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tv   BBC World News America  BBC News  July 2, 2021 10:00pm-10:30pm BST

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i'm laura trevelyan in new york city and this is bbc world news america. the last american troops have left the main us base in afghanistan, after waging war from there for almost 20 years, as the taliban offensive gains ground. the number of deaths linked to coronavirus in india has passed 400,000. only the us and brazil have seen a higher death toll from the virus. and zambia holds a state funeral for its founding president kenneth kaunda, a leader of africa's struggle against apartheid and aids.
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welcome to world news america on pbs and around the globe. the us military has left bagram air base in afghanistan, their centre of operations for almost 20 years. america's war in afghanistan began after the 9/11 attacks, which killed almost 3,000 people — more than 2,700 lost their lives here in new york city. as america is ending its longest war, the taliban is gaining ground. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner reports. bagram air base, afghanistan, the most strategically vital base in the country. last night, the us military pulled out after nearly 20 years there. it follows a decision by president biden for us forces to leave afghanistan by september 11. we're on track exactly as to where we expected to be, but i wanted to make sure there was enough "running room", that we wouldn't be able to do it all till september. there will still be some forces left, but it's a rational drawdown with our allies.
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the base has now been handed over to afghan government forces. but all over the country, they're coming under pressure from advancing taliban fighters. without western military support, there are doubts whether they can hold out. translation: the situationl in afghanistan will get worse. it is already chaotic. you see ghorband district falling. there is lots of insecurity. the government does not have all the weapons and equipment. western air support has been crucial, both for transporting troops to the battlefield and for carrying out air strikes. without it, more districts are expected to fall to the taliban. yet in the capital kabul, some are happy to see the americans and other western forces depart. translation: this is good news. the americans have reached an agreement with the taliban in doha and these agreements must be implemented, and
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this is for the good of afghanistan. the taliban are certainly delighted to see the us leaving. they've even thanked them for going. critics of the withdrawal deal say the afghan government got little in return, that the west is rushing to the exit and it's leaving afghanistan on the brink of another civil war. frank gardner, bbc news. let's go now to kabul and the bbc�*s yogita limaye. yogita, the white house today they expect american troops will have completed their withdrawal by the end of august. that is ahead of president biden�*s deadline of september 11, president biden�*s deadline of september", but president biden�*s deadline of september 11, but do afghans believe that their security forces can hold off the taliban? the that their security forces can hold off the taliban?— off the taliban? the afghan government _ off the taliban? the afghan government certainly - off the taliban? the afghan government certainly says i off the taliban? the afghan i government certainly says that off the taliban? the afghan - government certainly says that it has the strength to hold on in this country. but we know is that they're fighting taliban forces in 20 of this country's 3a provinces, hundreds are dying in this violence
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every week, thousands are being displaced. last week, the un said 50 of this country's 370 district had fallen to the taliban, warning that the time to prevent the worst case scenario right be running out, and i think ordinary afghans are subtly worried about what lies ahead. —— might be running out. there are some fears that once all international forces leave, there might be civil war in this country. find forces leave, there might be civil war in this country.— war in this country. and yogita, what do afghans _ war in this country. and yogita, what do afghans see _ war in this country. and yogita, what do afghans see as - war in this country. and yogita, what do afghans see as their. war in this country. and yogita, - what do afghans see as their legacy of this longest american war in afghanistan?— of this longest american war in afu hanistan? ~ ., ., , afghanistan? well, a lot will depend on what happens _ afghanistan? well, a lot will depend on what happens here _ afghanistan? well, a lot will depend on what happens here once - afghanistan? well, a lot will depend on what happens here once all - afghanistan? well, a lot will depend| on what happens here once all forces leave. it is not looking good at the moment. when you speak to people here, there is a mix of emotions. there is a sense of understanding that international forces had to leave at some point. 0r cannot continue forever. there is also some
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regard for what they say are the gains that have been made in the past 20 years, institutions that have either been created or strengthened in 20 years, like the army, like the police, but i think the worry is that all of that is so fragile that it could be lost very quickly once foreign forces leave. the other thing is the objective of the mission here, which was when george w bush announced it in 2001, it was strikes on military installations of the taliban regime and training camps of the al-qaeda to ensure that afghanistan's territory would not be used to threaten the security of the us and its allies, and questions being asked by many people, including people from the afghan government, about whether that objective has been achieved. find about whether that ob'ective has been achievedh about whether that ob'ective has been achieved. and us intelligence believes that _ been achieved. and us intelligence believes that the _ been achieved. and us intelligence believes that the afghan _ been achieved. and us intelligence l believes that the afghan government is so fragile, it could fall within six months to two years after the us withdrawal. why is the government seen as so fragile?—
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seen as so fragile? well, what we are seeing — seen as so fragile? well, what we are seeing already _ seen as so fragile? well, what we are seeing already happened - seen as so fragile? well, what we are seeing already happened all. seen as so fragile? well, what we i are seeing already happened all over the country, as i said, we have had fighting escalating over the past two months. the taliban are saying that in some areas, they have had afghan forces surrendered to them, this is something that is denied by the afghan government, and it is not just these two sites operating in this country. there are a lot of different tribal groups, which are preparing their own militaries as we speak. there also hardline extremist groups like al-qaeda and is operating in this country, and so i think the fears in front of people here are, what is going to happen in the months ahead?— here are, what is going to happen in the months ahead? yogita limaye in kabul for us — the months ahead? yogita limaye in kabul for us tonight, _ the months ahead? yogita limaye in kabul for us tonight, thank - the months ahead? yogita limaye in kabul for us tonight, thank you. -
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now to the coronavirus pandemic, and india has marked a grim milestone. the number of deaths linked to covid—19 has passed 400,000. experts warn the real number may be much higher. india is only the third country in the world — behind the us and brazil — to officially record more than 400,000 deaths. 0ur correspondent in delhi, devina gupta, reports. well, it's a grim milestone forsure, and i was just going through... the number of days it's taken india to cross this is just about over a month — that is 36 days to add over 100,000 loss of lives. for now, there are extreme messages of caution that the government has been giving to the indian public because in pockets of southern states like kerala, the western state of maharashtra and north—eastern states, the daily number of cases are rising, contributing to this milestone. there have been committees that are set up,
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excessive surveillance is on, but health experts say that, more than that, what's contributing to this number is the lax attitude and covid fatigue of people. because after a severe lockdown from april and may, some curbs were eased in earlyjune. people were allowed to step out of their homes, go to restaurants with limited capacity, visit shopping malls in certain areas, and that has led to people mixing and transmitting of this virus, which is now showing this result. also, another point of caution that's coming at this occasion from scientists is of a worrying case of a delta—plus variant that was first reported in india. there have been at least 20 deaths because of this variant in the western state of maharashtra, which is being watched with extreme caution by health committees and experts. devina gupta reporting from delhi. here in the us, president biden is encouraging americans to mark the independence day holiday as a liberation from coronavirus. though new infections and deaths here have declined sharply from the peak, cases are starting to creep up, due to the delta variant.
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and the administration willjust miss itsjuly 4 goal of partially vaccinating 70% of american adults. joining us now is dr william schaffner, a public health expert from vanderbilt university medical center. and friend of the programme. thanks so much forjoining us, dr schaffner. so do we really have covid on the run, as president biden said today? covid on the run, as president biden said toda ? ~ �* , ., covid on the run, as president biden said today?— said today? well, it's a country divided into _ said today? well, it's a country divided into two, _ said today? well, it's a country divided into two, isn't - said today? well, it's a country divided into two, isn't it? - said today? well, it's a country divided into two, isn't it? in . said today? well, it's a country i divided into two, isn't it? in many parts of the country, lots of people are vaccinated and the vaccine is getting ahead of the virus, but this highly contagious delta variant is spreading still very rapidly among the unvaccinated, and there are many parts of the country that i am afraid lag in vaccination. this also variant is honing in on them, seeking them out. other people hospitalised at the present time, laura, you can hardly find any
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vaccination people —— of the people. it is only unvaccinated people that are finding themselves in the hospital at present. 50 are finding themselves in the hospital at present.— hospital at present. so how significant _ hospital at present. so how significant do _ hospital at present. so how significant do you _ hospital at present. so how significant do you think - hospital at present. so how significant do you think it i hospital at present. so how significant do you think it isj hospital at present. so how i significant do you think it is an event, president bidenjust missing that goal of getting 70% of american adults being partially vaccinated by july four? adults being partially vaccinated by jul four? , ., ., , july four? first of all, it was very aspirational. _ july four? first of all, it was very aspirational, and _ july four? first of all, it was very aspirational, and all _ july four? first of all, it was very aspirational, and all of _ july four? first of all, it was very aspirational, and all of us - july four? first of all, it was veryl aspirational, and all of us thought it would be a stretch to get there. it is a wonderful goal, we are not there yet, but it does reveal that there yet, but it does reveal that there are still many people who are reluctant, concerned, uncertain and a few that are downright stubborn about getting vaccinated, and we need to work harder to reach them, comfort them, reassure them that vaccination really is the appropriate thing to do, as in most surely is, because vaccines are saving our safe and very effective at. �* ., ., saving our safe and very effective at. �* . ., ., saving our safe and very effective at. ., ., ., , ., at. and a lot of people not getting vaccinated in _ at. and a lot of people not getting vaccinated in the _ at. and a lot of people not getting vaccinated in the us _ at. and a lot of people not getting vaccinated in the us are _ at. and a lot of people not getting vaccinated in the us are in - at. and a lot of people not getting
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vaccinated in the us are in the - vaccinated in the us are in the american south where you are, dr schaffner, so how would you persuade people? and what do you think might happen to them in the fall when we all go indoors again if we do not can vaccinated? indie all go indoors again if we do not can vaccinated?— can vaccinated? we could have onauoin can vaccinated? we could have ongoing transmission - can vaccinated? we could have ongoing transmission in - can vaccinated? we could have ongoing transmission in those | ongoing transmission in those states, including in my southeastern part of the country, where there is a stint on vaccination, and this could actually not wait until the fall —— distinct on vaccination. we are going to see this throughout the summer. i think we have to reach out. i would love local leaders, political leaders, religious leaders, business leaders, all commit themselves to vaccination and persuade their constituencies to become vaccinated. we need that kind of local reassurance. dr become vaccinated. we need that kind of local reassurance.— of local reassurance. dr william schaffner. _ of local reassurance. dr william schaffner, thank _ of local reassurance. dr william schaffner, thank you _ of local reassurance. dr william schaffner, thank you so - of local reassurance. dr william schaffner, thank you so much i of local reassurance. dr william l schaffner, thank you so much for joining us. now to miami, where rescue teams have discovered two more bodies in the rubble of the collapsed apartment building, raising
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the death toll to 20, with 128 people still missing. the bbc�*s sophie long has more. well, the search and rescue operation is now in day nine, after it had to be paused for some 15 hours on thursday. that was largely due to fears that the remaining part of the building still left standing could fall. that remains a major area of concern when it comes to the safety of the rescue workers, who are continuing now their painstaking task of sifting through the rubble, and it seems they are now considering a controlled demolition of that remaining part of the building. now, in the latest update we've had from the mayor of miami—dade county, she informed us that, sadly, they have pulled two more bodies from that pile of rubble, one of them that of a seven—year—old little girl, the daughter of one of their own, of a fire and rescue workerfrom miami, so an extremely difficult day for those rescue workers. now, more than 120 people remain unaccounted for, and the mission to find them continues. but they have been dealing with some
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very, very challenging conditions. the sun is shining here now, but there are fears that there are more tropical storms on the way due to hurricane elsa. and the conditions they're working under, again, could become even more dangerous. sophie long reporting from miami on that latest heart—breaking news. now, us officials say they're setting a fresh tone with central america, after the contentious years of the trump administration. with the coronavirus, mass migration, and increasing violence, central america faces a difficult moment. so how can the biden—harris administration reset the relationship with those governments, given all the points of tension? the bbc�*s will grant reports from washington. the new administration in washington seemed like a new start for many migrants, but on her first trip to central america since taking office, vice president kamala harris delivered the same message that the trump administration had told anyone considering the journey. do not come. the united states will continue
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to enforce our laws and secure our border. she was widely criticised for it and later clarified that claiming asylum is an international right. but with washington also urging central american governments to crack down on people leaving their borders, many say there's no discernible difference from trump to biden. the state department's special envoy for the region denies that charge. the united states government is going to enforce its laws and other governments are going to do that as well, so the focus of this administration really is on trying to change the conditions that are driving people to leave irregularly. yet the situation on the ground in central america is dire. climate change and natural disasters have destroyed crops, and gang violence and government corruption is rampant. in el salvador, washington has grave reservations about the country's president, nayib bukele, who remains defiant in the face of such criticism. translation: behind this president -
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and this is something no-one - can deny — there is no oligarchy. there are no militaryjuntas, nor much less a guerrilla commander giving orders, saying what must be done, like all presidents from the past. meanwhile in honduras, the us state department has said the government ofjuan orlando hernandez is engaged in state—sponsored drug trafficking. washington's options in the region are few. so the way that we approach corruption in governance in general is consistent with our view that the role of the united states is to work with people in the region, not to impose but to work with people in the region to create the enabling conditions for broad—based growth. even if they're that corrupt? even if they're being discussed as state sponsors of drug trafficking? we work with a range of partners, people who are... this does not mean that the united states is not continuing with investigations, or with cases where there is a law enforcement interest, those cases continue. we are focused, though,
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on working with governments and working with civil society and working with the private sector, to work together to create those enabling conditions for growth. washington's policy towards central america speaks of trying to understand the drivers of migration. the key contradiction is, however, that one of the main factors pushing people to flee is human rights abuses committed by autocratic governments, so the biden administration finds itself in a strange position of trying to criticise those abuses while working in tandem with those governments. will grant, bbc news, washington. a new diplomatic approach to central america there with the same old problems. in other news from around the world: aid deliveries are due to resume in ethiopia's war—torn northern tigray region. the un's world food programme says they now expect to reach up to 40,000 people in the coming days.
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the ethiopian government has denied allegations that it's been blocking aid after tigrayan rebels took control of much of the northern region this week. the un security council was warned today that the conflict may quickly deteriorate. the second fastest woman in the world this year, the american sprinter sha'carri richardson, has tested positive for marijuana. she's been banned for a month and will miss the 100 metres at the tokyo olympics. she said she'd taken the recreational drug to cope with "a state of emotional pain", after learning of the death of her biological mother during us olympic trials injune. you're watching bbc world news america. still to come on tonight's programme: protesters in canada pull down statues of uk royals — including queen elizabeth — amid anger over the abuse of indigenous children in schools. australia is cutting the number of visitors allowed in from overseas, following problems with its covid quarantine system. the weekly intake will be cut
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to around 3,000 people and residents of australia still can't leave the country. shaimaa khalil has more. if you're an australian stranded overseas, this is not the news you wanted to wake up to. from the middle ofjuly, the already very complicated journey for thousands trying to get home is about to get more difficult. to temporarily reduce commercial inbound passenger arrivals to all major ports by 50% from current caps, to reduce the pressure on quarantine facilities, due to the increased risks of the delta strain of the virus. australia already has very tight border restrictions. anyone who comes in has to go into hotel quarantine first. now, what makes things quite difficult as well is the lower rate of vaccinations. less than 8% of the population have taken theirjab.
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thursday's national holiday in canada was marked by protests, following the recent discovery of hundreds of unmarked graves — most of them children — at a series of former schools for indigenous students. in response to the findings, thousands of people took part in a "cancel canada day" rally in downtown ottawa last night. the bbc�*s catherine karelli has been following the story. traditionally a day of celebration, but this year, canada has found itself reckoning with its colonial past. this was the scene in winnipeg, demonstrators pulling down a statue of queen victoria. across canada, thousands of people took to the streets protesting a dark chapter in their country's history — the residential school system. they murdered thousands of children, hundreds of thousands of children, we don't know yet, but we are here to tell you to today that that was wrong. you all know that it was wrong.
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we are here today to stand with everybody to oppose the ongoing genocide of the canadian government and state against indigenous people. between the 18705 and 1990s, more than 150,000 indigenous children were taken from their families. they were made to attend church—run boarding schools. there, they were forced to abandon their native languages and convert to christianity. thousands died of disease and malnourishment. some took their own lives. in 2015, canada's truth and reconciliation commission called it cultural genocide. calls to scale back this year's canada day celebrations intensified in recent weeks, following the discovery of almost 1,000 unmarked graves at former residential schools. that number has now gone up. the latest discovery, on the eve of canada day, was here — 182 unmarked graves at st eugene's mission school in british columbia.
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in his canada day message, prime ministerjustin trudeau said canada needed to face up to its history. to this day, we don't have a full picture of how many children died in residential schools and the circumstances of their deaths. indigenous leaders have said that as investigations continue, they expect more graves will be found. catherine karelli, bbc news. a reckoning over ca nada's a reckoning over canada's past. now to zambia, which has held a state funeral for its founding president, kenneth kaunda. in powerfor 27 years, he was one of the leaders of africa's struggles against apartheid and hiv/aids. mr kaunda died injune at the age of 97. from the capital lusaka, our
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correspondent nomsa maseko reports. singing away from the politics, liberation hero and zambia's first president kenneth kuanda sang, played musical instruments and dance. he wrote songs about what he hoped independence would bring to his country and later about socioeconomic issues and his activism against hiv and aids. you see, this is the song that he insisted must be part of the production. # sons of africa, rise and shine # sons of africa, rise and shine # in the name of great africa, we shall fight and call... #
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kk, as he was affectionately known, was also a father. but first and foremost, he was the father of the nation and he instilled that duty and respect for the country in his children. one of the things he always said is that zambia has one president at a time. and at this particular moment in time, this president is kenneth kuanda himself, and this president does not come with little presidents running all over statehouse. so you guys never, ever keep that in your mind that perhaps there is something different or special about people of myjob. dr kuanda ruled zambia for nearly three decades. he introduced the one—party repressive state which oversaw zambia's economic decline which ultimately led to his political defeat. but even in his great loss, he showed grace and let go of power peacefully. heroes are not perfect people. they are usually people
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who are human beings with their own faults, and dr kuanda had his own faults, but dr kuanda had committed and dedicated his life to zambia, to building zambia, and in many respects, he had succeeded. nomsa maseko, bbc news, lusaka, zambia. and finally tonight, people in the indian state of karnataka got something of a shock when they saw a giant crocodile sauntering down their village street. take a look at this. the huge reptile had climbed out of a nearby river and headed for the village. this video — which has gone viral — shows locals following the croc from a safe distance. well, i am delighted to tell you that wildlife officials rescued the animal and released it back into the river. phew! i'm laura trevelyan.
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thanks for watching bbc world news america. have a great weekend and a happy 4th ofjuly. hello there. today has been a warmer kind of day, with more in the way of thatjuly sunshine to go around. and we've had some beautiful weather watcher pictures sent to us. this one looks like it came from the caribbean — it's actually beautiful white sand beaches on the western it's actually beautiful white sand beaches of the western isles in scotland. we have seen some showers today, those storms working away from the far north of england, southern scotland. but overnight tonight, we'll see further bands of thundery rain moving in across parts of england and wales, reaching northern ireland later on in the night. quite a muggy kind of night, a few mist and fog patches around the coastal hills of england and wales, as well, and then, through the weekend, we've got some big downpours on the way. these storms could bring some problems as well. saturday morning, our band of thundery rain continues to work
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its way northwards and eastwards. what follows across england are showers and thunderstorms that could drop 30 millimetres of rain in the space ofjust one hour. some localised surface water flooding from the heaviest of those storms. but even worse than that, into parts of south—west england, we've got this convergence zone. and with the winds not changing, that convergence zone locks the showers and thunderstorms right along this kind of line, and there will be one or two areas that pick up something like 40 to perhaps as much as 80 millimetres of rain in the worst—case scenario, and that's enough to cause some flooding issues. the showers though will be widespread, heavy rain pushing across england, a few downpours too for scotland and northern ireland, as well. and, of course, it's the euros quarterfinal. england travelling to rome to take on ukraine. after a hot and sunny day in rome, temperatures drifting down into the mid—20s for the match itself. sunday, second half of the weekend, sees an area of rain pushed across other areas of england. elsewhere, we've got heavy, thundery
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showers, again, widespread — perhaps the heaviest showers and thunderstorms this time in scotland and northern ireland, the north—west of both england and wales. temperatures still a little bit below par for the time of year, 18—20 celsius, but the storms still bringing a few problems with surface water flooding issues. into next week, low pressure on the charts monday and tuesday, bringing not just wet weather, but also quite windy weather, the strongest winds likely towards the south of the uk where we may even have gales as well. so rain, strong winds on monday and tuesday, clearing, sunshine and showers for a time, probably drier and brighter towards the end of the week. that's your weather.
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this is bbc news.
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i'm shaun ley with the latest headlines. afghan troops are now guarding bagram, after the departure of the last american forces from the main us operational base north of kabul. the pull—out comes as more districts fall to a taliban offensive. on her final official visit to the uk, chancellor angela merkel has been visiting the queen. earlier, she said britons who've had both covid jabs should be able to visit germany in the foreseeable future without quarantine. 20 people are now confirmed dead in the surfside apartment collapse in miami. one of the latest bodies to be recovered is that of a seven—year—old child, whose father is a local firefighter. and the number of deaths linked to coronavirus in india has passed the 400,000 mark. experts warn that the real number of fatalities may be much higher, as many deaths are not officially recorded.

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