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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 4, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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in england, including the use of face coverings. the government suggests wearing a mask to become an issue of individual responsibility once rules are relaxed. we issue of individual responsibility once rules are relaxed.- issue of individual responsibility once rules are relaxed. we do not have to move _ once rules are relaxed. we do not have to move into _ once rules are relaxed. we do not have to move into different - once rules are relaxed. we do not| have to move into different period where we learn to live that the virus, we take precautions and we as individuals take personal responsibility.— individuals take personal responsibility. individuals take personal resonsibili . , . responsibility. labour since the economy needs _ responsibility. labour since the economy needs to _ responsibility. labour since the economy needs to reopen -
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responsibility. labour since the economy needs to reopen but i responsibility. labour since the i economy needs to reopen but the timing must be right. we will have the latest. also tonight. flying the flag, england fans are preparing for the semi finals. afghanistan troops patrolled their country alone as the final nato forces pull out after nearly 20 years. and from table tennis to the grass courts, we chart the rise of british 18—year—old who prepares to compete in the second week of wimbledon. suggesting that wearing a face covering can be a matter of personal
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choice when coronavirus restrictions are eased, which is expected in two weeks' time, the housing secretary says the public must learn to live with the virus and use their own judgment. labouragrees with the virus and use their own judgment. labour agrees that the economy must open up, but it wants to see the science behind the governments decisions. but scotland, wales and northern ireland will make their own announcements about unlocking in the weeks ahead. 0ur correspondent reports. from the cobbles of york, to the minster, a portrait of england wandering back to normal as the government suggests legal rules including wearing facemasks and checking into pubs and caf s are likely to go in a fortnight. that's caf s are likely to go in a fortnight-— caf s are likely to go in a fortniuht. . �*, . . ., . caf s are likely to go in a fortniuht. . �*, . ., . ., fortnight. that's a fantastic idea, i'm not sure _ fortnight. that's a fantastic idea, i'm not sure if _ fortnight. that's a fantastic idea, i'm not sure if masks _ fortnight. that's a fantastic idea, i'm not sure if masks were - fortnight. that's a fantastic idea, i'm not sure if masks were a - fortnight. that's a fantastic idea, | i'm not sure if masks were a great idea in the first place.— idea in the first place. personally, i would not _ idea in the first place. personally, i would not wear _ idea in the first place. personally, i would not wear it _ idea in the first place. personally, i would not wear it outside - idea in the first place. personally, i would not wear it outside by - idea in the first place. personally, i would not wear it outside by will| i would not wear it outside by will continue — i would not wear it outside by will continue to— i would not wear it outside by will continue to wear it in shops and closed — continue to wear it in shops and closed spaces. it continue to wear it in shops and closed spaces.— continue to wear it in shops and closed spaces. it can “ust bring on the bi aer closed spaces. it can “ust bring on the bigger risk_ closed spaces. it can “ust bring on the bigger risk of — closed spaces. it can just bring on the bigger risk of another - closed spaces. it can just bring on the bigger risk of another spike. l
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the bigger risk of another spike. and yes, — the bigger risk of another spike. and yes, cases— the bigger risk of another spike. and yes, cases are _ the bigger risk of another spike. and yes, cases are likely- the bigger risk of another spike. and yes, cases are likely to - the bigger risk of another spike.| and yes, cases are likely to rise, this cabinet minister said today. it looks like as if things to the success of the vaccine programme, that we now have the scope to rollback those restrictions and return to normality as soon as possible. we should be prepared if cases may continue to rise, they may continue to read significantly but we do have to move into a different period where we learn to live with the virus, we take precautions and we as individuals take personal responsibility. the we as individuals take personal responsibility.— we as individuals take personal responsibility. the best part of 18 months is that _ responsibility. the best part of 18 months is that we _ responsibility. the best part of 18 months is that we all _ responsibility. the best part of 18 months is that we all have - responsibility. the best part of 18 months is that we all have to - responsibility. the best part of 18 months is that we all have to get| months is that we all have to get used to an unprecedented squeeze under liberties and also its of rules such as facemasks in shops that will are just a few years ago but will be sought there from the minister is the strongest indication yet but it's about to be swept up in england. the government sounding so
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confident? take a look at this graph. the number of coronavirus cases is going up, but look at this line too. the number of people ending up in hospital is not rising anywhere near as quickly. to make the link is not completely broken. there are people in hospital who have been vaccinated, to make the goal is to get as many people vaccinated before july the 19th. goal is to get as many people vaccinated beforejuly the 19th. it vaccinated before july the 19th. it is important that the codes we are absolutely— is important that the codes we are absolutely confident but at the moment, overhearing for ministers, rather_ moment, overhearing for ministers, rather than — moment, overhearing for ministers, rather than the science behind it, we need — rather than the science behind it, we need to— rather than the science behind it, we need to see the science. the prime minister _ we need to see the science. tue: prime minister says we need to see the science. tte: prime minister says they we need to see the science. t"t2 prime minister says they need we need to see the science. tt2 prime minister says they need to explain the direction of travel tomorrow. separate decisions will be made for scotland, wales or northern ireland. across the uk in the last 2a hours,
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and 24,248 new infections. there were on average 211,809 new cases a day in the past week. 137,389 people have received a first dose of a vaccine in the latest 24—hour period. in total, more than 45.2 million people have had theirfirstjab, which is 86% of all uk adults. 196,209 people have had their second jab in the past 2a hours, which means more than 33.6 million people are now fully vaccinated — nearly 64% of adults. 0ur health editor hugh pym is here. numbers are rising, at what point does not increase start to get tricky for the government? we have
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been hearing _ tricky for the government? we have been hearing that _ tricky for the government? we have been hearing that ministers - tricky for the government? we have been hearing that ministers seem . tricky for the government? we have l been hearing that ministers seem set on removing the remaining restrictions from july the 19th in england and it was interesting hearing an argument made by sajid javid, the health secretary, that there were arguments in favour of ending restrictions. for example, that lockdown had put a severe impact on people'smental health. and as we have heard, there is increasing evidence that the vaccines are effective in reducing the number of people who get seriously ill and go into hospital relative to cases. what does the data show us? we can we, cases in the uk are going up at 67%. hospital admissions are the latest figure is up admissions are the latest figure is up by 24% week on week, although that fluctuates. daily hospital admissions, still around 10% or less what it was at the peak injanuary. there is no evidence of the nhs getting seriously under pressure at this stage. 0nce
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getting seriously under pressure at this stage. once you start easing restrictions further on july 19, this stage. once you start easing restrictions further onjuly 19, if restrictions further on july 19, if thatis restrictions further on july 19, if that is what happens, you will get more spread of the virus and more cases so there is a little bit of anxiety about cases rising in the nhs into august, putting more pressure on hospitals, and of course you don't need to get seriously ill with covid, you can have covid but have long covid symptoms for some time to come after.— time to come after. there are still difficult issues _ time to come after. there are still difficult issues out _ time to come after. there are still difficult issues out there. - time to come after. there are still difficult issues out there. thank i difficult issues out there. thank you, hugh pym. nearly 21 million people watched england sail into the euro 2020 semi—final last night, making it the most—watched live tv event of the year. their 4—0 defeat of ukraine at wembley means gareth southgate's men now face denmark on wednesday — with the prize a place in the final on sunday. 0ur sports editor dan roan reports. that didn't take long. just what england wanted. ukraine blown away, england on their way. having seen his side run riot in
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rome, gareth southgate finds himself in rarefied coaching company. only the second manager after legendary 1966 world cup winning sir alf ramsey to lead england into the semifinals of both that tournament and the european championship. it is an absolute honour to be in that sort of company, so i know how high i hold them in esteem, and yeah, it's lovely to be able to get the results that are putting our country on the football map again, really. if there had been any nerves against ukraine, harry kane settled them blend within five minutes. this is the first of two more goals for the captain. harry maguire also getting on the scoresheet. england's confidence will again be soaring. as his team recorded the biggest ever knockout win that a major tournament
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to cruise into the last four. use it to prove how good you are and that change of mentality means players are expressing themselves. england's quarterfinal triumph became the most watched live tv event of the year, with a peak audience of almost 21 million. today, a nation unified in praise, little time to recover ahead of what fans believe could be a week to remember. iam all i am all right, i think the boys have a sore head! they were partying until one o'clock this morning. the whole community has joined until one o'clock this morning. the whole community hasjoined in, especially— whole community hasjoined in, especially last night, we had a barbecue _ especially last night, we had a barbecue and drinks. it has been nice after— barbecue and drinks. it has been nice after the last couple of years. attention — nice after the last couple of years. attention returns to wembley where england know that one more victory on wednesday night will mean a final. forfans lucky on wednesday night will mean a final. for fans lucky enough to have tickets, a moment to savour. it final. for fans lucky enough to have tickets, a moment to savour. it was about 1500 — tickets, a moment to savour. it was about 1500 euros _ tickets, a moment to savour. it was about 1500 euros for _ tickets, a moment to savour. it was about 1500 euros for the _ tickets, a moment to savour. it was about 1500 euros for the semifinal. about 1500 euros for the semifinal and the final so it was a gamble but
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seeing the performance through the germany game gave us belief that england can go all the way. denmark have been one _ england can go all the way. denmark have been one of _ england can go all the way. denmark have been one of the _ england can go all the way. denmark have been one of the stories - england can go all the way. denmark have been one of the stories of- england can go all the way. denmark have been one of the stories of euro | have been one of the stories of euro 2020, inspired by christian eriksen after the cardiac arrest he suffered during the opening match, they also pose a stern threat. and they stand between the hosts and a date with destiny. england will prepare here with the confidence that comes from having conceded no goals and with selections vindicated and rare strength in depth. a growing sense that this team could be on the cusp of something very special. dan roan, bbc news, st george's park. let's take a look at some of today's other main stories. the government wants to give people who own flats with flammable cladding or other fire safety defects in england and wales up to 15 years to sue developers for poor construction. it's the latest attempt to try to solve the cladding crisis in the wake of the grenfell tower fire. the proposal is in the building safety bill being presented to parliament tomorrow.
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a military plane has crashed in the philippines, killing at least 45 people, including three civilians on the ground. dozens more were pulled alive from the burning wreckage after the aircraft overshot the runway on the southwestern island of jolo. pope francis is having what the vatican called scheduled surgery to treat a colon problem. the pontiff, who is 84, was admitted to hospital in rome earlier today after giving his sunday blessing to thousands of visitors in st peter's square. nato's military mission in afghanistan is now all but over, the bbc understands. america and its allies, including britain, arrived in the country in 2001 following the september 11th attacks. two decades later, the last of the troops are leaving, save around a thousand that will provide security. but as the us withdraws, the taliban is resurgent — and it's warned that if any international forces,
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including contractors, remain in afghanistan, they will be treated as an occupying force. from kabul, yogita limaye reports. afghan soldiers now managing what used to be america's biggest base. international forces making a quiet, hasty retreat. gains now under threat as foreign forces withdraw. women repressed by the taliban went to school and work. for this woman, an mp, fears the taliban will be back in power. the women are finished. it would be like black days for afghan women. notjust women, all the people. there won't be any rights, any freedom, any life here.
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how do you view international forces leaving afghanistan at this time? they are leaving so irresponsibly. after 20 years they just went into an agreement with the taliban and said to the taliban that it's ok, you can do whatever you do. it's a failure. 20 years ago, foreign forces arrived here with a fierce push. the moment in 2001 when the hardline islamist taliban regime was driven out of kabul. america's response to the 9/11 attacks, with the uk and other nato allies. the united states military has now begun strikes against al-qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the taliban regime in afghanistan. fighting followed in provinces across the country. this is helmand in the south, where some of the fiercest battles were fought.
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hundreds of british and foreign troops died here. thousands of afghan soldiers. the taliban were kept at bay. but not defeated. finally, the us signed a deal with the militant group last year. agreeing to fully withdraw foreign forces. they are leaving amidst rising violence. as they leave, violence is escalating. this is one of the roads that leads out of kabul. in the province just beyond, the taliban are battling afghan government forces. that's how close the fighting is to the capital. battles are being fought in more than half of the country's provinces. hundreds are dying every day. thousands being displaced.
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every day, more areas are falling to the taliban. but the group says there is no violence. it told the bbc that hundreds of afghan soldiers are defecting to the taliban — a claim the government denies. from their political office in doha, a taliban spokesman also told me that residual foreign troops would be considered an occupying force. all foreign forces should withdraw from the country, whether they are a contractor, adviser or trainers. because they were a part of occupation. that's a violation. we will react. but that reaction will be based on the decision of our leadership. he said embassies and ngos would not be targeted. the foreign war in afghanistan has ended. its legacy will be determined what happens here next. yogita limaye, bbc news, kabul. with all the sport now, here's sarah mulkerrins at the bbc sport centre. thanks, jane. max verstappen has extended his lead to 32
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points over lewis hamilton in formula 0ne's drivers' championship. his victory in the austrian grand prix was his fourth in five races, as andy swiss now reports. heavy rock music as warm—up acts go, how about this? the austrian national anthem performed heavy metal style. follow that, fellas! commentator: and away we go! but as it happened, following max verstappen was the order of the day. the championship leader charging into the distance while the rest battled behind him. in the orange car, britain's lando norris started second. but this collision earned him a time penalty, and he was then passed by lewis hamilton. hamilton, though, seemed to have his own problems. damaging the floor of his car — and with it his title hopes — he slipped back to fourth place, with norris overtaking him again to finish an impressive third. further back, kimi raikkonen and sebastian vettel provided a spot of late drama. at the front, there was none whatsoever. commentator: max verstappen wins the austrian grand prix! _
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delight for the thousands of travelling dutch fans, and with a 32—point lead in the title race, it is verstappen now very much in the driving seat. andy swiss, bbc news. england's cricketers won their one day international series against sri lanka 2—0 after the third match was abandoned. the tourists were bowled out for 166 in bristol before heavy rain arrived during the change of innings and no further play was possible. in rugby union, england ran in seven tries to beat the usa by 43 points to 29 at twickenham. harlequins fly—half marcus smith was one of eight players handed a first test start by eddiejones — and he crossed the line late on to help seal the win. emma radacanu, the 18—year—old british wildcard, will headline court 0ne tomorrow when she looks to continue her dream run at wimbledon. she's ranked 338 in the world, and if she wins she could face the world number one in the last eight. laura scott reports. cheering long—term goals...
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my dream is to win wimbledon. emma raducanu is hardly the only tennis mad teenager without ambition. the difference is she has already made her mark on sw19 in remarkable style. promoted from court 18, to the show courts, she has now been hailed the new star of british tennis, after making it to the fourth round, all without losing a set or her cool. cheering after the covid situation, i think you just have to cherish every single moment you get, and all the opportunities. so, i think that is definitely... if you're not having fun on court 1, then where are you going to have fun? 0n the court or in the classroom, raducanu holds herself to high standards. in april she was doing her a—levels, and won't accept anything less than a—stars. after her surprise results at wimbledon, her coach, andy murray's father—in—law, hopes she doesn't get swept up in the whirlwind.
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she has got to do it the same as everyone else, learn her trade, work her way up. i hope she stays grounded. i hope she keeps things together. and her parents must take a lot of credit for that because that is the way she handled herself, the way she has been brought up. raducanu's other hobbies are muddier and less tranquil. yes, that is her under the helmet, doing motocross as a youngster. there was go—karting, too. but tennis won through in the end. radukanu's promise was spotted young and it was on these courts in bromley that her rise through the ranks accelerated. despite her talent, school friends have still been surprised by her achievements. i think it has been mad, i don't think anyone really realised she would get this far. it's not over yet. preparing today for the biggest match of her career, emma raducanu knows a few would have known her name a week ago. she has made sure millions do now. laura scott, bbc news, bromley.
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and you can head to the bbc sport website for more on patrick viera, who is the new manager of crystal palace. jane. and finally, with the nations of the uk preparing to ease their coronavirus restrictions in the coming weeks, communities across the country held events today to say thank you to key workers and those who've helped others during the pandemic. our home editor mark easton reports. # don't stop thinking about tomorrow... # don't stop, it'll soon be here... at a london vaccination centre, health workers joined gospel singers — an impromptu community choir. # i want to think about things to come... with fleetwood mac's blessing, don't stop is the anthem of thank you day — a song of hope for the future as people gave thanks to those who helped the country
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through its past pandemic. the communities of london's east end came together for a bangladeshi barbecue today. a chance to reflect and connect. this is a way to actually remember all those that we have lost, but also to say thank you to the incredible effort that everybody has put in to get us through this pandemic. it is a paradox of the pandemic that social distancing and isolation actually brought communities closer together. and the hope is that thank you day will become an annual opportunity to renew and strengthen those bonds and friendships. # don't stop thinking about tomorrow... with its origins in the thursday evening clap for carers, thank you day is supported by celebrities, community groups, businesses and national leaders. prince charles thanked hospital radio. i know it's been of immeasurable value in connecting people and providing comfort and companionship. harry kane thanked community volunteers.
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i just want to say thank you on our behalf for everything. thank you! there have been thank you tartan tea and cakes. riverbank litter picks. and street parties. that sense of people just wanting those moments of connection to celebrate the things that bind us together. i think that's what's driving today. as britain prepares to leave its long covid quarantine, the hope is that the sacrifice and love that kept people going can be distilled in a huge annual thank you — ready for any challenges to come. mark easton, bbc news. #...don't you look back. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. now on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. goodbye.
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hello this is bbc news with me, lukwesa burak. john lewis has announced plans to move into the residential property market by building 10,000 homes for rental over the next few years. the department store chain said it wanted to address the national housing shortage and support local communities. tenants of the new properties — which will be built on sites owned by the chain — will have the choice of renting fully furnished with john lewis products or using their own. earlier i spoke to the i newspaper's housing correspondent vicky spratt — and asked her what she thinks of this announcement from john lewis. we do have a housing emergency. there are not enough affordable homes and there isn't
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enough social housing. but, 10,000 really won't make a dent in that emergency. and i suppose what we have to wonder is, will these homes be affordable in terms of rent? at what point in the market all the rent be? and who will they be aimed at? i think whether they are furnished or unfurnished, that's kind of by the buyer. 0bviously, john lewis having suffered a bit of a financial hit, due to the pandemic and other revenue streams, but when it comes to housing, we really need affordable homes that people can actually afford to live in. and it will depend on where they are, too. if they want to build them on car parks, for instance, well, will that work? will they be in places where there is enough infrastructure? i've visited some buildings around the country over the past few years, when i've been reporting on the housing emergency, where homes have been built on the site of former office blocks, for instance, and there just isn't
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enough green space nearby. so, i think it really depends where they are going to be, and how much they are going to cost. john lewis isn't the first retail company to move into property development, is it? we've got the likes of ikea. how have they done? well, ikea's homes, in this country at least, are in partnership with local authorities and they are intended primarily as emergency accommodation and they are flatpack homes, as you would expect from ikea, and those agreements with the local authorities were struck just before the pandemic. i am not sure if any of them are actually finished constructed yet, but it makes sense for a company like ikea, of course, and john lewis, to move into this sector, and they aren't the only ones, either. earlier this year it was announced that lloyds bank wanted to diversify and become a landlord. i suppose simply, you could say, being a landlord is rather lucrative, and its guaranteed income, so i think that also something to consider. you said that we need good quality homes. what is a good quality home, and why aren't we getting those now? well, there are lots of questions about this.
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the new homes quality board has been established to ensure that new homes being built are up to scratch. we have had a lot of problems with new builds over recent years, which include, but are by no means limited to, problems with cladding in the building safety scandal that has emerged in the wake of grenfell. there are also issues with new build developments where people have leaks, where plaster falls off, all you have to do is look on facebook to see people complaining about some of the biggest developers, so i think what we need is homes that, quite simply, don't fall apart, but also, at a basic level, are not flammable and are safe to live in and also, you know, in this country, we have some of the smallest homes in europe. we are throwing homes up that are really quite tiny, so these flats would also need to be a decent size. what does all they say, i don't know if you are more of a business correspondent, or you write about the housing market, but what would they say to you about the future of the high street? i think that's an interesting point.
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clearly, as i mentioned, with lloyds bank also looking to become a landlord, businesses who have suffered during the pandemic looking clearly are, know that there is money to be made in housing, you know, that property developers do very, very well, as do landlords. indeed, corporate landlords who build lots of homes and rent them out, this is called build to rent, also do very well so, if you were a business that was looking to diversify, asjohn lewis clearly is, had just gone through a pandemic, and suffered, because so many of your stores had been shut, housing might look quite attractive. i'm together, time for a look at the weather with helen willets. bringing some flash flooding to parts of edinburgh for example. but we had widespread funder activity —— thunder activity. we had low pressure and by the systems close by
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to the north and

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