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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 3, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news. we will be taking a look at tomorrow morning public papers and just a moment but first the headlines. full—time and 4— 02 england who have beaten ukraine to progress to the semi finals of a euro 2020. fair is to win this game but a lot of pressure and expectation and to perform like we did is top drawer, so it was a perfect night for us. supermarket chain worsens except a multi—billion pound takeover bid by us investment group led by the owner of majestic wine. the main doctors
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union urge the government to keep some measures in place after the 19th ofjuly we all covered restrictions are due to be removed in england. in these two bodies have been found at around 20 people remained missing injapan after a landslide sent mud cascading down the hillside and smashing into homes and sweeping away cars. she's done a! the youngest british woman to reach around the four of wimbledon after beating remaining world number 45 in straight sets. and welcome to our look ahead for
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the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with us isjo phillips and nigel nelson. tomorrow's front pages. lovely to see you both, very long time since we've done the papers together and great to have you with us this evening. unsurprisingly there is a common theme running through all of the papers, the sunday mirror has an image of the england players celebrating the demolition of the ukraine side tonight. the sunday telegraph has a similar picture. it also says boris has signed off on plans to end compulsory mask wearing on july the 19th. it's the same combination of stories on the front of the sunday express. the people has a big splash on the football. we came, we saw, we conquered. that's the headline there. more football on the front of the sunday times which also gives credit where it is most certainly do to emma, who has the youngest british woman to reach the last 16 of wimbledon since 1968.
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england will play denmark in the semi final we will start up with the sunday people, your your paper, nigel. we will start up with the sunday people, youryour paper, nigel. it was a tremendous performance tonight and i think that we could have all done with the kind of uplift after the last 15 months that we have gone through. with the first goal was scored in the three and a half minutes, you thought we are off and running, and then there was and another. and it wasjust running, and then there was and another. and it was just really nice
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towards the end whenjordan henderson came on as a substitute and the commentators were rather sniffing about his chances of actually scoring something and then he went in there and got his first international so it was a great game, great fun to watch and of course it was not meant to be so if my editor was watching i was still working at the time. we my editor was watching i was still working at the time.— my editor was watching i was still working at the time. we all were not distracted at — working at the time. we all were not distracted at the _ working at the time. we all were not distracted at the slightest, _ working at the time. we all were not distracted at the slightest, that's - distracted at the slightest, that's jordan henderson in the centre of the photo and the sunday mirror as well. in terms of the picture story and a bit of a gift for the headline writers as well, a fantastic story for the front pages tomorrow morning. for the front pages tomorrow morninu. , , ., ., morning. they been doing overtime with the sunday _ morning. they been doing overtime with the sunday mirror _ morning. they been doing overtime with the sunday mirror and - morning. they been doing overtime with the sunday mirror and others, | with the sunday mirror and others, and as_ with the sunday mirror and others, and as nigel said it's a great green, — and as nigel said it's a great green, it's a well—deserved victory and we _ green, it's a well—deserved victory and we have — green, it's a well—deserved victory and we have all been there for years
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and we have all been there for years and years— and we have all been there for years and years with hope and the hope you cannot_ and years with hope and the hope you cannot stand. a wonderful tweet i saw during — cannot stand. a wonderful tweet i saw during match of the day where somebody— saw during match of the day where somebody said football is not just coming _ somebody said football is not just coming home, it's parked the car in the garage — coming home, it's parked the car in the garage which i thoughtjust about— the garage which i thoughtjust about summed it up. the the garage which i thought 'ust about summed it up.�* the garage which i thought 'ust about summed it up. the nice thing is this is gareth _ about summed it up. the nice thing is this is gareth southgate's - about summed it up. the nice thing is this is gareth southgate's team, | is this is gareth southgate's team, and as he quickly came across to me was this, there was no drama. there was this, there was no drama. there was only the right sort. he wrote in his book last year or a couple of years ago about the things that really make anything possible is our kindness, bravery and ambition and i think that's what we saw tonight with those young men. you can think of the bad tempers and penalties, and overdramatic tackles and things. what we saw now and tonight was a calmness committee coolness and it
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will organise game, and it did after that first goal go a little bit flat and you thought, oh, and that they came back again. it was brilliant and all the plaudits are thoroughly deserved. most of the action in the second half and in the sunday times that has england in dreamland, as well as that photograph of 18—year—old emma through to the fourth round at wimbledon. and i would like to think, and not everybody will be back the england and the football but for a lot of people read across the home nations this is a really, really enjoyable period of support after a difficult 18 months. period of support after a difficult 18 months-_ 18 months. what a great day for su ort 18 months. what a great day for support has _ 18 months. what a great day for support has been. _ 18 months. what a great day for support has been. i _ 18 months. what a great day for support has been. i feel- 18 months. what a great day for support has been. i feel sorry i 18 months. what a great day for| support has been. i feel sorry for emma because she has been overshadowed completely by the england victory. all perhaps you should not feel too sorry for her, she is looking at prize money of
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£181,000, and that's an awful lot more than the 28,000 she has made in her entire tennis career. but to have an 18—year—old britt get so far in wimbledon is absolutely fantastic and let's hope she goes all the way. and let's take a look at the sunday telegraph as well. a picture there, lions roar of two wembley, and the mayor has 4—0. another use of the word dreamland and emma makes history at wimbledon, so quite a set of front pages as far as the sports coverage goes. now let's look away from sport at the sunday telegraph. we will pick up at that and that has bullish p.m. we will pick up at that and that has bullish pm. to ask mask laws as quote" nhs safe. we've been running
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that story from the british medical association today which has been making an appeal to the prime minister to keep some elements of the restrictions including the wearing of masks, so take us through the sunday telegraph story. this is a story that has obviously been briefed by downing street to the papers and as you have mentioned earlier is an interviewer or article about it, by the new health secretary but borisjohnson is supposed to be putting the final touches to what is being named freedom day from the 19th ofjuly when apparently there will be no compulsory mask wearing, there will be no compulsory social distancing, no need to use qr codes and people will not have to have any table seating in pubs which means that people will be go back into bars and
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restaurants and caf s, music venues and festivals can go ahead. as you rightly say, doctors are warning that they do need to be some controls and of course the government is that a very difficult position because of the moment i know it sounds not exactly shining but this is not the middle of winter or in a flu epidemic, but you have doctors warning that we know that the increase in the delta variant is going up quite a lot every day. the world health organization is already warning that the variance are winning the race against the vaccine globally. we have schools and businesses and the nhs all with competing demands, and the problem is that once you say ok it is up to you, use your common sense and do what you like, if you then have to put that genie back in the bottle in the autumn as the schools and
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universities go back and maybe there's another variant, it's going to be almost impossible. so it's all very well being bullish, i wonder how much of this is based on data and actually based on the fact that borisjohnson is obsessed and almost addicted to wanted to give the field back, and we were talking about good news and sport. maybe this is something he feels will be a great thing for the rate great british summer. nigel yourthoughts thing for the rate great british summer. nigel your thoughts on this as well, how much is political and a scientific decision? if we look at israel the exit the country in the world declared that masks are no longer needed and within a couple of weeks issued a mandate saying actually they do have to be worn indoors. �* g ., ., , ., indoors. i'm with joe on this one, i think we ought _ indoors. i'm with joe on this one, i think we ought to _ indoors. i'm with joe on this one, i think we ought to be _ indoors. i'm with joe on this one, i think we ought to be cautious - indoors. i'm with joe on this one, i think we ought to be cautious and | think we ought to be cautious and decide scientists i've talked to
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have been number crunching the data and they are saying that we are looking at a million new cases between now and july the 19th. and onjuly the 19th you will be 90,000 cases a day if it carries on a present trends. already more cases that all of europe put together and doubled the number of cases as in america, and it seems to me that borisjohnson is putting all of the eggsin borisjohnson is putting all of the eggs in one basket which is the vaccine basket and while the vaccine programme has been a massive success, and yes it has broken the link with mortality it has not broken with morbidity. and as with the figures we are talking about more people get very ill and more people will die. the problem obviously is what sort of pressures on the nhs is not going to cause? it won't be anything like it has been in the past. but still could stress
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the nhs to almost breaking point. look in the front of the mail on sunday you have this sense of momentum coming from with the cabinet is thinking and we have them saying opening up will make us healthier and talking about mask laws and ending onjuly 19. healthier and talking about mask laws and ending onjuly19. what does this say? it laws and ending on july 19. what does this say?— laws and ending on july 19. what does this say? it says matt hancock who? it's does this say? it says matt hancock who? it's very _ does this say? it says matt hancock who? it's very much _ does this say? it says matt hancock who? it's very much about - does this say? it says matt hancock who? it's very much about the - does this say? it says matt hancock who? it's very much about the new| who? it's very much about the new health _ who? it's very much about the new health secretary coming across again with these _ health secretary coming across again with these optimistic we are getting back to _ with these optimistic we are getting back to normal things, and to a certain— back to normal things, and to a certain extent there is an undertone here which— certain extent there is an undertone here which is about actually that matt _ here which is about actually that matt hancock, he was overcautious, he was _ matt hancock, he was overcautious, he was a _ matt hancock, he was overcautious, he was a bit — matt hancock, he was overcautious, he was a bit silly and so on and so forth _ he was a bit silly and so on and so forth this— he was a bit silly and so on and so forth this is— he was a bit silly and so on and so forth. this is about the government tried to _ forth. this is about the government tried to set — forth. this is about the government tried to set a new town, and it's about— tried to set a new town, and it's about an — tried to set a new town, and it's about an optimistic tone. but we still got — about an optimistic tone. but we
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still got questions about quarantine and questions about international travel, _ and questions about international travel, still got questions as nigel says about the nhs which and people are facing _ says about the nhs which and people are facing a massive backlog of all sorts _ are facing a massive backlog of all sorts of— are facing a massive backlog of all sorts of other things and there's lon- sorts of other things and there's tong covid — sorts of other things and there's long covid to deal with as well. there's— long covid to deal with as well. there's different definitions of health, economic well—being, mental health, economic well—being, mental health, physical health etc. find health, economic well-being, mental health, physical health etc.— health, physical health etc. and the caution can — health, physical health etc. and the caution can be _ health, physical health etc. and the caution can be doctored _ health, physical health etc. and the l caution can be doctored overcautious but there's— caution can be doctored overcautious but there's a — caution can be doctored overcautious but there's a point we had to say use your— but there's a point we had to say use your common sense, well, you know, _ use your common sense, well, you know. we _ use your common sense, well, you know, we know that that does not always _ know, we know that that does not always work. and sometimes what does that mean— always work. and sometimes what does that mean for pubs and restaurants with their— that mean for pubs and restaurants with their overcrowded? how hard is it going _ with their overcrowded? how hard is it going to— with their overcrowded? how hard is it going to be for shop workers to say to— it going to be for shop workers to say to people, can you give a bit of space? _ say to people, can you give a bit of space? 0r— say to people, can you give a bit of space? 0r people who feel anxious about— space? 0r people who feel anxious about going out and don't want getting — about going out and don't want getting into crowds, as you talk about _ getting into crowds, as you talk about mental health for them it's going _ about mental health for them it's going to — about mental health for them it's going to be much harder if all of a sudden _ going to be much harder if all of a sudden it's— going to be much harder if all of a
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sudden it's a free—for—all in the locai— sudden it's a free—for—all in the local supermarket. there's big challenges ahead. with local supermarket. there's big challenges ahead.— local supermarket. there's big challenges ahead. with got time for one more, let's _ challenges ahead. with got time for one more, let's look— challenges ahead. with got time for one more, let's look at _ challenges ahead. with got time for one more, let's look at the - challenges ahead. with got time for one more, let's look at the front - one more, let's look at the front page of the sunday times read says rebels forced pm into you turn over £4 billion cut to foreign aid, this is a story absolutely that has not gone away and says borisjohnson is poised to claim that offer mps a vote on foreign aid cuts as he is warned and risked turning the conservatives back into the nasty party. and he has been under pretty unyielding pressure from some mps and to do a u—turn on this. yes unyielding pressure from some mps and to do a u-turn on this.- and to do a u-turn on this. yes he has and as — and to do a u-turn on this. yes he has and as a _ and to do a u-turn on this. yes he has and as a result _ and to do a u-turn on this. yes he has and as a result he's _ and to do a u-turn on this. yes he has and as a result he's got - and to do a u-turn on this. yes he has and as a result he's got no - has and as a result he's got no alternatives. you're talking now about 15 hard—core tory rebels who want to determine to make sure that these are £4 million don't go ahead. it only takes a 40th borisjohnson's party to bring him down and so i
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think he's got to the state chair where he cannot persuade them, cannot appeal to the loyalty, he knows the game is up and good thing as well. we need to get that money that we were promised to some of the most desperate people in the world. that's it for tonight. unfortunately all we have time for but lovely to see you both. jo phillips and nigel nelson looking at tomorrow's front pages. and it's goodbye for me. hello and welcome to the film review with me, anna smith. i'm filling in for mark kermode to review this week's releases.

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