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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  July 5, 2021 5:30am-6:01am BST

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hello, you're with bbc news, i'm sally bundock with the top stories. global car sales shows signs of recovery after steering off the road during the pandemic. the right hailing giant didi says there will be a hit with revenues as regulators ordered it off trinder�*s app stores for violating was on personal data. and for the first time since its creation, and is not have to face off at the helm, one of the well�*s richest will step aside as boss today, so who is in charge and what will he do next? —— jeff
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bezos. let's get down to business and we are going to focus on the global car market. it is seeing a surge in new car sales after the disaster of 2020. but with ongoing issues surrounding a computer chip shortage, there is potential to derail the recovery with the auto industry forecast to be the biggest loser in 2021. without to $20 billion wiped off global carmakers operating profits this year, that's a prediction coming from goldman sachs. if we look at new registration figures for the uk, they are going to be released in a few hours�* time from the mmt, they are expected to show that junior registrations will up by approximately 27% compared to the same month last year smmt. but year—to—date uptake is up about 26% with consumer confidence yet to fully recover. so how will it hit
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future sales? let�*s talk this through withjim, editorial through with jim, editorial director at through withjim, editorial director at what car and auto car. nice to talk to you. comparing anything to this time last year is going to be skewed because of the pandemic. from your perspective, what is the outlook for the car market when it comes to new cars? i outlook for the car market when it comes to new cars?— it comes to new cars? i think there's a _ it comes to new cars? i think there's a very _ it comes to new cars? i think there's a very mixed - it comes to new cars? i think there's a very mixed picturel it comes to new cars? i think. there's a very mixed picture at there�*s a very mixed picture at there�*s a very mixed picture at the moment in different parts of the world and from different manufacturers and as you said, it very much depends on the situation as regards these chips that are so crucial to the car, between 50 and 1000 chips in each car, depending on just how advanced it is, but also the raw material shortages in terms of things like rubber which are holding back manufacturing but in some markets, the industry is surging, people are finally getting back to spending their money. they were restricted perhaps in some of the ways they could spend in terms of
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travel and they are looking to reward themselves after months of hardship so some markets we are seeing some surging, singularly in asia and china, and in other markets we think short to medium term problems because of these restrictions —— especially in asia and china. -- especially in asia and china. �* , , ., china. and used cars, are we seeinu china. and used cars, are we seeing a _ china. and used cars, are we seeing a surge _ china. and used cars, are we seeing a surge in _ china. and used cars, are we seeing a surge in sale - china. and used cars, are we seeing a surge in sale of - china. and used cars, are we| seeing a surge in sale of used cars? ~ , ,., , �* , seeing a surge in sale of used cars? absolutely. it's a very marked trend _ cars? absolutely. it's a very marked trend at _ cars? absolutely. it's a very marked trend at the - cars? absolutely. it's a very l marked trend at the moment, cars? absolutely. it's a very - marked trend at the moment, and supply in some areas is even running out of running low and of course that sending prices surging. people are trying to avoid double transport, they are perhaps trying to tighten their belts economically and moving from a new to a used car and of course they are not prepared to wait. 0ne and of course they are not prepared to wait. one of the big problems with all of these chips shortages is people are being asked to wait six months plus for a new car so if they want a car now, they are looking into the used market and there is a strong stock order or there was a strong stock on nearly new cars, so you are paying for a car that is nearly as good and there is a real strong trend in that
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direction as well. in a real strong trend in that direction as well. in terms of the chip shortage, _ direction as well. in terms of the chip shortage, many - the chip shortage, many carmakers, when, you know, the pandemic first kicked in last yearin pandemic first kicked in last year in around march, february, they actually stopped their orders, didn�*t they, for chips in some cases which meant that there was, when they did want them, there was a huge delay for them because there was a massive demand for chips. we want devices, whether it be a smartphone, laptop or a car, and they all need these chips. absolutely. the car industry works with a just—in—time principle, it does not stock car parts in any great numbers and after a few weeks of getting back to production when lockdown eased, they were going back to the manufacturers and trying to put their orders in but what has happened is there was a surge, the shortfall from the carmakers cancelling their orders had been taken up as you say with computer game and computer console makers, telephone makers, 10— 20% surge in demand over the course of
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the year and actually, carmakers are not in that scheme of things i be customer of these chip makers so they are at the back of the line again. when they went to them asking for supplies to resume. good to talk to you again and thank you for getting up so early. staying with transport. the right hailing up didi have been ordered off china�*s stores. it says didi has violated doors and collecting uses data and its removal. the firm says the app would continue to operate but it has stopped registering new users. let�*s talk with katie silva. tell us more, this is a real blow for didi. it tell us more, this is a real blow for didi. it absolutely is and as you — blow for didi. it absolutely is and as you say _ blow for didi. it absolutely is and as you say it _ blow for didi. it absolutely is and as you say it could - blow for didi. it absolutely is and as you say it could not i and as you say it could not come at a worse time so of
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course we all remember the ipo from just last week, it was the biggest listing of a chinese company on the new york stock exchange since alibaba and it raised almost $4.5 billion and went up quite significantly in trading during the first day but we saw its shares for example drop more than 5% on friday and the chinese regulators signalled they would be investigating this and as we heard over the weekend basically forbidding new users from downloading the arts and as a result it was not able to continue in the app store and current users can use it but new ones cannot and they said, didi, this will impact the price. it shows this latest crackdown that we are seeing against a number of big chinese tech giants, the likes for example of alibaba who was due to list last year, its present —— parent company was due to list last year and it was stopped at the last minute as well as of course inaudible which found itself in the cross buyers for beijing. what this will mean for us investors and investors around the world is
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they will need to look potentially more significantly when they make investments in china to see whether or not they are indeed going to be good investments and that is going to cause a problem. when it comes to didi, one analyst told me earlier that really is going to have a long, hard, difficult road ahead facing these allegations.- difficult road ahead facing these allegations. 0k, katie, thank you _ these allegations. 0k, katie, thank you for _ these allegations. 0k, katie, thank you for the _ these allegations. 0k, katie, thank you for the latest - these allegations. 0k, katie, thank you for the latest on i thank you for the latest on that. let�*s get some of the day�*s other news. a formal settlement has been reached between the insurers and owners of the container ship ever given. it was stuck in the suez canal in march for six days, disrupting global trade. the suez canal authority had demanded compensation, and held the crew and their ship since it was dislodged. the vessel will now be allowed to set sail onjuly the 7th. a new regulator will be set up in the uk with the power to prosecute property developers that do not meet safety standards. it�*s designed to prevent any repetition of the grenfell tower disaster. it
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killed 72 people in 2017. the government says the new regulator would provide essential oversight at every stage of a building�*s life—cycle, design, construction, completion to occupation. amazon�*s jeff bezos is to stand down as chief executive of amazon today. he founded the company in 1994 as an online bookstore and transformed it into an e—commerce giant. it employs now someone .3 million people and has a hand in everything from package delivery to streaming video to cloud computing —— some 1.3. it's cloud computing —— some 1.3. it�*s replacement runs amazon web services so what is next forjeff next for jeff bezos? next forjeff bezos? when jeff bezos started his online bookstore he told his parents had had a 70% chance of
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failure. a zumbo succeeded beyond his wildest dreams. he describes himself as being obsessed with customer satisfaction and that drivers help to turn amazon into a colossus. his management style is esoteric, people who work closely with him say he likes people to challenge him, just listen to this from a former colleague. i listen to this from a former colleague-— listen to this from a former colleauue. ., ., colleague. i would bang on the desk. really? _ colleague. i would bang on the desk. really? i— colleague. i would bang on the desk. really? iwould. - colleague. i would bang on the desk. really? iwould. if- colleague. i would bang on the desk. really? iwould. if i'm . desk. really? iwould. if i'm passionate _ desk. really? iwould. if i'm passionate about _ desk. really? iwould. if i'm passionate about things, - desk. really? iwould. if i'm passionate about things, i i passionate about things, i would bang on a desk. would he thou~h? would bang on a desk. would he though? he _ would bang on a desk. would he though? he would! _ would bang on a desk. would he though? he would! but- would bang on a desk. would he though? he would! but it's - would bang on a desk. would he though? he would! but it's not i though? he would! but it's not because, though? he would! but it's not because. you _ though? he would! but it's not because, you know, _ though? he would! but it's not because, you know, i'm - though? he would! but it's not. because, you know, i'm banging because, you know, i�*m banging on a desk to yell atjeff or his banging that is to gallop me, nadia, we are trying to figure out what is the best solution ——to yell at me. jeff solution --to yell at me. jeff bezos likes _ solution ——to yell at me. jeff bezos likes engineering, how things work and critics say he takes the mechanical view in how he structures his workforce. the lower down the pecking order at amazon sometimes complain of feeling like a cog in the machine. the new boss andy jassy and his
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stripes setting up a hugely successful amazon web services. he will now be charged with making amazon even bigger, expect amazon to get into other areas like healthcare. but he will also have to fend off negative headlines, there are always criticism circling around amazon over how much tax they pay, including how much tax jeff bezos they pay, including how much taxjeff bezos pays and how they treat their workers. and there are anti—trust investigations and swelling around amazon that he will have to fend off. jeff bezos has always been fascinated in space travel. �* , ., travel. it's the thing i wanted to do all my _ travel. it's the thing i wanted to do all my life. _ travel. it's the thing i wanted to do all my life. it's - travel. it's the thing i wanted to do all my life. it's an - to do all my life. it�*s an adventure. it�*s a big dealfor me to see the earth from space, it changes you, it changes your relationship with this planet, with humanity.— relationship with this planet, with humanity. later this month the aim is— with humanity. later this month the aim is to — with humanity. later this month the aim is to fly _ with humanity. later this month the aim is to fly into _ with humanity. later this month the aim is to fly into space - with humanity. later this month the aim is to fly into space on i the aim is to fly into space on the aim is to fly into space on the first crewed flight made by his company blue 0rigin. jeff bezosis his company blue 0rigin. jeff bezos is not leaving amazon, he will still be executive chair of the board, but this is a huge moment amazon and for the world�*s richest man. james
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clayton. let�*s talk with natalie berg. good morning. you co—authored a book that looks at amazon and what it will do next. how it will continue to revolutionise retail so let�*s talk about this new man in charge, what do you make of andy jassy and what his agenda might be? i make of andy jassy and what his agenda might be?— agenda might be? i think we have to call _ agenda might be? i think we have to call out _ agenda might be? i think we have to call out that - agenda might be? i think we have to call out that this - have to call out that this really is a movement in automatic or amazon. after more than a quarter of a century with its founder ceo jeff bezos at the helm, we are finally seeing for the first time a changing of the guard. and i don�*t see things changing materially for amazon under andy jassy. materially for amazon under andyjassy. he is a materially for amazon under andy jassy. he is a safe materially for amazon under andyjassy. he is a safe pair of hands, he�*s beenjeff bezos�*s right—hand man for a long time and he�*s proven himself by moving amazon into cloud computing which has been a phenomenal success of the company. he�*s turned it into a $40 billion business. amazon web services is now the cash
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cow of the business, allowing them to reinvest in that core retail offering. so i don�*t see things changing in a major way under andy jassy, things changing in a major way underandyjassy, i things changing in a major way under andyjassy, i think is most pressing challenge will be convincing lawmakers that amazon is good for the economy and democracy as a whole, because there is the growing threat of regulatory action to curtail amazon�*s dominance. and the second thing for andy jassy will be ensuring that amazon does not go from disruptor to disrupted because amazon is a big business now, ten years ago they employed about 30,000 people and now 1.3 million. so his challenge will be maintaining that start—up mentality, the ability to innovate at scale, and continue to allow them to enhance the customer experience, continue investing, continue to have that hunger for disruption that has allowed amazon to become
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the massive success that it is today. the massive success that it is toda . ~ , ., today. when it comes to the regulatory — today. when it comes to the regulatory issues _ today. when it comes to the regulatory issues and - today. when it comes to the regulatory issues and it - regulatory issues and it convincing the authorities it is not too big, would one way forward to be to say ok, we will hive off amazon web services, for example, it will be a separate company. would that be a way forward?- that be a way forward? could well see that. _ that be a way forward? could well see that. the _ that be a way forward? could well see that. the net - that be a way forward? could well see that. the net is - well see that. the net is closing in on big tech and amazon in particular. they are a huge company now. they are ubiquitous. every aspect of their business, from cloud computing to digital content to their core retail offering has been accelerated by the pandemic. and they�*ve woven themselves into the fabric of our everyday lives. crosstalk. sor , to our everyday lives. crosstalk. sorry, to interrupt, _ our everyday lives. crosstalk. sorry, to interrupt, very - sorry, to interrupt, very briefly to sustainability and the way that they treat workers globally, so critical for this company now, isn�*t going forward? it company now, isn't going forward?— company now, isn't going forward? , ., ., forward? it will be, one of the ma'or
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forward? it will be, one of the major issues, _ forward? it will be, one of the major issues, along _ forward? it will be, one of the major issues, along with - forward? it will be, one of the major issues, along with the l major issues, along with the continued threat of inaudible as well as their nora unionise the business in the us and it is not limited to the us but increasingly amazon will face theseissues increasingly amazon will face these issues globally.- increasingly amazon will face these issues globally. good to talk to you. — these issues globally. good to talk to you, natalie. _ these issues globally. good to talk to you, natalie. give - these issues globally. good to talk to you, natalie. give a . talk to you, natalie. give a joining us. you are with bbc news. still to come, supermarket swap — like the big shape up in the —— shake—up in the industry on the weekend so we analyse the future for morrisons and its rivals.
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this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: the publisher that make the partially collapsed building in miami has been brought down. president biden said the us is closer than everfrom president biden said the us is closer than ever from declaring independence from covid—19 as
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the white house marked the fourth ofjuly with a fat —— spectacular fireworks display. it�*s described as the biggest shake—up in the uk supermarket sectorfor a decade and in a few hours�* time morrison�*s share price — and other supermarket stocks will have their first chance to react to the news that broke on saturday that morrisons has accepted a six point three billion pound takeover bid by the us investment group fortress investment. -- £6.73 —— £6.3 billion. unions are calling for "unbreakable guarantees" on jobs and conditions. the firm has nearly 500 shops and more than 110,000 staff in the uk. experts warn proceed with caution and speculate on other supermarkets that could be in the sights of private equity investors. joining me now is janet mui, investment director, brewin dolphin. is here to discuss what might happen next. morrisons has been in the sights of private equity for some time now and has finally agreed a deal. what is your take? ., .,
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agreed a deal. what is your take? . ., ., take? thanks for having me. i think the _ take? thanks for having me. i think the deal— take? thanks for having me. i think the deal represents - take? thanks for having me. i think the deal represents a i take? thanks for having me. i. think the deal represents a 4096 think the deal represents a 40% premium to the morrisons share price so it is obviously an attractive deal to its owners and i think that this suggests that, primarily because of a pandemic, the supermarkets have been very resilient in terms of the business and because they has been penetration into online shopping. et cetera. these are the longer term prospects. it might be maximising the problem for the supermarkets. i think that
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given that the actual value of these groceries are actually much higher than the whole market has previously perceived.— market has previously erceived. , perceived. and as morrisons oints perceived. and as morrisons points out. _ perceived. and as morrisons points out, it _ perceived. and as morrisons points out, it has _ perceived. and as morrisons points out, it has ownership| perceived. and as morrisons i points out, it has ownership of its supply chain which is proving to be a good ring but what about unions�* concerns about the outlook. the number of shops in the uk that these private equity organisations are like vultures stripped companies down. absolutely, this is a valid _ companies down. absolutely, this is a valid concern. - companies down. absolutely, this is a valid concern. the i this is a valid concern. the model for these private equity companies is to go into the business, to improve the operation model and usually thatis operation model and usually that is done by either cost—cutting is the most obvious way is to cut the labour force. obvious way is to cut the labourforce. and also obvious way is to cut the labour force. and also to raise product —— raise prices for its products. they would have easily want to see a return on their investments. these are valid concerns. morrisons has
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over 100,000 workers in the uk so if the operation model is to go further automation, that could really meanjob go further automation, that could really mean job losses for the supermarket, so i think this is a valid concern. also the potential for raising prices in this very competitive environment is also a concern for the general public given that the supply chain and general... that the supply chain and general- - -_ that the supply chain and general... that the supply chain and ueneral. .. i. ., ., ., general... 0k. janet, good to talk to you — general... 0k. janet, good to talk to you for _ general... 0k. janet, good to talk to you for the _ general... 0k. janet, good to talk to you for the story - general... 0k. janet, good to talk to you for the story we i talk to you for the story we are keeping a close eye on here at the bbc. for many restaurant workers, covid—19 was the breaking point. and their decision not to return to work has caused a massive labour shortage in the industry. michelle fleury discoveres this is one of the millions of folk —— workers who have left the restaurant industry for good. will we left them but the response ability of the employer for us
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response ability of the employerfor us is response ability of the employer for us is low. response ability of the employerfor us is low. we do response ability of the employer for us is low. we do a lot but we don�*t feel like we see a lot. bile restaurants complain other staff shortage, —— while restaurants complain other staff shortage, there is actually a wage shortage. i think this conversation needs to happen for people to realise that if they are valued, they will work harder.— will work harder. the restaurant _ will work harder. the restaurant industry i will work harder. the l restaurant industry has will work harder. the - restaurant industry has 1.7 million fewerjobs than before the pandemic the top highest on record. despite the number of job openings planning to 1.3 million in april. —— climbing. this woman got a text from her employer telling her not to come back.— employer telling her not to come back. ~ ., , come back. we were all tossed to the wayside. _ come back. we were all tossed to the wayside. with _ come back. we were all tossed to the wayside. with five - to the wayside. with five children _ to the wayside. with five children at _ to the wayside. with five children at home - to the wayside. with five children at home and - to the wayside. with five . children at home and school to the wayside. with five - children at home and school is closed, childcare is the big issue for her. she wants to go back, she simply can�*t. i issue for her. she wants to go back, she simply can't. i don't think people _ back, she simply can't. i don't think people have _ back, she simply can't. i don't think people have brought - back, she simply can't. i don't i think people have brought about
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parents. think people have brought about arents. �* , , , , ., parents. and she bristles at the suggestion _ parents. and she bristles at the suggestion that - parents. and she bristles atj the suggestion that workers like herself have not returned because of extra pandemic unemployment benefits. she gets $479 a week. unemployment benefits. she gets $479 a week-— $479 a week. that is not adequate- _ $479 a week. that is not adequate. my _ $479 a week. that is not adequate. my mortgage| $479 a week. that is not i adequate. my mortgage by $479 a week. that is not - adequate. my mortgage by itself is over half of that.— is over half of that. abby smith has _ is over half of that. abby smith has worked - is over half of that. abby smith has worked in - is over half of that. abby - smith has worked in restaurants in pennsylvania for over a decade. for her, the choice to leave the industry was about self—care. leave the industry was about self-care— self-care. honestly, it 'ust comes down i self-care. honestly, it 'ust comes down to i self-care. honestly, it 'ust comes down to my i self-care. honestly, itjust comes down to my mental| self-care. honestly, itjust- comes down to my mental health and the worklife balance. tired ofthe and the worklife balance. tired of the stress _ and the worklife balance. tired of the stress and _ and the worklife balance. tired of the stress and long - and the worklife balance. tired of the stress and long hours, i of the stress and long hours, amber has swapped restaurant management for school books and is now studying psychology was not with restaurants trying to scrabble more workers, they are beginning to gain more power. how profound is that shift is hard to tell the stock could it fade as the economic rebound continues? 0rwill fade as the economic rebound continues? or will it turn out to be one of the lasting legacies of this pandemic. think of the founder of a startup — and the odds are, an image of someone in their twenties or early
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30s springs to mind. but the reality is — here in the uk and in the us — that most people are firmly middle aged before they take the leap and start their own business. joining me now is suzanne noble co founder of startup school for seniors. welcome to the programme, suzanne. why is that? why do people tend to start up a company in the middle age? for man in company in the middle age? for many in our— company in the middle age? fr?" many in our cohort, it is either simply because they lost their job either simply because they lost theirjob or they are being made redundant. so for them it is about, they feel like they have got limited choice or the other end of the spectrum is that they have a burning desire to do something, maybe an idea that they have had on the shelf for years, and this is the time that they are finally going to go for it. that they are finally going to no for it. �* ., that they are finally going to ofor it. �* ., that they are finally going to no for it. �* ., i. ~' go for it. and do you think the pandemic— go for it. and do you think the pandemic has _ go for it. and do you think the pandemic has made _ go for it. and do you think the pandemic has made that - go for it. and do you think the pandemic has made that even j pandemic has made that even more acute, that trend, because the pandemic has hit older workers are especially hard, hasn�*t it?
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workers are especially hard, hasn't it?— workers are especially hard, hasn't it? ., , ., hasn't it? the two ends of the spectrum _ hasn't it? the two ends of the spectrum that _ hasn't it? the two ends of the spectrum that had _ hasn't it? the two ends of the spectrum that had been - hasn't it? the two ends of the spectrum that had been hit i hasn't it? the two ends of the | spectrum that had been hit the hardest by the pandemic are the 18-25 hardest by the pandemic are the 18—25 —year—olds and those that are aged 50 plus. we have seen the numbers that are interested in the programme escalate substantially since the pandemic, absolutely. so what are senior— pandemic, absolutely. so what are senior entrepreneurs i pandemic, absolutely. so what are senior entrepreneurs like? | are senior entrepreneurs like? i assume they have a lot of experience and wisdom, but are they less likely to take risks? i would say that the biggest challenge for most of them is the lack of confidence. a lot of them, especially those that have lost their jobs, of them, especially those that have lost theirjobs, our coming to this feeling very low and wondering if they actually are able to start their own business so that is the biggest challenge. they are an incredibly diverse group of people, from people that have hobbies that they want to turn into careers, to people that want to have far scaling businesses of the type that out normally associated with younger start—ups. normally associated with younger start-ups.- normally associated with younger start-ups. and your top ti -s for younger start-ups. and your top tips for someone _ younger start-ups. and your top tips for someone thinking i younger start-ups. and your top tips for someone thinking of i tips for someone thinking of starting a business watching us
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now within his or her middle age? now within his or her middle ae? �* , , ., , now within his or her middle are? �* , _, , ., now within his or her middle a.e?,,, , ., ., age? absolutely go for it. there you _ age? absolutely go for it. there you go! _ age? absolutely go for it. there you go! but - age? absolutely go for it. there you go! but you i age? absolutely go for it. i there you go! but you need age? absolutely go for it. - there you go! but you need more thanjust there you go! but you need more than just that, surely. there you go! but you need more thanjust that, surely. what would be the first thing they need to think about?- would be the first thing they need to think about? sure, i mean, need to think about? sure, i mean. like _ need to think about? sure, i mean, like any _ need to think about? sure, i mean, like any start-up i mean, like any start—up business, you need to have a problem that needs to be solved and that is true of any business. there is no shortage of problems in the world today, especially affecting my generation. look around you, see the problems that either you are facing yourself or that you are facing yourself or that you see others face, and how you see others face, and how you think you can go about solving them. shill you think you can go about solving them.— solving them. all right, suzanne. _ solving them. all right, suzanne, it _ solving them. all right, suzanne, it has - solving them. all right, suzanne, it has been i solving them. all right, i suzanne, it has been good to talk to you. thanks for talking to us. co—founder of startup school for seniors. just to see there is plenty more detail on there is plenty more detail on the stories we have covered in this programme on the website, including of course the morrisons decision to accept an offerfor the company from morrisons decision to accept an offer for the company from a us private equity company stop there is a lot more detail on
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what unions have asked for in terms of promises for protection forjobs and protection for jobs and conditions. protection forjobs and conditions. all of that there for you to read. thank you so much for your time and have a lovely day. hello. sunday evening�*s showers brought some flash flooding to edinburgh. for example, we had widespread thunderstorms for a time, and it�*s because we�*ve got low pressure sat on top of the uk and it�*s with us through the day ahead. in fact, we�*re also watching this developing area of low pressure to bring some more persistent rain in later. but still plenty of showers as we get going on monday morning — perhaps a few in the south and east, as well as those close to the weather system in the north so, needless to say, a pretty mild start to the day. but it does look as if we will see more sunshine compared with sunday across the southern half of the uk. still plenty of showery rain across northern england, northern ireland, north wales and scotland as well, some misty low cloud near the coast, and some of those will turn out to be quite heavy, again with some thunder around — can�*t rule out the odd one further south —
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but fewer than we saw during sunday. some strong sunshine, but look at this coming in through during the mid afternoon to the south and the west. so once again with sunshine — strong sunshine — high levels of pollen — grass pollen, of course, at this time of year for many — so that�*s something to be aware of if you are heading off to wimbledon for the day. i think quite a lot of dry weatherfor the most part but come the evening, we are going to start to see those clouds thickening and the rain rolling in, and that�*s really a risk for tuesday as well. i wouldn�*t like to rule out showers wednesday or thursday. but this is the low pressure we�*re watching. clearly, we�*ve got the scope for some really intense and torrential downpours with some localised flash flooding in the north. and then, this system comes in, sweeps its rain and across england and wales during the course of monday evening and overnight, so several hours of quite heavy rain, but also some unseasonably windy weather — some gale—force winds and gusts even 40—50 miles an hour inland, so that�*s unusual for this time of year — and it could well, combined with the rain, cause some disruption further north and west, as you can see. still some showers around on tuesday. that low pressure makes its way into the north sea, we think dragging rain up across the east coast of england and scotland with showers
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following on behind, so the pattern remains really quite unsettled. some sunshine in between, 18 or 19, so not quite as high as the day ahead. now, that low pressure then starts to drift and fill further north and east, so the isobars open up. not as windy by the time we get to wednesday and thursday — in fact, a ridge of high pressure starts to try to build in, so that will quieten down the shower activity — but there is still some in the forecast even until late in the week. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. 0ur headlines today... restoring people�*s freedoms. the prime minister will set out plans today for the final stage of lockdown lifting, but with the warning that we must learn to live with covid. what might that mean if you are looking to book a foreign holiday? i looking to book a foreign holiday? i look at where you stand and how things might change. good morning. england will be back here at wembley on wednesday night for their first european championship semi—final in 25 years.
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