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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 4, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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to solve the attempt in trying to solve the cladding crisis in the wake of the grenfell tower fire. cladding crisis in the wake of the grenfell towerfire. the cladding crisis in the wake of the grenfell tower fire. the proposals in the building safety bill which is being presented to parliament tomorrow. here's a business correspondent. four years on from the grenfell tower fire, hundreds of other buildings still haven't been made safe. the government says it is putting over £5 billion towards the removal of dangerous cladding. and today, the housing secretary announced a change that will increase the current six—year time limit for homeowners to seek compensation from developers for sub—standard building work. it is not right that either the leaseholder or the taxpayer has to step up. and i am announcing today that we are going to change the law retrospectively to give every home owner 15 years in which to take action against the people who built their building, if there is shoddy workmanship. but some flat owners say this won't help them. this building in sheffield is set to receive £6 million
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from the government's building safety fund for cladding removal. however, to fix other fire safety defects, the leaseholders still face another £6 million in bills, an average of £50,000 each. willis one of them. i welcome it. it won't help me, my building is over 15 years and even if my building was less than 15 years old, my developer is insolvent so it won't help me. mrjenrick this morning said on the show that the majority of these buildings were built in the 2000s so it doesn't take a mathematician to work out that by the time the bill is implemented many of those buildings will not benefit from this because they will be over 15 years old. the main issue here is that leaseholders are being landed with bills for—
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leaseholders are being landed with bills for work that they cannot afford — bills for work that they cannot afford to — bills for work that they cannot afford to pay and they should not have _ afford to pay and they should not have to _ afford to pay and they should not have to pay. that is what needs fixing — have to pay. that is what needs fixina. ~ . ., fixing. meanwhile the government insists that good _ fixing. meanwhile the government insists that good progress - fixing. meanwhile the government insists that good progress has - fixing. meanwhile the governmentl insists that good progress has been made towards removing the grenfell tower style acm cladding. qe’s made towards removing the grenfell tower style acm cladding.— tower style acm cladding. 9596 of buildin . s tower style acm cladding. 9596 of buildings have _ tower style acm cladding. 9596 of buildings have had _ tower style acm cladding. 9596 of buildings have had the _ tower style acm cladding. 9596 of buildings have had the cladding . buildings have had the cladding removed or there are workers on site now removing it. and about 70% of them have finished the job altogether. them have finished the 'ob altogether.�* altogether. but the latest government _ altogether. but the latest government figures - altogether. but the latest l government figures actually altogether. but the latest - government figures actually show just 61% of buildings with acm cladding in the public sector, for example housing associations, have had it completely removed and replaced. 0ne private sector blocks it is 44%. the extended period to seek redress for shoddy building work will take time to come in. it will take longer still for legal cases to get going. those stuck in flammable flats that they can't sell say that they need help much sooner. katy austin, bbc news.
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explosives will be installed later today in what's left of a collapsed apartment block near miami, to enable its controlled demolition. the decision to demolish was made because of concerns that an approaching tropical storm could endanger the lives of rescuers. 120 people are still missing, nine days after the building collapsed. finally, events have been taking place across britain today to say a national thank—you to everyone who's helped during the coronavirus pandemic, including nhs staff and key workers. our home editor mark easton reports. # don't stop thinking about tomorrow # don't stop thinking about tomorrow # don't stop thinking about tomorrow # don't stop, it will soon be here # at the london vaccination centre health workers joined gospel singers in an impromptu community choir. don't stop is the anthem of thank
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you day, song of hope that future as people give thanks to those who help the country through its past pandemic. the communities of london's east end came together for a bangladeshi barbecue today, a chance to reflect and connect. this is a way to — chance to reflect and connect. this is a way to actually _ chance to reflect and connect. ti 3 is a way to actually remember all those that we have lost and to say thank you to the incredible effort that everyone has put in to get us through this pandemic. we that everyone has put in to get us through this pandemic.— that everyone has put in to get us through this pandemic. we want to sa thank through this pandemic. we want to say thank you _ through this pandemic. we want to say thank you for _ through this pandemic. we want to say thank you for all _ through this pandemic. we want to say thank you for all the _ through this pandemic. we want to say thank you for all the support i say thank you for all the support for us _ say thank you for all the support for us. , ., ., , ., for us. they are tremendous and without those _ for us. they are tremendous and without those people _ for us. they are tremendous and without those people that - for us. they are tremendous and without those people that came | for us. they are tremendous and i without those people that came out in their_ without those people that came out in their snow— without those people that came out in their snow suits... _ without those people that came out in their snow suits... the _ without those people that came out in their snow suits. . ._ in their snow suits... the rain, the snow, in their snow suits... the rain, the snow. normality. _ in their snow suits... the rain, the snow, normality, plight, _ in their snow suits... the rain, the snow, normality, plight, kept - in their snow suits... the rain, the snow, normality, plight, kept the| snow, normality, plight, kept the pub going — snow, normality, plight, kept the ub anoin. , , snow, normality, plight, kept the rub aoian. , , ., snow, normality, plight, kept the rub aoain. , , ., snow, normality, plight, kept the auaaboin. , , ., ,., pub going. kept us going. it is a aaradox pub going. kept us going. it is a paradox of— pub going. kept us going. it is a paradox of the _ pub going. kept us going. it is a paradox of the pandemic - pub going. kept us going. it is a paradox of the pandemic that i pub going. kept us going. it is a - paradox of the pandemic that social distancing and isolation actually brought communities closer together and they hope is that thank you dave will become an annual opportunity to renew and strengthen those bonds and friendships —— thank you day. thank
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you day is supported by community groups, businesses and national leaders. prince charles thanked hospital radio.— hospital radio. know that it has been of immeasurable - hospital radio. know that it has been of immeasurable value i hospital radio. know that it has been of immeasurable value in| been of immeasurable value in connecting people, in providing comfort and companionship. hana; comfort and companionship. harry kane thanked _ comfort and companionship. harry kane thanked community - comfort and companionship. harry kane thanked community volunteers. we thank you on our behalf for everything. we thank you on our behalf for everything-— we thank you on our behalf for everything._ thankl we thank you on our behalf for- everything._ thank you. everything. thank you. thank you. there will be _ everything. thank you. thank you. there will be thank— everything. thank you. thank you. there will be thank you _ everything. thank you. thank you. there will be thank you tartan, - everything. thank you. thank you. j there will be thank you tartan, tea and cakes, river bank litter picks, and cakes, river bank litter picks, and street parties.— and cakes, river bank litter picks, and street parties. everyone has got behind it from _ and street parties. everyone has got behind it from royalty _ and street parties. everyone has got behind it from royalty to _ and street parties. everyone has got behind it from royalty to harry - behind it from royalty to harry kane, and that sense of people wanting those moments of connection to celebrate the things that bind us together, that is what driving it. as britain prepares to leave its long covid quarantine, the hope is that the sacrifice and love that kept people going can be distilled into a huge annual thank you, ready
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for any challenges to come. # don't you look back. # we're back with the late news at ten. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are.
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hello, this is bbc news with martine croxall. more now on the lifting of covid restrictions in england later this month, as the government indicates it may remove all legal coronavirus measures from the 19th ofjuly. paul hunter is professor in medicine at the university of east anglia and says he expects covid will remain for generations and we will have to learn to live with it. i think our grandchildren's grandchildren will be getting covid, but like the other coronaviruses that have been circulating for decades, it'll probably end up, fairly soon, being just another cause of the common cold.
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how wise, in your view, is it that we ditch the remaining restrictions, such as face coverings, when things change in england for certain on the 19th ofjuly? i think a lot of the debate at the moment is around, is it the safe thing to do at present? and actually, i don't think that's the correct question to be asking. the question should be, when is it going to be the safest? and if we don't do it now, we'll be lifting restrictions in the early autumn, when schools will be back, so increasing transmissions. the first round of vaccines, before we start the next booster round of vaccines, will be possibly reducing in their effectiveness somewhat, and also by then we may well be seeing the arrival of other respiratory virus infections that have been kept at bay. so, ultimately, i think we've got to do it now, because relaxing in the autumn might actually carry with it an even bigger risk of disease burden for the public health, because of these other viruses, because of waning immunity
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to people who've just had their first round of vaccine. and that's despite us seeing these big increases on some days in the delta variant. yeah, absolutely, but, and they have been quite dramatic in the last week or so. some element of that might be around celebrations around the euros. it's noticeable that this epidemic has spread up about a week or so after the first games, when you would expect to start seeing some impact, so that may turn out to be a fairly short lived spurt, but you're quite right — case are going up, but hospitalisations are drifting up slowly. and actually, this last week, we saw fewer deaths reported in the last seven days than in the previous seven days before that, so there is no evidence that deaths are going up.
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but again, if we don't do it now, things might be actually a lot worse in the autumn because of the reasons that i've already mentioned. robertjenrick, the housing secretary, told the bbc this morning that he thinks the government will be making a statement on school bubbles and what will happen in the new term in september. that's when entire groups of pupils have to self—isolate if one within the group tests positive. how likely is it do you think we will be able to dispense with bubbles in september? it's been hugely disruptive. absolutely, and i hope we do, because i think they had substantial value early on in the epidemic, when we still had many people that weren't immunised. i think the value of those school bubbles are coming to the end now, and i would certainly be very uneasy about them continuing into the autumn. given that this virus is going to be here forever, and that we are not, we are unlikely to be vaccinating children under 11, and we may well not also vaccinate
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children between 11 and 16, you know, they are going to at some point have to get an actual infection, so to a large extent, the school bubbles are in effect delaying the inevitable. and at the same time, damaging children's education, so i think the value of them continuing in the new school year is quite low, and i would certainly be arguing for that rule to be lifted. as we've heard, it was a night of celebration for england fans after the team's stunning euro 2020 quarter final victory over ukraine in rome. earlier we spoke to our correspondent simonjones in south—west london, where residents have covered the streets in flags to show their support for the lions. you will never guess who they are supporting here. iwill give you will never guess who they are supporting here. i will give you a
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clue. just take a look at this — flags everywhere you see. they went up flags everywhere you see. they went up a couple of weeks ago at the start of the tournament and now they are putting up even more flags. let me show you, everyone is getting into the spirit. the neighbours. just me bruno the dog, a big football fan. he hasjust been playing football, and he not a bad player. and england doing really well as well. jade, the owner, what are you making of it all quits like it's amazing, getting together at a community and just making the best of a couple of rubbish years, i suppose. it is bringing people together, because if we look over here, they are putting up even more flags. i'm surprised there's any flags. i'm surprised there's any flags left in this area. careful coming down, i don't want an accident. you were watching last night like everyone — what did you make of it? night like everyone - what did you make of it?— make of it? fantastic, fantastic. the way we _ make of it? fantastic, fantastic. the way we got _ make of it? fantastic, fantastic. the way we got through, - make of it? fantastic, fantastic. i the way we got through, brilliant. continue to play like that, we will win, definitely. aha,
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continue to play like that, we will win, definitely.— continue to play like that, we will win, definitely. a lot of confidence here. win, definitely. a lot of confidence here- lots — win, definitely. a lot of confidence here- lots of— win, definitely. a lot of confidence here. lots of people _ win, definitely. a lot of confidence here. lots of people got _ win, definitely. a lot of confidence here. lots of people got togetherl here. lots of people got together last night for the game. what will you be doing on wednesday? the same aaain. get you be doing on wednesday? the same again- get the — you be doing on wednesday? the same again. get the gazebos _ you be doing on wednesday? the same again. get the gazebos up, _ you be doing on wednesday? the same again. get the gazebos up, everybody l again. get the gazebos up, everybody partying, _ again. get the gazebos up, everybody partying, watching the match altogether. it partying, watching the match altogether-— partying, watching the match altoaether. , ., , . ., altogether. it will be lovely. what will it be like — altogether. it will be lovely. what will it be like if— altogether. it will be lovely. what will it be like if ultimately - will it be like if ultimately england get through to the final and dare i say it when it?— dare i say it when it? crazy, crazy. yeah, absolutely _ dare i say it when it? crazy, crazy. yeah, absolutely crazy. _ dare i say it when it? crazy, crazy. yeah, absolutely crazy. it's - dare i say it when it? crazy, crazy. yeah, absolutely crazy. it's all - yeah, absolutely crazy. it's all thanks — yeah, absolutely crazy. it's all thanks to _ yeah, absolutely crazy. it's all thanks to all the neighbours, though _ thanks to all the neighbours, though. they will put in there and it's been— though. they will put in there and it's been beautiful, really lovely. let's _ it's been beautiful, really lovely. let's look — it's been beautiful, really lovely. let's look at everything over here. some more of the neighboursjust down here. let's do the typical thing and ask you, next time, score prediction, please? 3—0. what about you? prediction, please? 3-0. what about ou? ' 2-0. prediction, please? 3—0. what about you? 24. 2—0. how confident are you you? 2-1. 2-0. how confident are you overall that — you? 2-1. 2-0. how confident are you overall that it's _ you? 2»1.2—0. how confident are you overall that it's coming home? it's coming home. you've heard it here, and the flags are still going up, and the flags are still going up, and a lot of anticipation, ruby, ahead of that next game. simonjones
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in feltham. if you could only hear the voice of our director, mike, who is welsh. he's not very happy. earlier i spoke to the ex—england footballerjohn barnes, and i asked him what team he thinks gareth southgate should field for wednesday's game against denmark. the two holding midfield players are the backbone of the team. those two players have been the reason we've done what we've done. stirling and kane may create chances and score goals, but what has kept a clean sheet, notjust about goals, but what has kept a clean sheet, not just about four, goals, but what has kept a clean sheet, notjust about four, but those two holding midfield players. i don't think we will see much difference to that. even if he goes to three at the back, i'm sure he will play two holding midfield players. will play two holding midfield ala ers. �* ., ., ., players. being the favourite, how much extra _ players. being the favourite, how much extra pressure _ players. being the favourite, how much extra pressure does - players. being the favourite, how much extra pressure does that i players. being the favourite, how. much extra pressure does that add? there's no extra pressure. there is always pressure running in london. there was pressure on them when they
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are not favourites. belgium have gone out, france have gone up, portugal, the holders, have gone out. germany was going to be our hardest game and we came through. of course, now, we are expected to be denmark, much as it will be a difficult game, because they are a well—organised team. they've got togetherness because of christian eriksen's situation, so it's not a foregone conclusion. if we get to the final, i would rather play against spain and italy. let's get through denmark first.- against spain and italy. let's get through denmark first. looking back on our through denmark first. looking back on your time — through denmark first. looking back on your time playing _ through denmark first. looking back on your time playing for _ through denmark first. looking back on your time playing for england, i through denmark first. looking back on your time playing for england, a l on your time playing for england, a huge privilege, but how do you control the nerves, especially when you are playing in the home of football, wembley? riff you are playing in the home of football, wembley? of course, all ala ers football, wembley? of course, all players are _ football, wembley? of course, all players are different. _ football, wembley? of course, all players are different. there - football, wembley? of course, all players are different. there are i players are different. there are individual to get nervous. i never got particularly nervous. paul gascoigne used to get really nervous, as much as he always played well. it's trying to alleviate the pressure by saying, yes, there is enough pressure on us, but let's not
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put added pressure on ourselves, particularly when we are a young, inexperienced side, one of the youngest in the competition. fortunately, things have gone well for us, but we need to keep our feet on the ground and take every minute of the game as it comes, rather than thinking about the final, and gareth has got the players' feet well on the ground so i don't think there will be a problem. the headlines on bbc news: a cabinet minister indicates that the use of face coverings will become a personal choice when lockdown restrictions in england are eased. more than 20 million people watched england's brilliant night in rome as they thrashed ukraine, and moved on to the semifinals of the euros. ministers extend the period in which legal action can be taken against housing developers in light of the cladding crisis. at least 45 people have died after a military plane crashed in southern philippines. the aircraft with more than 90 people on board crashed as it tried to land on the island ofjolo. three civilians on the ground are among the victims. david campa nale reports.
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a large ball of black smoke was seen above the wreckage of a transport plane, a lockhead c130 hercules, supplied to the philippines by the united states. the head of the armed forces said it had missed the runway. it's not clear why. and then it's tried to regain power but it had failed and hit the ground. many of those on board were soldiers. they were flying from mindanao to the provincial airport ofjolo, when the plane came down in patikul. remarkably, a number of soldiers were seenjumping out of the aircraft before it hit the ground, sparing them from explosion caused by the crash according to an army statement. dozens of soldiers were pulled from the site of the burning wreckage. they are now receiving hospital treatment. the soldiers were part of the military�*s stepped up presence in the philippines to combat islamist militants, stepped up such as the abu sayyaf group. 0fficials there said there was no
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sign that the aircraft had been attacked, and an investigation would start once the rescue operation was complete. many of those on board had only recently completed basic military training. at least four people have been killed in a wildfire in cyprus. the blaze has been spreading through an area north of the cities of limassol and larnaca and has forced the evacuation of several villages, though rescue workers say people are no longer at risk. police have arrested a man on suspicion of arson, after he was seen driving away from a village near limmasol as the fire started. sodaba haidare reports on what the country's president has described as the worst tragedy on the island in decades. flames raging out of control in the southern coast of cyprus. wildfires broke out in limassol district around two in the afternoon local time, and raced through the village, swiftlyjumping district boundaries, into larnaca. visiting and aid effort coordination centre, this is true —— the cypriot president said
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it was the worst tragedy the country had seen in decades. translation: the services responded immediately - and did everything possible in order to prevent deaths. unfortunately, this was not avoided, as we now know that a deadly incident has been reported. the fires ravaged homes and cars and destroyed a large forested area. it also forced evacuation of several nearby villages. translation: civil defence - volunteers found four burnt bodies in a mountain area on the outskirts of a village. according to information, it seems the bodice belonged to the four egyptians we were searching for since yesterday afternoon. as various rescue teams attempted numerous efforts, the scene has been secured, and coroners are on site for an autopsy. helicopters tried to douse the wildfire, fanned by strong winds
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and high temperatures. cyprus has been experiencing a week—long heatwave, and temperatures rising to ho celsius, posing a challenge for firefighters trying to tackle the blaze. planes assisted by british troops and equipment stationed on the mediterranean island are fighting the flames, but cyprus has called for more help. israel has come to the rescue, and eu neighbours are sending more planes to help put out the fires. rescue teams injapan battling heavy rain have pulled survivors from their ruined homes after a landslide struck the coastal city of atami. authorities have said an elderly couple were among 19 people who have been rescued so far. two people have been confirmed killed but several others remain missing after a torrent of mud swept the city, south—west of tokyo, on saturday morning,
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after days of torrential rain in central and eastern japan. the city saw more rainfall in the first three days ofjuly than it usually sees in the whole month. borisjohnson may perform a u—turn on planned cuts to the foreign aid budget. a report in the sunday times says the prime minister will allow mps a vote on the issue before parliament breaks for the summer recess. there s been growing controversy over the plans, which would see the uk s spending on aid slashed from 0.7% to 0.5% of national income. around 50 conservative mps, including the former prime minister theresa may are amongst those against the £4 billion cut. one of those mps is tobias ellwood. he says he would welcome a vote on the issue the uk prides itself on its strength to identify problems across the world, find solutions and take nations with them, so this decision to cut our aid budget has caused huge harm both on a strategic and on our operational level. it's damaged our hard—fought reputation as a soft power superpower, it's sent a poor example
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to other nations. as us as a permanent member of the united nations security council, how do we persuade others to stand with us? and, of course, we were the only g7 nation at the summit this summer to actually cut our budget. and, operationally, this saves lives. this money provide support for clean water, for polio vaccinations, for tackling hiv, and, of course, the critical humanitarian support in places like yemen, in syria and in libya. and those vacuums get filled either by extremists or, indeed, by other nations with very different agendas. if china or russia push in then they will pursue very, very different agendas — very difficult for us to get back in there. a fire has caused a huge plume of smoke to fill the skies above the town of strabane in northern ireland. it happened in the railway street area of the town, which people
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are being told to avoid. a local councillor has told the bbc that the fire is coming from a coffin makers. retail bosses are calling on the government to take action against violence and abuse aimed at shop staff. this security footage was released by boots pharmacy to highlight the problems workers face. some of the uk's biggest brands are campaigning for greater legal protection for employees. the government said courts should be increasing sentences for such assaults. the prime minister of luxembourg — xavier bettel— is admitted to hospital after testing positive for covid—19. in a statement, the government said bettel will be kept under observation as tests are carried out a week after he tested positive for the virus. he is to stay in hospital for 26 hours as a precautionary measure. for many parents across the uk, the school drop—off can be a logistical nightmare. but now residents living near one school who have grown so fed up of the influx of traffic each morning and afternoon have chosen to �*take a stand' — providing another obstacle for families to contend with, as philip norton reports.
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bin blockades at home time, because this school gate has been opened, and these are some of the people who live in this cleethorpes street who were behind that blockade. they say they're fed up with school traffic and some pupils' behaviour. we knew we was breaking the law by blocking a main road, but no, we had to make a stand. they're riding their bikes on the paths, in the middle—of—the—road and everything and it'sjust manic. my main concern is people not being able to get - in and out of the cul—de—sac when they need to. - residents say it was agreed the gate would stay closed more than ten years ago, but it was reopened for the pandemic to help the school manage student flow. we moved here four years ago, and if i'd known that gate was gonna be opened, i wouldn't have done. we want it stopped. this is a small cul—de—sac, it's not built for loads of cars. the police have been attending.
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some parents on the school run here say they've been threatened, so didn't want to be identified. been abused while i'm here. i daren't leave my car in case it gets damaged. i just don't know what the problem is. anybody can park here �*cause it's not private road. but they said they don't want it. none of the other residents got any problems because i've asked �*em. i just want to come up, pick my lad up and go home, i don't want all this hassle, what they're causing us. it's not acceptable. the school says it followed government covid guidance which prompted the reopening of the gate. and it's not happy with events this week. i've had parents in tears as well as children who i am extremely disappointed. i'm looking forward to meeting with local counsellors, local residents and the police to find a solution that is suitable for all concerned. my primary concern and my primary reason for opening both of these entrances is to ensure the safety of my children. is this not being a bit petty
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around a school gate? this goes on outside school gates everywhere round the country. no, it's not petty. you've got a bunch of elderly citizens here. they've had enough. they've done their time in life and they wanted some peace and that's why they moved here, these bungalows, with other elderly people. and basically, it's not right. those who live here say this roadblock and people power has already made a difference. with a meeting next week, they feel the school is listening. philip norton, bbc news, cleethorpes. chinese astronauts have conducted their first—ever double spacewalk. it's only the second time chinese astronauts have stepped outside their craft while in space. the astronauts are testing next—generation spacesuits and installing equipment forfuture missions. the launch is a matter of huge prestige for china which this month is marking the hundredth anniversary
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of the ruling communist party. a teenagerfrom devon is hoping to become the youngest person to sail single—handedly around the british isles. 14—year—old katie mccabe is attempting the challenge in a 26—foot wooden sailing boat to raise awareness of ocean pollution. she gave us a tour on her first day at sea. there is the anchor, and here is the jib, so i can move that really easily. i'm11l and i'vejust jib, so i can move that really easily. i'm11l and i've just set off on my trip, which is going to take me all the way around britain. i'm going round because it's a great challenge, and because it's a real opportunity for me to try and raise awareness about ocean pollution. here is the boom, the mast, and the mainsail. this is the bit i am going
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—— this is the boat i'm going round in, 26 foot. i've done this myself last winter. i bought it really cheaply. it has been in fresh water for about ten years, which is awful for about ten years, which is awful for about ten years, which is awful for a wooden boat. my insurance only lets me be insured if i have a guardian, a parent or guardian, staying nearby. my dad is going to be following me in his book, and he will be behind me all the time. as i go round, i will be trying to raise money for ocean pollution charities. i'm hoping to take about ten weeks and hoping to be back in exmouth around the end of august. the best of luck to her. _ paintings from andy warhol are being exhibited for the first time at the tehran museum of contemporary art, in iran. the masterpieces had been left for decades in the museum's storage, away from the public�*s eye. sara monetta reports. bright colours, nervous lines, andy warhol's
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work is unmistakable. but these paintings are even more extraordinary because they've never been seen before. now they're on display for the first time in their home, tehran. translation: when i heard about a new exhibition - on andy warhol, i thought it was happening abroad. but no, it's happening here. it's a real surprise. i didn't know we had any warhol work. these, like hundreds of other pieces, were bought in the 1960s, by iran's empress, who posed for warhol herself. after the iranian revolution in 1979, these artworks remained locked away from sight in the museum's storage. the empress' collection is one of the largest in the world, it counts 3,500 masterpieces and has been valued at over three billion euros. the museum's curators think it's time to start
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sharing their treasure with the public. people are much more up—to—date in iran than — about the west than west — about iran. andy warhol broke down barriers in the art world. the curators hope his work could do the same with some of the barriers between iran and the west. sara monetta, bbc news. time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. menacing clouds across many parts of the uk today. those heavy, thundery showers will continue throughout the rest of this evening. sunshine early on between, but even through the night, we will continue to see them, particularly for scotland, northern ireland, northern england, perhaps that on the thunder reasoning away, but a cloudy and unsettled night, mild as well. fewer showers by dawn. we expect to see the lengthy spells
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of sunshine through the day in

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