlands, further north by dawn. we keep some clearer skies into scotland, but temperatures generally staying into double figures to greet us on tuesday. that will be fairly academic, particularly if you're caught under the cloud, the wind and the rain. the strongest of the winds across the kent coast, the heaviest of the rain moving out to the north of england across the scottish borders, a trail of showers following in behind, particularly into the south west and into wales. top temperatures tuesday afternoon down a degree or so at around 18 or 19 degrees. that's because of the amount of cloud around.
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but it does mean, for wimbledon — which has been pretty tricky, hasn't it? — there's still the risk of some showers around on tuesday, wednesday, but thursday, friday certainly looks much better. and the reason for that is that we finally say goodbye to the low pressure, and an area of high pressure starts to build in from the south west, quietening things down. there'll be a good deal of dry weather, some lighter winds, and temperatures once again back up into the low 20s.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go. we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations and that's why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly19th. but despite the vaccination programme, some experts are urging caution over lifting all restrictions. it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs — as his wife is forced to self—isolate.
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the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished over safety fears — as a tropical storm approaches florida. and can she do it? all eyes this afternoon on 18—year—old emma raducanu, as she continues her dazzling wimbledon run. good afternoon. the prime minister is to announce details of plans to ease most of the remaining coronavirus restrictions in england. the measures could include making the wearing of a facemask voluntary, ending social distancing rules, and ending signing in at pubs and restaurants. covid infections in england are still rising, and are expected
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to rise further if the rules are eased, but ministers think the vaccine is limiting the number of deaths. there is concern though from medical leaders, scientists, and some union leaders about making the wearing of face coverings a personal decision. plans for scotland, wales and northern ireland will be outlined later this month. here's our political correspondent helen catt. for more than a year, ministers have set laws that have closely governed some of the smallest details of our lives. from the 19th ofjuly in england, that is set to change. instead it will be up to us to decide. one—metre plus distancing rules are expected to be scrapped so pubs would no longer be forced to provide table service for example. we wouldn't have to check in to visit a venue, and there would not be any cap on how many people we could meet or have inside our own homes. the government says coronavirus cases will go up but the vaccine programme means fewer people are ending up in hospital. although infection rates are rising, hospital admissions are not rising at the rate we have
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seen in previous peaks. if we look back to december for instance, when we had around 23,000 infections per day, which is around the rate we've seen in the last few days, there were nearly 15,000 people with covid in hospital, whereas now there's only around 1,700 in england. but some scientists have questioned if now is the right time. why on earth are we now changing from protecting people through vaccination to suddenly lifting all the protections and going towards, if you like, achieving immunity through infection by people? it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we're so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. one of the most visible measures of the pandemic has been the face mask. it's expected wearing one in shops or on public transport won't be legally required in england after the 19th ofjuly — like much else, it will be a personal choice. i don't particularly- like wearing a face mask. i think that's something many
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people will share with me. i i also know that it's really hard i for some people, particularly those hard of hearing, to hear well when someone is speaking i to them in a face mask. but i will of course follow - the guidance that will be set out when people should think of wearing one and not, i think to make - a judgment to follow the guidance on what are the right _ precautions to take. but part of wearing a face mask is about protecting others. the train drivers union aslef says it's a step too far, too soon. i will be keeping my mask. i think there will be times we want to do things slightly differently from how we are at the moment. however, i put a plea in for the shop workers, people in restaurants and on the transport system, we are doing it for them as well as each other and it's really important we take into account not putting them at risk. isolation if you test positive for coronavirus will still be required, and it's expected there will be a signal given on the future of the isolation policy for schools. the overall message from downing street, though, is that though the rules may be
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about to disappear, the risk posed by covid won't. it's about learning to live the virus. our political correspondent ben wright says the government is getting pressure from both directions. it has consistently had pressure from tory backbenchers, people in parliament and beyond who are good for exhilarating lifting of restrictions as the vaccine rule it has gone well. —— who have been advocating lifting of restrictions. on the other hand you have particularly big medical voices like the british medical association urging caution particularly as a third wave of this virus rolls in, the delta variant continues to spread fast and a large number of people have still not been double jabbed and they are arguing the government should wait a bit longer, until that degree of protection is
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even more widespread across the country. pressures from both sides. it is clear the government is going to hit itsjuly 19 target for listing all legal restrictions in england, that will be confirmed next monday, today we will get an insight into what the government thinks about all the guidance around social distancing, facemasks and working from home and all the rest of it. how much latitude the companies have, particularly transport companies, on insisting on different rules from those that are laid down by law? i think they do and i think say, for instance, supermarket chain that wanted to have a mask mandate in place or say customers should wear masks, they would be entitled to put a sign saying that, the problem is it would not be underpinned by legal mandate that has existed for the last 12 months which would potentially weaken it and weaken
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compliance. the same i think applies to train operators, it may be tempted to do same. what really matters later, for those businesses, for local leaders, andy burnham, the labour mayor, said he would like to see the wearing of facemask continuing in big retail venues, see the wearing of facemask continuing in big retailvenues, on public transport. what will matter is the prime minister's words on what he says about the guidance and whether he thinks it would be advisable for people to continue to wear facemasks advisable for people to continue to wearfacemasks in advisable for people to continue to wear facemasks in the crowded public spaces, for instance. like a station concourse or a shop. the signs are he is not going to say that although the number ten as saying the prime minister will urge caution and tell people this is not over yet and i think he will be quite explicit with the lifting of restrictions, that will accelerate infection rates and there will be more deaths as a result but as far as number ten
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goes, spawning this into autumn and winter would only produce a bigger wave of the virus later on —— west —— postponing this into the autumn or the winter. the uk has recorded 27,334 cases in the last 24 errors, up over 3000 compared to yesterday, although we know cases reported over the weekend is not always as accurate —— in the last 24 hours. nine deaths reported today. that is down from the figure reported yesterday, of 15 deaths. scotland is currently suffering the highest rates of covid infections in europe according to the who. tayside tops the list of virus hotspots followed by lothian, which includes
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edinburgh. the north—east of england is next and then the greater glasgow and clyde area. the scottish government is currently planning to ease some restrictions in a fortnight, on the 19th ofjuly, which is when england also takes the next step. the remaining major legal limit in scotland are due to be removed three weeks after that on the 9th of august but these figures could change the thinking of the government there. no decision yet been made at hollywood's on masks, which could still be required on transport into the autumn. scotla nd scotland currently the highest rates of covid infection. in europe, that is. i'm nowjoined by dr chris smith who is a virologist at the university of cambridge. what is your view on the timing of these restrictions being lifted in england? i these restrictions being lifted in encland? ., these restrictions being lifted in encland? . ., these restrictions being lifted in enrland? ., .., ., england? i am encouraged when i look at the data,
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england? i am encouraged when i look at the data. we — england? i am encouraged when i look at the data, we are _ england? i am encouraged when i look at the data, we are increasingly - at the data, we are increasingly being reminded it is the science we are responding to, the science strongly suggests we are in really good shape in terms of how well the vaccines are performing which is what is giving me enormously assurance. yes, we have lots of cases but if you compare where the cases but if you compare where the case burden is with the january, when we saw the sort of numbers we had significant number of hospitalisations and unfortunate people losing their lives. as you reported, that is not happening this time on the difference is because of one factor only, because we have vaccinated a very significant proportion of the population and now we've got very robust data at the vaccines protect people from getting severe disease and prevent people becoming so surreally they lose their lives, this is giving government greatly shouldn't opening up government greatly shouldn't opening up onjuly the 19th is the right thing to do —— giving the government great reassurance.
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as we have said, there are tens of thousands of new cases every day because of the delta variant, lots of those people at risk of developing long covid. wouldn't it be better to ease some of these restrictions bit by bit rather than wholesale? i restrictions bit by bit rather than wholesale?— restrictions bit by bit rather than wholesale? i think the answer to that would _ wholesale? i think the answer to that would be _ wholesale? i think the answer to that would be what _ wholesale? i think the answer to that would be what is _ wholesale? i think the answer to that would be what is the - wholesale? i think the answer to that would be what is the area i wholesale? i think the answer to i that would be what is the area under the curve? if by easing restrictions more slowly you arrive at the same point within same number of infections anyway, that is not really helping doing it sooner or later, there isjust a higher price in terms of freedoms and economy. the government will be thinking if we are going to arrive at the same sort of point because regardless of what we do in terms of long covid we will arrive at the same sort of position so we may as well say we are doing this onjuly the 19th and stick to that. there are other factors that mean it is attractive to do it now and one of them as it is allegedly summer, the weather is
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allegedly improving, and we know seasonal infections and respiratory viruses including coronaviruses spread much less well in summertime. people can ventilate their properties better and keep doors and windows open, the same with shops. that will make keeping the places lower risk easier, it is also going to coincide with the end of the school term so schools will be sending children home and all of these factors make it less likely we will see a bigger surge. these are mitigating factors that help. we know we wear a mask to protect other people are not ourselves but if mass are no longer mandatory, the people who feel they are most at risks are not being protected by the people around the —— if masks are no longer mandatory. most of the masks we wear in public places, as opposed to masks we were in hospitals, in hospital when you are treating people who are acutely
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unwell with virus infections including coronaviruses and also flu and other infections, those ppe work quite differently and they protect the wearer. but the masks people wear in places like supermarkets, they are there to try and arrest some of the droplets that come from your airways when you breathe and just when you are sitting at that talking to someone quietly, you are shedding droplets into the environment. quite rightly to see if people do not doubt that there is a higher likelihood that people will be shedding more droplets into the area and therefore there will be a higher likelihood of transmission. but we do not think the effect is so night and day, so binary, it will make the difference between life and death. it is one of the factors that will help to mitigate the big upswing in numbers but it'll certainly not make a massive difference because otherwise there would have been a very difference between what we saw last year when people started to use face coverings
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all the time compared with when they did not. it is a case of most of the transmissions happen in people's house is, at — 90% occur in domestic setting and —— 80 to 90% occur in the domestic setting. how confident are you we will not return to restriction in the next few months? i return to restriction in the next few months?— return to restriction in the next few months? ~' , , ., few months? i think there is still a rocky road — few months? i think there is still a rocky road ahead _ few months? i think there is still a rocky road ahead and _ few months? i think there is still a rocky road ahead and i _ few months? i think there is still a rocky road ahead and i say - few months? i think there is still a rocky road ahead and i say that i rocky road ahead and i say that because i have learnt never say neverin because i have learnt never say never in medicine and the only predictable thing about coronaviruses as it is predictably unpredictable so i do not think we should assume everything will be a bed of roses from here on in. i think we are moving in the right direction and we have got really powerful evidence that vaccines are working really well and at the have converted what could otherwise be little infections in vulnerable people into more mild infections. that is sort of what we do with flu and that is why you are increasingly
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hearing politicians and health professionals regarding this like the flute because we only have a very good system to manage the flue every year which includes an international system and our way of prioritising vaccination and because that works and we have very good evidence that has worked for decades, it seems reasonable to apply similar approaches to what we do it for coronaviruses and so i optimistic if we are able to do that, with —— we have every reason to think we can get this thing under control now. to think we can get this thing under control now— control now. doctor chris smith, virolo . ist control now. doctor chris smith, virologist from _ control now. doctor chris smith, virologist from the _ control now. doctor chris smith, virologist from the university i virologist from the university of cambridge, thank you very much for joining us. you can watch the prime minister's news conference from downing street this afternoon here on the bbc news channel. special coverage starts at 4.45. the queen has awarded the nhs
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the george cross for bravery, as the health service marks its 73rd birthday. her majesty has paid tribute to the �*courage, compassion and dedication' of all nhs staff. this morning, a thanksgiving service was held at st paul's catherdral, attended by the duke of cambridge. the duchess of cambridge was due to be there — but she's now self—isolating after coming into contact with someone who tested positive for coronavirus. our health correspondent catherine burns sent this from st paul's. some dressed up in theirfinest, and others wearing their uniforms with pride. today is all about the nhs staff who've worked so hard, especially during the pandemic. they reflected on their experiences, including a doctor who treated the first ever covid patients in the uk. in the absence of treatments and vaccines, it would have been easy to lose hope. for the vision of those who pioneered our national health service. you might recognise mae parsons, she read out a prayer. as the matron who gave the first vaccine outside of clinical trials back in december, she represents one of the most hopeful moments during the pandemic. but she says, at times,
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it felt like she was going to war. the hardest one is the amount of deaths we have seen, it'sjust terrifyingly big in numbers. and those are the things that in my 21 years of nursing i've never come across. the duke of cambridge arriving alone today ahead of the ceremony, his wife is isolating after testing positive for coronavirus. —— coming in contact with somebody who tested positive for coronaviruses. more thanks too for the royal family because the queen has awarded all nhs staff past and present the george cross. this is given for extreme heroism or courage in the face of danger. there are also patients here today remembering what the nhs has done for them, like the mum who had to give birth two months early because she and her baby both had covid. she remembers that last call to her husband before she was put on a ventilator.
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ijust felt...it�*s hard to describe, it's notjust scared, it's a feeling of utter terror inside. it's a feeling that i can't express in words. it was traumatic. it all started 73 years ago today. the first time that health care became free at the point of contact. this leaflet is coming through your letterbox one day soon. the head of the nhs in england now says the health service is a gift that we gave ourselves, but it needs to build back better. out of adversity can come strength. if together, like those who have gone before us, we choose to confront and resolve our deepest social challenges with determination and conviction. away from the pomp and ceremony, huge challenges lie ahead. the impact of long covid, record numbers on waiting lists, exhausted staff and a row over
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pay in england. we can speak to aneira thomas, who was born at one minute past midnight on fivejuly 1948, making herfirst baby in great britain to be born into the? nhs — and that also means it's her birthday today. aneira — happy birthday! let's start with your name, tell us what you got it from. mr; let's start with your name, tell us what you got it from.— let's start with your name, tell us what you got it from. my mother used to relate the — what you got it from. my mother used to relate the story _ what you got it from. my mother used to relate the story very _ what you got it from. my mother used to relate the story very often, - what you got it from. my mother used to relate the story very often, she i to relate the story very often, she nearly gave birth to me at midnight on the 4th ofjuly, independence day, and she was waiting for the doctor and nurse in the delivery room to tell her to push but instead of push they kept looking at the clock and a mother and said hold on, edna, hold on. and she held her breath for one minute and i came into the world one minute past
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midnight on the day that changed history. they brought in the nhs for everybody meaning equality because previous to that it was on the privileged few could afford health care. ca re. as care. as you say nye bevan was the minister at the time who led the plan. you have quite an affinity for the nhs, don't you?— plan. you have quite an affinity for the nhs, don't you? yes, with seven airls, two the nhs, don't you? yes, with seven girls. two boys. _ the nhs, don't you? yes, with seven girls, two boys, several— the nhs, don't you? yes, with seven girls, two boys, severalwent - the nhs, don't you? yes, with seven girls, two boys, severalwent into i girls, two boys, several went into mental health nursing, both my aunts were matrons in the 1950s, my own daughter as a paramedic, were matrons in the 1950s, my own daughteras a paramedic, my were matrons in the 1950s, my own daughter as a paramedic, my great grandmother was the local midwife in the village. so we have given a lot of tender loving care, i hope. it sounds like it. it's a bit of a family dynasty. how old were you
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when you first started to realise the important role that you as a baby arriving at that very point had in the beginning of the health service? , ., , , ., ., , service? growing up my mother always introduced me — service? growing up my mother always introduced me to _ service? growing up my mother always introduced me to new _ service? growing up my mother always introduced me to new people _ service? growing up my mother always introduced me to new people as i service? growing up my mother always introduced me to new people as a i introduced me to new people as a national health baby and i did not understand what she was talking about and i don't think i understood the significance of it until i had children myself, really. went to drama school and my name was almost topical teachers would ask me where i got my name is always say same story. and that is how it started. my story. and that is how it started. my elder sisters were nursing in sussex at the time when i passed my exams and my mother said i can follow my sisters and be a nurse like them. follow my sisters and be a nurse like them-— follow my sisters and be a nurse like them. how important is it to celebrate the _ like them. how important is it to celebrate the 73rd _ like them. how important is it to celebrate the 73rd anniversary i like them. how important is it to celebrate the 73rd anniversary of the nhs. it is not a year you would normally particularly matte but this
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has not been a normal year. like i said, has not been a normal year. like i said. covid — has not been a normal year. like i said, covid descended _ has not been a normal year. like i said, covid descended upon i has not been a normal year. like i said, covid descended upon us i has not been a normal year. i - i said, covid descended upon us and i cannot put into words how grateful as a country we are, we owe them a debt, the whole of the nhs, volunteers, key workers, scientists, researchers. i always say we stand on the shoulders of giants when it comes to a team effort of helping us move on, and we will. and my heart goes out to the people that have not made it and the families. but, yes, every year is important and this is going to be preserved, protected, cherished for future generations. and taught in schools as well. they have delivered, they are amazing, remarkable, and it makes me
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emotional. sometimes i am cardiff and look at the statues of nye bevan i have tried. both my children have been saved by the nhs, in the last ten years. life changing. it touches all our lives at some point, doesn't it? my mother used to say very often, 21 grandchildren and 65 great grandchildren, she used to say i am so rich, rich in love and love will conquer all. and that is how i feel by having the national health service, ifeel rich by having the national health service, i feel rich and safe. by, service, i feel rich and safe. a safe revolution i think is how you put it. happy birthday and take it so much for talking to us this afternoon. so much for talking to us this afternoon-— so much for talking to us this afternoon. . ,, , ., ., ,, , ., afternoon. thank you. thank you, all, for everything _ afternoon. thank you. thank you, all, for everything that _ afternoon. thank you. thank you, all, for everything that you i afternoon. thank you. thank you, all, for everything that you do, i afternoon. thank you. thank you, | all, for everything that you do, day in, day out. all, for everything that you do, day in, day out-— the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami
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has been demolished over safety fears — as a tropical storm approaches florida. 24 people are known to have died and more than 120 others are still unaccounted for. aru na iyengar reports. the remaining section of champlain towers south complex comes crashing down. demolition experts drilled small explosive charges into columns to bring the remaining unstable structure down in a controlled explosion. neighbours were advised to stay indoors and close their windows until two hours after the explosion. but some came to pray for those still missing. drones with thermal imaging were used to make sure there were no people or pets still inside the building. the approaching tropical storm elsa, which has hit cuba with winds of up to 65 mph, brought forward discussions about when to demolish the remaining building.
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it's eliminated a looming threat, a dangerous threat for our rescue workers. it will potentially open up probably a third of the pile so we can all, you know, so the teams can focus not just on two thirds of the pile but on the whole thing. crews are now hoping to be able to get into the apartment block's underground garage and get a clearer picture of any air holes that may exist in the rubble. but no survivors have been pulled out alive from the site in surfside since the first few hours after the structure's collapse. that's 11 days ago. what caused the 40—year—old building to collapse is still unclear, but a 2018 inspection warned of major flaws in the original design. aruna iyengar, bbc news. the bbc has been told that nato forces have almost completed their withdrawal from afghanistan — more than two months before the deadline of the 11th of september. the taliban have warned that any
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foreign soldiers remaining in afghanistan beyond that date will be treated as an occupying force. but violence in the country continues to rise, with the taliban taking more territory. neighbouring tajikistan says more than a thousand afghan government soldiers have fled across the border after clashes with the insurgents. hamid karzai was afghan president between 2001 and 2014. he's been telling my colleague yalda hakim that the us and its allies had not completed what they set out to achieve. the entire mission with regard to the stated objective of the united states and its nato allies in defeating terrorism and extremism has failed. because, let we repeat myself, they did not do what they should have done. they did what they should have not done, as i described earlier. the compartment of helping afghanistan in civilian areas, and education come in rebuild income in reconstruction,
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that was successful and you can see it clearly when you visit afghanistan that there is something to show to the world. and no doubt afghanistan... and no doubt, afghanistan has come a long way and it is not the country that was invaded by the us in 2001. before that we saw the taliban had turned the nation into. however, there are many critics now who do say afghanistan today is a failed state. afghanistan today is not a failed state. as far as the afghan people are concerned, they created a constitution, they went to the elections, they embrace democracy wholeheartedly. they went to school, they educated themselves, we have millions of afghan boys and girls educated today. we did all that we could to put afghanistan on the
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right track and to represent it well on the international scene. the failure of the state that one would describe, especially in the western press is exactly where the authority and the responsibility was more with the united states and its nato allies. that is where things have failed. and that is where we, the afghan people, are also paying the price. a very heavy price. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is in kabul. she described the precarious state of the afghan national security forces. it is not a good look, is it, when your afghan forces are fleeing before they even fire a shot. that is a snapshot of what is happening in all too many places across afghanistan. there are bases and sometimes checkposts with no more than a flag. where soldiers are begging the command here in kabul saying, "we are running out of food, running out of water, we have no more "ammunition, we are begging you to help us." someone told me yesterday, that one base asked
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70 times for assistance. and that is ringing alarm bells, that the afghan national security forces, who have been relying on nato forces for the supply chain, have to get their act together. but in other districts across afghanistan, although the numbers tell us what is for many afghans a very alarming story, that the situation is unraveling more quickly than anyone expected, some of those districts are irrelevant in strategic terms. some of them, the afghan national forces retreated to protect more important gains, but they do tell us a story that the taliban are advancing much more quickly than expected. and, yes, people are fleeing in the other direction. afghanistan, one of the poorest countries in the world, was already facing a huge and worsening humanitarian crisis. wow, yet again, thousands more afghans are on the run. and afghans know that this is just the beginning and it is likely to get much worse. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with louise lear. good afternoon. so far, there has been a bit of a north—south divide with our weather story this monday. the cloud and showers, some of them heavy and thundery across scotland, northern ireland and one or two into north west england, but there is also some sunshine further south of that. this is what is to come, though, more rain and strong winds through the night tonight. with this area of low pressure which is moving its way steadily north and east. so a spell of heavy rain overnight tonight with gale force gusts of winds across the channel coast, moving up through wales, the midlands and into the north of england. the rain will ease in scotland. we will have some clear skies, so here, perhaps single figures. it will be a relatively mild start, but it is all about where the rain is sitting first thing in the morning. out to the north of england, pushing across the scottish borders. the strongest of the winds are across the kent coast. a blustery day generally across the country and those temperatures well, they will peek just into the high teens if we are lucky with a few scattered showers into the southwest
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a little later on. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings could go. we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations, and that's why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly19th. but despite the vaccination programme, some experts are urging caution over lifting all restrictions. it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we're so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. on its 73rd anniversary, the queen has awarded the nhs the george cross for heroism and bravery. nhs england's medical director has praised his colleagues' response to the coronavirus pandemic.
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the partially collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished before tropical storm elsa sweeps in and endangers the lives of rescuers. it's six months since brexit trading rules came into play when the uk left the eu single market, and business owners have been working hard to hold on to their european customers while seeking new markets further afield. so how are they coping? bbc panorama has been following companies across the uk to get a sense of the impact. richard bilton reports. paperwork, paperwork. it is just madness. on the shores of loch fyne in the west of scotland, jamie mcmillan is trying to make a living. he's a shellfish wholesaler who's spent the last six months wrestling with the new brexit rules. that's three hours' work every
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morning that we export to the eu. his sales are down 40% since leaving the single market. jamie has abandoned the eu and turned to new asian markets. in simple terms, to export to china, hong kong or singapore, it is cheaper and quicker to export there than it is to france. prime minister borisjohnson warned there would be bumps on the road ahead for uk businesses. but for some, those bumps have turned into roadblocks. robert hewitt from surrey transports concert equipment for some of the world's biggest stars. that came off a robbie williams tour. that had a dragon on it. that was the dragon, basically. since january, lorries from the uk can no longer make more than two drop—offs onjourneys in the eu. even without covid, european tours would be impossible.
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what we're looking is the rear yard of our facility in holland. so robert has spent £3.5 million on this new depot in the netherlands, and retrained all his drivers so they have irish licences, allowing them to work more easily between the uk and the eu. our income will actually now not all come into the uk, a lot of it will go into holland. the treasury will receive less money. the uk government says it is disappointed the eu didn't accept its proposals for the music industry, and it's encouraging member states to be flexible. as companies readjust, there are success stories. julie anne runs a vegan snack food company with her partner. her sales are up 50%. there's so many things in the pipeline at the moment for us, which is so exciting. we've got some big potential clients in the middle east and we're on the cusp of signing a deal in the us
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with a large distributor. most uk businesses have faced change. millions ofjobs depend on how many bumps lay ahead. and you can watch panorama — brexit: six months on at 7.35pm this evening on bbc one, or via the bbc iplayer. labour's kim leadbeater has been sworn in as the new mp for batley and spen. speaking before the ceremony in the house of commons, she said she was honoured and proud to have been elected. last week she retained the seat for labour in a hard—fought by—election. the constituency was previously held by her older sisterjo cox, who was murdered five years ago by a far—right activist. the co—leader of the green party, jonathan bartley, will step down at the end ofjuly. the party's longest—serving leader says he's "hugely proud" of what the greens have achieved in his five years of tenureship. co—leader sian berry is set to continue as acting leader while a leadership
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election takes place. legislation on safety in high—rise buildings drawn up in response to the grenfell tower disaster four years ago will be presented to parliament this afternoon. the building safety bill will create a new regulator with powers to prosecute developers. our correspondent sarah corker has been telling us how significant this new legislation is. this legislation outlines major reforms to building and fire safety in england and wales. as you say, there will be a new regulator and it will have powers to prosecute developers who don't meet standards. it will also have the ability to force them to withdraw products from the market. this is four years since the market. this is four years since the grenfell tower fire. that tragedy exposed decades of systematic regulatory failures and safety checks on high—rises since then have exposed problems notjust with cladding, but many other fire safety faults too. this building here in salford quays, they arejust having their cladding removed at the
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moment and there was this £5 billion government cladding removal fund, the mps estimate that this is a £15 billion problem and leaseholders say they are the ones that are having to pay these huge costs. in this legislation this afternoon, we expect there will be a legal requirement for building owners to look at alternative methods of paying to fix these buildings before passing on those costs to leaseholders. leaseholders will also have 15 years to sue developers for shoddy workmanship. at the moment, they have got six years. but cladding campaigners say they don't have the time and the money to take on these complex legal cases. it's also difficult to prove a liability. at the moment, it is estimated that 700,000 people are living in flats wrapped in flammable materials.
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the rspca has received almost 100,000 reports of cruelty to animals across the uk over the last five years — withjuly often being the busiest month for investigating cases. as officers prepare for another demanding summer, it's launched a new campaign to promote animal welfare. luxmy gopal reports now from north yorkshire. good boy. cuddles, treats and playtime, everything man's best friend deserves. but a year ago, max's life was very different. we received a report from somebody that had overheard someone bragging they had just beaten up their dog. so they made the call to us and we attended the address with the police. hello, can you open the door, please, sir, it's the police? that's when we found max, terrified, covered in blood and badly injured. there's a lot of blood here, sir. on the floor. do you know what that's from? evidence at the scene suggested max had been beaten with a metal colander. he was rescued and cared for at the rspca york animal home, which oversees recovery, rehabilitation and rehoming.
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this was a willing act of cruelty. he wilfully submitted max to terrible injuries and an appalling act of violence. over the past five years, the rspca has received the equivalent of 10,000 reports of intentional animal cruelty every six months, with a spike lastjuly, when more than 1,500 incidents were reported in that month alone. max was left with a fractured pelvis and dislocated hip. over months, his health and confidence was rebuilt. we were overwhelmed, really, at how forgiving he was, mainly. an animal that's gone through what he went through really had the right to never trust people again, but he did. and he's living his best life now. and, as a special treat, a reunion with the staff who turned his life around. come on! good boy. bless him! to see him this happy is...
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you know, it's why we do what we do, really. itjust makes everything worthwhile. the idea of deliberate animal cruelty seems almost incomprehensible. but at least this tale has a happy ending, with max shaking off his past trauma and finding an owner worthy of his loyalty. luxmy gopal, bbc news. sport and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. not long to wait until emma raducanu stepped out for her match. she is the 18—year—old british wild card taking the tournament by storm so far. let's catch up with our reporter at wimbledon. far. let's catch up with our reporterat wimbledon. how far. let's catch up with our reporter at wimbledon. how much anticipation is the head of this match for raducanu? could she progress even further in the tournaments?—
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progress even further in the tournaments? , , , , tournaments? there is, because she is -la in: tournaments? there is, because she is playing an — tournaments? there is, because she is playing an opponent _ tournaments? there is, because she is playing an opponent who - tournaments? there is, because she is playing an opponent who is i tournaments? there is, because she is playing an opponent who is the i is playing an opponent who is the world number 75 and there is a sense that raducanu can do this because of how brilliant she has been so far at these championships without dropping a set. wimbledon will be at 75% capacity today, just over 9000 people on court one when raducanu comes out, and she dealt with that sense of occasion so well last time out. there is an expectation that she could potentially make it to the quarterfinals, incredible for a player who is doing her a—levels a couple of months ago and wasn't even sure if she would qualify for these championships, in the end becoming a wild card after bypassing the qualification process. it's an astonishing story for her and ash barty potentially awaits raducanu in the next round.— the next round. some of the top names have _ the next round. some of the top names have been _ the next round. some of the top names have been in _ the next round. some of the top names have been in action i the next round. some of the top names have been in action on i the next round. some of the top i names have been in action on this monday morning, including novak djokovic and ash barty. absolutely,
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and the world _ djokovic and ash barty. absolutely, and the world number— djokovic and ash barty. absolutely, and the world number one - djokovic and ash barty. absolutely, and the world number one is i djokovic and ash barty. absolutely, and the world number one is on i djokovic and ash barty. absolutely, and the world number one is on the men's and women's sides to progress through. ash barty is into herfirst quarterfinal at wimbledon. through. ash barty is into herfirst quarterfinalat wimbledon. she through. ash barty is into herfirst quarterfinal at wimbledon. she has "only" won one grand slam before. could she make it two? the french open champion went into this match having won 15 matches in a row, a real test for party, but she came through it well. the men's number one is also through. novak djokovic has had no real problems at these championships so far. the only set he dropped was the one againstjack draper in the opening round. he made it through with ease. the chilean player wasn't really going to bother djokovic today. for the men's, there were wins also for sebastian korda, —— sebastian korda is out. let's take you to what is happening at the
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moment. on centre court, coco gauff is playing the former champion angelique kerber, who since winning wimbledon in 2018 has only won one title and that was on grass recently. but she has been causing gauff some problems. meanwhile on court number one, which is where we are waiting to see raducanu last, at the moment, there is a men's match happening there. alexander zverev is taking on felix augur aliassime. zverev lost that set. alijaz bedene is a guy who beat federer, so he knows how to play on this surface. but federer is the favourite to win this. we will have roger federer in action on centre court later. it is all happening on manic monday here. thank you for that. news to concern
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the british & irish lions on their tour of south africa. the springboks have been forced to suspend training after another coronavirus outbreak. the sale sharks player tested positive, with the whole squad having to quarantine. it puts their game against georgia on friday in doubt. the lions�* first test against south africa is set to take place on july the 24th. that is all the sport for now.
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this is bbc news. i�*m reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 4:45pm... borisjohnson will confirm plans to ease most of the remaining coronavirus restrictions in england. face coverings, along with social distancing, could go. we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations and that�*s why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly19th. although uptake for the covid vaccine has been strong, some experts say caution is still needed when it comes to removing all restrictions.
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it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection

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