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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 5, 2021 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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still so young and absolutely needs time to grow as a player, and she's onlyjust time to grow as a player, and she's only just started time to grow as a player, and she's onlyjust started on the main tour. this is her first onlyjust started on the main tour. this is herfirst grand slam tournament ever, so of course she's going to have ups and downs and things like that, but we just need to give her a bit of space because she has got a long career ahead of her. preparing for the biggest match of her life, emma raducanu knows few would have known her name this time a week ago. she's made sure millions do now. there's not just emma—mania there's notjust emma—mania today, all the singles matches are being played today on the same day. ash barty opening the show cards, and we have a mixture of the old guard with the new, with roger federer following coco gauff under the centre court. you get the feeling tennis fans might not get much work done today! tennis fans might not get much work done toda ! . ., ., ., ~ , ., time for a look at the weather.
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here's louise lear. it's been keeping us on our toes, the wimbledon forecast. there are some shower clouds threatening but i suspect there will be plenty of played today. i don't suspect there will be that much golf, this was earlier on. those showers have been sitting across the north of the country. into scotland come into northern ireland, fairly widespread, may be still the odd rumble of thunder. furthersouth may be still the odd rumble of thunder. further south that is where we have the clearer skies. however, you can already see what is waiting in the wings to arrive later on today. enjoy the sunshine while you have got it. any showers will be a very isolated indeed. the sharper showers will drift into western scotland and northern ireland this afternoon. and if you get the sunshine, you are probably likely to see temperatures into the low 20s. but we change gear once again down
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to the south—west. by the end of the afternoon into the isles of scilly and across cornwall, we will see this deep area of low pressure, unseasonably heavy rain and strong winds for this time of year, set to arrive through this evening, matching its way promptly across wales, into the midlands and the north of england by the end of the night. the showers will ease in scotland, here under clear skies we might see temperatures down into single figures but it will be a relatively mild start. that is pretty academic really because it will be a miserable one for many others with cloud and rain. that moves into southern scotland, blustery winds and gales across exposed coasts, and we will see those driving in plenty of showers across the south—west. not so windy in scotland but across england and wales it will be a blustery story generally, and that means the showers will rattle through at quite a pace with temperatures more subdued for tomorrow afternoon at around 15 to 19 degrees. that means there is still the risk of showers
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interrupting play for wimbledon on tuesday and wednesday, but high pressure is set to build notjust across swi9 but for many of us thursday into friday. it looks as if we say goodbye to that low, we see high pressure building into the south—west, quietening things down with a good deal of dry weather and lighter winds. that translates that we will see some good dry sunny spells for many, but make the most of it. unfortunately showers the sequel set to return at the weekend! louise, thank you. a reminder of our top story. borisjohnson will confirm this afternoon details of plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. that's all from the bbc news at one, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. good afternoon. it's just after 1:30,
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and this is your latest sports news. all eyes are on wimbledon today for manic monday, the day when all fourth—round matches take place. men's number one novak djokovic is in action, but attention turns to 18—year—old emma raducanu later, she's the only brit left in singles action. chetan pathak is there for us. great to see you, what a story this is turning into, raducanu was a wild card for the championships. it’s card for the championships. it's incredible. _ card for the championships. it�*s incredible, isn't it? we thought we might be talking about andy murray or dan evans or kamm norrie on the second monday, but we are talking about emma raducanu, an 18—year—old who many out of ten it had not heard of before the championships, ranked 338 in the world, she could jump way up, an incredible story, and already at wimbledon people buzzing about this match, which will be last on court number one. she has beaten the
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former french open runner—up in the second round, that fantastic performance against sorana cirstea in the third round, where she was beaming, took it all in his stride, she hasn't even dropped a set, and thatis she hasn't even dropped a set, and that is why so many people are excited about what she could do here. her parents said you might not need to pack too many match day outfits, you are being a bit ambitious. i think she knew she would be in the second week perhaps, and absolutely everyone talking about raducanu's match later tonight. polite how wrong they were in that respect! what other matches to look out for today, chetan? so much going on, gavin, just here we have got said korda, who put out dan evans in the last round. it is manic monday, we are not going to have this next year, they will play on the traditional match day of sunday and match up with what the other grand slams do. the former french
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champion has gone out, onjava's incredible story continues, the first north african woman to get this far in the championships. —— on is —— onsjabeur, a this far in the championships. —— on is —— ons jabeur, a fantastic story that continues into the quarterfinals for her. we have also seen sabalenka, who she will be playing next, reach herfirst grand slam quarterfinal, a good win for her earlier today. a couple of other results that have come through, matteo berrettini, the queens champion, he has won in straight sets. he looked a little uncertain at the start of the championships but has played himself into some great form. and i think we should be able to take your life to the action happening at the moment, the showpiece chords are now under way, and ash barty, the world number one, she is currently in action on court
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one, playing krejcikova, who is on a 15 match unbeaten run. nobody was talking about her before roland garros, and now she has broken barty, she was up 4—2, 4—3 for the moment, so krejcikova still has that break of serve. and hopefully we can take you to centre court, the men's top seed is an action, novak djkovic, the very clear favourite here at wimbledon, in action against the chilean who was more of a clay—court player, not many people forcing problems for djokovic in this one. it is early doors, they arejust this one. it is early doors, they are just getting this one. it is early doors, they arejust getting under this one. it is early doors, they are just getting under way on centre court. so much to look forward to, coco gauff in action, roger federer on centre court, but all eyes, as i was in at the start, on emma raducanu against islay tomljanovic.
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excitement is building ahead of england's european championship semi final against denmark at wembley on wednesday. the players spent time relaxing in a swimming pool yesterday. the stunning 4—0 win over ukraine in the last eight on saturday means there's genuine hope that they can reach a major tournament final for the first time since 1966. it's something former england striker alan shearer thinks manager gareth southgate should take a lot of credit for. he allows them to express themselves. he takes a lot of the pressure on his shoulders, which will be very, very tough for him but he handles it magnificently. but that allows his players to go out and play with a freedom. they don't seem to care about past tournaments. it's great to see. it's great to see them go out and strut their stuff. let's hope they can do it again on wednesday evening. and england flanker tom curry
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will make his first appearance for the british and irish lions, while ireland's iain henderson will be captain against the cell c sharks injohannesburg on wednesday. the lions recorded their first win on the tour when they thumped the sigma lions 56—14 on saturday. wales lock adam beard and back rowjosh navidi will also make their debuts after being called up by warren gatland as replacements. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's return to our top story that borisjohnson will confirm this afternoon details of plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. one key element will be the relaxation of the rules on masks. it will no longer be a legal requirement for people to wear mask on public transport. london mayor sadiq khan, who is responsible for the london underground and the capital's transport network, was asked what would happen in the city. i'll be watching and listening very carefully to what the prime minister and health secretary announce today. i think it's important
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when you are in a crisis, which is what this pandemic is, for clarity around communications. we also, in london, there are some trains that we are responsible for, so i wouldn't want to have confusion where tfl has one set of rules and the government has another, so let's wait and see what the government are announcing. but if they did announce they were going to scrap them, would you be pushing for some sort of bylaw for the tube and the bus network? what we do know is, where there are instances where you can't keep a social distance, wearing a facemask can make a big difference, because it's possible for you to have the virus, have no symptoms, and by wearing a facemask, you reduce the chances of it being passed on. so let's wait and see what the government announces, we are keen to make sure that public transport continues to be as safe as it possibly is. it's important that we make sure that passengers are safe, londoners are safe, and also our staff as well. so will you be pushing for it, then, to keep them? i think the government knows my view is somebody who has advocated for wearing facemasks back last year in march and april. it was only a few months later that the government finally acceded to our request. i think it important to make sure
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the public transport is safe. it also gives public confidence in relation to using public transport and people returning to the tubes and buses as soon as possible. i want the west end to be busy and thriving. one way to do that is to give people confidence in public transport. let's wait and see what the government announces. president biden says the united states is closer than ever to declaring independence from covid—i9. in a speech marking the fourth ofjuly public holiday, he said the country was emerging from the darkness and isolation of the pandemic and although the virus wasn't yet beaten, he was optimistic. mark lobel reports. stepping forward for a dazzling display, capping a year that's been anything but. the fourth ofjuly in america. celebrating independence day, but from what? listen to what president biden said back in may. our goal byjuly 4th is to have 70%
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of adult americans with at least one shot and 160 million americans fully vaccinated. but two months on, he's facing up to a more hesitant nation than he had anticipated. short of his target, 67% of americans have had a first dose, withjust over 149 million adults, 58% of americans, fully immunised. mission not yet accomplished. we are emerging from the darkness of years, a year of pandemic and isolation, a year of pain, fear and heartbreaking loss. and think about how far we've come. since his election, joe biden made addressing the pandemic his priority, but almost six months on, he concedes the virus is not yet vanquished. the more contagious delta variant means that, in some cities like los angeles, even vaccinated residents
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are being asked to resume mask wearing indoors and hospitals are filling up again where many remain unvaccinated. but the best defence against these variants is to get vaccinated. my fellow americans, it's the most patriotic thing you can do. then, reaching into his jacket pocket, the 78—year—old gets a card gets a card he says he carries with his daily schedule on it. on that card are the number of americans who have lost their lives to covid, the precise number. as of tonight, that number is 603,018 people have lost their lives. and that number keeps rising. it's not the end of the pandemic they're celebrating here, though they're comfortable enough
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to get up close and personal, strengthened by the vaccine — convinced, it seems, the darkest days are over. mark lobel, bbc news. pope francis has undergone successful surgery to treat a colon problem in rome. the vatican sizes is recovering well problem in rome. the vatican sizes is recovering wel— is recovering well after the procedure. _ is recovering well after the procedure, which - is recovering well after the procedure, which was - is recovering well after the i procedure, which was carried is recovering well after the - procedure, which was carried out under general anaesthetic. before the operation, he gave his sunday blessing to worshippers in st peter's square. it is the first time the 84—year—old has been in hospital since his election in 2013. the forestry department in cyprus is that a wildfire, the island's worst in decades, is now under control. around 50 square kilometres of pine and scrub in the foothills of the mountains was coached by flames. four egyptian farm workers died in
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the wildfire. countries including the wildfire. countries including the uk have been sending in planes to help extinguish the flames. time for a look at the headlines on bbc news. borisjohnson will confirm this afternoon details of plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs, as his wife is forced to self—isolate. the remaining section of the partly collapsed apartment block near miami is demolished over safety fears, as a tropical storm approaches florida. now it's time for a look at the stories happening in different areas across the uk. family and friends of residents who died from coronavirus at a care home in kent have been holding
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a memorial service this morning. managers at pelham house in folkestone say they lost 50% of their residents to the virus and described it as a living nightmare. the service coincides with a two minute silence for nhs, social care workers. simonjones is at the home now. workers. simon jones is at the home now. ~ ., ., , . now. well, the memorial service was held here in — now. well, the memorial service was held here in the _ now. well, the memorial service was held here in the grounds _ now. well, the memorial service was held here in the grounds of _ now. well, the memorial service was held here in the grounds of the - now. well, the memorial service was held here in the grounds of the care. held here in the grounds of the care home. it is very close to the garden of remembrance, and here they have planted ten roses to mark the lives of the ten residents who died after contracting covid. during the service, their names were read out, we had one of the residents had an amazing smile, another really enjoyed italian opera. it was a very emotional service. enjoyed italian opera. it was a very emotionalservice. roger enjoyed italian opera. it was a very emotional service. roger is the owner of pelham house care home. how has the last year also being for
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you, losing half your residence? it has been extremely challenging for us as_ has been extremely challenging for us as a _ has been extremely challenging for us as a home, both witnessing the loss of— us as a home, both witnessing the loss of ten— us as a home, both witnessing the loss of ten residents and also the challenges for the staff, to manage and cope _ challenges for the staff, to manage and cope in very difficult environments.— and cope in very difficult environments. ., ,., ., environments. you felt it important to invite friends _ environments. you felt it important to invite friends and _ environments. you felt it important to invite friends and family - environments. you felt it important to invite friends and family of- to invite friends and family of those who died, just to remember their lives. we those who died, 'ust to remember their lives. ~ those who died, 'ust to remember their lives.— their lives. we felt it was important _ their lives. we felt it was important because - their lives. we felt it was important because we i their lives. we felt it was i important because we didn't their lives. we felt it was - important because we didn't get their lives. we felt it was _ important because we didn't get the chance _ important because we didn't get the chance to _ important because we didn't get the chance to appreciate, recognise and pay tribute — chance to appreciate, recognise and pay tribute to the people we lost in such a _ pay tribute to the people we lost in such a shocking and sudden way. we really _ such a shocking and sudden way. we really wanted to take the time to appreciate them and their lives and say goodbye in a way that we felt was dignified. it is say goodbye in a way that we felt was dignified.— was dignified. it is thought that covid entered _ was dignified. it is thought that covid entered the _ was dignified. it is thought that covid entered the care - was dignified. it is thought that covid entered the care home i was dignified. it is thought that i covid entered the care home after one of the residents was sent back to the care home from hospital before they had had test results reported. how do you feel about that? it reported. how do you feel about that? ., , reported. how do you feel about that? ., _ reported. how do you feel about that? ., ,_, reported. how do you feel about that? ., , that? it was obviously a very challenging _ that? it was obviously a very challenging time _ that? it was obviously a very challenging time and, - that? it was obviously a very challenging time and, you i that? it was obviously a very i challenging time and, you know, it is something that we look back on,
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and we _ is something that we look back on, and we do — is something that we look back on, and we do feel it could have been done _ and we do feel it could have been done differently. it oppose great challenges for us as a care home, but in _ challenges for us as a care home, but in many— challenges for us as a care home, but in many senses we have had to move _ but in many senses we have had to move on— but in many senses we have had to move on from that and to deal with the people — move on from that and to deal with the people we have got and to manage things— the people we have got and to manage things the _ the people we have got and to manage things the best way we possibly can. the thing _ things the best way we possibly can. the thing for us, there are lessons in the _ the thing for us, there are lessons in the past, — the thing for us, there are lessons in the past, and we hope those lessons — in the past, and we hope those lessons will be learned and things will he _ lessons will be learned and things will be better for elderly people in care homes such as ours. you will be better for elderly people in care homes such as ours.- care homes such as ours. you talk about moving _ care homes such as ours. you talk about moving on, _ care homes such as ours. you talk about moving on, and _ care homes such as ours. you talk about moving on, and we - care homes such as ours. you talk about moving on, and we are i about moving on, and we are expecting to hear from the prime minister about the easing of restrictions in england. what are you hoping for in terms of care homes? do you want to see things change? i homes? do you want to see things chance? ~ , homes? do you want to see things chance? ~' , ., , change? i think we still need to be careful, change? i think we still need to be careful. we — change? i think we still need to be careful, we know _ change? i think we still need to be careful, we know there _ change? i think we still need to be careful, we know there is - change? i think we still need to be careful, we know there is a - change? i think we still need to be careful, we know there is a rising i careful, we know there is a rising rate of— careful, we know there is a rising rate of covid in the country, the way it _ rate of covid in the country, the way it is— rate of covid in the country, the way it is going up, and at the same time— way it is going up, and at the same time the _ way it is going up, and at the same time the restrictions on daily lives are diminishing, but we would say we have to _ are diminishing, but we would say we have to be _ are diminishing, but we would say we have to be cautious. our number one 'ob have to be cautious. our number one job is— have to be cautious. our number one job is looking — have to be cautious. our number one job is looking after vulnerable people — job is looking after vulnerable people and keeping them safe, and we will continue with the route whereby
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we protect— will continue with the route whereby we protect them and their interests, really. _ we protect them and their interests, really. we _ we protect them and their interests, really, we will review the situation as we _ really, we will review the situation as we go— really, we will review the situation as we go on, but there is still a need _ as we go on, but there is still a need to— as we go on, but there is still a need to be _ as we go on, but there is still a need to be careful in the current environment. to need to be careful in the current environment.— environment. to be frank, our preference _ environment. to be frank, our preference would _ environment. to be frank, our preference would be _ environment. to be frank, our preference would be for- environment. to be frank, our preference would be for socialj preference would be for social distancing and ppe, i don't see anything that encourages us distancing and ppe, i don't see anything that encourages- distancing and ppe, i don't see anything that encourages us to relax at the moment. _ anything that encourages us to relax at the moment, and _ anything that encourages us to relax at the moment, and our— anything that encourages us to relax at the moment, and our number- anything that encourages us to relax| at the moment, and our number one obligation— at the moment, and our number one obligation is— at the moment, and our number one obligation is to look after people and keep— obligation is to look after people and keep them safe. we take that very seriously, so i think we take every— very seriously, so i think we take every precaution that it feels reasonable and sensible to keep the people _ reasonable and sensible to keep the people we _ reasonable and sensible to keep the people we look after as safe as possible — people we look after as safe as ossible. ., ., ,, people we look after as safe as ossible. ., . ~' , ., , possible. 0k, roger, thank you very much forjoining _ possible. 0k, roger, thank you very much forjoining us. _ possible. 0k, roger, thank you very much forjoining us. today, - possible. 0k, roger, thank you very much forjoining us. today, a - possible. 0k, roger, thank you very| much forjoining us. today, a chance to look back at the ten residents who were lost, but also looking forward to see how things could be done differently in the future. simon, thank you, simonjones reporting there.
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the rapper fekky has set up a laptop library for schoolchildren from his local area in london to help tackle deprivation. students will be able to borrow laptops for school work, receive training on how to use them, as well as learning about internet security. one in ten london children do not have access to a laptop or computer outside school, according to charity the cc foundation. jamie moreland reports. welcome to the laptop library in lewisham, lending devices to children who may not have computers at home. the project was set up by rapper fekky to tackle deprivation in his area. i grew up in lewisham. i went to school five minutes away and met my first girl at the bus stop. first fight at the bus stop here. this is my stomping ground. and that's why it is very important for me to give back because they are like me and i am like them. i've got success and i would love to see many people from my area have the same success. jeremiah is one of the young people borrowing the laptops. it keeps me out of trouble. i'm able to do stuff, web designing and coding, and i feel like that's good for me.
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a survey suggests more than one in ten children in london don't have access to a laptop or computer outside of school. many have struggled to learn at home during lockdown. a lot of the young people, i despite them even being given devices by their schools, - there were various other barriers, so whether it was access to internet or whether it was actually— knowing how to use the laptops, i and a lot of them had to share these devices between siblings. it teaches them how to become laptop savvy. security on laptops and it encourages them to work. fekky wants the project to open up more opportunities for children, and jeremiah hopes it could help him start a career in technology. these are really good kids, and if you can get to them now, they're more intelligent, the sky's the limit. jamie moreland, bbc london. a retired doctor from bristol children's hospital swapped his stethoscope for speedos when he swam the bristol channel this weekend.
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professor andy wolf completed the six—hour swim yesterday and says he's now getting ready for an even bigger challenge. tracey miller went to meet him. this retired doctor has already swum the english channel while raising over £30,000 for bristol children's hospital. as andy wolf stood waiting for support boat, weather and tide for his next swimming challenge, he explained why he has more to do. there is always something that could be helped with in the children's hospital, and on this occasion, i am swimming for the emergency department to get some additional facilities which will make the experience of children and their carers better. enjoy. ok, guys! enjoy it. sunday morning, everything was perfect, and andy slipped off the support boat, left the welsh beach and began the long swim across the bristol channel to england. there is always this issue that it gets tough at some point, and you then do have
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to put your mind in a state where you consider its only one day of your life. you will, eventually, if you move one arm in front of the other, you will get to the other side. and six hours later, ahead of time, andy and his support boat were spotted from clevedon beach. an incredible achievement — but andy is using this swim as training for an even bigger challenge. yeah, i've persuaded myself that this is a seven hour training swim in preparation for a much longer swim in cold water up at loch ness in about six, seven weeks' time. it's about 23 miles. it's cold, it's about 12 degrees, and it's freshwater, which means you sink a bit. a warm welcome for andy to english shores after his swim from wales — now he turns his thoughts to the scottish loch. tracey miller, bbc points west, clevedon.
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as we saw at the g7 in cornwall, world leaders have pledged to reduce their carbon emissions. efforts are being made closer to home though too. bbc look east are measuring how much carbon they manage to save today. janine machin, presenterfor bbc look east, can tell us more. i surely can, we have ditched our studio, and you find me broadcasting from the bike shed, something i never thought i would say! we are trying to bring you tonight's bbc look east without creating any carbon emissions, and it is not easy at all. our programme, and an average night, would produce about a third of a tonne of carbon, and if you stick the details into one of those online calculators, it is more than flying one way from stansted to malaga, and it is because we have a very big region, a lot of reporters covering it, they use diesel
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vehicles, satellite trucks, computers, studio lights, which is why i am not in there tonight. so what have we changed? come over here, i will show you. we are powering everything differently, this massive white box is a battery, we are using solar panels to put energy into the battery, we are also using this little blue fell down here, a hydrogen generator, so it uses hydrogen to create electricity, and the by—product is water, not c02. and the by—product is water, not co2. obviously, you have to create hydrogen in the first place, but it is definitely greener. we are using this battery to power our trucks, the camera crews are using it to charge their batteries. we have also hired a fleet of electric vehicles, which was surprisingly hard. and not just electric cars, but electric bicycles, our science correspondent richard wescott is on one of them right now, cycling 18 miles to a
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village which is one of the first in the uk to install a community ground source heat pump. around 200 homes there have signed up, they are going to ditch their oilfired there have signed up, they are going to ditch their oil fired boilers and warm their waterfrom the to ditch their oil fired boilers and warm their water from the heat in the ground. we will be looking at that and we will be looking at what we can all do. low cost as well, because it is expensive to live greener, looking at whether trees can really offset the carbon we produce. find out if we manage our zero carbon programme at 6:30pm tonight, fingers crossed! many thanks, janine. and that is our round—up in our special across the uk. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. good afternoon. it may well be the height of summer, but it's been a bit of a nightmare to try and make plans to see friends and family outside, hasn't it? the best of the sunshine so far today has been across england and wales. and it should be a reasonable day if you are spending time outside, the risk of a few shower clouds
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developing, but there's more widespread rain further north. and we've seen some overcast skies so far across edinburgh where we had that heavy rain on sunday. this weather front still to clear away, still bringing the risk of showers, rumbles of thunder, with another area of low pressure waiting in the wings to arrive a little later on. so, so far today, the sharpest of the showers have been through scotland, one or two across the north of england and also into northern ireland. some of those showers could be heavy and thundering and bring a lot of heavy rain in a short space of time this afternoon. the best of the sunshine will be through england and wales, and any showers here will be very isolated. with the sunshine, we should see temperatures peaking at around 22 degrees, that's 72 fahrenheit. but you can't escape the fact that there's more wet weather to come down through the isle of scilly into cornwall, that arrives later on this afternoon. it's going to be accompanied by some pretty unseasonably strong winds for this time of year, particularly on the southern flank of that low, so running up through the channel as we go overnight. so gale force gusts of wind, a spell of heavy rain as well moving its way across wales
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into the midlands, further north by dawn. we keep some clearer skies into scotland, but temperatures generally staying into double figures to greet us on tuesday. that will be fairly academic, particularly if you're caught under the cloud, the wind and the rain. the strongest of the winds across the kent coast, the heaviest of the rain moving out to the north of england across the scottish borders, a trail of showers following in behind, particularly into the south west and into wales. top temperatures tuesday afternoon down a degree or so at around 18 or 19 degrees. that's because of the amount of cloud around. but it does mean, for wimbledon — which has been pretty tricky, hasn't it? — there's still the risk of some showers around on tuesday, wednesday, but thursday, friday certainly looks much better. and the reason for that is that we finally say goodbye to the low pressure, and an area of high pressure starts to build in from the south west, quietening things down. there'll be a good deal of dry weather, some lighter winds, and temperatures once again back up into the low 20s.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — borisjohnson will confirm later plans to ease most of the remaining covid restrictions in england. social distancing and face coverings, could go. we are at last seeing a real weakening of the link between the case numbers and hospitalisations and that's why we expect we are going to be able to take this step onjuly 19th. but despite the vaccination programme, some experts are urging caution over lifting all restrictions. it seems to be odd to me to take all those risks with infection when we are so close to vaccination doing the job of keeping us safe. the duke of cambridge attends a service to mark the 73rd birthday of the nhs, as his wife is forced to self—isolate.

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