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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 4, 2021 10:30pm-11:00pm BST

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during the pandemic looking clearly are, know that there is money to be made in housing, you know, that property developers do very, very well, as do landlords. indeed, corporate landlords who build lots of homes and rent them out, this is called build to rent, also do very well so, if you were a business that was looking to diversify, asjohn lewis clearly is, had just gone through a pandemic, and suffered, because so many of your stores had been shut, housing might look quite attractive. i'm together, time for a look at the weather with helen willets. bringing some flash flooding to parts of edinburgh for example. but we had widespread funder activity —— thunder activity. we had low pressure and by the systems close by
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to the north and hence all of the rain and shower rain and for the south, fewer showers as we go through monday and some sunshine today press a few showers in southern and eastern areas and taking a while to ease but the brightness develops and feels warm in the sunshine, not ruling out the odd heavy shower and certainly more likely for the south, we are watching the next area of rain. the next area of low pressure which will sweep rain through the late afternoon and in the evening up across much of northern england and wales no be accompanied by some unseasonably windy weather and you'll see how the isobars are, we are expecting gale force winds through channel coasts and gusty winds accompanying this rain and will keep you posted.
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more than 20 million people watched england's brilliant night in rome — as they thrashed ukraine, and moved onto the semi—finals of the euros. ministers extend the period in which legal action can be taken against housing developers in light of the cladding crisis. from retail to real estate — john lewis outlines plans to build 10,000 homes for rental over the next few years. crisis now some breaking news — plans on how england moves to the final step of unlocking coronavirus restrictions, will be set out by the prime minister
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in a press conference tomorrow. joining me now is our political correspondent, chris mason. thank you for coming in with this. what have we been told? fix, thank you for coming in with this. what have we been told?- what have we been told? a news conference _ what have we been told? a news conference tomorrow _ what have we been told? a news conference tomorrow afternoon, | what have we been told? a news i conference tomorrow afternoon, we will hear from sajid javid, the relatively new health secretary the house of commons. we will get the direction of travel from the government effectively saying that in england in a fortnight, that last stage of a locking of the so—called road map will happen. subject to the data, which will be examined in a week, in other words, data, which will be examined in a week, in otherwords, halfway between now and july 19, the pattern since the road map was published in february. we will remember those dates set out, every single date was met on time, every single one apart from the last one which was due to happen a fortnight ago and is now
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highly likely to happen in a fortnight. let's get to the specifics of what we are told this evening is coming. some of the review work that has been going on looking at some of the measures and whether they can be eased will be published tomorrow on social distancing, on so—called certification, this idea of covid passports, for internal use, in other to grant you access to particular venues, so we will hear the outcome of those, we will also hear the government's view as you hinting at the headlines on the one metre plus rule on face coverings and working from home, and on care home visits, with the expectation that there will be a significant liberalisation of those rules, which will be swept away. what we may not get, we will not get news tomorrow about travel, the expectation is that the red list will remain in place for some time. we will not get tomorrow any change of the rules as far as schools are concerned, this increasingly controversial policy
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around bubbles where one positive case in a bubble of potentially 300 children leaves them all shunted off home to be working from the kitchen table for umpteen days. there will be no change on that. looks like we will wait until the summer holiday in england before that policy is tweaked. so when we get to a fortnight�*s time, assuming the data is ok from the government perspective in one week, it will not be entirely back to normal, but it will be a significant leap towards it. �* , ., ., ., it. let's fix the date in our head, ou said it. let's fix the date in our head, you said a _ it. let's fix the date in our head, you said a week, _ it. let's fix the date in our head, you said a week, so _ it. let's fix the date in our head, you said a week, so monday - it. let's fix the date in our head, you said a week, so monday the | it. let's fix the date in our head, - you said a week, so monday the 12th ofjuly? you said a week, so monday the 12th ofjul ? ~ ., you said a week, so monday the 12th ofjul ? ~ . ., ., , ofjuly? when the final data is looked at _ ofjuly? when the final data is looked at and _ ofjuly? when the final data is looked at and we _ ofjuly? when the final data is looked at and we get - ofjuly? when the final data is looked at and we get a - ofjuly? when the final data is i looked at and we get a definitive answer, tomorrow will be it is highly likely that kind of answer. remind us how labour have reacted. their argument is they also want to see lots of these restrictions removed. rachel reeves the shadow chancellor was in this very chair this morning talking to andrew marr and saying that, but they want to see more scientific evidence. they
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say that they have heard from the ministers. they want to hear from the scientists. what we do know scientifically is that, if you look at the data, there is no doubt that there is an increase in the number of positive cases, the graph is doing that, and the expectation from ministers and from the scientific modelling is that that will continue as restrictions are eased and logically you would expect that, but because of the vaccination programmes, the rate of hospitalisation is only taking up at a much, much steadier pace, and clearly, and we know all the way through, the key concern of government has been that they don't want people ending up in hospital because of the fear that the nhs would be overwhelmed, but what we will get from ministers increasingly in the next couple of weeks is an emphasis on us having to learn to live with covid, the reality that it will be there, that people will get it, the reality that some people will be ill, and yes, some people will be ill, and yes, some people will die, but because of the success of the vaccination programme in
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reducing that hospitalisation rate, the judgment is that society has to be allowed to reopen. very strikingly this morning in the mail on sunday the new health secretary sajid javid making the case that it is in the health interests of the country that these restrictions are eased, notjust economic ones, because of the profound additional health consequences of these restrictions and of the pandemic, not least the vast backlogs that await plenty of hospitals as far as waiting lists were treatment are concerned. waiting lists were treatment are concerned-— waiting lists were treatment are concerned. ., ., ., concerned. you said that from the outset. there _ concerned. you said that from the outset. there is _ concerned. you said that from the outset. there is a _ concerned. you said that from the outset. there is a striking - outset. there is a striking difference _ outset. there is a striking difference in _ outset. there is a striking difference in tone - outset. there is a striking difference in tone from i outset. there is a striking i difference in tone from matt hancock. ., , . difference in tone from matt hancock. ., ., ~ ., hancock. people are talking about boosters already, _ hancock. people are talking about boosters already, what _ hancock. people are talking about boosters already, what are - hancock. people are talking about boosters already, what are we - hancock. people are talking about l boosters already, what are we likely to hear about theirs, is it everyone vaccinated or is there a limit? looks like there's a limit at the moment, the government is doing preparations booster doses, a third jab for the 50s and over and the most vulnerable over the winter months. it looks like that could
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happen around the same time as people are getting their flu jab, based on some interim advice from the scientists on that. what we don't yet know is if it will be practical or indeed if it will be advised that people younger than 50 without underlying medical conditions will also get an additionaljab, but certainly a decent chunk of the population will. tomorrow, what time? fiee decent chunk of the population will. tomorrow, what time? five o'clock. there will be _ tomorrow, what time? five o'clock. there will be a _ tomorrow, what time? five o'clock. there will be a similar _ tomorrow, what time? five o'clock. there will be a similar statement i there will be a similar statement from sajid javid in the comments. there was a bit of heat for the government last time that they ignored the comments and they are keen to address that, and a real sense of the change in direction of travel and change in communication, a real emphasis on that says that this is now something that we have to learn to live with and pretty much get back to normal. chris mason, thank _ much get back to normal. chris mason, thank you _ much get back to normal. chris mason, thank you very - much get back to normal. chris mason, thank you very much, i much get back to normal. chris mason, thank you very much, thank you for that. now on bbc news — it's now
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time for the papers. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are parliamentaryjournalist tony grew and journalist and broadcaster caroline frost. thank you slightly late but some breaking news that may influence how the front pages go. let as give you a flavour of what the front pages look like. the mail leads on the government's plans forjuly 19th in england — the paper says tomorrow the prime minister will declare it's time to restore personalfreedoms, and will argue that we need to learn to live with covid as we do with flu — specifying that after the rules are dropped onjuly19th, individuals will be asked to judge the risks for themselves. "use yourjudgment on masks"
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continues the telegraph — which says borisjohnson will tell the public that they will no longer be bound by covid laws on facemasks and social distancing but should instead exercise their own judgment. the guardian reports on a backlash from scientists over the planned lifting of restrictions — as government scientific advisers warn that lifting lockdown will be like building "new variant factories." "mobile ban planned for schools injanuary" — is the headline on the i newspaper as ministers aim to eradicate mobile phones in classrooms by 2022. the paper reports that the move, saying "wi—fi connectable devices" are a "distraction". we will bring you that front page shortly. let's go straight to our
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view —— review now, caroline and tony, lovely to see you both. we will start with the mail, how do you feel about controlling your own freedom, caroline? i feel about controlling your own freedom, caroline?— feel about controlling your own freedom, caroline? i don't know what freedom, caroline? i don't know what freedom feels — freedom, caroline? i don't know what freedom feels like. _ freedom, caroline? i don't know what freedom feels like. it _ freedom, caroline? i don't know what freedom feels like. it seems - freedom, caroline? i don't know what freedom feels like. it seems like - freedom feels like. it seems like such a long time since we had to make any decisions for ourselves and to decide how far away to stand, where do you wear a mask and were to 90, where do you wear a mask and were to go, it is going to feel very surreal, and one of, so many things we used to take for granted that were taken away from us for obvious reasons, and i think we are going to have a fresh sense of appreciation for just this have a fresh sense of appreciation forjust this very have a fresh sense of appreciation for just this very word have a fresh sense of appreciation forjust this very word freedom, autonomy, independence. it'll definitely feel like at the —— a big sea change upon us. definitely feel like at the -- a big sea change upon us.— definitely feel like at the -- a big sea change upon us.- hi. i definitely feel like at the -- a big sea change upon us.- hi. sea change upon us. tony? hi. what would ou
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sea change upon us. tony? hi. what would you like _ sea change upon us. tony? hi. what would you like to _ sea change upon us. tony? hi. what would you like to say? _ sea change upon us. tony? hi. what would you like to say? in _ sea change upon us. tony? hi. what would you like to say? in march - sea change upon us. tony? hi. what| would you like to say? in march 2020 when they started _ would you like to say? in march 2020 when they started i _ would you like to say? in march 2020 when they started i never _ would you like to say? in march 2020 when they started i never thought - would you like to say? in march 2020 when they started i never thought we j when they started i never thought we would _ when they started i never thought we would still _ when they started i never thought we would still be talking about restrictions and that we would be under— restrictions and that we would be under restrictions in july 2021, restrictions and that we would be under restrictions injuly 2021, so it has— under restrictions injuly 2021, so it has been— under restrictions injuly 2021, so it has been a long time coming the lifting _ it has been a long time coming the lifting of— it has been a long time coming the lifting of these restrictions. broadly, i think, lifting of these restrictions. broadly, ithink, you lifting of these restrictions. broadly, i think, you talk about the guardian— broadly, i think, you talk about the guardian front page and scientists complaining, that is theirjob to stop— complaining, that is theirjob to stop it — complaining, that is theirjob to stop it is — complaining, that is theirjob to stop it is theirjob to point out likely— stop it is theirjob to point out likely scenarios, worst scenarios, but one _ likely scenarios, worst scenarios, bul one of— likely scenarios, worst scenarios, but one of the things we have forgotten in this crisis is that advisers _ forgotten in this crisis is that advisers advise and ministers decide so the _ advisers advise and ministers decide so the government has now decided that we _ so the government has now decided that we are — so the government has now decided that we are going to lift these restrictions and leave it up to personal— restrictions and leave it up to personal responsibility. even the large _ personal responsibility. even the large amount of the population that are vaccinated i think this is the right— are vaccinated i think this is the right decision. everything in life is a calculated risk. 150,000 people a year— is a calculated risk. 150,000 people a year in _ is a calculated risk. 150,000 people a year in britain are injured on the roads. _ a year in britain are injured on the roads. we — a year in britain are injured on the roads, we could get that number down to zero. _ roads, we could get that number down to zero. it _ roads, we could get that number down to zero, it would be simple, we could _ to zero, it would be simple, we could just — to zero, it would be simple, we could just ban driving cars, but we don't _ could just ban driving cars, but we don't do _ could just ban driving cars, but we don't do that, we take a calculated risk, _ don't do that, we take a calculated risk, just— don't do that, we take a calculated risk, just like we do every time you leave _ risk, just like we do every time you leave the _ risk, just like we do every time you leave the house. i think people,
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many— leave the house. i think people, many people will still for example still not _ many people will still for example still not be comfortable not wearing masks _ still not be comfortable not wearing masks in _ still not be comfortable not wearing masks in crowded places but the essence — masks in crowded places but the essence to this for me is that it is no longer— essence to this for me is that it is no longer the government mandate, it is a personal— no longer the government mandate, it is a personal choice. just no longer the government mandate, it is a personal choice.— is a personal choice. just going back to the _ is a personal choice. just going back to the first _ is a personal choice. just going back to the first sentence - is a personal choice. just going back to the first sentence you | is a personal choice. just going - back to the first sentence you said, that you did not think we would be talking about restrictions at this point in the year. just expand that for me, please, why not? i point in the year. just expand that for me, please, why not?- for me, please, why not? i didn't think it would _ for me, please, why not? i didn't think it would take _ for me, please, why not? i didn't think it would take this _ for me, please, why not? i didn't think it would take this long - for me, please, why not? i didn't think it would take this long for. think it would take this long for the virus — think it would take this long for the virus to be dealt with. i remember it vividly because the irish embassy st patrick's day reception was cancelled which is a horrifying — reception was cancelled which is a horrifying moment for me, and this year was _ horrifying moment for me, and this year was also cancelled. i remember talking _ year was also cancelled. i remember talking to _ year was also cancelled. i remember talking to a — year was also cancelled. i remember talking to a friend early in the crisis — talking to a friend early in the crisis and _ talking to a friend early in the crisis and he said that we are not down _ crisis and he said that we are not down to— crisis and he said that we are not down to go— crisis and he said that we are not down to go back to the office until at least _ down to go back to the office until at least mid—2021 and i thought that was a _ at least mid—2021 and i thought that was a huge — at least mid—2021 and i thought that was a huge overreaction and it turns out that— was a huge overreaction and it turns out that the — was a huge overreaction and it turns out that the people who made that decision— out that the people who made that decision had a better grasp of how lon- decision had a better grasp of how long this _ decision had a better grasp of how long this was going to last than i
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did. long this was going to last than i did so _ long this was going to last than i did. , .,, , long this was going to last than i did. , , ,, long this was going to last than i did. ,, , ,, did. so this has per surprise you. sian es, did. so this has per surprise you. sign yes. the _ did. so this has per surprise you. sign yes, the length _ did. so this has per surprise you. sign yes, the length of— did. so this has per surprise you. sign yes, the length of it - did. so this has per surprise you. sign yes, the length of it and - did. so this has per surprise you. sign yes, the length of it and the fact they got better then was, then better, then worse, and that has been part of the nature of it. as we turn to the front page of the telegraph, the same story, caroline, but i don't know if you caught chris mason, he was telling us what boris johnson will be saying on monday afternoon, just laying out what we can expect, and saying that we will have to learn to live with this virus, as we do with flu. you get the sense _ virus, as we do with flu. you get the sense that, _ virus, as we do with flu. you get the sense that, just _ virus, as we do with flu. you get the sense that, just as - virus, as we do with flu. you get the sense that, just as save - virus, as we do with flu. you get the sense that, just as save the | the sense that, just as save the nhs, was plastered on every corridor and door in the corridors of westminster this new phrase, learn to live with it has been plastered everywhere to get it out there, and it is about passing the battle now from the state to the individual. lots of people are of the mind that
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that's what it always should have been, that we are as responsible as we are unable to be, although clearly time has moved on, as tony says, this has been going on a long time and there is this weighing up of the fact that for some people, especially children this has become a significant portion of their crucial learning period so all of this has to be taken into account but as chris mason says, a bit of the detail in the telegraph is in fact not going to happen tomorrow. the telegraph mentions schools, it mentioned travel, and the later briefing is that neither of those two things will be impacted by the announcement tomorrow, but clearly there will be pressure exerted by tory mps that those rules should be relaxed later on, but the main message is over to you chaps, we have done our bit.— message is over to you chaps, we have done our bit. let's turn to the guardian, same _ have done our bit. let's turn to the guardian, same subject, _ have done our bit. let's turn to the guardian, same subject, but - have done our bit. let's turn to the guardian, same subject, but i - have done our bit. let's turn to the guardian, same subject, but i willl guardian, same subject, but i will start with you caroline, you can ask people to use their own judgment, and many people would probably say that i'm going to stick wearing the mask, but we know what herd
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behaviour is like, don't we? irate mask, but we know what herd behaviour is like, don't we? we have seen roof behaviour is like, don't we? we have seen proof of — behaviour is like, don't we? we have seen proof of it _ behaviour is like, don't we? we have seen proof of it over _ behaviour is like, don't we? we have seen proof of it over the _ behaviour is like, don't we? we have seen proof of it over the last - behaviour is like, don't we? we have seen proof of it over the last 18 - seen proof of it over the last 18 months. i read an interesting profile of chris witty in the last couple of days. he is keen to make the point and tony has touched upon it that scientists can bring all of the data that they can, and this is theirjob, to say, using this very emotive phrase, if you carry on at this rate we will be creating varied factories and politicians have to say thank you for all of that medical information, scientific data that you bring to the table, we have to juggle that with the care of the elderly, schools, children's development, bring us to go in the mix and clearly once again boris johnson has sort of tended towards the positive, but they are giving themselves a let out, we are being told that it is two weeks' time. they have become good at under promising, over delivery, this seems different from that. this is promising something in two weeks but
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giving them that an opt out in one week should they need to pull the strings. week should they need to pull the strin . s. , week should they need to pull the strinus. , ., ., ., ., strings. they have done that all alon: , a strings. they have done that all along. a week _ strings. they have done that all along, a week before _ strings. they have done that all along, a week before the - strings. they have done that all along, a week before the date i strings. they have done that all. along, a week before the date they give a hint of how it is going. the front page of the guardian, tony, you mentioned that at the top. the scientists are saying that this is creating "variant factories". irate creating "variant factories". we will see. that _ creating "variant factories". we will see. that is a calculated risk. not a _ will see. that is a calculated risk. not a decision to be made by scientists. theirjob is to advise. it scientists. theirjob is to advise. it is _ scientists. theirjob is to advise. it is the — scientists. theirjob is to advise. it is the job— scientists. theirjob is to advise. it is the job of the government to check— it is the job of the government to check that— it is the job of the government to check that a and consider it and decide — check that a and consider it and decide on— check that a and consider it and decide on what course of action the country— decide on what course of action the country is _ decide on what course of action the country is going to take. there will always— country is going to take. there will always be — country is going to take. there will always be variants. this is not going — always be variants. this is not going to — always be variants. this is not going to go away. it is going to be a fact— going to go away. it is going to be a fact of— going to go away. it is going to be a fact of life for some years to come — a fact of life for some years to come as— a fact of life for some years to come as i_ a fact of life for some years to come. as i say, a significant percentage of the population have been vaccinated, and those of the most _ been vaccinated, and those of the most at _ been vaccinated, and those of the most at risk groups, the vaccination numbers— most at risk groups, the vaccination numbers are — most at risk groups, the vaccination numbers are close to 100%. we cannot keep delaying the reopening of
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society— keep delaying the reopening of society when we have children who have effectively had two years of school _ have effectively had two years of school interrupted and 5 million people — school interrupted and 5 million people on the nhs waiting lists in england — people on the nhs waiting lists in england. we have to make the calculation and decide which of these — calculation and decide which of these factors are more important than others, but we cannotjust continually keep the country and lockdown — continually keep the country and lockdown because some scientists said that _ lockdown because some scientists said that there might be some variants — said that there might be some variants in the future. that isjust not sustainable. variants in the future. that is 'ust not sustainablei variants in the future. that is 'ust not sustainable. ~ ., ., .,~ ., not sustainable. what do you make of the fact that — not sustainable. what do you make of the fact that for _ not sustainable. what do you make of the fact that for business _ not sustainable. what do you make of the fact that for business as _ not sustainable. what do you make of the fact that for business as they - the fact that for business as they can start to plan, uncertainty is the worst for that sector, but the travel industry are not going to be getting anything, from what we are hearing tonight.— getting anything, from what we are hearing tonight. brexit has given us the idea that _ hearing tonight. brexit has given us the idea that we _ hearing tonight. brexit has given us the idea that we live _ hearing tonight. brexit has given us the idea that we live in _ hearing tonight. brexit has given us the idea that we live in a _ hearing tonight. brexit has given us the idea that we live in a bubble - the idea that we live in a bubble that nobody else interacts with but it is about — that nobody else interacts with but it is about whether other countries will let— it is about whether other countries will let british people in, not a decision— will let british people in, not a decision for the british government whether— decision for the british government whether british people can travel anywhere in the world, but i think the point — anywhere in the world, but i think the point about businesses, they have _ the point about businesses, they have been— the point about businesses, they have been significantly messed around — have been significantly messed around. if you're trying to run a major— around. if you're trying to run a major event _ around. if you're trying to run a major event injuly, you have to pray— major event injuly, you have to pray that— major event injuly, you have to pray that you have planned it after
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the 19th _ pray that you have planned it after the 19th ofjuly because that became the 19th ofjuly because that became the government was matt bryant new arbitrary— the government was matt bryant new arbitrary date when we are told everything will unlock. for businesses, this has been 18 months of severe _ businesses, this has been 18 months of severe disruption, particularly if you _ of severe disruption, particularly if you work— of severe disruption, particularly if you work in a restaurant or in a bar~ _ if you work in a restaurant or in a bar~ i'm— if you work in a restaurant or in a bar. i'm surprised any of them are still able _ bar. i'm surprised any of them are still able to — bar. i'm surprised any of them are still able to operate, quite frankly, _ still able to operate, quite frankly, even with the furlough scheme, — frankly, even with the furlough scheme, but it is more complicated because _ scheme, but it is more complicated because it — scheme, but it is more complicated because it involves decisions beyond government. travel, that is. caroline, _ government. travel, that is. caroline, did you want to add to the business angle?— business angle? now, i think tony covered it! — business angle? now, i think tony covered it! the _ business angle? now, i think tony covered it! the front _ business angle? now, i think tony covered it! the front page - business angle? now, i think tony covered it! the front page of- business angle? now, i think tony covered it! the front page of the i business angle? now, i think tonyj covered it! the front page of the i, i am covered it! the front page of the i, i am looking _ covered it! the front page of the i, i am looking at— covered it! the front page of the i, i am looking at its _ covered it! the front page of the i, i am looking at its front _ covered it! the front page of the i, i am looking at its front page - covered it! the front page of the i, i am looking at its front page and i i am looking at its front page and cheering, to be honest, mobile ban plan for schools in january. cheering, to be honest, mobile ban plan for schools injanuary. isn’t plan for schools in january. isn't it nice to be _ plan for schools in january. isn't it nice to be talking _ plan for schools in january. isn't it nice to be talking about - it nice to be talking about something other than lockdowns and covid and vaccinations? this is an actual policy which mothers across the land will support you in your relief because i'm surprised it has
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taken this long. we know that mobile phones in schools are, i'm sure that there are a couple of good reasons and justifications for a couple of children across christendom to have a phone in their back pocket that they can access readily, however, for the most part, there are three main reasons just off the top of my head. it is a major distraction. we know that there is an easy way for children to access all sorts of unsuitable stuff and we know that it is a lot of wear trouble is that school teachers then have to waste valuable time sorting out, take root, in and selfies and all of the problems we have seen happening on social media the rest of the time, why that has to take place in schools and teachers at the police that i will never know, and i'm amazed it has ever been allowed, i guess itjust happened, boiling frog syndrome but i'm happy to see it being stopped in its tracks, and it cannot come soon enough for me. tony, some schools and classes actually use children's phones as part of the lesson.—
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actually use children's phones as part of the lesson. that comes as a surrise part of the lesson. that comes as a surprise to — part of the lesson. that comes as a surprise to me- _ part of the lesson. that comes as a surprise to me. it _ part of the lesson. that comes as a surprise to me. it is _ part of the lesson. that comes as a surprise to me. it is not _ part of the lesson. that comes as a surprise to me. it is not something | surprise to me. it is not something i surprise to me. it is not something i was _ surprise to me. it is not something i was aware — surprise to me. it is not something i was aware of. if this headline had arrived _ i was aware of. if this headline had arrived in _ i was aware of. if this headline had arrived in 2001, were smartphones invented _ arrived in 2001, were smartphones invented last week and the government has onlyjust decided to ban them _ government has onlyjust decided to ban them because matter i'm stunned that they— ban them because matter i'm stunned that they have not been banned from schools _ that they have not been banned from schools already, but for parents who want to _ schools already, but for parents who want to keep in contact with children. _ want to keep in contact with children, and i think psychologically it might be good for parents _ psychologically it might be good for parents as well to have a sense that their children are not always immediately available to them because — immediately available to them because they are actually in school, learning _ because they are actually in school, learning. we will see. i don't know anything _ learning. we will see. i don't know anything about schools are told in but i _ anything about schools are told in but i would imagine that many schools — but i would imagine that many schools already have them banned. i think the _ schools already have them banned. i think the government is coming along a little _ think the government is coming along a little bit _ think the government is coming along a little bit late and saying that we are going — a little bit late and saying that we are going to institute this as a national— are going to institute this as a national policy. | are going to institute this as a national policy.— are going to institute this as a national policy. are going to institute this as a national oli . ., �* ~ ., national policy. i don't know if you mentioned — national policy. i don't know if you mentioned it, _ national policy. i don't know if you mentioned it, caroline, _ national policy. i don't know if you mentioned it, caroline, they- national policy. i don't know if you mentioned it, caroline, they are l mentioned it, caroline, they are also ordering a consultation into behaviour in schools, tony, what we think of this? it behaviour in schools, tony, what we think of this?—
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think of this? it has got much worse since we were _ think of this? it has got much worse since we were there, _ think of this? it has got much worse since we were there, but _ think of this? it has got much worse since we were there, but kids - think of this? it has got much worse since we were there, but kids are i since we were there, but kids are kids, _ since we were there, but kids are kids. they— since we were there, but kids are kids, they will be misbehaving. i'm concerned — kids, they will be misbehaving. i'm concerned about reports of teachers being _ concerned about reports of teachers being sexually harassed by pupils, something i find shocking and the fact that — something i find shocking and the fact that girls in particular feel vulnerable in school, and a lot of that is _ vulnerable in school, and a lot of that is to — vulnerable in school, and a lot of that is to do _ vulnerable in school, and a lot of that is to do with kids having phones. _ that is to do with kids having phones, taking photos up other peoples' — phones, taking photos up other peoples' skirts, and all that kind of stuff, — peoples' skirts, and all that kind of stuff, so _ peoples' skirts, and all that kind of stuff, so behaviour is an issue, and if— of stuff, so behaviour is an issue, and if teachers, using phones to teach _ and if teachers, using phones to teach lessons i would ask again why doesn't _ teach lessons i would ask again why doesn't every child in this country have _ doesn't every child in this country have a _ doesn't every child in this country have a laptop, we are one of the wealthiest — have a laptop, we are one of the wealthiest countries in the world, it cannot — wealthiest countries in the world, it cannot be that difficult. good ruestion. it cannot be that difficult. good question. let's _ it cannot be that difficult. good question. let's turn _ it cannot be that difficult. good question. let's turn back- it cannot be that difficult. good question. let's turn back to - it cannot be that difficult. good j question. let's turn back to the front page of the guardian, caroline. a smile that says that we are in the semifinals. i had to look twice at this picture. i wasn't sure what was going on. this is england's jadon sancho. for what was going on. this is england's jadon sancho-— what was going on. this is england's jadon sancho. for the harbour bridge and he is relaxing _ jadon sancho. for the harbour bridge
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and he is relaxing on _ jadon sancho. for the harbour bridge and he is relaxing on an _ jadon sancho. for the harbour bridge and he is relaxing on an inflatable - and he is relaxing on an inflatable unicorn! —— for the hard of vision. it is amazing how a victory can skew our opinion of something. this man has obviously deserved his time with this unicorn in the swimming pool. it is the day after the evening before. this is a picture of a lad who deserves all of the pleasures that life can bring him on a sunday, having performed so well with his team—mates on the saturday evening. tony? sorry, iamjust, i corpse, 0k! england'sjadon tony? sorry, iamjust, i corpse, 0k! england's jadon sancho, they did well, didn't they? this ok! england's jadon sancho, they did well, didn't they?— well, didn't they? this is the photo that sa s well, didn't they? this is the photo that says we _ well, didn't they? this is the photo that says we won, _ well, didn't they? this is the photo that says we won, although - well, didn't they? this is the photo that says we won, although it - that says we won, although it doesn't — that says we won, although it doesn't really say that to me. i am delighted — doesn't really say that to me. i am delighted for the english. it is great — delighted for the english. it is great that they are progressing well in the _ great that they are progressing well in the tournament after 100 years of
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heartache _ in the tournament after 100 years of heartache or whatever so it is good, and if _ heartache or whatever so it is good, and if they— heartache or whatever so it is good, and if they win on wednesday doctor we are _ and if they win on wednesday doctor we are still— and if they win on wednesday doctor we are still owning link. we will turn to the front page of the sun. best bar none. tony? this turn to the front page of the sun. best bar none. tony?— turn to the front page of the sun. best bar none. tony? this is to do with what we _ best bar none. tony? this is to do with what we spoke _ best bar none. tony? this is to do with what we spoke about - best bar none. tony? this is to do with what we spoke about earlier. | with what we spoke about earlier. the fact _ with what we spoke about earlier. the fact that people will be able to crowd _ the fact that people will be able to crowd into — the fact that people will be able to crowd into pubs again. my understanding is that that will happen— understanding is that that will happen on the 19th ofjuly, after the euros. — happen on the 19th ofjuly, after the euros, so we looking forward to the euros, so we looking forward to the euros _ the euros, so we looking forward to the euros and then after the euros we will— the euros and then after the euros we will all— the euros and then after the euros we will all be able to go the pub. so people — we will all be able to go the pub. so people will be eight deep at the bar trying — so people will be eight deep at the bar trying to get served. can�*t bar trying to get served. can't wait! caroline, _ bar trying to get served. can't wait! caroline, please? - bar trying to get served. can'tl wait! caroline, please? people crowdinu wait! caroline, please? people crowding into _ wait! caroline, please? people crowding into pubs, _ wait! caroline, please? people crowding into pubs, nobody. wait! caroline, please? people crowding into pubs, nobody is| wait! caroline, please? people- crowding into pubs, nobody is saying it that this is better than the boys of 66 but perhaps that they will yet come, and in the meantime it is clear that nature, in some way, is healing!
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clear that nature, in some way, is healinu! ., .,, . clear that nature, in some way, is healinu! . ., . ., , clear that nature, in some way, is healinr! . . ., , , clear that nature, in some way, is healinu! . ., . ., , , . healing! fantastic. tony grew and caroline force, _ healing! fantastic. tony grew and caroline force, back— healing! fantastic. tony grew and caroline force, back again - healing! fantastic. tony grew and caroline force, back again at - caroline force, back again at 11:30pm. thank you. for those of you that caught the top of the mail, we had a blank area and that is because thatis had a blank area and that is because that is a story that is embargoed, but it is a good new story and you can find out about it from midnight. i will be back with you on about four minutes. thank you. sunday evening brought flash leading to edinburgh with widespread thunderstorms because we have no pressure sat on top of the uk which is with us through the day ahead. we are watching this developing area of low pressure bringing some more persistent rain in later. still plenty of showers as we get going on monday morning, perhaps some in the south and east as well as those close to the weather system in the north, so a mile started the day.
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but it looks as if we will see more sunshine, compared with sunday come —— across the southern half of the uk, still showers in northern england, northern ireland and scotland was a missed and looked out near the coast, and some of those will turn out to be heavy with some funder. you cannot rule out the odd one further south but fewer than we saw during sunday. some strong sunshine but look at this coming in from mid—afternoon to the south and west. more sunshine, so high levels of pollen, grass pollen at this time of pollen, grass pollen at this time of year for many, something to be aware of if you are heading off to wimbledon, for the day. quite a lot of dry weather for the most part, but, come the evening, we will see those clouds thickening, and rain rolling in, and that is a risk for tuesday as well. i wouldn't like to rule out showers on wednesday and thursday but this is the low pressure we had been watching, there is scope for torrential downpours with localised flash flooding in the north and then this system comes in sweeping rain across england and wales during the course of monday
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evening and overnight, so several hours of quite heavy rain but also some unseasonally windy weather, gale force winds and gusts of 40—50 mph in length. that is unusual for this time of year and combined with the rain could cause some disruption. further north and west, some shells around on tuesday, low pressure making its way to the north sea, dragging rain up across the east coast of england and scotland with showers following on behind, so the pattern remains quite unsettled, so sunshine in between 18—19, so not quite as high as the day ahead. that low pressure starts to drift and fill further north and east, so the isobars overnight not as windy by the time we get you wednesday and thursday, and in fact a ridge of high pressure starts to build ntamack whitening down the shower activity but still some in the forecast until later in the week. goodbye for now.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. all covid restrictions could go later this month in england — including the use of face coverings afghanistan's troops patrol their country alone — as the final nato forces pull out after nearly 20 years. south africa's former president jacob zuma days he'll defy a court order to hand himself in to start a 15 month jail sentence. he also said that he was not scared of going to jail. he's been there before. at this time around, he refuses to go because he believes it was an injustice to be sentenced to a prison

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