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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 4, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. at least 29 people have died after a military plane crashed in the southern philippines. a brilliant night for england in rome — as they thrash ukraine, and move on to the semi finals of the euros. it's been a long year for everybody. i'm chuffed the two performances we've put on have brought so much enjoyment and happiness to people. cheering it was a saturday night to celebrate for fans — football now is coming home — when england face denmark at wembley on wednesday. i can't believe it. we're over the moon. absolutely brilliant. they've played amazing. great goals, harry kane is back.
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can't wait for the semifinal. could not even have dreamt it. a uk government minister suggests wearing face coverings will be a matter of personal choice when coronavirus restrictions are eased in england on 19thjuly. robertjenrick says the success of the vaccination programme means much more permissive measures could be put in place. we trust the british public to exercise good judgment. people will come to different conclusions. in miami — an approaching storm accelerates plans to demolish the rest of the apartment block where at least 2a people died and more than a 120 are missing. and — hidden away for 42 years — the priceless andy warhol paintings — finally being put on show by a gallery in iran. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world.
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29 people have died after a philippines air force plane crashed in the south of the country. the lockheed c—130 transport aircraft crashed at patikul in sulu province, onjolo island. the defence minister said 50 injured people had been rescued so far and are being treated in hospital. the incident occurred when the plane missed the runway while trying to regain power. pictures from the scene showed flames and smoke pouring from wreckage strewn among trees. many of those on board recently completed basic training. they were being deployed to the region as part of a joint task force fighting a long war against islamist militants from the abu sayyaf and otherfactions. the incident is not being treated as an attack. i've been getting the latest from our asia—pacific regional editor, michael bristow. there were a total of 92 people on board the aircraft, eight crew members, and as you mentioned, all of the rest, 84, were soldiers who
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had just completed their basic training and on their way to the island ofjolo to begin an operation against militants operating in the area. they had been operating there for several decades. the main group is a group called abu sayyaf, islamic militants, but more known in years for kidnapping people for ransom, earning money that way, and there has been an ongoing military operation against them. so that's what the recruits were there to try and fight. how difficult will it be to mount a search and rescue operation in that area? i do not think it is too difficult. because as you mentioned in the introduction to this report, the aircraft was approaching a random strip on the island ofjolo. for some reason it missed the runway and was attempting to pull back up. it did not succeed and then crashed.
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so the accident appears to have happened in a built—up area near the airport. pictures show that some of the aircraft appears to have remained intact, although it was on fire. there were plumes of smoke coming from the side. the rescue operation is not too difficult in terms of the location. it isa it is a very serious accident and obviously people have already died. the inquiry into what happened will surely now begin. england are heading to their first semi—final at the euros for 25 years after a decisive 4—0 win over ukraine in rome last night. gareth southgate�*s side will now head home to wembley to face denmark in the last four on wednesday. spain and italy face each other on tuesday also at wembley stadium in the other semi. mark lobel reports. # i cannot escape, and i cannot forget!# for england fans that travelled to italy for this one,
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the sky is the limit. the only thing perhaps worth flagging up now — for once — is overconfidence. if you were gonna offer us at the start of the tournament a semifinal against denmark, you'd take that every time. so at wembley, i think, it is not in doubt at all. ukraine's fans found solace in equalling their greatest run in a major international football tournament. translation: ukraine got to the quarterfinals. - we lost to england. there are no weak rivals in the quarter—finals. this is not a problem. england got off to a flying start. kane slotted home a superb pass from sterling after only four minutes. barely a minute into the second half, maguire powered home a headerfrom shaw's free kick to give england some breathing space. four minutes later, shaw provided a perfect cross, headed in from six yards by kane. then it was england's fourth from substitute henderson —
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his first international goal on his 62nd appearance. it was a fifth successive clean sheet for a jubilant england. on a night that was beautiful for football with the weather, i think inspired the players and they gave a fantastic performance. england face denmark in the semi—finals after they beat the czech republic in baku. they led from the fifth minute when delaney evaded his marker to head in from a corner. they made it 2—0 just before half—time with dolberg volleying in a superb cross from maehle. but it was the czech republic's schick volleying the next one, his fifth goal of the tournament, taking him level with portugal's cristiano ronaldo in the race for the golden boot. yet, denmark held on. standing between them and the final
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is gareth southgate's england. it's a chance to make history — we have never been to a european championship final, so it's not so much pressure for this team, it's another challenge that they've got the chance to take on. bbc commentator guy mowbray described the feeling for england's fans during the ukraine match as "the greatest therapy session watching england you've ever had." they will soon find out if this competition also offers a lasting cure to years of hurt. mark lobel, bbc news. let's go live to our correspondent, anna holligan who's in rome where the match took place. anna, it was low—key in terms of the number of england fans but in terms of what happened on the pitch, absolutely electric. and here we are listening to pope francis give his weekly blessing. and actually, some of the fans who were inside the stadio olimpico last
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night have come down, and of course they are praying for england to continue in the competition. but they have already managed to exceed expectations with that scoreline. 4-0. expectations with that scoreline. 4—0. absolutely incredible. and as you say, in the stadium last night england fans were not allowed to fly over from the uk england fans were not allowed to fly overfrom the uk because england fans were not allowed to fly over from the uk because of those covid travel restrictions. but people travelled from across europe to represent and make sure the pride could be heard as people roared for the three lions inside the stadium. much calmer today, and actually there will be a lot of people who haven't made it out of bed yet because they were celebrating on the streets of rome until the early hours here. streets of rome until the early hours here-— streets of rome until the early hours here. �* ., , , ., ., hours here. and obviously attention will now turn _ hours here. and obviously attention will now turn away _ hours here. and obviously attention will now turn away from _ hours here. and obviously attention will now turn away from their - will now turn away from their because the semis loom. {iii will now turn away from their because the semis loom. of course. the fans who _ because the semis loom. of course. the fans who watched _ because the semis loom. of course. the fans who watched the _ because the semis loom. of course. the fans who watched the game - because the semis loom. of course. the fans who watched the game in l because the semis loom. of course. i the fans who watched the game in the stadium last night, there were about
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2000 england fans. they will be able to follow england back on the road to follow england back on the road to wembley because of those covid travel rules —— they won't be able to. however, it is denmark on wednesday. everyone here was watching the game last night because if things continue to go england's way, this has been a for gareth southgate, his very controlled, calm, considered tactics on the pitch, initially people were rather sceptical about his methods initially. his name was being cheered on the terraces last night. and as we were meeting fans coming out of the stadium, they were all paying tribute to his professionalism. but also the way in which he has respected and looked after the 23 man squad throughout this tournament. so a testament to the manager here as well. but yes, if you were watching last night, if england win against denmark on wednesday, then we could very well be looking forward to an italy —
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england final on sunday. and actually, just as pope francis is speaking behind me at st peter's basilica, among his words, "when we allow the convenience of habit to have the upper hand, it's difficult to open us to what is new and allow ourselves to be amazed." well, england's fans were certainly amazed last night. i england's fans were certainly amazed last niuht. ~ ., england's fans were certainly amazed last niuht. ~' . ., ~ last night. i like that line. thank ou ve last night. i like that line. thank you very much- _ the mood has been very different in the ukrainian capital kiev. our correspondent sarah rainsford has been speaking to fans there the fans we have been speaking to all day were massively enthusiastic, as you might expect, going into the game. they were ignoring the statistics, the facts of course, that england was a firm favourite and letting their hearts rule their heads to some extent. they were telling me all day they felt ukraine could win and the very least they thought they could end the clean sheet england have held on to. they thought they could score.
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it took just four minutes for their dreams to start to shatter and faces in the fan zones where we were last night were a bit of a sad picture to watch. there were 10,000 fans squeezed into one of the squares here in the city. there were other fan zones in the city, others across the country, as ukraine dared to dream they could make more history here. what they are clinging on to is the fact this was an historic performance by ukraine, the first time in a quarter—final of a european championship. even as that massively crushing defeat came in, at the end of the match, they were clapping, they were cheering, they were shouting, "ukraine!" they are proud of their team, and fans afterwards were telling me, "look, this is a moment to be proud, to be happy we have got this far and to see as start of something better, not the end a dream." the housing secretary, robertjenrick, has suggested that the wearing of face coverings will be a matter of personal choice when coronavirus restrictions are eased in england on i9thjuly. mrjenrick told the bbc�*s andrew marr show that the success of the vaccination programme meant
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that a much more permissive regime of covid measures could be put in place. with me now is our political correspondent nick eardley. we have also heard this morning from the health secretary who has done an article in one of the papers. is it now almost certain the 19th ofjuly will see almost everything go? we can be as will see almost everything go? - can be as certain as we can be at the moment. there are still key decisions to be made in the coming days. we have a bunch of committees that make these big decisions for the government, they involve the scientists and the medics as well. but all the mood music from the government in terms of england is extremely positive. we have sajid javid the new health secretary writing in the mail on sunday this morning that there were compelling health reasons, notjust economic, but health reasons as well to lift the restrictions that remain. this morning robertjenrick, the housing secretary, has been making it clear
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that much of the decision is now going to be about personal responsibility. so we have all got used to wearing face coverings on trains and in shops because legally we have too. that's not going to disappear completely. but it sounds like the legal restriction on that is going to be lifted. have a listen to this exchange between robert jenrick and andrew marr this morning. do you see some kind of social tensions— do you see some kind of social tensions in_ do you see some kind of social tensions in all of this new period were _ tensions in all of this new period were some — tensions in all of this new period were some cautious people are wearing — were some cautious people are wearing masks and other people are not wearing masks, some are trying to socially— not wearing masks, some are trying to socially distance, other people are refusing to socially distance? in are refusing to socially distance? in other— are refusing to socially distance? in other words, you are throwing a bit in other words, you are throwing a hit of— in other words, you are throwing a bit of tension into the community, areni— bit of tension into the community, aren't you? — bit of tension into the community, aren't you? |— bit of tension into the community, aren't you?— bit of tension into the community, aren't ou? ., ~ , aren't you? i hope not. we trust the british public— aren't you? i hope not. we trust the british public to _ aren't you? i hope not. we trust the british public to exercise _ aren't you? i hope not. we trust the british public to exercise good - british public to exercise good judgment _ british public to exercise good judgment. people _ british public to exercise good judgment. people will- british public to exercise good judgment. people will come . british public to exercise goodl judgment. people will come to different— judgment. people will come to different conclusions, - judgment. people will come to different conclusions, as - judgment. people will come to different conclusions, as you . judgment. people will come to i different conclusions, as you say, but there — different conclusions, as you say, but there are _ different conclusions, as you say, but there are things _ different conclusions, as you say, but there are things we _ different conclusions, as you say, but there are things we all- different conclusions, as you say, but there are things we all need i different conclusions, as you say, i but there are things we all need to do, but there are things we all need to do. we _ but there are things we all need to do. we all— but there are things we all need to do. we all need _ but there are things we all need to do, we all need to— but there are things we all need to do, we all need to ensure - but there are things we all need to do, we all need to ensure that- but there are things we all need to do, we all need to ensure that wel do, we all need to ensure that we are double — do, we all need to ensure that we are double vaccinated _ do, we all need to ensure that we are double vaccinated and - do, we all need to ensure that we are double vaccinated and that. do, we all need to ensure that wel are double vaccinated and that will be absolutely _ are double vaccinated and that will be absolutely critical _ are double vaccinated and that will be absolutely critical if _ are double vaccinated and that will be absolutely critical if we - are double vaccinated and that will be absolutely critical if we want. are double vaccinated and that will be absolutely critical if we want to| be absolutely critical if we want to maintain — be absolutely critical if we want to maintain this— be absolutely critical if we want to maintain this momentum. - be absolutely critical if we want to maintain this momentum. there i be absolutely critical if we want to . maintain this momentum. there are still people — maintain this momentum. there are
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still people in— maintain this momentum. there are still people in those _ maintain this momentum. there are still people in those categories - maintain this momentum. there are still people in those categories 1—9 i still people in those categories 1—9 who haven't — still people in those categories 1—9 who haven't come _ still people in those categories 1—9 who haven't come forward - still people in those categories 1—9 who haven't come forward to - still people in those categories 1—9 who haven't come forward to be i who haven't come forward to be vaccinated~ _ who haven't come forward to be vaccinated. we _ who haven't come forward to be vaccinated. we will _ who haven't come forward to be vaccinated. we will also - who haven't come forward to be vaccinated. we will also need i who haven't come forward to bej vaccinated. we will also need to ensure — vaccinated. we will also need to ensure that _ vaccinated. we will also need to ensure that people _ vaccinated. we will also need to ensure that people get- vaccinated. we will also need to ensure that people get the - vaccinated. we will also need to i ensure that people get the booster 'abs ensure that people get the booster jabs when — ensure that people get the booster jabs when they _ ensure that people get the booster jabs when they come _ ensure that people get the booster jabs when they come online - ensure that people get the booster jabs when they come online and i ensure that people get the booster. jabs when they come online and also we will— jabs when they come online and also we will need — jabs when they come online and also we will need to — jabs when they come online and also we will need to ensure _ jabs when they come online and also we will need to ensure that - jabs when they come online and also we will need to ensure that people l we will need to ensure that people -et we will need to ensure that people get flu _ we will need to ensure that people get flu jabs— we will need to ensure that people get flu jabs because _ we will need to ensure that people get flu jabs because that _ we will need to ensure that people get flu jabs because that will- we will need to ensure that people get flu jabs because that will be i we will need to ensure that people get flu jabs because that will be ai get flu jabs because that will be a very important _ get flu jabs because that will be a very important element _ get flu jabs because that will be a very important element in- get flu jabs because that will be a very important element in our- get flu jabs because that will be a. very important element in our plan inthe— very important element in our plan in the autumn— very important element in our plan in the autumn and _ very important element in our plan in the autumn and the _ very important element in our plan in the autumn and the winter. - very important element in our plan in the autumn and the winter. 50 l in the autumn and the winter. so that's in the autumn and the winter. that's the government. just yesterday we were talking about the doctor's union, the british medical association, saying may be some restrictions should be kept in place, we should be cautious, keep things like the legal requirement to wear face coverings in some areas. and a lot of people, i suspect, will be watching this thinking the number of cases is going up quite dramatically at the moment. how does this all add up? the simple answer is that the government and the medics advising it think that the relationship between people getting the disease and ending up in hospital hasn't been removed completely but the vaccine programme means it has been severely weakened, that was the phrase being used this
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morning. that matters because it means there is much less likelihood of the nhs being overwhelmed, there is much less likelihood of thousands of people dying, as we saw in earlier waves of the pandemic. so there is optimism there. politically, though, there are still some warnings, this was the message this morning from the labour party. i want the economy and society open up i want the economy and society open up again. we are all getting sick and tired of the restrictions to our everyday lives and doing the things we love. but everyday lives and doing the things we love. �* , ,., ., ., we love. but it is important that if the qr we love. but it is important that if the or codes _ we love. but it is important that if the qr codes are _ we love. but it is important that if the qr codes are going _ we love. but it is important that if the qr codes are going to - we love. but it is important that if the qr codes are going to stop, i we love. but it is important that if the qr codes are going to stop, ifj the qr codes are going to stop, if the qr codes are going to stop, if the masks — the qr codes are going to stop, if the masks are going to come off, that we _ the masks are going to come off, that we are — the masks are going to come off, that we are absolutely confident that we are absolutely confident that that — that we are absolutely confident that that is the right thing to do. and at— that that is the right thing to do. and at the — that that is the right thing to do. and at the moment all we are hearing is briefings _ and at the moment all we are hearing is briefings from ministers rather than _ is briefings from ministers rather than the — is briefings from ministers rather than the science behind it. we need to see _ than the science behind it. we need to see that— than the science behind it. we need to see that science. we than the science behind it. we need to see that science.— to see that science. we are not far away from — to see that science. we are not far away from the _ to see that science. we are not far away from the date _ to see that science. we are not far away from the date where - to see that science. we are not far away from the date where this - to see that science. we are not far. away from the date where this could all change, the 19th ofjuly. when will we actually know? i all change, the 19th ofjuly. when will we actually know?— will we actually know? i think we will we actually know? i think we will aet will we actually know? i think we will get more _ will we actually know? i think we will get more clarity _ will we actually know? i think we will get more clarity in _ will we actually know? i think we will get more clarity in the - will we actually know? i think we | will get more clarity in the coming days. as we have said, these decisions haven't all been
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completely signed off yet, despite the positive mood music you have heard, there are committees that make these decisions. but i think probably by the end of this week we will have a lot more clarity on what exactly that so—called freedom day on the 19th ofjuly looks like. important to point out, bit like the football, this is england only, the scottish, welsh and northern ireland administrations will make their own decisions and some of their timetables are slightly different. thank you. search efforts for possible survivors of the collapse of a tower block in miami have been temporarily suspended, to allow for the demolition of the rest of the building. there are fears an approaching tropical storm could bring down debris onto search teams. 24 people are known to have died with more than 120 still unaccounted for. our north america correspondent david willis has the latest. for those leading the painstaking recovery effort, it's now a race against time. a tropical storm is bearing down on miami, packing winds of up to 70mph.
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officials fear tropical storm elsa could send what remains of the apartment complex toppling on to those on the ground, so they're now looking to demolish it before elsa makes landfall. this will protect our search and rescue teams because we don't know when it could fall over and, of course, with these gusts, potentially, you know, that would create a really severe hazard. that means boring into the structure of the building in order to install explosives — a precarious proposition, given how unstable it has become. once complete, however, the effort will give officials their first access to the garage area, which has been the focus of the search so far. meanwhile, residents of another miami apartment building have been evacuated after engineers came across concrete and electrical problems. their building isjust seven miles from the one that collapsed. there, two more bodies
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were discovered overnight, bringing the total confirmed dead to 24. david willis, bbc news, washington. at least four people have been killed in a wildfire in cyprus. the blaze has been spreading through an area north of the cities of limassol and larnaca and has forced the evacuation of several villages. the interior ministry said the four victims were probably egyptian farm workers reported missing after their car was destroyed by the blaze. greece, italy and israel are sending planes to cyprus following an appeal for help. lightning strikes in western canada have sparked more wildfires across bc. the fire service is trying to control more than 170 fires. canadian military is on standby to help more residents leave their homes. they recorded canada's highest ever temperature of 49.6 celsius on tuesday. injapan the search and rescue effort has resumed
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following a landslide which devastated the city of atami. a popular hot—spring resort in the prefecture of shizuoka, southwest of tokyo. two bodies have been found and 20 people are still missing. tanya dendrinos reports. as the morning mist envelops the mountains, below, a city lies smothered. the buildings still standing tell a tale as stark as those destroyed, painted by the torrent of mud that tore through atami on saturday. translation: it was l an unimaginable sound. i knew it was a landslide. translation: the mudslide came really close, right - in front of my house. i couldn't get away so i climbed up a ladder _ i couldn't get away so i climbed up a ladder i— i couldn't get away so i climbed up a ladder. i could hear it coming before — a ladder. i could hear it coming before i— a ladder. i could hear it coming before i saw it. rescue teams are still searching for survivors. translation: we're doing |
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everything we can in putting people's lives first. the police, fire department, - japan coast guard and self— defense forces are working hard to rescue and search for people. _ but due to the weather, - we're unable to fly helicopters and drones for the rescue missions. the landslide followed heavy rainfall in the prefecture with some areas receiving close to 800mm in just three days. an emergency task force has been established and residents remain on alert with more rain to come. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. the german interior minister this weekjoined a growing chorus of eu leaders calling for eu funding to hungary to be reduced unless it was since a controversial law. the law, passed by parliament in mid—june, forbids the portrayal or promotion of homosexuality among children. nick thorpe sent this report from budapest, on reaction to the law in the gay community and the governments response to the wave
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of international condemnation. when the sun sets off for kindergarten, he and his husband adam, like any other parents, tidy his room. but unlike most of the parents they are both men and they are leading a campaign to oppose the government view that a family can only mean one woman, one man and their offspring. taste only mean one woman, one man and their offspring-— their offspring. we wanted to show that the family _ their offspring. we wanted to show that the family is _ their offspring. we wanted to show that the family is not _ their offspring. we wanted to show that the family is not an _ their offspring. we wanted to show that the family is not an exclusive l that the family is not an exclusive club and — that the family is not an exclusive club and we wanted to show that the hungarian— club and we wanted to show that the hungarian same sex parents, hungarian same sex parents, hungarian rainbow families exist. we are part _ hungarian rainbow families exist. we are part of— hungarian rainbow families exist. we are part of the society. we are here and we _ are part of the society. we are here and we do _ are part of the society. we are here and we do have a face. and are part of the society. we are here and we do have a face.— and we do have a face. and do you feel ou and we do have a face. and do you feel you are _ and we do have a face. and do you feel you are winning _ and we do have a face. and do you feel you are winning the _ and we do have a face. and do you | feel you are winning the argument? it's not about winning and losing. it's not about winning and losing. its about— it's not about winning and losing. it's about we do want the best for this society, we want the best for the kids— this society, we want the best for the kids come under this law is not helping _ the kids come under this law is not helping the — the kids come under this law is not helping the kids. this law is putting _ helping the kids. this law is putting all the kids, not only lgbtq kids, putting them into a very dark place _ kids, putting them into a very dark lace. ~ ' , kids, putting them into a very dark lace. ~ ~ , ~' ., place. when prime minister viktor orban arrived _
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place. when prime minister viktor orban arrived in _ place. when prime minister viktor orban arrived in brussels - place. when prime minister viktor orban arrived in brussels for- place. when prime minister viktor orban arrived in brussels for an i place. when prime minister viktor| orban arrived in brussels for an eu max summit after the law was passed he got a hostile reception. translation: is he got a hostile reception. translation:— he got a hostile reception. translation: is not about homosexuality, _ translation: is not about homosexuality, it's - translation: is not about homosexuality, it's about l translation: is not about | homosexuality, it's about the translation: is not about - homosexuality, it's about the kids and parents, that's all. thea;r and parents, that's all. they criticise it. _ and parents, that's all. they criticise it. yes, _ and parents, that's all. they criticise it. yes, but - and parents, that's all. they criticise it. yes, but it - and parents, that's all. they criticise it. yes, but it is - and parents, that's all. they - criticise it. yes, but it is hungary alone. criticise it. yes, but it is hungary alone- the _ criticise it. yes, but it is hungary alone. the law _ criticise it. yes, but it is hungary alone. the law is _ criticise it. yes, but it is hungary alone. the law is already - criticise it. yes, but it is hungary - alone. the law is already announced, it is published. _ alone. the law is already announced, it is published. with _ alone. the law is already announced, it is published. with this _ alone. the law is already announced, it is published. with this law- it is published. with this law viktor orban _ it is published. with this law viktor orban tried _ it is published. with this law viktor orban tried to - it is published. with this law viktor orban tried to rally i it is published. with this law| viktor orban tried to rally his it is published. with this law- viktor orban tried to rally his own supporters ahead of a crunch election next spring. protecting children, he thought, is a sure vote winner. but it was also designed to impress an international public. from brazil to poland, the name viktor orban is already known and everybody understood that there is a politician who is thinking in the modern world, his not living in the 19th century, but he is trying to give conservative answers. b5 19th century, but he is trying to give conservative answers. as the danube divides _ give conservative answers. as the danube divides the _ give conservative answers. as the danube divides the hungarian - danube divides the hungarian capital, so the hungarian government has divided society with this controversy. both sides claim the
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high moral ground. the reputation and prestige of hungary is on the line. nick thorpe, bbc news, budapest. tens of thousands of people in cities across brazil have been protesting against the government of presidentjair bolsonaro, calling president jair bolsonaro, calling for presidentjair bolsonaro, calling for his resignation over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. the demonstrations were triggered by recent allegations of corruption involving the purchase of vaccines by the health ministry. mr bolsonaro denies any wrongdoing. oliver stuenkel is professor of international relations at the getulio vargas foundation in sao paulo — he says the president is coming increasingly under pressure. for the first time since bolsonaro has become president there is now serious pushback. he has actually governed largely without an opposition for the past two years, has been able to disorient opposition movements now. now there are signs that the economy is taking a very long time to recover, unemployment is fairly high, there is a risk of inflation and a growing sense
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of the mishandling of the pandemic. the president has always promoted this dichotomy between either be for the lockdown or the economy. he has always said i'm in favour of the economy. but now there's a sense brazil may be left with the worst of both worlds, a very high death rate of more than 500,000 people who have died of covid and a sluggish economy. on top of that now, the corruption scandal. so i think that the first time we are seeing a growing discontent with the president. paintings from andy warhol are being exhibited for the first time at the tehran museum of contemporary art — in iran. the masterpieces had been left for decades in the museum's storage — away from the public�*s eye. sara monetta reports. bright colours, nervous lines, andy warhol's work is unmistakable. but these paintings are even more extraordinary because they've never been seen before.
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now they're on display for the first time in their home, tehran. translation: when i heard about a new exhibition - on warhol, i thought it was happening abroad. but no, it's happening here. it's a real surprise. i didn't know we had any warhol work. these, like hundreds of other pieces, were bought in the 1960s, by iran's empress, who posed for warhol herself. after the iranian revolution in 1979, these artworks remained locked away from sight in the museum's storage. the empress' collection is one of the largest in the world, it counts 3,500 masterpieces and has been valued at over three billion euros. the museum's curators think it's time to start sharing their treasure with the public. people are much more up—to—date in iran than — about the west than west — about iran. andy warhol broke down barriers in the art world. the curators hope his work could do
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the same with some of the barriers between iran and the west. sara monetta, bbc news. you're watching bbc news. now it's time to get a look at the weather with matt taylor. some of you will stay dry this afternoon and evening with sunny spells but keep your eyes on the skies for dark and gloomy skies on the horizon, we could see flashes of lightning and rumbles of thunder, potentially the odd torrential downpour causing flash flooding too. through the afternoon across southern counties of england and south wales the shower numbers will reduce compared to what we saw this morning, some longer dry spells. in north wales, north midlands northwards, while there will be sunny spells for most, away from rather gloomy north—east corner, showers will develop and where those showers will develop and where those showers start to come, thunder, hail and a risk of a lot of rain in a short space of time. warm in the sunshine, temperatures in the low
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20s. this evening and overnight, some showers and thunderstorms that develop will continue and longer spells of rain in northern ireland, southern scotland and may be the far north of england. southern areas will be dry compared with what we saw to start this morning. temperatures for most in double figures, if not the mid—teens. a quick look ahead at monday into tuesday, we have an unseasonably deep area of low pressure, want to keep an eye on the forecast for, especially if you are spending any length of time outdoors across southern counties of england and wales were released on monday during the day it will be a dry and bright today, only a few showers around, the same across wales, midlands and east anglia. northern england, scotland and northern ireland, cloud and outbreaks of rain, the odd thunderstorm thrown in for good measure and longer spells of rain in northern scotland through the afternoon where of course we will see that bit of extra rain at the moment, not great news if you're on holiday. temperatures down on what we have seen this weekend. it is through monday night after a wet end to the day in the southwest and channel islands that swell of winds, the area of low pressure pushing
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northwards and eastwards throwing some potential and persistent rain across the north and west of infant and wales, strengthening winds across tuesday morning, southern counties, gusting winds up to 60 mph could cause damage and travel disruption. heavy showers to go with it whipping across the sky across the money, longer spells of rain, heavy and thundery in northern england potentially into southern and eastern scotland, sunshine and showers mixed further west. with the breeze in place across southern areas, it is going to be a cooler day but even further north temperatures down a bit on the weekend, even though the winds are generally lighter. more sunshine and thundery showers to come across the country on wednesday. but from then onwards it looks like things turn dry, a little bit brighter and by the weekend a touch warmer too.
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hello, this is bbc news with me, joanna gosling. the headlines: at least 29 people have died after a military plane crashed in the southern philippines. a brilliant night for england in rome as they thrashed ukraine and move on to the semifinals of the euros. our uk government minister suggests wearing face coverings will be a personal choice when coronavirus restrictions are eased in england on the 19th ofjuly. in miami, an approaching storm accelerate plans to demolish the rest of the apartment block where at least 24 people died. more than 120 are missing. now, it's time for dateline london.
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hello and welcome to the programme, which brings

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