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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 2, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. our headlines today. a narrow win for labour in the batley and spen by—election after a closely fought battle. kim leadbeater, sister of murdered mpjo cox, thanked herfamily in an emotional victory speech. without them, i could not have gone through— without them, i could not have gone through the last five years, never mind _ through the last five years, never mind the — through the last five years, never mind the last five weeks. my amazing parents _ mind the last five weeks. my amazing parents and _ mind the last five weeks. my amazing parents and my wonderful partner. and i_ parents and my wonderful partner. and i want— parents and my wonderful partner. and i want to give a special shout out to— and i want to give a special shout out to my— and i want to give a special shout out to my niece and nephew, who i cannot_ out to my niece and nephew, who i cannot wait— out to my niece and nephew, who i cannot wait to hug, as soon as i see them _ harry dunn's parents start legal proceedings in the us
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against the woman involved in the crash that killed their son. if football is coming home, it could provide a big boost for business. so what is the economic impact of success at the euros? i am at a rooftop bar in london to find out. there's no stopping, britain's new star at wimbledon. 18—year—old emma raducanu causes another shock and is now into the third round, on her tournament debut, only two months after completing her a—levels. warm sunshine in the next few days. get the umbrellas ready for some big showers and rumbles of thunder. full forecast here. good morning. it's friday, the 2nd ofjuly. our top story. in the last hour, it's been announced labour has narrowly held its seat in the batley and spen by—election. the party's candidate, kim leadbeater, beat her conservative challenger
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by 323 votes. kim is the sister of murdered mp, jo cox, and paid tribute to her family and friends after the result was declared. let's take a look at that moment. ido hereby i do hereby declare that kim leadbetter is duly elected. —— kim leadbetten — leadbetter is duly elected. —— kim leadbetter. | leadbetter is duly elected. -- kim leadbetter-— leadbetter. i want to say a huge thank ou leadbetter. i want to say a huge thank you to _ leadbetter. i want to say a huge thank you to the _ leadbetter. i want to say a huge thank you to the police, - leadbetter. i want to say a huge thank you to the police, who - leadbetter. i want to say a huge l thank you to the police, who sadly leadbetter. i want to say a huge i thank you to the police, who sadly i have needed more than ever of the last few weeks. and i wanted to say a huge thank you to the whole labour party team for the hours and at the time and the commitment they have put into supporting me and helping me to get to this fantastic result of this evening. well done for keeping up, everybody. there's way too many people to mention by name. but i do want to refer to my family and my friends. who, without them, i could not have got through the last five years, never mind the last five weeks. my amazing parents and my
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wonderful partner. and i want to give a special shout out to my niece and nephew, who i cannot wait to hug as soon as i see them. the focus now is catching up on a bit of sleep! maybe having a few glasses of fizz. then there's lots to do. and i think the campaign has highlighted there's lots to do. but i am going to crack on with it and i will do my very best to represent the whole of batley and spen as their new mp. i'm absolutely delighted that the people of batley and spen have rejected a division and they've voted for help. thank you very much, everybody. thank you very much, everybody. thank you. we can speak now to our political correspondent nick eardley, who is at the count for us in huddersfield. as kim leadbetter referenced, this has been a bitter and divisive campaign. how much can we read into the result? it’s campaign. how much can we read into the result? �* , , ., ., , the result? it's been a really heated campaign. _ the result? it's been a really heated campaign. we - the result? it's been a really heated campaign. we have i the result? it's been a really - heated campaign. we have seen that over the _ heated campaign. we have seen that over the past few weeks. there was quite _ over the past few weeks. there was
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quite a _ over the past few weeks. there was quite a heavy police presence at times— quite a heavy police presence at times when some of the candidates were out _ times when some of the candidates were out. you heard some of the emotion— were out. you heard some of the emotion from kim leadbeater in her speech _ emotion from kim leadbeater in her speech but — emotion from kim leadbeater in her speech. but also has quite a significant political ramification too. there had been an expectation actually, _ too. there had been an expectation actually, that after the hartlepool by—election, where labour lost a massive — by—election, where labour lost a massive majority to the conservatives, that labour were in trouble _ conservatives, that labour were in trouble here. many people were predicting that the conservatives would _ predicting that the conservatives would win this by—election, not because — would win this by—election, not because george galloway was taking a number— because george galloway was taking a number of— because george galloway was taking a number of votes away from the labour party. _ number of votes away from the labour party, particularly in the sizeable asian _ party, particularly in the sizeable asian community in the constituency. that didn't _ asian community in the constituency. that didn't happen. and the fact that kim — that didn't happen. and the fact that kim leadbetter has managed to come _ that kim leadbetter has managed to come through and win this by the narrowest— come through and win this by the narrowest of margins, only about 300 votes _ narrowest of margins, only about 300 votes in _ narrowest of margins, only about 300 votes in it. _ narrowest of margins, only about 300 votes in it, means there will be a pretty— votes in it, means there will be a pretty significant a sigh of relief being _ pretty significant a sigh of relief being breezed in the labour party this morning. i've already heard from _ this morning. i've already heard from a — this morning. i've already heard from a couple of people close to sir keir starmer, the labour leader, saving _
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keir starmer, the labour leader, saying these shows some of the talk about _ saying these shows some of the talk about his _ saying these shows some of the talk about his leadership, some of the talk about— about his leadership, some of the talk about a potential leadership challenge, is overcooked and it shows — challenge, is overcooked and it shows that he actually has a job to be getting — shows that he actually has a job to be getting on with. the conservatives will play it down and say it _ conservatives will play it down and say it is _ conservatives will play it down and say it is not — conservatives will play it down and say it is not normal for a governing party— say it is not normal for a governing party to— say it is not normal for a governing party to win — say it is not normal for a governing party to win by—elections from the opposition— party to win by—elections from the opposition and historically that is true _ opposition and historically that is true but— opposition and historically that is true. but as i say, the expectation he had _ true. but as i say, the expectation he had been that labour would really struggle _ he had been that labour would really struggle and the —— they are absolutely delighted this morning they have managed to win this seat. thank— they have managed to win this seat. thank you _ they have managed to win this seat. thank you very much. the parents of teenage motorcyclist harry dunn have given evidence against the women suspected of causing his death in 2019. charlotte charles and tim dunn flew to washington dc earlier this week, ahead of legal proceedings against the suspect, anne sacoolas. david willis has this report. harry dunn died after a car travelling on the wrong side of the road hit his motor bike outside raf croughton in northamptonshire. the driver, anne sacoolas, pictured here
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on her wedding day, was charged with causing death by dangerous driving but a the country and claimed diplomatic immunity. officials here have refused to extradite her. last month, at the g7 summit in cornwall, borisjohnson reiterated to president biden his desire to see justice done and there are now plans for ms sacoolas to attend a virtual civil trial from for ms sacoolas to attend a virtual civil trialfrom her home in the state of virginia. with the process gathering pace, harry's parents have come here to give evidence under oath. ., , ., ., come here to give evidence under oath. .,, ., ., , ., come here to give evidence under oath. ., ., , oath. there has got to be a proper end to this- _ oath. there has got to be a proper end to this. there's _ oath. there has got to be a proper end to this. there's got _ oath. there has got to be a proper end to this. there's got to - oath. there has got to be a proper end to this. there's got to be - end to this. there's got to be justice of some description. this cannot be just left as it is. we will keep going. we will keep going, evenif will keep going. we will keep going, even if it takes us forever, we will keep going. share even if it takes us forever, we will keep going-— keep going. are you any more confident _ keep going. are you any more confident after _ keep going. are you any more confident after today - keep going. are you any more confident after today justice . keep going. are you any more i confident after today justice will be served? confident after today “ustice will be swept confident after today “ustice will be served? . ., , , ., be served? yeah, absolutely. you know, like — be served? yeah, absolutely. you know, like i— be served? yeah, absolutely. you know, like i said, _ be served? yeah, absolutely. you know, like i said, everything - be served? yeah, absolutely. you know, like i said, everything we i be served? yeah, absolutely. you| know, like i said, everything we do is a step— know, like i said, everything we do is a step in— know, like i said, everything we do is a step in the right direction. so, is a step in the right direction.
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so. we — is a step in the right direction. so. we are _ is a step in the right direction. so, we are confident that what we are doing — so, we are confident that what we are doing will all go towards getting _ are doing will all go towards getting justice for our boy. it is getting “ustice for our boy. it is nearl getting justice for our boy. it is nearly two _ getting justice for our boy. it is nearly two years _ getting justice for our boy. it 3 nearly two years since harry dunn's death and his parents now they may have to wait another six months before they get a big day in court. david willis, bbc news, washington. rescuers in miami have resumed the search for survivors in the rubble of an apartment block that collapsed last week. so far, 18 people have been confirmed dead and 140 people are still unaccounted for. on a visit to the scene yesterday, us presidentjoe biden said he was still hopeful of finding life in the rubble. sophie long has this report. how are you? president biden thanking the rescue workers who've been searching for survivors day and night. he also spent time with the families affected, who he said are going through hell. they had basic, heart—wrenching questions. will i be able to recover the body of my son or daughter,
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my husband, my cousin, my mum and dad? how can i have closure without being able to bury them if i don't get the body? what do i do? jill and i want them to know that we're with them and the country's with them. when i saw the video, my heart was ripped from my chest because that's the moment i saw my mum, my grandmother died. and that's all i see now when i close my eyes. now, pablo tries to hold onto memories of happier times, in the days that have passed since the building where his mother rescue teams have been working around the clock, painstakingly removing rubble, searching for survivors. it is a dangerous and demanding task, both physically and emotionally. we are human beings and we are dealing with human beings beneath the surface. and we know that we look for them and we do the best to get to them. but still, the thought that under all this concrete, all this,
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still there is a person, maybe a little boy that is buried there, it's very difficult to fail to understand. the families of those still unaccounted for have been to visit the site. and some have told me that seeing the homes that they used to visit reduced to rubble with their own eyes, is helping them now to start to prepare for the worst. all of them, though, have one question. how long can someone possibly survive in there? it's a question no—one can answer, but they were able to see what's being done to reach those trapped in the twisted metal and concrete before the hope they cling to fades completely. sophie long, bbc news, surfside, miami. borisjohnson will meet with chancellor angela merkel today, on her last visit to the uk as head of the german government. the two leaders are expected to discuss coronavirus travel restrictions and post—brexit relations between the uk and germany.
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mrs merkel will later visit the queen at windsor castle. a company appointed to help oversee britney spears' financial affairs, has asked to withdraw from an arrangement that has controlled the singer's life for the last 13 years. the organisation had been named asjoint guardians of her estate, along with her fatherjamie spears. the announcement comes days after the pop star said she was traumatised by the arrangement. more than a thousand people have been forced to flee a town in western canada because of fires caused by an unprecedented heatwave. according to the canadian authorities, lytton in british columbia has been almost completely destroyed by forest fires, after temperatures reached 49.6 degrees celsius. a fleeing resident recorded this video showing the dangerous roads out of town. sir richard branson is a step closer to beating rival billionaires in the race into space. he's announced the date he'll blast beyond the earth's atmosphere — nine days ahead of the amazon founderjeff bezos.
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both tycoons have created space tourism companies offering flights for the wealthy. branson's vehicle can climb to an altitude of 90km giving those on—board a few minutes of weightlessness and a view of the curvature of the earth. what is the betting thatjeff bezos will somehow bring forward his timeline by nine days? filth. will somehow bring forward his timeline by nine days? 0h, 'ust to net some timeline by nine days? 0h, 'ust to get some more i timeline by nine days? 0h, 'ust to get some more headlines? _ timeline by nine days? oh, just to get some more headlines? well, | timeline by nine days? oh, just to i get some more headlines? well, just get some more headlines? well, 'ust to be first. you — get some more headlines? well, 'ust to be first. you would, i get some more headlines? well, 'ust to be first. you would, wouldn't h to be first. you would, wouldn't ou? to be first. you would, wouldn't you? that _ to be first. you would, wouldn't you? that is — to be first. you would, wouldn't you? that is what _ to be first. you would, wouldn't you? that is what he _ to be first. you would, wouldn't you? that is what he would - to be first. you would, wouldn't you? that is what he would do. | to be first. you would, wouldn't i you? that is what he would do. if you? that is what he would do. if you and i were in a space race, rachel, and it were going down to the wire, you would be doing exactly that. of course you would. it is natural. 11 minutes past six. matt has got of the weather. i was at looking? how are you? i am a very well, majority. good morning. you might mod —— you might not want to hear the rest of this though. the weather in the next few days is not the best in the next few days is not the best in the next few days is not the best in the summer variety six. some
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sunshine. you will get a bit of that. quite pleasant when the sun is out. but be prepared more showers cropping up under some of those will be heavy and thundery. out there this morning a little bit of rain to get your day under way, particularly the borders of scotland and england. that is now pulling away. rain will break up across the borders of this morning. away from that, most places dry. chilly start. 22 degrees yesterday around the grampians. grey and gloomy across the english channel coast. plenty of cloud to begin with. brightening up. showers developing later. in the sunshine temperatures in the low 20s. it will feel quite pleasant. through the afternoon isolated chance of a heavy thundery showers in the north of scotland. the chance of thundery showers southern scotland into the north of england. fewer showers
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elsewhere. most of you will stay dry. but clouding over a bit more towards the south west later on as we head into the early part of the evening. through this evening and overnight we will see the showers fade. a few will continue in northern scotland. wetter weather arrives from the south—west to take us into tomorrow morning. some of that rain will be on the heavy side. temperatures in double figures if not the mid—teens. the outlook on the weekend and into next week, look away. lots of showers. but there will be some sunshine too. i promise. will be some sunshine too. i promise-— will be some sunshine too. i romise. . ., ., i promise. without looking at your screen, how— i promise. without looking at your screen, how do _ i promise. without looking at your screen, how do you _ i promise. without looking at your screen, how do you think- i promise. without looking at your screen, how do you think the - i promise. without looking at your i screen, how do you think the skyline over london is looking this morning? rather grey, i would guess. over london is looking this morning? rather grey, iwould guess. is over london is looking this morning? rather grey, i would guess. is it? oh, actually, it is quite bright! what do you think about it now? halt; what do you think about it now? hazy sunshine. there _ what do you think about it now? hazy sunshine. there is _ what do you think about it now? hazy sunshine. there is cloud. right - sunshine. there is cloud. right every time- _ sunshine. there is cloud. right every time. as _ sunshine. there is cloud. right every time. as always! - sunshine. there is cloud. right every time. as always! see - sunshine. there is cloud. rightj every time. as always! see you later. there is a reason why we are
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looking over that skyline. ben has that outlook. looking ahead to a couple of busy days for football and the money that comes alongside it. good morning. matt will kill you for that, by the way. welcome to our gorgeous viewpoint. we are looking back at that skyline. over the next couple of days very few people will be looking at that. instead they would be looking at that, the big screen here in the bar on a rooftop with that glorious vista. and of course, the euros. we are talking about the business implications. success at the euros for the home nations means a boost to the economy. let me run you through the numbers. overall the tournament could boost the size of the uk economy by 150 million quid. now that's not a huge amount in the big scale of things, but it helps.
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if we are feeling optimistic we put our hands in her pockets. just on beer sales alone, 19 million pints of beer expected to be sold on saturday for england's game. we should say, if social distancing rules and some of those restrictions were not in place, had they been lifted when we originally thought they would be, that number would be much higher. another £5 million. quite a significant difference. nonetheless for hospitality firms, they are glad to be back open and have people through the doors. it is notjust hospitality. it is also retail. we spend more for big events like this. all of the merchandise that goes with things like this. sale is expected to be sharply up. £3.5 billion boat in the shops as a result of the tournament. and also, supermarkets doing well. apart from the beer sales, pizza sales expected to jump.
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the beer sales, pizza sales expected tojump. a 200% rise in pizza sales. 10 million will be eaten during the tournament. spare a thought for the people making those pizzas. we caught people making those pizzas. we caught up people making those pizzas. we caught up with people making those pizzas. we caught up with some people making those pizzas. we caught up with some of people making those pizzas. we caught up with some of them. people making those pizzas. we caught up with some of them. it’s we caught up with some of them. it�*s bringing the country together massively. restrictions ease and people spend time with each other. you are allowed to sit in the garden with a lot of people as opposed to on a park bench. people are taking advantage of the fact they can do that, which is great. your deliveries and your takeaway is increasing significantly. with the football on tuesday, if we were to compare that with tuesdays over june, as opposed to the tuesdayjust gone, you would have to say it would be an extra 20 to 25% of sales wise. we prep more in advance. we make sure we are covered for staff. people may have to pick up a few more hours, we order more product. in the next two to three weeks, it
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will all be basically back to normal. it's great. when you coincide that with sporting events, especially the football, you see everybody coming together. every time england play i am confident they are going to win. even when they are going to win. even when they get com —— knocked out of the group stage. also, i have taken next week off, so they need to win, otherwise i'm wasting my holiday. lots of pizzas consumed. all of that merchandise. let me introduce you to harry. he is the venue manager here. good morning. thank you for letting us in so bright and airy. a big weekend ahead for you. how important are the euros for places like this? fantastic. with all the stuff going on with covid at the moment, it is fantastic to get people excited about drinking again, eating again, on the roof. about drinking again, eating again, on the roof-— on the roof. there is a fly in the ointment- _ on the roof. there is a fly in the ointment. you _ on the roof. there is a fly in the ointment. you can't _ on the roof. there is a fly in the ointment. you can't have - on the roof. there is a fly in the ointment. you can't have big i on the roof. there is a fly in the - ointment. you can't have big groups, which you would like to have. it limits capacity. you are very lucky you have a big outdoor venue with a
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big screen and a glorious view. it works in yourfavour? big screen and a glorious view. it works in your favour? absolutely. a blessin: works in your favour? absolutely. a blessing and _ works in your favour? absolutely. a blessing and a _ works in your favour? absolutely. a blessing and a curse _ works in your favour? absolutely. a blessing and a curse being - works in your favour? absolutely. a blessing and a curse being on - works in your favour? absolutely. a blessing and a curse being on the l blessing and a curse being on the roof. we fall victim to the weather when it's not great. we can have groups of 30. we open bars indoors for smaller groups. making the most of it, definitely. hobie for smaller groups. making the most of it, definitely.— of it, definitely. how important is this tournament, _ of it, definitely. how important is this tournament, given _ of it, definitely. how important is this tournament, given the - of it, definitely. how important is this tournament, given the year. of it, definitely. how important is i this tournament, given the year that you have had? we know hospitality is one of the worst affected industries by all of those restrictions. you are counting on success to make a little bit of money back? absolutely, we have hit the ground running. we have expanded the team. we have got almost 100 people hired here now on the roster. it is great to have a lot of people working, friendly faces. socially distanced. keeping our guests say. still providing a great service. what keeping our guests say. still providing a great service. what are our providing a great service. what are your guests _ providing a great service. what are your guests telling _ providing a great service. what are your guests telling you _ providing a great service. what are your guests telling you about - providing a great service. what are| your guests telling you about being back? they must be thrilled to be back? they must be thrilled to be backin back? they must be thrilled to be back in a barfor a big event and for you to be able to welcome them? yeah, absolutely. a bit cagey at
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first. with a social distance measures and the way we do things here, the way we have tailored our operation, people are comfortable and enjoying themselves. good operation, people are comfortable and enjoying themselves. and en'oying themselves. good luck. i and enjoying themselves. good luck. i know ou and enjoying themselves. good luck. i know you have _ and enjoying themselves. good luck. i know you have a _ and enjoying themselves. good luck. i know you have a lot _ and enjoying themselves. good luck. i know you have a lot of _ and enjoying themselves. good luck. i know you have a lot of work - and enjoying themselves. good luck. i know you have a lot of work ahead. | i know you have a lot of work ahead. fingers crossed. nice to see you. harry, the venue manager. a little later we will take you through all of the stock. big economic boost as a result. but yeah, fingers crossed for the games over the next couple of days. for the games over the next couple of da s. �* ., ~ for the games over the next couple ofda s. �* ., ,, we are going to look at the front pages of the papers. they came into early for the result of the batley and spen by—election. kim leadbeater, the sister of murdered mpjo cox, was the winner. this tweet from brendan cox, the husband ofjo cox.
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it is worth saying as well that in the next ten to 15 minutes we will be speaking to kim leadbeater, who won the batley and spen election. the result came injust and spen election. the result came in just before and spen election. the result came injust before six and spen election. the result came in just before six o'clock. we will be speaking to her live in about 15 minutes. iterate be speaking to her live in about 15 minutes. ~ ., ., ., minutes. we will get a reaction from the conservative _ minutes. we will get a reaction from the conservative party _ minutes. we will get a reaction from the conservative party later - minutes. we will get a reaction from the conservative party later in - minutes. we will get a reaction from the conservative party later in the i the conservative party later in the morning as well. let's take a look at today's papers. like many of the front pages today, the daily mirror leads with prince william and harry's tribute to their mother. the pair said in a statement: "every day, we wish she were still with us." they thanked people around the world for keeping her memory alive. the daily mail says the brothers were "together... but still so far apart." the telegraph reports the prime minister has called for parents to be patient over the ending of the school bubble system. the paper is campaigning for ministers to "take action to bring to an end to the disruption
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in schools", as rising numbers of pupils are being sent home to isolate. and over on the bbc news website, there's a story about an 82—year—old woman, who, after spending six decades trying to reach space, willjoinjeff bezos on the first human flight by his space company later this month. wally funk, who first underwent training in the 1960s, is on course to become the oldest person to ever fly to space. it was because of her gender. she did all the training like the male astronauts at the time in the 19605 but because of her gender didn't get to go. but because of her gender didn't get to no. ., but because of her gender didn't get to .o_ ., ., , but because of her gender didn't get to no. ., ., , , to go. now finally, she will. amazing — to go. now finally, she will. amazing story. _ to go. now finally, she will. amazing story. more - to go. now finally, she will. i amazing story. more reaction throughout the morning to that result in batley and spen, the by—election. kim leadbeater the victor. we will be talking to her just after half past six. it is 6:21am. in november 2019, saskia jones was volunteering at a prisoner rehabilitation conference in central
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london, when she was attacked and killed by convicted terrorist usman khan. now, in herfamily�*s first interview, saskia's uncles, phil and petejones, have been speaking about the impact of her death. they've been telling their story to zoe conway. we want to represent how she saw the world, how she interacted with people, how much we loved her and still love her. people need to know what has actually happened here. the enormity of what's happened, and what a devastating effect it has had on ourfamily and a number of other people. convicted terrorist usman khan surrounded on london bridge. three men armed with a fire extinguisher and a narwhal tusk, tackle him to the ground nearby. in fishmongers' hall, saskia jones and jack merritt lay dying.
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khan had stabbed them with knives strapped to his wrists. just two hours earlier, he was sat at a table chatting to saskia. both were guests at a prison education event. it's actually emotionally difficult to come to terms with anyone sitting almost next to someone for that amount of time, and then a person, whatever the human being, whoever the human being is, doing what they did to that person. that's very difficult to take. once in a while, we realise that these things are not good for the problems we are seeing. this is saskia taking part in a discussion at the fishmongers' hall event. she believed in prisoner rehabilitation, and had been a volunteer for learning together. how do you want to remember her? we have so many memories of saskia that contribute to remembering her. she was vibrant. i always remember her as being challenging, actually, because whatever i said to her,
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she would challenge it, and she'd make sure that i was on firm ground, and she would make sure that there was justice, notjust in the wider sphere ofjustice, butjustice in everyday dealings with people. i've lived for 20 years longer than saskia did, and i view what she achieved in her short life as far greater value than anything i've achieved so far. and building upon that is something that we're focused upon. as a teenager, usman khan was convicted of plotting to set up a terrorist training camp and went to prison. shortly before his release in 2018, m15 had intelligence he was planning another attack. he was monitored in the community by the probation service, the police and m15. they allowed him to go to fishmongers' hall that day without a police escort. learning together is a theoretically informed, values—led educational mission.
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amy ludlow and ruth armstrong are the directors of the cambridge university learning together programme, which teaches prisoners and university students side by side, and which held the event at fishmongers' hall. i'm going to explain to you how- i got introduced to learn together. khan became one of their students in prison. amy and ruth, amongst others, saw him as a success story. they put him on their leaflets. they gave him a computer. i think people saw the advantage of having him as somebody they had involved in their programme, showing some capability to deal with even the highest category of offender. theyjust lost sight of the danger to the public, their employees and anyone else associated with the programme. at the inquest into saskia's death, learning together said it was the responsibility of the prison and probation service to assess khan's risk,
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and they'd relied on those agencies' expertise. something that was put to amy ludlow if, after everything that's happened, learning together would rule out working with categories of prisoner terrorist offenders. and her answer was no, because there's no research evidence to support that. yeah, and we heard a number of times there's no research evidence for this and no research evidence for that. i suggest that the main evidence we have now is that it wasn't a wise idea. the arrogance in thinking that academics necessarily can on their own deal with the types of prisoners that usman khan was, to the point where, you know, someone can manipulate that. amy ludlow and ruth armstrong received several awards for their work, which was also praised by the prison inspectorate. but the organisation is now suspended whilst cambridge university carries out a review. do you think ruth armstrong and amy ludlow can continue to lead this organisation?
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they shouldn't be leading an organisation that got something badly and tragically wrong. from a family point of view, we'd be very distressed, upset and frankly insulted, if they did. in a statement, cambridge university said... saskia was passionate about improving justice for rape victims, and her dissertation on the subject was recently cited in a government report. there's now a phd in her name
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at anglia ruskin university, where she was once a student. saskia obviously will be forever young in our eyes, but her legacy is already far bigger than she would ever have hoped for, if she had thought about her legacy, which she actually wouldn't have done at the end of the day. we want to represent how saskia is positioned in our hearts as well as in our minds. we will talk to the prison service later about the issue of rehabilitation of prisoners and extremists. ah thanks to the family. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a man in his 605 remains
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in a critical condition after being stabbed last night at oxford circus. a 25—year—old man was arrested after being detained by members of the public at the scene. anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to contact the police. city hall and the metropolitan police have set out plans to work with multiple agencies to tackle violence in london ahead of the school summer holidays. more areas will see an increased police presence, especially in open spaces and parks. and there'll be additional funding for programmes run by london's violence reduction unit in places like brent, redbridge and camden. lmost 200,000 newjob adverts were posted in the last week ofjune, with many of them for roles in london. latest figures by the recruitment and employment confederation said there were now over 1.5 million vacancies being advertised, being driven by sectors recently re—opening after being closed due to the pandemic. jobs in professional and skilled sectors were particularly in demand. ahead of the capital hosting one of the most exciting matches in recent history, more than 3,000
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of londoners faces have been pasted around the city. its to showcase individual achievements throughout the pandemic as well as celebrate the sense of community in areas across london. the posters have temporarily gone up across tower bridge, in kings cross, the royal docks, catford and in tottenham. we've had some people, we've asked them to put the faces on the wall and they almost seem like some of them think they are not worthy to go on the well and it's quite strange that they have that reaction but everyone is worthy because we are all one community. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. because of the incident at oxford circus it remains closed. good morning. well, it is a mild start. temperatures in the double figures. high—pressure to the south of the uk. we still have sunshine today
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but notice waiting in the wings is this low pressure system for the weekend. any mist this morning will burn back, cloud breaking. some decent sunny spells, but those sunny spells can spark off one or two heavy, slow—moving showers. it is going to be warm today too. temperatures getting up to 23—24 celsius. into this evening, they showers peter out. we get some clear spells to start with, but moving in that low—pressure system flinging towards us, so we are looking at rain as we head into saturday morning. minimum temperature mild, between 13 and 15. so that rain spreading in tomorrow but for play at wimbledon today, it's not looking too bad. there is the risk of a shower, but it's fairly slim. plenty of dry weather, temperatures getting up to 24. now for tomorrow, those outbreaks of rain heavy, slow moving. you might get a rumble of thunder. sunday as well, further outbreaks of rain. and that low—pressure still influencing as we head into the first part of next week. it's not exactly a dry picture, with things getting a bit breezy for monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london
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newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. goodbye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. in the last hour, it has been announced that labour has narrowly held its seat in the batley and spen by—election. kim leadbeater peter conservative challenger by 323 votes. kim is the sister of murdered mpjo cox and paid tribute to her family and friends after the result was declared. well, we can speak now to kim leadbeater. good morning and congratulations on your win. good mornin: congratulations on your win. good morning and _ congratulations on your win. good morning and thank— congratulations on your win. good morning and thank you _ congratulations on your win. (13mm morning and thank you very much. congratulations on your win. good i morning and thank you very much. in your acceptance speech, which was just before 6am this morning, you
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said that people in the constituency had rejected division and voted for hope. what will that look like with you as an mp? i’sere hope. what will that look like with you as an mp?— you as an mp? i've spent the last few ears you as an mp? i've spent the last few years working _ you as an mp? i've spent the last few years working for _ you as an mp? i've spent the last few years working for the - you as an mp? i've spent the last few years working for the jo - you as an mp? i've spent the last few years working for the jo cox i few years working for the jo cox foundation, bringing people together across the community of batley and spen and one of the reasons i put myself forward to br mp was to build on that work and i think sadly we have seen some nastiness during this by—election campaign and there are some divisions that need to be healed but i think if anyone can achieve that, then i can. i have conducted a very positive campaign and have focused very much on the good people of batley and spen. we have had a huge amount of people helping me to campaign. i am incredibly grateful to them and for putting their trust and faith in me. you have referenced a number of times already, i think in your speech you said it has been a gruelling few weeks. you also said that the police who you have sadly
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needed more than ever during this period of time. can you tell us a little bit more about some of the things and the pressure you have been under things and the pressure you have been unde— things and the pressure you have been unde ., , been under there has been some poor behaviour and — been under there has been some poor behaviour and we _ been under there has been some poor behaviour and we have _ been under there has been some poor behaviour and we have had _ behaviour and we have had campaigners who have had things thrown at them and someone has been arrested. there have been moments of real unpleasantness. what is really upsetting as i have had police looking after me. those police should be out and doing other things and spending their time on issues that people are concerned about, whether it is anti—social behaviour or fighting whether it is anti—social behaviour orfighting crime. i have tried to rise above that wherever i can and the team around me have risen above that but we need to think about what politics looks like going forward had for me some of the tactics we have seen in recent weeks, they have no place in politics in this country as far as i am concerned. iterate no place in politics in this country as far as i am concerned.- as far as i am concerned. we will come back _ as far as i am concerned. we will come back to _ as far as i am concerned. we will come back to some _ as far as i am concerned. we will come back to some of— as far as i am concerned. we will come back to some of the - as far as i am concerned. we will come back to some of the widerl come back to some of the wider issues in a moment, but on that theme, given what happened tojo cox
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and given what you just said about your concerns for your own safety, obviously you are now a politician but there is a very personal element to what you are doing, initially the decision to stand but also the security fears you have been talking about, given what happened. yes. security fears you have been talking about, given what happened. yes, of course, and — about, given what happened. yes, of course, and it's— about, given what happened. yes, of course, and it's very _ about, given what happened. yes, of course, and it's very sad _ about, given what happened. yes, of course, and it's very sad that - about, given what happened. yes, of course, and it's very sad that when . course, and it's very sad that when i should be spending my time being incredibly excited, which i am, and really looking forward to the future in this role that i'm also very conscious of security and safety, but we have to be but i thing we have to get your point in politics where we do things differently and the public have a more positive relationship with politicians and there's lots of work that we can do around that. people view politicians as humans beings. it is someone's mum, someone's daughter or husband and we need to make sure that politicians connect with people so we can hopefully breakdown some of that toxicity. lets we can hopefully breakdown some of that toxicity-— that toxicity. lets get to the detail of your _ that toxicity. lets get to the
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detail of your win. _ that toxicity. lets get to the detail of your win. why - that toxicity. lets get to the detail of your win. why was | that toxicity. lets get to the i detail of your win. why was the margin so narrow in your win? just over 300 votes, it was very close. why'd you think the labour party lost so many votes in your constituency? it lost so many votes in your constituency?— lost so many votes in your constituen ? . , , . lost so many votes in your constituen ? , . . constituency? it was very close. we are under no _ constituency? it was very close. we are under no illusion. _ constituency? it was very close. we are under no illusion. we _ constituency? it was very close. we are under no illusion. we have i constituency? it was very close. we are under no illusion. we have had| are under no illusion. we have had two very tough election defeats and we have some work to do and that is why a put myself forward because i want to be part of that. the labour party values are ones i have lived my life by, this is about social justice and fairness and equality, but we have got to reconnect with some of our voters had for me to be part of that is something i am very excited about doing.— excited about doing. rebuilding is one of those _ excited about doing. rebuilding is one of those political— excited about doing. rebuilding is one of those political phrases i excited about doing. rebuilding is one of those political phrases that people use when something is fundamentally wrong. is there something fundamentally wrong with how labour is connecting with local communities? ida. how labour is connecting with local communities?— how labour is connecting with local communities? no, i don't think there
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is something — communities? no, i don't think there is something fundamentally - communities? no, i don't think there is something fundamentally wrong, i is something fundamentally wrong, but i think there is work to be done. the labour party is a broad church and it should be. we want people from all different backgrounds so we have some work to do, but certainly what i have found during the campaign is whatever people's different backgrounds are, we all care about the same sorts of things. we all want to live communities, have good schools and good social care and a strong nhs, so whatever the differences are across communities, the values of the labour party around those key issues are really important to pretty much everybody. x�*t�*ou issues are really important to pretty much everybody. you will be very aware — pretty much everybody. you will be very aware as _ pretty much everybody. you will be very aware as you _ pretty much everybody. you will be very aware as you have _ pretty much everybody. you will be very aware as you have thought i pretty much everybody. you will be very aware as you have thought a i very aware as you have thought a local campaign over issues that were important to local people, but you will be very aware that there was a lot of interest in what happened there in relation to the labour party, the conservative party. keir starmer particularly. he was using his name, his appearance, alongside you — was using his name more of an asset or a problem? the
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you - was using his name more of an asset or a problem?— asset or a problem? the focus of the cam -aain asset or a problem? the focus of the campaign was _ asset or a problem? the focus of the campaign was very — asset or a problem? the focus of the campaign was very much _ asset or a problem? the focus of the campaign was very much listening i asset or a problem? the focus of the campaign was very much listening to | campaign was very much listening to local people. sometimes national issues came up, but i have to be honest, the vast majority of conversations were about very local issues. people want to feel like they have an mp who cares about this community and as someone who has led here my whole life and in various places across the constituency, think that is ready connection came from, the fact that i was local. national staff plays a part but this was really about the local issues that people care about. they want some they can trust a at the vet and going forward and i think the fact that i am born and bred here has been really important to people. i understand that point. the question was about keir starmer particularly, whether or not he was an asset as your leader as you were campaigning and talking to people. would that be and talking to people. would that be a fair description or not? i and talking to people. would that be a fair description or not?— a fair description or not? i think most of the _ a fair description or not? i think most of the conversations i a fair description or not? i think i most of the conversations weren't about the labour leadership. most of the conversations were about
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people's day—to—day lives. i think thatis people's day—to—day lives. i think that is probably all i can say, really. that is probably all i can say, reall . , ., ., , really. 0k, given you are the newest labour mp, — really. 0k, given you are the newest labour mp, i— really. 0k, given you are the newest labour mp, i wonder _ really. 0k, given you are the newest labour mp, i wonder if _ really. 0k, given you are the newest labour mp, i wonder if you - really. 0k, given you are the newest labour mp, i wonder if you could i labour mp, i wonder if you could flash out a little more about what you thought about the rebuilding of the relationship between the labour party, a national labour party if you like, and people in their homes and their lives. what you see there is a key elements that are missing? i think the big thing is listening to people, listening to their concerns, and certainly that is what i've been doing a lot of, and understanding that having a really good labour mp to fight for them in westminster, but also at a local level, to change things and get things done, i think that is the things done, i think that is the thing that most people are concerned about and certainly that is how i will approach the job from day one. it is being in the community and listening and getting the right people around the table to take action on the things that people care about. that is what the mp
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should do, be in the heart of the community and trying to improve things. iii community and trying to improve thins. ., , ., community and trying to improve thins. . , ., ~' community and trying to improve thins. ._ ., ,, ., things. if! may, iwould like to finish on a _ things. ifi may, iwould like to finish on a personal— things. if! may, iwould like to finish on a personal note i things. if! may, iwould like to| finish on a personal note where things. if! may, i would like to i finish on a personal note where we began and thank you for going through the issues in relation to the wider context. are you, when you took the podium and you hailed the result and you became an mp. where were your thoughts in relation to your sister and your family? were your thoughts in relation to your sister and yourfamily? it’s your sister and your family? it's inevitable _ your sister and your family? it�*s inevitable not to think about higher and mum and dad and particularly her children. it was a very big decision to put myself forward. it has been very emotional campaign and today is very emotional campaign and today is very emotional campaign and today is very emotionalfor me very emotional campaign and today is very emotional for me for lots of reasons but if i can behalf the mp that she was, i know that i will do her proud and my family proud and fingers crossed that i do a fantasticjob just fingers crossed that i do a fantastic job just as fingers crossed that i do a fantasticjob just as she did. kim fantastic job 'ust as she did. kim leadbeater, — fantasticjobjust as she did. kim leadbeater, thank you very much for your time this morning.— your time this morning. well, let's
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aet your time this morning. well, let's get reaction _ your time this morning. well, let's get reaction from _ your time this morning. well, let's get reaction from jo _ your time this morning. well, let's get reaction from jo cox's - your time this morning. well, let's| get reaction from jo cox's husband, brandon cox. he has tweeted his congratulations. thank you for talking to us. an emotional day for the whole family.— the whole family. yes, it's a big da , i the whole family. yes, it's a big day, i think— the whole family. yes, it's a big day, i thinkjust _ the whole family. yes, it's a big day, i thinkjust on _ the whole family. yes, it's a big day, i thinkjust on the - the whole family. yes, it's a big day, i thinkjust on the personal day, ithinkjust on the personal level— day, i thinkjust on the personal level were — day, i thinkjust on the personal level were all incredibly proud of what _ level were all incredibly proud of what kim — level were all incredibly proud of what kim has done. it was incredibly brave _ what kim has done. it was incredibly brave of— what kim has done. it was incredibly brave of her— what kim has done. it was incredibly brave of her to step forward into it, brave of her to step forward into it. not _ brave of her to step forward into it. notjust — brave of her to step forward into it, notjust around brave of her to step forward into it, not just around the brave of her to step forward into it, notjust around the security side _ it, notjust around the security side of— it, notjust around the security side of things, given what happened tojo, _ side of things, given what happened tojo, but _ side of things, given what happened tojo, but also side of things, given what happened to jo, but also the context of being very bruising and horrible campaign at times— very bruising and horrible campaign at times and put yourself into that to try— at times and put yourself into that to try to— at times and put yourself into that to try to keep positive, key provision _ to try to keep positive, key provision focused on what you want to change _ provision focused on what you want to change and how you bring people together _ to change and how you bring people together. when our loose, it would have been— together. when our loose, it would have been - — together. when our loose, it would have been — i would have together. when our loose, it would have been — iwould have beenjust as proud _ have been — iwould have beenjust as proud of— have been — iwould have beenjust as proud of her. have been - i would have been 'ust as proud of heni as proud of her. talking about that bruisin: as proud of her. talking about that bruising campaign _ as proud of her. talking about that bruising campaign and _ as proud of her. talking about that bruising campaign and how - as proud of her. talking about that. bruising campaign and how personal it became, i think all of the candidates would say that it was challenging in different forms.
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perhaps demonstrates a lot of work to be done, givenjo's legacy and how hard you have worked on that to make politics a kinder place. yes. make politics a kinder place. yes, there is a differentiation - make politics a kinder place. yes, there is a differentiation between kinder— there is a differentiation between kinder and still being able to have that lively, energetic, passionate debate, — that lively, energetic, passionate debate, and i think the majority of the campaigns between the conservative party and the labour party— conservative party and the labour party was — conservative party and the labour party was that, it was about the ideas _ party was that, it was about the ideas and — party was that, it was about the ideas and how you change things for local people and who is the best candidate to do that. it is at the margins — candidate to do that. it is at the margins that you have candidates who are focused _ margins that you have candidates who are focused on dividing and splitting communities and it's very easy to _ splitting communities and it's very easy to divide people. that is the easy— easy to divide people. that is the easy thing — easy to divide people. that is the easy thing to do in politics. the difficult — easy thing to do in politics. the difficult thing, the poetry of politics. _ difficult thing, the poetry of politics, is how you bring people together, — politics, is how you bring people together, how do you manage to give people _ together, how do you manage to give people that hope and want people to connect, _ people that hope and want people to connect, both with each other and with their— connect, both with each other and with their communities, and i think that is— with their communities, and i think that is what— with their communities, and i think that is what kim focused on resolutely and i think ultimately that is—
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resolutely and i think ultimately that is what saw her over the line. and kim _ that is what saw her over the line. and kim said in her acceptance speech, she couldn't wait to hug her niece and nephew. have you woken the children up and told them the result? i children up and told them the result? ., �* �* , children up and told them the result? . �* �* , ., result? i haven't. i'm trying to keep them _ result? i haven't. i'm trying to keep them asleep _ result? i haven't. i'm trying to keep them asleep for - result? i haven't. i'm trying to keep them asleep for as i result? i haven't. i'm trying to keep them asleep for as long i result? i haven't. i'm trying to i keep them asleep for as long as possible — keep them asleep for as long as possible so that their energy levels don't _ possible so that their energy levels don't dip— possible so that their energy levels don't dip too much during the day but they— don't dip too much during the day but they are going to be incredibly excited _ but they are going to be incredibly excited. we had a call with keane yesterday — excited. we had a call with keane yesterday and just talking about when _ yesterday and just talking about when or — yesterday and just talking about when or lose, how proud they were of her and _ when or lose, how proud they were of her and so _ when or lose, how proud they were of her and so they will be incredibly excited _ her and so they will be incredibly excited this morning. just trying to put of— excited this morning. just trying to put of the — excited this morning. just trying to put of the moment when they start bouncing _ put of the moment when they start bouncing around the house. that is robabl bouncing around the house. that is probably entirely _ bouncing around the house. that is probably entirely sensible. - bouncing around the house. that is probably entirely sensible. thank l probably entirely sensible. thank you very much, brendan. it is 643. time to talk— you very much, brendan. it is 643. time to talk about _ you very much, brendan. it is 643. time to talk about the _ you very much, brendan. it is 643. time to talk about the sport. i time to talk about the sport. wimbledon is always good when an 18—year—old does well. especially good when it is a british 18—year—old and it is friday of the first week and still in. and not just one shot that she has caused, emma raducanu, but two now. what a
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month for her, and made an appearance on the women present tour. all the way to round three. now she has her a—levels out of the way, so she can now focus full—time on tennis. the 18—year—old stunned the former french open finalist keith under sober to become the only british woman left into round three. in the men's draw, there is a big name awaiting cameron norrie in round four. our sports correspondent rounds it all up. you can look through every match scheduled for a wimbledon day, and then it happens. early evening, out on court 12, emma raducanu, and a huge breakthrough. keepin raducanu, and a huge breakthrough. keep in mind, the british player is just 18, ranked 338 in the world, and that her opponent once reached a grand slam final. at match point, on the verge of the third round in her
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first major tournament, would she collapse? well, only once the match was won. emma raducanu, a—level studentjust months ago, britain's remaining woman at wimbledon. mr; remaining woman at wimbledon. iji motivation remaining woman at wimbledon. ii motivation is remaining woman at wimbledon. ii1: motivation is honestly remaining woman at wimbledon. ii1 motivation is honestlyjust remaining woman at wimbledon. i’i1 motivation is honestlyjust to remaining woman at wimbledon. ii motivation is honestlyjust to keep staying here. ijust love being here and being in the selection. it is incredible. the whole surroundings, i'm just taking it all in and ijust really want to prolong my experience here. ~ . ., ., , ., ., here. well, cameron norrie is one of three british — here. well, cameron norrie is one of three british men _ here. well, cameron norrie is one of three british men in _ here. well, cameron norrie is one of three british men in round _ here. well, cameron norrie is one of three british men in round three. - three british men in round three. that is him nearest the camera. seeded 29 here, his straight sex victory over alex bolt was full of confidence, decisive and he seems to revel in the atmosphere. that is encouraging. who would want to play him next? well, this guy. roger federer set up a match with cameron norrie by beating richard gasquet, gently. and it was straight sets.
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that friday night is scheduled for another andy murray night. you have been wormed. wow, what an image that is. and andy murray is playing sharper love. andy murray knows he is in for a tough day. it is sharper love. andy murray knows he is in for a tough day.— is in for a tough day. it is -- mckee is — is in for a tough day. it is -- mckee is definitely - is in for a tough day. it is -- mckee is definitely a - is in for a tough day. it is -- - mckee is definitely a shotmaker. he likes playing in front of big crowds. the thing i have got on my side is the experience and obviously having played a lot on centre court. i am not saying we definitely will, but i think there will be a good chance of that. we will be — that will be quite new for him. chance of that. we will be - that will be quite new for him.- chance of that. we will be - that will be quite new for him. what a da in will be quite new for him. what a day in store- _ will be quite new for him. what a day in store. one _ will be quite new for him. what a day in store. one more _ will be quite new for him. what a day in store. one more day - will be quite new for him. what a day in store. one more day to . will be quite new for him. what a | day in store. one more day to wait before anger�*s quarterfinal at ukraine in euro 2020. the teams m today. one player who is mentioning his place is the goalkeeperjordan pickford. he has not let in a single
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goal so far. this will be the team's first match away from wembley but he insists the lack of home atmosphere will not be a problem. we insists the lack of home atmosphere will not be a problem.— will not be a problem. we have to create our — will not be a problem. we have to create our own _ will not be a problem. we have to create our own atmosphere - will not be a problem. we have to create our own atmosphere on - create our own atmosphere on saturday in rome, which we are capable of doing. the fans were tremendous the other night and throughout the group stages as well so i think that gives us added motivation for the games that are there to come back in the semifinal against 60,000 fans. mark cavendish is havin: a against 60,000 fans. mark cavendish is having a dream _ against 60,000 fans. mark cavendish is having a dream return _ against 60,000 fans. mark cavendish is having a dream return to _ against 60,000 fans. mark cavendish is having a dream return to the - against 60,000 fans. mark cavendish is having a dream return to the tour. is having a dream return to the tour de france after beating illness and injury, he is back in the world's biggest bike race after three years away and he has won his second stage. no hiding the smile behind the mask. mark cavendish, back on the mask. mark cavendish, back on the podium where he first won in 2008. two weeks ago, he wasn't even expecting to race, but after winning his first stage in five years, here he was. stage six was mainly flat,
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which helped goring to thomas. 12 overall and still recovering from his crash on monday. the mercy of a relatively easy day before the race it's the hills today in the mountains tomorrow. he finished safely with the balaton, as did the leader in the yellowjersey. but for cavendish, the colour will always be green, the shade of the race's reading sprinter. everyone knew what he could do on top form. no one could stop him doing it. the 36—year—old manx missile had earned the right to reminisce. the celebration just the same as it was many years ago. he is not talking about the record of 3a stage wins. just happy to be back here doing what he loves. what a story. fantastic to see him back. so well and right at the top of the game. at the age of 12, sky brown, she is set to become the youngest summer olympian of all time after being named in the team gb squad. she will compete in the skateboarding in tokyo this month. she might be team
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gb's tokyo this month. she might be team gb�*s youngest athlete, but with a smile like that she is the happiest two. she turns 13just smile like that she is the happiest two. she turns 13 just a week before the tokyo games begin. becoming a teenager and aiming for gold in skateboarding, which will feature at the olympics for the first time ever. ~ .,, ., , , the olympics for the first time ever. ~ ., _ , the olympics for the first time ever. ~ .,, ., , , , ., ever. well, obviously trying to get a gold-medal- _ ever. well, obviously trying to get a gold-medal. i— ever. well, obviously trying to get a gold-medal. i am _ ever. well, obviously trying to get a gold-medal. i am going - ever. well, obviously trying to get a gold-medal. i am going to - ever. well, obviously trying to get a gold-medal. i am going to try i ever. well, obviously trying to getj a gold-medal. i am going to try to a gold—medal. i am going to try to have fun and enjoy being in the olympics and show the world what skateboarding is like and inspire. although she has lived in america, her mum is from japan aegean slept in britain. it her mum is from japan aegean slept in britain. ., , her mum is from japan aegean slept in britain. . , ., her mum is from japan aegean slept in britain. . , . ., ., . in britain. it means a lot to me and i lad that in britain. it means a lot to me and i glad that i — in britain. it means a lot to me and i glad that i get _ in britain. it means a lot to me and | glad that | get to _ in britain. it means a lot to me and i glad that i get to compete - in britain. it means a lot to me and i glad that i get to compete for - i glad that i get to compete for england which i love and japan, which i also love. being injapan but also competing for england. i don't know, ifeel like it
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but also competing for england. i don't know, i feel like it could bring the countries together. the families spend most of their time in los angeles. they needed a lot of convincing to let sky compete at the olympic games. my convincing to let sky compete at the olympic gama-— olympic games. my parents didn't want me t0- _ olympic games. my parents didn't want me to. they _ olympic games. my parents didn't want me to. they thought - olympic games. my parents didn't want me to. they thought it - olympic games. my parents didn't want me to. they thought it was l olympic games. my parents didn't l want me to. they thought it was too much pressure. but then lucy adams and team gb said that there is no pressure, just get out there, have fun, just enjoy the journey. and my parents still said no but i back them and then they said yes. and them and then they said yes. and there are other— them and then they said yes. and there are other pressures too. well—known for sharing her ups and downs on social media. but this was the toughest of them all, a spectacular fall last year caught on camera and shared with her millions of fans. can you tell is at the last 12 months have been like for you? i have been feeling really good. i got
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stronger after that accident. it may sound weird but i feel like i have more power and ifeel like i have more power and ifeel like i have more of a fire in my heart to just do stuff now. i don't know, ijust feel like i missed a little bit of time, so now i want to do this. she suffered skull— time, so now i want to do this. she suffered skull fractures and a broken wrist and hand. her helmets and armed bands saved her life. she first got into skateboarding because of tutorials she had seen on youtube. now she is representing great britain and could become the youngest olympic medallist for 85 years. it youngest olympic medallist for 85 ears. , ., , youngest olympic medallist for 85 ears. , . , . ., youngest olympic medallist for 85 ears. ,._ . ., . years. it is really nice to have lots of fans. _ years. it is really nice to have lots of fans. that _ years. it is really nice to have lots of fans. that really - years. it is really nice to have - lots of fans. that really motivates me as well. lots of fans. that really motivates me as well-— me as well. you have such a wonderful— me as well. you have such a wonderful smile _ me as well. you have such a wonderful smile and - me as well. you have such a wonderful smile and a - me as well. you have such a wonderful smile and a great| wonderful smile and a great personality. best of luck. thank ou.
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personality. best of luck. thank yom certainly — personality. best of luck. thank you. certainly a _ personality. best of luck. thank you. certainly a new— personality. best of luck. thank you. certainly a new generation j personality. best of luck. thank. you. certainly a new generation of athlete. you. certainly a new generation of athlete- she _ you. certainly a new generation of athlete. she doesn't _ you. certainly a new generation of athlete. she doesn't really - you. certainly a new generation of athlete. she doesn't really have . you. certainly a new generation of athlete. she doesn't really have a | athlete. she doesn't really have a regular skateboarding coach but she learns her tricks from youtube. flan learns her tricks from youtube. can ou not learns her tricks from youtube. can you not smile _ learns her tricks from youtube. (can you not smile when you see her like that? it you not smile when you see her like that? , ., , you not smile when you see her like that? , . , , you not smile when you see her like that? , , that? it is a big smile. maybe she will be a double _ that? it is a big smile. maybe she will be a double sport _ that? it is a big smile. maybe she will be a double sport athlete - that? it is a big smile. maybe she will be a double sport athlete has| will be a double sport athlete has well. thank you very much. hundreds of thousands of people across the uk are experiencing the symptoms of lung covid. that is according to the national office for statistics. this comes after _ national office for statistics. this comes after a — national office for statistics. this comes after a study _ national office for statistics. ti 3 comes after a study found only a small proportion of cases of lung covid are being recorded by gps. stock to doctor william byrd about this. good morning. just give us your analysis of this. ruc and many people who have symptoms of lung covid? , . , , . . covid? yes, absolutely. we are seeinu covid? yes, absolutely. we are seeing people _ covid? yes, absolutely. we are seeing people with _
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covid? yes, absolutely. we are seeing people with headaches, | seeing people with headaches, particularly fatigue, depression, many of those symptoms which actually during lockdown have been common anyway because of the mental health strain that most people have been under. what is really difficult is to isolate which ones are coming from the covid and which ones are becoming because of the lockdown. studies are showing that those people who had positive covid tests actually had a 75% increase of all the psychiatric problems. things like sleep and fatigue were way up at almost 500%. but people who scored negative on their covid tests also had an increase as well. it shows that there is a residual problem in the whole society, which is probably due to lockdown. i think the key thing is that those people are not owing to be left outjust because you had a negative covid test, you may still have problems of depression, anxiety and other problems which although real are not caused by covid. so we still don't understand exactly what is going on. we just know that there are huge
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number of people, probably 10%, we just know that there are huge number of people, probably10%, of people who have got the symptoms. i know some people in their 20s simply can't get out and walk round the garden from being completely fit and well, so it really has been devastating for a lot of people. that is really interesting. i am trying to separate out the sort of medical conditions, but may be residual lung problems are things like that, from what appear to be psychological conditions but are nonetheless directly related to covid itself, rather some of the stresses and strains of your life. it is all very real. that is not saying that this doesn't happen. when they compare in that big study of 11 million people, they found that flu also had even a greater impact on people cosmic psychological well—being as well, so we know that there is this postviral problem. ijust think
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we know that there is this postviral problem. i just think at this moment acute amount of research needs to be done. there are clinics being developed and we have one here which gps are being encouraged to refer patients to, but with 10% of people who have got it, it is going to be a huge deluge of people and we have just got to understand a little bit more. one of the pleas is to get more. one of the pleas is to get more researching as quickly as possible because otherwise we will get a whole cohort of children and adults coming through who are going to be really debilitated. just a thou~ht to be really debilitated. just a thought for— to be really debilitated. just a thought for you _ to be really debilitated. just a thought for you about - to be really debilitated. just a thought for you about the - to be really debilitated. just a l thought for you about the euros to be really debilitated. just a thought for you about the euros and the big events that are happening. there is a debate about whether or not they should be happening. i strongly believe that they should go ahead. i think that we should be careful with the stadium and people coming in, to make sure that you have got some of that testing done. there is no doubt that europe is going to another wave and probably will be associated with that, right into august. we will see some very
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high numbers coming through into august, which we predicted and it has been known for a long time, but the euros are just so important, we can'tjust the euros are just so important, we can't just stop them. the euros are just so important, we can'tjust stop them. and it is great to see a stadium full. it really makes a difference. but the unnecessary risks have to be taken away and we have to be more responsible and just make sure that we don't use those matches is super breeding grounds, but for goodness' sake, let's keep those going. thank ou ve sake, let's keep those going. thank you very much _ sake, let's keep those going. thank you very much for — sake, let's keep those going. thank you very much for your— sake, let's keep those going. thank you very much for your time. - sake, let's keep those going. thank you very much for your time. it - sake, let's keep those going. thank you very much for your time. it is i you very much for your time. it is time to get _ you very much for your time. it is time to get the — you very much for your time. it is time to get the news, _ you very much for your time. it 3 time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a man has been left in a critical condition in hospital after being stabbed last night at oxford circus. a 25—year—old man was arrested after being detained by members of the public at the scene. anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to contact the police. meanwhile, city hall and the metropolitan police have set
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out plans to work with multiple agencies to tackle violence in london ahead of the school summer holidays. more areas will see an increased police presence, especially in open spaces and parks. and there'll be additional funding for programmes run by london's violence reduction unit in places like brent, redbridge and camden. almost 200,000 newjob adverts were posted in the last week ofjune, with many of them for roles in london. latest figures by the recruitment and employment confederation said there were now over 1.5 million vacancies being advertised, being driven by sectors recently re—opening after being closed due to the pandemic. jobs in professional and skilled sectors were particularly in demand including it to haulage. ahead of the capital hosting one of the most exciting matches in recent history, more than 3,000 faces of londoners have been pasted around the city. its to showcase individual achievements throughout the pandemic, as well as celebrate the sense of community in areas across london.
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the posters have temporarily gone up across tower bridge, in king's cross, the royal docks, catford and in tottenham. we've had some people, we've asked them to put the faces on the wall, and they almost seem like, some of them think they are not worthy to go on the wall, and it's quite strange that they have that reaction, but everyone is worthy because we are all one community. let's take a look at the travel situation now. because of the incident at oxford circus, it remains closed. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, it is a mild start. temperatures in double figures. high—pressure to the south of the uk. we still have sunshine today, but notice waiting in the wings is this low pressure system for the weekend. any mist this morning will burn back, cloud breaking. some decent sunny spells, but those sunny spells can spark off one or two heavy, slow—moving showers.
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it is going to be warm today too. temperatures getting up to 23—24 celsius. into this evening, they showers peter out. we get some clear spells to start with, but moving in that low—pressure system flinging towards us, so we are looking at rain as we head into saturday morning. minimum temperature mild, between 13 and 15. so that rain spreading in tomorrow, but for play at wimbledon today, it's not looking too bad. there is the risk of a shower, but it's fairly slim. plenty of dry weather, temperatures getting up to 24. now for tomorrow, those outbreaks of rain heavy, slow moving. you might get a rumble of thunder. sunday as well, further outbreaks of rain. and that low—pressure still influencing as we head into the first part of next week. it's not exactly a dry picture, with things getting a bit breezy for monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. our headlines today. a narrow win for labour in the batley and spen by—election after a closely fought battle. kim leadbeater, sister of murdered mp jo cox, thanked herfamily in an emotional victory speech. without them, i could not have got through the last five years, never mind the last five weeks. my amazing parents
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and my wonderful partner. and i want to give a special shout out to my niece and nephew, who i cannot wait to hug, as soon as i see them. harry dunn's parents start legal proceedings in the us, against the woman involved in the crash that killed their son. there's no stopping britain's new star at wimbledon. 18—year—old emma raducanu causes another shock and is now into the third round, on her tournament debut, only two months after completing her a—levels. and with euros fever sweeping the uk, sales of retro football shirts are soaring. we'll find out why fans prefer them to contemporary options. we are about to see the more changeable side of summer. sunshine at times, but get ready, plenty of showers in the next few days and thunder too. showers in the next few days and thundertoo. full showers in the next few days and thunder too. full forecast coming up. good morning. it's friday, july 2nd. our top story.
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labour has narrowly held its seat in the batley and spen by—election. the party's candidate, kim leadbeater, saw off a strong conservative challenge, to win by 323 votes. the seat was previously held by her sister, jo cox, who was murdered in 2016. our political correspondent, adam fleming, has this report. ido hereby i do hereby declare that kim michelle led beater is duly elected. it michelle led beater is duly elected. it was _ michelle led beater is duly elected. it was close but a win is a win. kim leadbeater is the sister ofjo cox, who was murdered when she was the mp here. so this packs an emotional punch. i here. so this packs an emotional unch. ., . ., ., , punch. i do want to refer to my family and _ punch. i do want to refer to my family and my _ punch. i do want to refer to my family and my friends, - punch. i do want to refer to my family and my friends, who, i punch. i do want to refer to my - family and my friends, who, without them, i could not have got through them, i could not have got through the last five years, never mind the last five weeks. my amazing parents and my wonderful partner. and i want to give a special shout out to my niece and nephew, who i cannot wait to hug as soon as i see them. she won byjust _ to hug as soon as i see them. she won byjust over— to hug as soon as i see them. she won byjust over 300 votes, putting
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the conservative candidate in a close second place. the big unknown was the effect of george galloway cow, who ended up with over 8000 votes in a campaign that was tense and intense. i votes in a campaign that was tense and intense-— votes in a campaign that was tense and intense. i am going to crack on with it and — and intense. i am going to crack on with it and i — and intense. i am going to crack on with it and i will _ and intense. i am going to crack on with it and i will do _ and intense. i am going to crack on with it and i will do my _ and intense. i am going to crack on with it and i will do my very - and intense. i am going to crack on with it and i will do my very best i with it and i will do my very best to represent the whole of batley and spen as their new mp. i am absolutely delighted that the people of batley and spen have rejected division and they've voted for hope. it's a big sigh of relief for sir keir starmer, his leadership of the labour party would have been plunged into a serious crisis if they'd lost. adam fleming, bbc news. we can speak now to our political correspondent nick eardley, who is at the count for us in huddersfield. good morning. this win, there's no point denying, this is from other results with mp5, this is very personal, alongside enormous scrutiny about what, if anything, tells us about wider politics? yeah,
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i think tells us about wider politics? yeah, i think that's _ tells us about wider politics? yeah, i think that's absolutely _ tells us about wider politics? yeah, i think that's absolutely right. - tells us about wider politics? yeah, i think that's absolutely right. it - i think that's absolutely right. it has been — i think that's absolutely right. it has been a pretty vicious campaign. at times _ has been a pretty vicious campaign. at times we — has been a pretty vicious campaign. at times we have heard a lot of stories— at times we have heard a lot of stories about allegations of harassment and intimidation. kim leadbeater made a big thing about being _ leadbeater made a big thing about being a _ leadbeater made a big thing about being a local candidate. it does have _ being a local candidate. it does have a — being a local candidate. it does have a really important national ramifications too for the labour leaden — ramifications too for the labour leader. we saw in hartlepool are a couple _ leader. we saw in hartlepool are a couple of — leader. we saw in hartlepool are a couple of months ago, labour losing a seat _ couple of months ago, labour losing a seat it_ couple of months ago, labour losing a seat it had — couple of months ago, labour losing a seat it had held for a decade —— for decades _ a seat it had held for a decade —— for decades. here, labour has held the batley— for decades. here, labour has held the batley and spen seat since 1997. if the batley and spen seat since 1997. if labour— the batley and spen seat since 1997. if labour is— the batley and spen seat since 1997. if labour is going to show it has any chance _ if labour is going to show it has any chance of winning power in the future, _ any chance of winning power in the future, it— any chance of winning power in the future, it needs to hold onto seats like this _ future, it needs to hold onto seats like this. that is why adam was talking — like this. that is why adam was talking about a huge sigh of relief being _ talking about a huge sigh of relief being breezed in the labour party this morning, particularly in sir keir— this morning, particularly in sir keir starmer's office. but when sir -- kim _ keir starmer's office. but when sir —— kim leadbeater spoke to bbc breakfast — —— kim leadbeater spoke to bbc breakfast earlier, she made sure it was not _ breakfast earlier, she made sure it was notjust— breakfast earlier, she made sure it was notjust about national politics _ was not 'ust about national olitics. , politics. the focus during the campaign — politics. the focus during the
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campaign was _ politics. the focus during the campaign was on _ politics. the focus during the campaign was on listening i politics. the focus during the campaign was on listening to politics. the focus during the - campaign was on listening to local people _ campaign was on listening to local people and — campaign was on listening to local people and focusing _ campaign was on listening to local people and focusing on _ campaign was on listening to local people and focusing on local- campaign was on listening to local. people and focusing on local people. sometimes — people and focusing on local people. sometimes national— people and focusing on local people. sometimes national issues - people and focusing on local people. sometimes national issues came - people and focusing on local people. j sometimes national issues came up. the vast _ sometimes national issues came up. the vast majority _ sometimes national issues came up. the vast majority of _ sometimes national issues came up. the vast majority of conversations i the vast majority of conversations about _ the vast majority of conversations about local — the vast majority of conversations about local issues. _ the vast majority of conversations about local issues. people - the vast majority of conversations about local issues. people want. the vast majority of conversations| about local issues. people want to think— about local issues. people want to think they— about local issues. people want to think they have _ about local issues. people want to think they have an _ about local issues. people want to think they have an mp— about local issues. people want to think they have an mp who - about local issues. people want to think they have an mp who cares i think they have an mp who cares about— think they have an mp who cares about this — think they have an mp who cares about this community. _ think they have an mp who cares about this community. as - think they have an mp who cares i about this community. as someone think they have an mp who cares - about this community. as someone who has lived _ about this community. as someone who has lived here _ about this community. as someone who has lived here their— about this community. as someone who has lived here their whole _ about this community. as someone who has lived here their whole life _ about this community. as someone who has lived here their whole life and - has lived here their whole life and lived _ has lived here their whole life and lived in _ has lived here their whole life and lived in various _ has lived here their whole life and lived in various different - has lived here their whole life and lived in various different places i lived in various different places across — lived in various different places across the _ lived in various different places across the constituency, - lived in various different places across the constituency, i- lived in various different placesj across the constituency, i think that's— across the constituency, i think that's where _ across the constituency, i think that's where the _ across the constituency, i think that's where the connection - across the constituency, i think . that's where the connection came from _ that's where the connection came from during — that's where the connection came from during the _ that's where the connection came from during the campaign. - that's where the connection came from during the campaign. the i that's where the connection came i from during the campaign. the fact that was— from during the campaign. the fact that was locat _ from during the campaign. the fact that was local. arsenal— from during the campaign. the fact that was local. arsenal still- from during the campaign. the fact that was local. arsenal still plays . that was local. arsenal still plays a part. _ that was local. arsenal still plays a part. but— that was local. arsenal still plays a part. but for— that was local. arsenal still plays a part, but for me _ that was local. arsenal still plays a part, but for me this— that was local. arsenal still plays a part, but for me this was- that was local. arsenal still plays a part, but for me this was reallyj a part, but for me this was really about— a part, but for me this was really about local— a part, but for me this was really about local issues _ a part, but for me this was really about local issues people - a part, but for me this was really about local issues people care i about local issues people care about — about local issues people care about. . about local issues people care about. ,, , about local issues people care about. ,, ., about. local issues key there for the victorious _ about. local issues key there for the victorious labour— about. local issues key there for the victorious labour candidate. | the victorious labour candidate. that _ the victorious labour candidate. that said. — the victorious labour candidate. that said, you can absolutely expect the labour— that said, you can absolutely expect the labour leader, sir keir starmer, to come _ the labour leader, sir keir starmer, to come out— the labour leader, sir keir starmer, to come out and show that they showed — to come out and show that they showed some of the criticism of his leadership— showed some of the criticism of his leadership was overcooked, that they are doing _ leadership was overcooked, that they are doing a _ leadership was overcooked, that they are doing a good job, that they can hold onto _ are doing a good job, that they can hold onto these key marginal seats. and i_ hold onto these key marginal seats. and i wouldn't be surprised if you hear— and i wouldn't be surprised if you hear his— and i wouldn't be surprised if you hear his allies saying, you may even hear his allies saying, you may even hear from _ hear his allies saying, you may even hear from him himself, hear his allies saying, you may even hearfrom him himself, saying, this shows— hearfrom him himself, saying, this shows he _ hearfrom him himself, saying, this shows he is— hearfrom him himself, saying, this shows he is still the man for the topiob — shows he is still the man for the
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topiob for— shows he is still the man for the topjob. for now, any talk shows he is still the man for the top job. for now, any talk of a leadership— top job. for now, any talk of a leadership challenge on sir keir starmer— leadership challenge on sir keir starmer will disappear into the background. starmer will disappear into the background-— starmer will disappear into the background._ just i starmer will disappear into the | background._ just to starmer will disappear into the - background._ just to bring background. thank you. just to bring ou a little background. thank you. just to bring you a little bit _ background. thank you. just to bring you a little bit more _ background. thank you. just to bring you a little bit more reaction - background. thank you. just to bring you a little bit more reaction to - you a little bit more reaction to that. the labour leader sir keir starmer has tweeted this morning, a fantastic result for the brilliant and brave kim leadbeater. kim ran a positive campaign of hope in the face of division. she will be an outstanding labour mp for batley and spen. we will talk to a representative of the labour party shortly and also hear from the conservatives. the parents of teenage motorcyclist harry dunn have given evidence against the woman suspected of causing his death in 2019. charlotte charles and tim dunn flew to washington dc earlier this week, ahead of legal proceedings against the suspect, anne sacoolas. david willis has this report. harry dunn died after a car travelling on the wrong side of the road hit his motor bike outside raf croughton in northamptonshire. the driver, anne sacoolas, pictured here on her wedding day, was charged
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with causing death by dangerous driving but fled the country and claimed diplomatic immunity. officials here have refused to extradite her. last month, at the g7 summit in cornwall, borisjohnson reiterated to president biden his desire to see justice done, and there are now plans for ms sacoolas to attend a virtual civil trialfrom her home in the state of virginia. with the process gathering pace, harry's parents have come here to give evidence under oath. there has got to be a proper end to this. there's got to be justice of some description. this cannot be just left as it is. we will keep going. we will keep going, even if it takes us forever, we will keep going. are you any more confident after today justice will be served? yeah, absolutely. you know, like i said, everything we do is a step in the right direction. so, we are confident that what we are doing will all go
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towards getting justice for our boy. it is nearly two years since harry dunn's death, and his parents know they may have to wait another six months before they get their day in court. david willis, bbc news, washington. rescuers in miami have resumed searching in the rubble of an apartment block that collapsed last week. so far, 18 people have been confirmed dead and 140 people are still unaccounted for. on a visit to the scene yesterday, us presidentjoe biden said he was still hopeful of finding life in the rubble. sophie long has this report. how are you? president biden thanking the rescue workers who've been searching for survivors day and night. he also spent time with the families affected, who he said are going through hell. they had basic, heart—wrenching questions. will i be able to recover the body of my son or daughter, my husband, my cousin,
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my mum and dad? how can i have closure without being able to bury them if i don't get the body? what do i do? jill and i want them to know that we're with them and the country's with them. when i saw the video, my heart was ripped from my chest because that's the moment i saw my mum, my grandmother die. so it was was very difficult. and that's all i see now when i close my eyes. now, pablo tries to hold onto memories of happier times. in the days that have passed since the building where his mother and grandmother lived crashed to the ground, rescue teams have been working around the clock, painstakingly removing rubble, searching for survivors. it is a dangerous and demanding task, both physically and emotionally. we are human beings and we are dealing with human beings beneath the surface. and we know that we look for them and we do the best to get to them.
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but still, the thought that under all this concrete, all this, still there is a person, maybe a little boy that is buried there, it's very difficult to fail to understand. the families of those still unaccounted for have been to visit the site. and some have told me that seeing the homes that they used to visit reduced to rubble with their own eyes, is helping them now to start to prepare for the worst. all of them, though, have one question. how long can someone possibly survive in there? it's a question no—one can answer, but they were able to see what's being done to reach those trapped in the twisted metal and concrete before the hope they cling to fades completely. sophie long, bbc news, surfside, miami. more than a thousand people have been forced to flee a town in western canada because of fires caused by an unprecedented heatwave. according to the canadian authorities, lytton in british columbia has been almost completely destroyed by forest fires, after temperatures reached 49.6 degrees celsius.
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a fleeing resident recorded this video showing the dangerous roads out of town. that is what they had to drive through. extraordinary. really dramatic conditions. _ through. extraordinary. really dramatic conditions. i - through. extraordinary. really| dramatic conditions. i assume, through. extraordinary. really- dramatic conditions. i assume, matt, you are looking on. these temperatures have been so high. it was inevitable they would be problems like this that followed on? exactly. tinderbox conditions. we are talking about breaking records by nearly 5 degrees and breaking records that have existed for many years, over three consecutive days. very sad. let's bring you back to our shores. this weather watchers shot came in a short time ago. notice the ghostly figure, the mist and low fog. it is the shadow cast by the person taking the picture. that was the scene in padstow. blue
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sky overhead. we will see some sunshine in the next few days. a little bit of optimism because the dark clouds will gather every now and again and there will be more and more in the way of showers. some heavy infantry. out there this morning a little bit of wet weather to get your friday on the borders of scotland and england. that has started break. the showers fading away but more later. as we go through friday we will see more showers pop up here and there. some could get close to wimbledon. most of the day will be dry. most will spend the day dry. maki along the coast. inland, some sunshine. temperatures in the sunshine climbing into the mid 20s. warmer there when you have the sunshine on your back. a few showers dotted around. the odd heavy and thundery one in the highlands. the greater chance of heavy and thundery showers in northern scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere, most will be dry.
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a full forecast in half an hour. thanks, matt. as we've been hearing, labour has retained its seat in the batley and spen by—election. they won by 323 votes. the win will be a relief to _ they won by 323 votes. the win will be a relief to the _ they won by 323 votes. the win will be a relief to the party _ they won by 323 votes. the win will be a relief to the party leader, - they won by 323 votes. the win will be a relief to the party leader, sir l be a relief to the party leader, sir keir starmer, who has been under pressure since a poor showing in the may elections. let's hear now from shabana mahmood, labour's new election co—ordinator, who took on the role in may. is it relief? is that the overwhelming feeling among the labour party leadership this morning?— labour party leadership this mornini? . . , labour party leadership this mornini? �*, . . . , ., morning? it's a fantastic result for the labour — morning? it's a fantastic result for the labour party. _ morning? it's a fantastic result for the labour party. and _ morning? it's a fantastic result for the labour party. and a _ morning? it's a fantastic result for the labour party. and a richly - the labour party. and a richly deserved _ the labour party. and a richly deserved win for our superb, brilliant _ deserved win for our superb, brilliant and brave candidate, kim leadbeater. she is a woman from batley— leadbeater. she is a woman from batley and — leadbeater. she is a woman from batley and spen, she is for batley and spen — batley and spen, she is for batley and spen and i am utterly delighted for her_ and spen and i am utterly delighted for her that she will be representing your home turf in parliament as their member of parliament. | parliament as their member of parliament-— parliament. i imagine there is -robabl parliament. i imagine there is probably a _ parliament. i imagine there is probably a great _ parliament. i imagine there is probably a great sense - parliament. i imagine there is probably a great sense of - parliament. i imagine there is i probably a great sense of relief. kim leadbeater herself was on this programme a short while ago and she
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really emphasised how important local issues were in this by—election. you get the sense that she won in spite of labour's leadership of sir keir starmer, not because of him? this leadership of sir keir starmer, not because of him?— because of him? this was a collective — because of him? this was a collective effort _ because of him? this was a collective effort from - because of him? this was a | collective effort from across because of him? this was a - collective effort from across the whole _ collective effort from across the whole of — collective effort from across the whole of the labour movement. i was so pleased _ whole of the labour movement. i was so pleased to see so many campaigners from all over the country — campaigners from all over the country. sir keir starmer was in the seat campaigning alongside kim. it was an— seat campaigning alongside kim. it was an election in which local issues — was an election in which local issues were at the heart of it. we were _ issues were at the heart of it. we were talking to voters in batley and spen about the issues that matter to them _ spen about the issues that matter to them it— spen about the issues that matter to them it is— spen about the issues that matter to them. it is both local and national. but kim _ them. it is both local and national. but kim is— them. it is both local and national. but kim is a — them. it is both local and national. but kim is a local woman and she is the only— but kim is a local woman and she is the only candidate in this election that lived — the only candidate in this election that lived in that area, was able to vote in— that lived in that area, was able to vote in the — that lived in that area, was able to vote in the by—election herself and it's not— vote in the by—election herself and it's not surprising therefore, when local— it's not surprising therefore, when local people saw a local woman, they wanted _ local people saw a local woman, they wanted to _ local people saw a local woman, they wanted to talk about those issues because _ wanted to talk about those issues because they could trust her that they would take them up for her as -- for— they would take them up for her as -- for them — they would take them up for her as —— for them as member of parliament. at its— —— for them as member of parliament. at its heart— —— for them as member of parliament. at its heart is— —— for them as member of parliament. at its heart is the local voice represented by kim leadbeater. let�*s represented by kim leadbeater. let's not -retend represented by kim leadbeater. let's not pretend this _ represented by kim leadbeater. let's not pretend this was _ represented by kim leadbeater. let�*s not pretend this was a resounding
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victory. overall the labour vote was down by 7%. george galloway�*s party came third with 22% of the vote. you have to assume he did take some votes away from your core base. why do you think that was? it votes away from your core base. why do you think that was?— do you think that was? it was a very difficult by-election. _ do you think that was? it was a very difficult by-election. we _ do you think that was? it was a very difficult by-election. we faced - do you think that was? it was a very difficult by-election. we faced such| difficult by—election. we faced such abuse _ difficult by—election. we faced such abuse on _ difficult by—election. we faced such abuse on the doorsteps. our activists— abuse on the doorsteps. our activists were attacked. some of them _ activists were attacked. some of them had — activists were attacked. some of them had eggs thrown at them. i was on the _ them had eggs thrown at them. i was on the doorsteps myself talking to voters _ on the doorsteps myself talking to voters with 20 men with a megaphone screaming _ voters with 20 men with a megaphone screaming abuse. i've never seen anything — screaming abuse. i've never seen anything like it in all the time i have _ anything like it in all the time i have been— anything like it in all the time i have been a member of parliament. we saw glittery _ have been a member of parliament. we saw glittery interviews and very clearly — saw glittery interviews and very clearly george galloway has a modus operandi _ clearly george galloway has a modus operandi of sowing fear and division where _ operandi of sowing fear and division where goes. that is what he was doing _ where goes. that is what he was doing in— where goes. that is what he was doing in batley and spen. it is a breakthrough moment that we were able to— breakthrough moment that we were able to see off that kind of campaign and we were able to see it off because — campaign and we were able to see it off because of the positivity that kim leadbeater brought to that campaign and that the rest of the campaign — campaign and that the rest of the campaign team amplified and supportive. i'm delighted, as kim said in— supportive. i'm delighted, as kim said in her— supportive. i'm delighted, as kim said in her own victory speech, that
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the people — said in her own victory speech, that the people of batley and spen shows hope over— the people of batley and spen shows hope over division and that is very much _ hope over division and that is very much the — hope over division and that is very much the message this morning. —— chose _ much the message this morning. —— chose i_ much the message this morning. —— chose i am — much the message this morning. —— chose. iam pleased much the message this morning. —— chose. i am pleased they could do that because they fear george galloway were spreading was a frightening thing to see, take hold in a seat _ frightening thing to see, take hold in a seat that does not need that kind of— in a seat that does not need that kind of politics. you in a seat that does not need that kind of politics.— kind of politics. you seem to be suggesting _ kind of politics. you seem to be suggesting that _ kind of politics. you seem to be suggesting that thousands - kind of politics. you seem to be suggesting that thousands of i kind of politics. you seem to be i suggesting that thousands of voters were somehow bullied into voting for george galloway. maybe they saw he offered them something the labour party didn't?— party didn't? let's be clear about the nature _ party didn't? let's be clear about the nature of— party didn't? let's be clear about the nature of the _ party didn't? let's be clear about the nature of the campaign i party didn't? let's be clear about i the nature of the campaign george galloway— the nature of the campaign george galloway was running. it was hateful and divisive. it was succeeding because — and divisive. it was succeeding because he was sowing fear among different— because he was sowing fear among different communities, setting people — different communities, setting people against each other, making people _ people against each other, making people are feared —— afraid of one another~ _ people are feared —— afraid of one another. kim was able to see that off with _ another. kim was able to see that off with her— another. kim was able to see that off with her campaign where she could _ off with her campaign where she could show people that if elected, she has— could show people that if elected, she has been, she would stand up for every— she has been, she would stand up for every community in batley and spen and bring _ every community in batley and spen and bring that community together. perhaps _ and bring that community together. perhaps he just exploited is what people perceive as a disconnect between the national labour party leadership and issues that are very important to do certain local
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communities, likely questions around, for example, palestine or kashmir. the labour leadership doesn't perhaps fully understand or appreciate how significant those particular questions were to some of voters, certainly in batley and spen? voters, certainly in batley and sen? ~ voters, certainly in batley and sien? ~ voters, certainly in batley and sien? . ., , ., spen? well, i was there on the iround spen? well, i was there on the ground myself. _ spen? well, i was there on the ground myself. i— spen? well, i was there on the ground myself. i was _ spen? well, i was there on the ground myself. i was there i spen? well, i was there on the| ground myself. i was there with spen? well, i was there on the i ground myself. i was there with kim and the _ ground myself. i was there with kim and the rest — ground myself. i was there with kim and the rest of my team. we were talking _ and the rest of my team. we were talking about the issues coming up on the _ talking about the issues coming up on the doorstep. tackling them head on. on the doorstep. tackling them head on stating _ on the doorstep. tackling them head on. stating the labour position. fighting — on. stating the labour position. fighting off the propaganda that was --oin fighting off the propaganda that was going viral across whatsapp groups and other— going viral across whatsapp groups and other social media platforms as well. and other social media platforms as welt and _ and other social media platforms as well. and stating our position and our case — well. and stating our position and our case and dealing with those things— our case and dealing with those things head on and allowing him to explain _ things head on and allowing him to explain to— things head on and allowing him to explain to people what she is their member— explain to people what she is their member of parliament would be saying about all— member of parliament would be saying about all of those issues, whether they are _ about all of those issues, whether they are crime and anti—social behaviour. _ they are crime and anti—social behaviour, issues around palestine or human _ behaviour, issues around palestine or human rights abuses in kashmir, all of— or human rights abuses in kashmir, all of that— or human rights abuses in kashmir, all of that broad panoply of issues she was— all of that broad panoply of issues she was able to show and ultimately prove _ she was able to show and ultimately prove to— she was able to show and ultimately prove to the people of batley and spen _ prove to the people of batley and spen that is their mp she would happily— spen that is their mp she would happily represent and advocate for them _ happily represent and advocate for them in _ happily represent and advocate for them in parliament, and that is what
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he is going _ them in parliament, and that is what he is going to do. | them in parliament, and that is what he is going to do— he is going to do. i wonder how secure keir— he is going to do. i wonder how secure keir starmer _ he is going to do. i wonder how secure keir starmer will - he is going to do. i wonder how secure keir starmer will now i he is going to do. i wonder how. secure keir starmer will now feel his position? there have been rumours about his leadership and possible challenges of the run—up to the election. i don't know where they come from a very certainly appear to be rumblings. do they disappear now, do you think? weill. appear to be rumblings. do they disappear now, do you think? well, i don't know where _ disappear now, do you think? well, i don't know where they _ disappear now, do you think? well, i don't know where they come - disappear now, do you think? well, i don't know where they come from i don't know where they come from either. _ don't know where they come from either. and — don't know where they come from either, and wherever those grumblings come from i hope they stop _ grumblings come from i hope they stop keir— grumblings come from i hope they stop. keir starmer is the leader of the labour— stop. keir starmer is the leader of the labour party. under his leadership we are making progress. we know— leadership we are making progress. we know the amount and we have to climb _ we know the amount and we have to climb if— we know the amount and we have to climb if we _ we know the amount and we have to climb if we are to win the next general— climb if we are to win the next general election. we have to pull off a feed — general election. we have to pull off a feed beyond what we achieved in i997~ _ off a feed beyond what we achieved in 1997. keir starmer is clear eyed in1997. keir starmer is clear eyed about— in 1997. keir starmer is clear eyed about the — in 1997. keir starmer is clear eyed about the scale of the challenge we have in _ about the scale of the challenge we have in front of us. what we have seen _ have in front of us. what we have seen in _ have in front of us. what we have seen in the — have in front of us. what we have seen in the local elections and beyond — seen in the local elections and beyond is _ seen in the local elections and beyond is that we are making progress _ beyond is that we are making progress in some parts of the country _ progress in some parts of the country, and we still have a challenge in other parts of the country — challenge in other parts of the country. we have got to find a way to overcome that. it is a long road to overcome that. it is a long road to the _ to overcome that. it is a long road to the next— to overcome that. it is a long road to the next general election but i am confident that the labour movement, putting forward local candidates and positive campaigns, that is— candidates and positive campaigns, that is what we can do.—
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that is what we can do. thank you very much- _ that is what we can do. thank you very much. shabana _ that is what we can do. thank you very much. shabana mahmood, i that is what we can do. thank you i very much. shabana mahmood, labour mp for very much. shabana mahmood, labour mpfor birmingham very much. shabana mahmood, labour mp for birmingham ladywood. if you were watching those ecstatic scenes at wembley earlier this week, you may have noticed england fans celebrating in a wide range of retro football shirts. indeed, the market in vintage kit is booming, with more dedicated websites cropping up each year. our correspondent matt graveling is at the national football museum in manchester this morning. football fa ns football fans are back. and with them comes the cheers, the tears, obviously the beers. but what about the gear? it seems everywhere you look fans are wearing a piece of sporting history. it still remains to be seen where euro 2020 will rank in the history of english football. i mean, we have all got our favourite tournament. mine, as you can see, is euro 96. but this ——
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with this rise in revival and retro fashion, where do you go to get a keepsake or my mental, to take you down memory lane? let me show you. hello. good to see you. let down memory lane? let me show you. hello. good to see you.— hello. good to see you. let me take ou to hello. good to see you. let me take you to shut — hello. good to see you. let me take you to shut heaven. _ hello. good to see you. let me take you to shut heaven. it's _ hello. good to see you. let me take you to shut heaven. it's safe - hello. good to see you. let me take you to shut heaven. it's safe to i hello. good to see you. let me take you to shut heaven. it's safe to say. you to shut heaven. it's safe to say football fuelled _ you to shut heaven. it's safe to say football fuelled fashion _ you to shut heaven. it's safe to say football fuelled fashion has - you to shut heaven. it's safe to say football fuelled fashion has led i you to shut heaven. it's safe to say football fuelled fashion has led to l football fuelled fashion has led to big business. why are we seeing this revival of vintage fashion? i big business. why are we seeing this revival of vintage fashion?— revival of vintage fashion? i think first and foremost _ revival of vintage fashion? i think first and foremost because i revival of vintage fashion? i think first and foremost because he i first and foremost because he designs are so good. people just want to wear shorts that have got a lot of character to them. colours, bright colours, crazy designs. it is also about nostalgia. people harking back to their first world cup, their first euros, memories of getting into football. bud first euros, memories of getting into football.— first euros, memories of getting into football. and you guys love a retro kit. jack _ into football. and you guys love a retro kit. jack and _ into football. and you guys love a retro kit. jack and alice _ into football. and you guys love a retro kit. jack and alice sent i into football. and you guys love a retro kit. jack and alice sent us i retro kit. jack and alice sent us this pair of italian classics. eli is still wearing his germany shirt with pride after tuesday. and andrew has dug out of this beauty of a scotland shirt from 1982. there were
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24 scotland shirt from 1982. there were 2a teams at this year's euros. most with at least a couple of old shirts considered fan favourites. but why are more of us are choosing to buy costly classics rather than the cheaper current kids? i costly classics rather than the cheaper current kids?- costly classics rather than the cheaper current kids? i think a lot of it isjust _ cheaper current kids? i think a lot of it is just what _ cheaper current kids? i think a lot of it is just what becomes - of it isjust what becomes fashionable in pop culture. i think there _ fashionable in pop culture. i think there is— fashionable in pop culture. i think there is a — fashionable in pop culture. i think there is a real thing at the moment around _ there is a real thing at the moment around the — there is a real thing at the moment around the 1990s and early 2000 nostalgia — around the 1990s and early 2000 nostalgia. obviously if you want to dip into _ nostalgia. obviously if you want to dip into that wearing a football shirt— dip into that wearing a football shirt is— dip into that wearing a football shirt is a — dip into that wearing a football shirt is a great way to do that. the three lions — shirt is a great way to do that. the three lions are _ shirt is a great way to do that. tue: three lions are just shirt is a great way to do that. tie: three lions are just three games away from the european crown. and after every wing, sales surge. doug says winning it all could bring in £1 million. says winning it all could bring in £1 million-— says winning it all could bring in £1 million. , £1 million. most shirts started life at about 40p _ £1 million. most shirts started life at about 40p to _ £1 million. most shirts started life at about 40p to 50 _ £1 million. most shirts started life at about 40p to 50 p. _ £1 million. most shirts started life at about 40p to 50 p. this - £1 million. most shirts started life at about 40p to 50 p. this year. £1 million. most shirts started life i at about 40p to 50 p. this year now, it would be about 300 for an original euro 96 with gaza on the back. ~ ., , , , original euro 96 with gaza on the back. ., , , , ~ back. who is buying them? meet peter from lincolnshire. _ back. who is buying them? meet peter from lincolnshire. 367 _ back. who is buying them? meet peter from lincolnshire. 367 shorts _ back. who is buying them? meet peter from lincolnshire. 367 shorts and i from lincolnshire. 367 shorts and counting. from lincolnshire. 367 shorts and countini. , ., . . counting. every tournament that eniland counting. every tournament that england have — counting. every tournament that england have played _
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counting. every tournament that england have played and - counting. every tournament that england have played and won i counting. every tournament that england have played and won in| counting. every tournament that i england have played and won in the euro so— england have played and won in the euro so far. — england have played and won in the euro so far, i've had this shirt on. iwill— euro so far, i've had this shirt on. twill be _ euro so far, i've had this shirt on. i will be sticking with this one on saturday — i will be sticking with this one on saturda . . ., i will be sticking with this one on saturda. . ., , , ,, saturday. so, thanks to places like this, even saturday. so, thanks to places like this. even if— saturday. so, thanks to places like this, even if you _ saturday. so, thanks to places like this, even if you weren't _ saturday. so, thanks to places like this, even if you weren't there, i this, even if you weren't there, didn't do it, you have still got the t—shirt. so what are the best selling, top eight retro england football shirts? well, this calls for a catwalk. and in the number one spot, this from euro 96. an unlikely hero on the back. of course, it's notjust international shirts here. with club football making up the majority of stock on the shelves. but what england progress, the three lions will ensure this place does a roaring trade. doug, half a million shirts in this warehouse and you've got nothing in my size?! what is
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this about?— this about? that is a one-off siecial this about? that is a one-off special sort _ this about? that is a one-off special sort we _ this about? that is a one-off special sort we wear - this about? that is a one-off special sort we wear for i this about? that is a one-off special sort we wear for the l special sort we wear for the matches, but they had, they are flying out. it matches, but they had, they are fl im out. , matches, but they had, they are flying out-— those hats are everywhere at the moment. ., , ., those hats are everywhere at the moment. . , ., ., those hats are everywhere at the moment. . ., ., those hats are everywhere at the moment-— no. those hats are everywhere at the. moment-— no. i moment. have you got one? no, i would quite — moment. have you got one? no, i would quite like _ moment. have you got one? no, i would quite like one. _ moment. have you got one? no, i would quite like one. shall - moment. have you got one? no, i would quite like one. shall i i moment. have you got one? no, i would quite like one. shall i wearl would quite like one. shall i wear one tomorrow? let would quite like one. shall i wear one tomorrow?— would quite like one. shall i wear one tomorrow? let us know if you want rachel— one tomorrow? let us know if you want rachel to _ one tomorrow? let us know if you want rachel to wear _ one tomorrow? let us know if you want rachel to wear a _ one tomorrow? let us know if you want rachel to wear a hat - one tomorrow? let us know if you i want rachel to wear a hat tomorrow. matt is at the national football museum in manchester. excellent modelling of the football shirts, by the way. modelling of the football shirts, by the wa . ., ., , modelling of the football shirts, by the wa. . ., modelling of the football shirts, by thewa. . ., the way. that last one was peter crouch's, which _ the way. that last one was peter crouch's, which explains - the way. that last one was peter crouch's, which explains why i the way. that last one was peter crouch's, which explains why it l the way. that last one was peter| crouch's, which explains why it is quite _ crouch's, which explains why it is quite big — crouch's, which explains why it is quite big and me. but forget it's coming — quite big and me. but forget it's coming home, because i've come to the home _ coming home, because i've come to the home of— coming home, because i've come to the home of football. and if you look— the home of football. and if you look at — the home of football. and if you look at this, this picture here, is your— look at this, this picture here, is your heart— look at this, this picture here, is your heart breaking? because it is for me _ your heart breaking? because it is for me 25— your heart breaking? because it is for me. 25 years ago mr gareth southgate had that kick with his right _ southgate had that kick with his right foot. agony, heartbreak. to
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these _ right foot. agony, heartbreak. to these guys, the germans. it may be redemption, — these guys, the germans. it may be redemption, possibly. we are hoping it is going _ redemption, possibly. we are hoping it is going to be coming home. here we are _ it is going to be coming home. here we are at— it is going to be coming home. here we are at the national football museum. as you saw in my vt where i turned _ museum. as you saw in my vt where i turned a _ museum. as you saw in my vt where i turned a bit _ museum. as you saw in my vt where i turned a bit naomi campbell, we are talking _ turned a bit naomi campbell, we are talking about retro football shirts. i talking about retro football shirts. i have _ talking about retro football shirts. i have got — talking about retro football shirts. i have got this one here. germany, courtesy— i have got this one here. germany, courtesy of— i have got this one here. germany, courtesy of my next guest. we are not going _ courtesy of my next guest. we are not going to use this one today because — not going to use this one today because of course they are out of the competition. so let's bring in chris _ the competition. so let's bring in chris. chris... sorry, phil! it has been— chris. chris... sorry, phil! it has been a _ chris. chris... sorry, phil! it has been a busy— chris. chris... sorry, phil! it has been a busy morning for both of us. first and _ been a busy morning for both of us. first and foremost, why are retro kids doing — first and foremost, why are retro kids doing such big business at the moment? — kids doing such big business at the moment? ., kids doing such big business at the moment? . . kids doing such big business at the moment? ., ., ., , moment? there are a few key storylines- — moment? there are a few key storylines. one _ moment? there are a few key storylines. one of— moment? there are a few key storylines. one of them i moment? there are a few key storylines. one of them is - moment? there are a few key storylines. one of them is the \ storylines. one of them is the designs, — storylines. one of them is the designs, like_ storylines. one of them is the designs, like the _ storylines. one of them is the designs, like the one - storylines. one of them is the designs, like the one i've - storylines. one of them is the designs, like the one i've got| storylines. one of them is the - designs, like the one i've got here, famous _ designs, like the one i've got here, famous germany _ designs, like the one i've got here, famous germany shirt, _ designs, like the one i've got here, famous germany shirt, is _ designs, like the one i've got here, famous germany shirt, is so- famous germany shirt, is so creative. _ famous germany shirt, is so creative. so _ famous germany shirt, is so creative, so exciting, - famous germany shirt, is so. creative, so exciting, compared famous germany shirt, is so- creative, so exciting, compared to a lot of— creative, so exciting, compared to a lot of international _ creative, so exciting, compared to a lot of international kids. _ creative, so exciting, compared to a lot of international kids. they- creative, so exciting, compared to a lot of international kids. they are i lot of international kids. they are quite _ lot of international kids. they are quite boring _ lot of international kids. they are quite boring. another— lot of international kids. they are quite boring. another big - lot of international kids. they are quite boring. another big thing. lot of international kids. they are quite boring. another big thing isi quite boring. another big thing is authenticity, _ quite boring. another big thing is authenticity, fans, _ quite boring. another big thing is authenticity, fans, particularly. authenticity, fans, particularly club _ authenticity, fans, particularly club fans. _ authenticity, fans, particularly club fans, they _ authenticity, fans, particularly club fans, they want _
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authenticity, fans, particularly club fans, they want to - authenticity, fans, particularly club fans, they want to be - authenticity, fans, particularly. club fans, they want to be known authenticity, fans, particularly- club fans, they want to be known as being _ club fans, they want to be known as being there — club fans, they want to be known as being there when _ club fans, they want to be known as being there when the _ club fans, they want to be known as being there when the going - club fans, they want to be known as being there when the going was- being there when the going was tough — being there when the going was tough. manchester— being there when the going was tough. manchester city- being there when the going was tough. manchester city fan - being there when the going was. tough. manchester city fan wants being there when the going was- tough. manchester city fan wants to show _ tough. manchester city fan wants to show they _ tough. manchester city fan wants to show they were _ tough. manchester city fan wants to show they were there _ tough. manchester city fan wants to show they were there in _ tough. manchester city fan wants to show they were there in the - tough. manchester city fan wants to show they were there in the 90s - tough. manchester city fan wants to. show they were there in the 90s back in division _ show they were there in the 90s back in division one — show they were there in the 90s back in division one. an _ show they were there in the 90s back in division one. an old _ show they were there in the 90s back in division one. an old shirt— show they were there in the 90s back in division one. an old shirt is- show they were there in the 90s back in division one. an old shirt is a - in division one. an old shirt is a symbol— in division one. an old shirt is a symbol of— in division one. an old shirt is a symbol of that. _ in division one. an old shirt is a symbol of that. and _ in division one. an old shirt is a symbol of that. and finally, - in division one. an old shirt is a i symbol of that. and finally, price as welt — symbol of that. and finally, price as welt a— symbol of that. and finally, price as welt a lot _ symbol of that. and finally, price as well. a lot of _ symbol of that. and finally, price as well. a lot of vintage - symbol of that. and finally, price as well. a lot of vintage kits - symbol of that. and finally, price as well. a lot of vintage kits are i as well. a lot of vintage kits are quite _ as well. a lot of vintage kits are quite affordable. _ as well. a lot of vintage kits are quite affordable. there - as well. a lot of vintage kits are quite affordable. there are - as well. a lot of vintage kits are quite affordable. there are a . as well. a lot of vintage kits are l quite affordable. there are a few as well. a lot of vintage kits are - quite affordable. there are a few of the key— quite affordable. there are a few of the key storylines. _ quite affordable. there are a few of the key storylines. [— quite affordable. there are a few of the key storylines.— the key storylines. i met the viewers would _ the key storylines. i met the viewers would have - the key storylines. i met the viewers would have seen - the key storylines. i met the viewers would have seen in l the key storylines. i met the i viewers would have seen in the the key storylines. i met the - viewers would have seen in the vt, and he _ viewers would have seen in the vt, and he said — viewers would have seen in the vt, and he said shirts will do well for one or— and he said shirts will do well for one or two — and he said shirts will do well for one or two reasons. if the team does well in _ one or two reasons. if the team does well in a _ one or two reasons. if the team does well in a big — one or two reasons. if the team does well in a big tournament, or possibly— well in a big tournament, or possibly if an iconic image was captured — possibly if an iconic image was captured in the chart. think of gaza cryinq~ _ captured in the chart. think of gaza cryinq~ the — captured in the chart. think of gaza crying. the zintan headbutt. is that what you _ crying. the zintan headbutt. is that what you are finding? i've got another— what you are finding? i've got another one here which is quite funny — another one here which is quite funny~ this— another one here which is quite funny. this is a portugal shirt. this— funny. this is a portugal shirt. this is— funny. this is a portugal shirt. this is much sadder memories for england _ this is much sadder memories for england fans. this is 2004. helder postiqa _ england fans. this is 2004. helder postiga equalised and then scored a penalty _ postiga equalised and then scored a penalty. completely opposite to the germany _ penalty. completely opposite to the germany shirt. you are absolutely right _ germany shirt. you are absolutely right the — germany shirt. you are absolutely right. the stories with shirts realty— right. the stories with shirts really kind of elevate whatever
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desiqn — really kind of elevate whatever design it — really kind of elevate whatever design it is. anybody wins any trophy, — design it is. anybody wins any trophy, it— design it is. anybody wins any trophy, it always makes a shirt better — trophy, it always makes a shirt better. lots of people getting in touch _ better. lots of people getting in touch and they have been sending in their pictures of their shirts. with their— their pictures of their shirts. with their stories. it is absently fantastic. this is shameful. i will -et fantastic. this is shameful. i will get one — fantastic. this is shameful. i will get one on— fantastic. this is shameful. i will get one on next time. tell me about your shirt _ get one on next time. tell me about your shirt and your stories? it is very— your shirt and your stories? it is very much— your shirt and your stories? it is very much club shirts too?- your shirt and your stories? it is very much club shirts too? yes, one ofthe very much club shirts too? yes, one of the phenomenon _ very much club shirts too? yes, one of the phenomenon is _ very much club shirts too? yes, one of the phenomenon is we _ very much club shirts too? yes, one of the phenomenon is we have - very much club shirts too? yes, one of the phenomenon is we have seen i very much club shirts too? yes, one l of the phenomenon is we have seen is that a _ of the phenomenon is we have seen is that a lot _ of the phenomenon is we have seen is that a lot of— of the phenomenon is we have seen is that a lot of fans _ of the phenomenon is we have seen is that a lot of fans like _ of the phenomenon is we have seen is that a lot of fans like collecting - that a lot of fans like collecting shirts _ that a lot of fans like collecting shirts from _ that a lot of fans like collecting shirts from all— that a lot of fans like collecting shirts from all over— that a lot of fans like collecting shirts from all over the - that a lot of fans like collecting shirts from all over the globe. i that a lot of fans like collecting | shirts from all over the globe. i have _ shirts from all over the globe. i have a — shirts from all over the globe. i have a borussia _ shirts from all over the globe. i have a borussia dortmund - shirts from all over the globe. i have a borussia dortmund shirti shirts from all over the globe. i- have a borussia dortmund shirt from the 90s _ have a borussia dortmund shirt from the 90s i'm — have a borussia dortmund shirt from the 90s i'm not— have a borussia dortmund shirt from the 90s. i'm not from _ have a borussia dortmund shirt from the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. - have a borussia dortmund shirt from the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. i. the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. i followed _ the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. i followed them _ the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. i followed them but _ the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. i followed them but effectively - the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. i followed them but effectively i - the 90s. i'm not from dortmund. i followed them but effectively i am i followed them but effectively i am wearinq _ followed them but effectively i am wearing a — followed them but effectively i am wearing a because _ followed them but effectively i am wearing a because i— followed them but effectively i am wearing a because i love _ followed them but effectively i am wearing a because i love the - followed them but effectively i am . wearing a because i love the design. you are _ wearing a because i love the design. you are absolutely— wearing a because i love the design. you are absolutely right, _ wearing a because i love the design. you are absolutely right, not - wearing a because i love the design. you are absolutely right, not a - you are absolutely right, not a people — you are absolutely right, not a people cottect _ you are absolutely right, not a people collect shirts _ you are absolutely right, not a people collect shirts from - you are absolutely right, not a people collect shirts from all. you are absolutely right, not a i people collect shirts from all over the world — people collect shirts from all over the world it _ people collect shirts from all over the world. it is _ people collect shirts from all over the world. it is quite _ people collect shirts from all over the world. it is quite exciting - people collect shirts from all over the world. it is quite exciting for. the world. it is quite exciting for someone — the world. it is quite exciting for someone like _ the world. it is quite exciting for someone like me. _ the world. it is quite exciting for someone like me. i— the world. it is quite exciting for someone like me. i collect - the world. it is quite exciting for| someone like me. i collect shirts from _ someone like me. i collect shirts from every— someone like me. i collect shirts from every club. _ someone like me. i collect shirts from every club. i— someone like me. i collect shirts from every club. i support - someone like me. i collect shirts i from every club. i support liverpool but i'm _ from every club. i support liverpool but i'm having — from every club. i support liverpool but i'm having elected _ from every club. i support liverpool but i'm having elected an— from every club. i support liverpool but i'm having elected an everton . but i'm having elected an everton shirt if— but i'm having elected an everton shirt if it — but i'm having elected an everton shirt if it is — but i'm having elected an everton shirt if it is a _ but i'm having elected an everton shirt if it is a good _ but i'm having elected an everton shirt if it is a good one. _ but i'm having elected an everton shirt if it is a good one. i- shirt if it is a good one. i shouldn't— shirt if it is a good one. i shouldn't say— shirt if it is a good one. i shouldn't say that! - shirt if it is a good one. i shouldn't say that! a - shirt if it is a good one. i shouldn't say that! a lot| shirt if it is a good one. i. shouldn't say that! a lot of shirt if it is a good one. i- shouldn't say that! a lot of people are quite — shouldn't say that! a lot of people are quite shocked _ shouldn't say that! a lot of people are quite shocked but _ shouldn't say that! a lot of people are quite shocked but it— shouldn't say that! a lot of people are quite shocked but it is- shouldn't say that! a lot of people are quite shocked but it is a - are quite shocked but it is a growing _ are quite shocked but it is a growing area _ are quite shocked but it is a growing area and _ are quite shocked but it is a growing area and it - are quite shocked but it is a growing area and it is - are quite shocked but it is a growing area and it is fun. i are quite shocked but it is a growing area and it is fun. good luck getting _ growing area and it is fun. good luck getting a — growing area and it is fun. good luck getting a ticket _ growing area and it is fun. good luck getting a ticket to - growing area and it is fun.
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luck getting a ticket to enfield growing area and it is funm luck getting a ticket to enfield now you have _ luck getting a ticket to enfield now you have said that on national television. i guess the final thing to say— television. i guess the final thing to say is, — television. i guess the final thing to say is, for me, 1996 was the one. i to say is, for me, 1996 was the one. i was _ to say is, for me, 1996 was the one. i was of— to say is, for me, 1996 was the one. i was of a _ to say is, for me, 1996 was the one. i was of a certain age. i remember the players. — i was of a certain age. i remember the players, rememberthe heartbreak of the _ the players, rememberthe heartbreak of the gareth southgate miss. there will be _ of the gareth southgate miss. there will be young people who in 25 years time. _ will be young people who in 25 years time. their— will be young people who in 25 years time, their 2020 will be my 1996? absolutely spot on. for me it was 2002. _ absolutely spot on. for me it was 2002. 2004. _ absolutely spot on. for me it was 2002, 2004, those _ absolutely spot on. for me it was 2002, 2004, those are _ absolutely spot on. for me it was 2002, 2004, those are the - 2002, 2004, those are the tournaments _ 2002, 2004, those are the tournaments i _ 2002, 2004, those are the tournaments i remember. 2002, 2004, those are the | tournaments i remember the 2002, 2004, those are the - tournaments i remember the most. 2002, 2004, those are the _ tournaments i remember the most. you are spot _ tournaments i remember the most. you are spot on _ tournaments i remember the most. you are spot on your— tournaments i remember the most. you are spot on. your first _ tournaments i remember the most. you are spot on. your first woke _ tournaments i remember the most. you are spot on. your first woke up, - are spot on. your first woke up, your— are spot on. your first woke up, your first — are spot on. your first woke up, your first european _ are spot on. your first woke up, - your first european championships, there _ your first european championships, there are _ your first european championships, there are the — your first european championships, there are the ones _ your first european championships, there are the ones you _ your first european championships, there are the ones you remember. i your first european championships, i there are the ones you remember. it is pretty— there are the ones you remember. it is pretty coot~ — there are the ones you remember. it is pretty coot~ for— there are the ones you remember. it is pretty cool. for kids _ there are the ones you remember. it is pretty cool. for kids growing - there are the ones you remember. it is pretty cool. for kids growing up i is pretty cool. for kids growing up in 2020. — is pretty cool. for kids growing up in 2020. pretty— is pretty cool. for kids growing up in 2020, pretty good _ is pretty cool. for kids growing up in 2020, pretty good tournamentl is pretty cool. for kids growing up i in 2020, pretty good tournament to be growing — in 2020, pretty good tournament to be growing up — in 2020, pretty good tournament to be growing up in _ in 2020, pretty good tournament to be growing up in here— in 2020, pretty good tournament to be growing up in-— be growing up in. very exciting. thank you _ be growing up in. very exciting. thank you very _ be growing up in. very exciting. thank you very much. _ be growing up in. very exciting. thank you very much. we - be growing up in. very exciting. thank you very much. we will. be growing up in. very exciting. | thank you very much. we will be doing _ thank you very much. we will be doing more — thank you very much. we will be doing more retro shirts later. i am 'ust doing more retro shirts later. i am just qoinq — doing more retro shirts later. i am just going to finish with this image _ just going to finish with this image. ahead of tomorrow's game. this was— image. ahead of tomorrow's game. this was the — image. ahead of tomorrow's game. this was the one that has been burned — this was the one that has been burned into our memories for 25 years _ burned into our memories for 25 years and — burned into our memories for 25 years. and who knows, on saturday coutd _ years. and who knows, on saturday could we _ years. and who knows, on saturday could we have another one which could _ could we have another one which could grace these walls in 25 years
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time? _ could grace these walls in 25 years time? |_ could grace these walls in 25 years time? ~ , ., , .,, could grace these walls in 25 years time? ~ , ., , time? i think we should stop looking at that picture- _ time? i think we should stop looking at that picture. i _ time? i think we should stop looking at that picture. i thought _ time? i think we should stop looking at that picture. i thought we'd - at that picture. i thought we'd extinguish _ at that picture. i thought we'd extinguish this _ at that picture. i thought we'd extinguish this to _ at that picture. i thought we'd extinguish this to after - at that picture. i thought we'd extinguish this to after last i at that picture. i thought we'd - extinguish this to after last week. i thought we had. let's move the camera away from that memory and thought. there we go. that's better. matt, we have a little bit of time. you have an opportunity, 30, 40 seconds, to give us another catwalk. we all saw that needed some work. can i borrow that shirt, please? we have can i borrow that shirt, please? have got a can i borrow that shirt, please? a have got a little bit of time. can i borrow that shirt, please? we have got a little bit of time. which l have got a little bit of time. which colour do you _ have got a little bit of time. which colour do you want? _ have got a little bit of time. which colour do you want? is _ have got a little bit of time. which colour do you want? is it - have got a little bit of time. which colour do you want? is it going - have got a little bit of time. which colour do you want? is it going on| colour do you want? is it going on over the jacket? _ colour do you want? is it going on over the jacket? very _ colour do you want? is it going onj over the jacket? very impromptu. colour do you want? is it going on - over the jacket? very impromptu. you over the 'acket? very impromptu. you are over the jacket? very impromptu. you are -aushin over the jacket? very impromptu. you are pushing it- — over the jacket? very impromptu. you are pushing it. hang _ over the jacket? very impromptu. you are pushing it. hang on. _ over the jacket? very impromptu. you are pushing it. hang on. he _ over the jacket? very impromptu. you are pushing it. hang on. he can't - are pushing it. hang on. he can't seak are pushing it. hang on. he can't speak now- _ are pushing it. hang on. he can't speak now. that's _ are pushing it. hang on. he can't speak now. that's ok. _ are pushing it. hang on. he can't speak now. that's ok. we - are pushing it. hang on. he can't speak now. that's ok. we can't i are pushing it. hang on. he can't - speak now. that's ok. we can't hear him any more- _ speak now. that's ok. we can't hear him any more. nice. _ speak now. that's ok. we can't hear him any more. nice. nice. _ speak now. that's ok. we can't hear him any more. nice. nice. he - speak now. that's ok. we can't hear him any more. nice. nice. he did . him any more. nice. nice. he did well.
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one of the reasons retro shirts are doing quite well as the cost of getting a new england shirt, 60 quid. that might be a reason why. share your pictures. you, your family members, whoever it might be, in your retro shirts. we would love to see them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a man has been left in a critical condition in hospital after being stabbed last night at oxford circus. a 25—year—old man was arrested after being detained by members of the public at the scene. anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to contact the police. meanwhile city hall and the metropolitan police have set out plans to work with multiple agencies to tackle violence in london ahead of the school summer holidays. more areas will see an increased police presence, especially in open spaces and parks.
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over 80% of the most deprived schools in inner london saw a real—terms cut in theirfunding. the head of the national audit office, which carried out a study, questioned whether schools funding was allocated fairly. a department for education spokesperson said that it was providing more than six billion pounds of funding for pupils with additional needs this year. a new scheme aims to transform patches of waste ground around london into community hubs. it's being tried in haringey where an unused patch of land has been converted into a garden and kitchen allowing young people in the area to learn new skills. they've given me the opportunity to actually learn how to grow, especially from the fact that i didn't know much about it. if you want a happy life, i'm telling you, gardening, that will give you such a spiritual happiness in life. let's take a look at
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the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. just minor delays on the hammersmith and city line. oxford circus has just reopened after last night's incident. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, it's a mild start. temperatures in the double figures. high—pressure to the south of the uk. we still have sunshine today but notice waiting in the wings is this low pressure system for the weekend. any mist this morning will burn back, cloud breaking. some decent sunny spells, but those sunny spells can spark off one or two heavy, slow—moving showers. it is going to be warm today too. temperatures getting up to 23—24 celsius. into this evening, they showers peter out. we get some clear spells to start with, but moving in that low—pressure system flinging towards us, so we are looking at rain as we head into saturday morning. minimum temperature mild, between 13 and 15.
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so that rain spreading in tomorrow but for play at wimbledon today, it's not looking too bad. there is the risk of a shower, but it's fairly slim. plenty of dry weather, temperatures getting up to 24. now for tomorrow, those outbreaks of rain heavy, slow moving. you might get a rumble of thunder. sunday as well, further outbreaks of rain. and that low—pressure still influencing as we head into the first part of next week. it's not exactly a dry picture, with things getting a bit breezy for monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. "brilliant and brave" — that's how labour leader sir keir starmer described his party's newest mp, kim leadbeater. her victory over her conservative challenger will come as a disappointment for borisjohnson, whose party had
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been targeting the seat. we can speak now to amanda milling, the conservative party chair. good morning. what do you make of what happened to?— what happened to? obviously, i am bitterly disappointed _ what happened to? obviously, i am bitterly disappointed that _ what happened to? obviously, i am bitterly disappointed that we - what happened to? obviously, i am bitterly disappointed that we didn't| bitterly disappointed that we didn't gain the seat but i want to play tribute to ryan stevenson who has worked hard and run a really positive campaign. also to congratulate kim. but this is a labour hold. it is not a labour win. it's also true that governing parties do not win by—elections. and so even to get this close has been really rather exceptional. your vote has one really rather exceptional. your vote has gone down- _ really rather exceptional. your vote has gone down. well, _ really rather exceptional. your vote has gone down. well, the - really rather exceptional. your vote has gone down. well, the labour. really rather exceptional. your vote i has gone down. well, the labour vote also went down. _ has gone down. well, the labour vote also went down. i _ has gone down. well, the labour vote also went down. i would _ has gone down. well, the labour vote also went down. i would prefer - has gone down. well, the labour vote also went down. i would prefer to - also went down. i would prefer to talk about the _ also went down. i would prefer to talk about the conservative - also went down. i would prefer to| talk about the conservative party. so let's do that. your boat has gone down. . . . so let's do that. your boat has gone down. , ., ., , so let's do that. your boat has gone down. , ., , ., so let's do that. your boat has gone down. , ., . , ., ., , so let's do that. your boat has gone down. , ., ., .,, ., down. this was always going to be a really tough — down. this was always going to be a really tough election _ down. this was always going to be a really tough election for _ down. this was always going to be a really tough election for us. - really tough election for us. by—elections are unique and each in 131 of them is different between 40 really hard campaign and a really
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positive campaign. obviously, i am disappointed that we didn't win but we came withinjust disappointed that we didn't win but we came within just over 300 votes and that in itself is quite an exceptional result. l and that in itself is quite an exceptional result.- and that in itself is quite an exceptional result. i am looking at what our exceptional result. i am looking at what your candidate, _ exceptional result. i am looking at what your candidate, ryan - exceptional result. i am looking at - what your candidate, ryan stevenson, said in advance of the actual result. he said, talking to people on the doorstep, people say they want change and more and more people are saying they need a conservative mp to work with the government to get the investment for our area. now, we know the labour party in batley and spen held a very local election. that is what they were talking about, local issues. my understanding is that ryan stevenson did the same thing, but it didn't come through. what's the problem? latte come through. what's the problem? a run a really positive campaign about change. ryan stevenson was making the case in terms of why the people of batley and spen should elect a conservative mp and we were very, very close to gaining it. what i would say which was quite extraordinary was the fact that the labour party didn't really have that
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much branding and they didn't have that much reference to keir starmer. they were very much distancing themselves from the national party and also their leader. qm. themselves from the national party and also their leader.— themselves from the national party and also their leader. ok, so do you want to apply _ and also their leader. ok, so do you want to apply the — and also their leader. ok, so do you want to apply the same _ and also their leader. ok, so do you want to apply the same logic - and also their leader. ok, so do you want to apply the same logic to - want to apply the same logic to borisjohnson? how much of an advantage do you think he was to your candidate who lost? the prime minister is incredibly _ your candidate who lost? the prime minister is incredibly popular. - your candidate who lost? the prime minister is incredibly popular. i - minister is incredibly popular. i know that he did some visits up in the area and he is a real asset to the area and he is a real asset to the campaign. we came so close to winning. governing parties don't win or gain by—elections. particularly 11 years into government. we saw that in both the thatcher government and also the blair government. it is quite extraordinary, frankly, that we got so close and i want to pay tribute to ryan for fighting such a positive and hard campaign. he was out, day in and day out, fighting the case. ., , ._ out, day in and day out, fighting the case. .,, ._ ,., the case. people may get bored with the case. people may get bored with the statistics, _ the case. people may get bored with the statistics, but _ the case. people may get bored with the statistics, but we _ the case. people may get bored with the statistics, but we will— the case. people may get bored with the statistics, but we will still- the case. people may get bored with the statistics, but we will still go - the statistics, but we will still go through them. you were talking about borisjohnson being an asset.
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general election, 2019, batley and spen, conservative outs, 19,000. and then ryan stevenson in 2021, the vote that has just happened, 12,900. so vote that has just happened, 12,900. 50 19,020 vote that has just happened, 12,900. so19,02019 vote that has just happened, 12,900. so 19,020 19 down to vote that has just happened, 12,900. so19,02019 down to 12,920 21. vote that has just happened, 12,900. so 19,020 19 down to 12,920 21. one of the things that has changed for the labour party is borisjohnson is the labour party is borisjohnson is the leader. how do you equate these things? something is happening there thatis things? something is happening there that is not good. each things? something is happening there that is not good.— that is not good. each and every toy-election _ that is not good. each and every toy-election is — that is not good. each and every by-election is incredibly - that is not good. each and every by-election is incredibly tough l that is not good. each and every i by-election is incredibly tough and by—election is incredibly tough and we didn't win the seat in 2019. and within a whisker. and each and everyone has a different range but we fought positive campaign and we came close and that is so unusual in by—elections at this point in an election cycle and after being in government for 11 years.-
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election cycle and after being in government for 11 years. what you make in terms _ government for 11 years. what you make in terms of— government for 11 years. what you make in terms of the _ government for 11 years. what you make in terms of the campaigning | make in terms of the campaigning because there has been talk about it being ugly. we have heard that from people directly on the doorstep. what do you make of that? this people directly on the doorstep. what do you make of that? this was a really divisive — what do you make of that? this was a really divisive and _ what do you make of that? this was a really divisive and nasty _ what do you make of that? this was a really divisive and nasty campaign - really divisive and nasty campaign and it is not something that i wanted to see and that is why we ran a very positive campaign, trying to make the case to residents and voters in batley and spen as to why they should vote for ryan as a conservative candidate because it's unacceptable to see some of the scenes that we have seen and some of the literature that we saw over the last few weeks. the the literature that we saw over the last few weeks-— the literature that we saw over the last few weeks. the evidence appears at the moment _ last few weeks. the evidence appears at the moment you _ last few weeks. the evidence appears at the moment you can't _ last few weeks. the evidence appears at the moment you can't win - last few weeks. the evidence appears at the moment you can't win any - at the moment you can't win any by—elections or any elections, that seems to be even places where you had previously been holding. each and eve had previously been holding. eacq and every by—election is had previously been holding. em and every by—election is incredibly different. each and everyone is unique. but it is not that long ago that we had those election results, the mayoral results and also the win
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in hartlepool, which was quite extraordinary. at this point in the election cycle, we have done incredibly well in local elections, incredibly well in local elections, in the by—election in hartlepool and in the by—election in hartlepool and in those mayoral elections. does in the by-election in hartlepool and in those mayoral elections. does ask ou in those mayoral elections. does ask you whether — in those mayoral elections. does ask you whether you _ in those mayoral elections. does ask you whether you think _ in those mayoral elections. does ask you whether you think that _ in those mayoral elections. does ask you whether you think that in - in those mayoral elections. does askj you whether you think that in anyway issues related to matt hancock and the resignation of the health secretary during a pandemic, any of thoseissues secretary during a pandemic, any of those issues around that had any bearing on what happened? lots of issues came _ bearing on what happened? lots of issues came up _ bearing on what happened? lots of issues came up on _ bearing on what happened? lots of issues came up on the _ bearing on what happened? lots of issues came up on the doorstep - bearing on what happened? lots of. issues came up on the doorstep over the last few weeks. i will be honest with you, the issue with matt did come up on the doorstep, but it was a whole wide—ranging different issues. at the end of the day, we still have to come back to the fact that governing parties just don't gain by—elections. it is unprecedented to do so and it was in hartlepool. you unprecedented to do so and it was in hartle ool. ., ., ., , ., hartlepool. you want to tell us more about how that _ hartlepool. you want to tell us more about how that came _ hartlepool. you want to tell us more about how that came up? _ hartlepool. you want to tell us more about how that came up? i - hartlepool. you want to tell us more about how that came up? i have - hartlepool. you want to tell us more about how that came up? i have to l about how that came up? i have to assume it was not positive. tell is more about that.— assume it was not positive. tell is more about that. that was an issue that was coming _ more about that. that was an issue that was coming up _ more about that. that was an issue that was coming up but _
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more about that. that was an issue that was coming up but it _ more about that. that was an issue that was coming up but it was - more about that. that was an issue that was coming up but it was right| that was coming up but it was right that was coming up but it was right that matt resigned. and we have a new health secretary. [10 that matt resigned. and we have a new health secretary.— new health secretary. do want to flesh out what _ new health secretary. do want to flesh out what you _ new health secretary. do want to flesh out what you meant - new health secretary. do want to flesh out what you meant when i new health secretary. do want to l flesh out what you meant when you said it came up on the doorstep? what were people saying? it said it came up on the doorstep? what were people saying?- said it came up on the doorstep? what were people saying? it was one of a number — what were people saying? it was one of a number of _ what were people saying? it was one of a number of different _ what were people saying? it was one of a number of different issues - what were people saying? it was one of a number of different issues that l of a number of different issues that came up but obviously people have made many sacrifices over the last kind of 12 months or so and i have been frustrated by what the impact of the virus has had on our lives. but as a government, we are totally focused on getting those vaccines rolled out so that we can get life back to normal.— rolled out so that we can get life back to normal. . ,, , ., , . back to normal. thank you very much for our back to normal. thank you very much for your time — back to normal. thank you very much for your time this _ back to normal. thank you very much for your time this morning. _ back to normal. thank you very much for your time this morning. lets - for your time this morning. lets talk about _ for your time this morning. lets talk about sport _ for your time this morning. lets talk about sport and _ for your time this morning. lets talk about sport and wimbledon. one woman in particular. the name raducanu. i will admit, woman in particular. the name raducanu. iwilladmit, not woman in particular. the name raducanu. i will admit, not on my radar at all. she's a phenomenal young woman. she radar at all. she's a phenomenal young woman-— radar at all. she's a phenomenal young woman. she only made her maiden appearance _ young woman. she only made her maiden appearance on _ young woman. she only made her maiden appearance on the - young woman. she only made her. maiden appearance on the women's tourin maiden appearance on the women's tour injune. last month, she was
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doing her a—levels. tour injune. last month, she was doing hera—levels. it tour injune. last month, she was doing her a—levels. it ties back to something we were doing previously when the head of tennis asked why there are not more youngsters. he said he has this new programme which will take youngsters away from other sports and get them into it. and here you are starting to see the results. his 19—year—old sonjack draper already started in this tournament and now raducanu. latte draper already started in this tournament and now raducanu. we were talkin: about tournament and now raducanu. we were talking about how— tournament and now raducanu. we were talking about how composed _ tournament and now raducanu. we were talking about how composed she - talking about how composed she looks. it talking about how composed she looks. . . . talking about how composed she looks. . , . ., , looks. it was a remarkable performance _ looks. it was a remarkable performance and - looks. it was a remarkable performance and also - looks. it was a remarkable performance and also that| looks. it was a remarkable - performance and also that thing where she was actually genuinely looking happy. there are times when it was not going well, but embracing the moment. i it was not going well, but embracing the moment-— it was not going well, but embracing the moment. i would say that is what the moment. i would say that is what the have the moment. i would say that is what they have learned. _ the moment. i would say that is what they have learned. she _ the moment. i would say that is what they have learned. she could - the moment. i would say that is what they have learned. she could have i they have learned. she could have gone into go—karting or basketball. but being on this programme seems to be working. she was asked, which you prefer to get good a—level results are through to round four. what you think she said? round format. l’m think she said? round format. i'm sure she has _ think she said? round format. i'm sure she has good a—level results as well but now she can focus fully on
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tennis. if yesterday's sports bulletin was all about andy murray, this morning's headlines are all about britain's newest star emerging at wimbledon. 18—year—old emma raducanu, on her debut, is into the third round. she's the only british woman left in the singles, after she stunned mark ta vondrou ov , in straight sets, and she will now play romania's, sorana, kirstya, next. good news too for, fellow british player cameron norrie. he's also into round three, after beating australia's alex bolt in straight sets. only two players on tour have won more matches than norrie this year. ididn't give i didn't give him too much today so i didn't give him too much today so i was really pleased with everything and definitely a lot of improvement from the other day and, like i said before, just a pleasure to be out here. my first time on court one, so i definitely enjoyed it.
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the eight—time champion, roger federer next, in the third round. he eased past richard gasquey, in straight sets — in a match that lasted less than two hours. mark cavendish's incredible tour de france continues — two days after winning his first stage in five years, he did it again. mathieu van der pool, kept the leader's yellow jersey after stage six. but yesterday was all about cavendish, wearing the green, of the leading sprinter, he crossed the line in chateauroux, which is where he won, his first ever tour stage 13 years ago. that was his 32nd victory, at the event, two short of equalling eddy merckx's, all—time record. england's cricketers, have taken an unbeatable, 2—0 lead in the one—day series, against sri lanka, after a comfortable eight—wicket win at the oval. sam curran was the star with the ball, he took five wickets, as sri lanka posted a target of 242. in response, england were never troubled, captain owen morgan, built on the good foundation laid by the opening batsmen, guiding his side to victory with 7 overs to spare. played a lot of cricket in front of
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empty stadiums for obvious reasons but today in front of a home crowd if you would say in terms of being at the oval, first time actually seeing that new stand and stuff like that, it was really special, you get that, it was really special, you get that extra bit of buzz. it is one of my favourite rounds in the world and i really saw that today. it was a great game and great to have the fans back in. next to the euros, with one day to go until england's match against ukraine, lets take a look at the quarter final line up, with the teams, now two matches away from the final. first of all, in st petersburg, switzerland, who knocked out the world champions france, take on, spain. that's followed by the clash in munich between the world number one team belgium and italy. then tomorrow tea time, the czech republic go head—to—head with denmark in baku before it's to rome, where ukraine will take on england. gareth southgate will be focusing only on that match, but let's have a look, at what could come next. if england make it through tomorrow,
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they would face the czech republic, whom england beat in the group phase, or denmark, in the semi finals, at wembley next wednesday. and beyond that, the final, against you'd think belgium, italy or spain, again at wembley — ?a week on sunday, but in this tournament, where there have been upsets. you cannot rule out switzerland, and that's a long way off. if england fans and the team start thinking about beyond ukraine, they could easily become undone in rome tomorrow night. i do could easily become undone in rome tomorrow night-— tomorrow night. i do worry that all that emotion _ tomorrow night. i do worry that all that emotion and _ tomorrow night. i do worry that all that emotion and energy _ tomorrow night. i do worry that all that emotion and energy that - tomorrow night. i do worry that allj that emotion and energy that went into that game. the that emotion and energy that went into that game-— into that game. the history, what that takes out _ into that game. the history, what that takes out of _ into that game. the history, what that takes out of them. _ into that game. the history, what that takes out of them. and - into that game. the history, what that takes out of them. and of. that takes out of them. and of course, no home support this time. and a much bigger ukrainian population in italy than a uk one. exactly. and they have proved before that they are dangerous. l’m that they are dangerous. i'm beginning — that they are dangerous. i'm beginning to _ that they are dangerous. l“n beginning to feel a bit tense. thanks.
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here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. we were chatting about the heatwave in the us and canada. there have been questions of whether it is coming our way. been questions of whether it is coming ourway. no, it is been questions of whether it is coming our way. no, it is not. but the heat and the high pressure will have an indirect impression on us. all of that heat and the high—pressure system has sent the jet stream way further north. that causes a ripple southwards to the south of us and in that ripple we will see areas of low pressure develop over the next few days. our weather is set to take a much more changeable turn and so be prepared as we head into a spell of weather. sunshine and warmth, but also more showers around and even the odd rumble of thunder to go with it. even today, we could catch one or two more showers than we have seen. so far this morning, most damp across the borders of scotland and england. that will break up. plenty of cloud with mist and merck. that could linger around some of the
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coasts. inland, optimistic that we'll see more sunshine develop. hazyin we'll see more sunshine develop. hazy in places but we will also the showers develop. the bulk of the day will be dry but particularly northern england, southern scotland, where you do see the showers they could be heavy and thundery. warm in the centre comes out. that will be the centre comes out. that will be the case at wilton. warmer than recent days. this moral chance of showers into the late afternoon and evening. many will fade for a time, but then it is eyes down towards the south—west. a low pressure system starting to have more of an impact and wetter weather arriving later in the night. it will be a cold night. temperatures 11—15. into the weekend, there is confirmation. low pressure to the west. one weather system pushes up and as the low—pressure sets in place, it will feed in those showers. the wettest conditions will be in saturday morning across central and eastern
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england. parts of northern scotland will start off dry and sunny and possibly staying dry all day long. some heavy and under a showers. some of the showers could be thundery. and it will feel cooler than it does today. into saturday evening and overnight, we see those showers start to fade a little bit. of course, it is going to be a case of keeping eyes on rome as well. where much more summery weather there. temperatures around 29. as you go into sunday, it is low—pressure in charge. it is going to be hit and miss. some of the showers will be fairly slow—moving and torrential in places. rain will vary from one places. rain will vary from one place to the next. 19—21. changeable. back to you. with the rapid growth
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of renewable energy and electric vehicles in recent years, it's no surprise the demand for the metals they rely on, is soaring. but could the answer lie deep underground in cornwall? our science correspondent rebecca morelle takes a look. heading underground into cornwall�*s mine. latte heading underground into cornwall's mine. ~ . ' :: heading underground into cornwall's mine. . . ' :: , heading underground into cornwall's mine. . ' :: ,, ., mine. we are 120 metres below the surface right _ mine. we are 120 metres below the surface right now _ mine. we are 120 metres below the surface right now and _ mine. we are 120 metres below the surface right now and we _ mine. we are 120 metres below the surface right now and we are - mine. we are 120 metres below the i surface right now and we are beneath the surrounding water table. all you can see here is basically the sheet of mineralisation that was mined. work stopped decades ago, but these caverns could soon open up again. minerals in cornwall have been mined for hundreds of years, but with the green economy, metals like lithium and tin are now soaring in demand and tin are now soaring in demand and the hope is that this mine could play a crucial part in the uk's supply. play a crucial part in the uk's su -l . �* , ., play a crucial part in the uk's su -l . �* , . . . supply. anything with an electric connection. _ supply. anything with an electric connection. a — supply. anything with an electric connection, a circuit _ supply. anything with an electric connection, a circuit board - supply. anything with an electric connection, a circuit board or -
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connection, a circuit board or whatever, has teen in it, so all of these objectives and uses that we are using to get to this carbon—neutral economy require tin to some degree and to have that domestic supply on your doorstep, to make sense to see this mine into production. make sense to see this mine into production-— make sense to see this mine into production. above ground to, new methods of— production. above ground to, new methods of mineral _ production. above ground to, new methods of mineral extraction - production. above ground to, new methods of mineral extraction are j methods of mineral extraction are being trialled. lithium, essential for batteries, is abundant in the south—west. this borehole reaches about a kilometre beneath my feet, where there are lithium rich rocks. unless the water down their washes over them, the mineral seats out into the brine. that is brought back up into the brine. that is brought back up and i have got some of the liquid here and it is from this that the lithium is extracted. the project is currently at the pilot stage. the aim is to have it entirely powered by renewable energy to make the process carbon neutral. right now, lithium comes from australia and south america, but the company thinks it could eventually supply around a third of the uk's future
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lithium needs.— around a third of the uk's future lithium needs. . , , .,, , ., lithium needs. atypical mobile phone has about two — lithium needs. atypical mobile phone has about two or _ lithium needs. atypical mobile phone has about two or three _ lithium needs. atypical mobile phone has about two or three grams - lithium needs. atypical mobile phone has about two or three grams of- has about two or three grams of lithium — has about two or three grams of lithium in — has about two or three grams of lithium in it, whereas an elected vehicle _ lithium in it, whereas an elected vehicle good have up to 50 kilos, so it really— vehicle good have up to 50 kilos, so it really is— vehicle good have up to 50 kilos, so it really is a — vehicle good have up to 50 kilos, so it really is a huge step change in radium _ it really is a huge step change in radium demand and that is wider is the need _ radium demand and that is wider is the need to— radium demand and that is wider is the need to look for it in places where — the need to look for it in places where we — the need to look for it in places where we haven't looked for it before — where we haven't looked for it before. . ., ,, where we haven't looked for it before. ,, , ., , before. the world bank estimates we will need a 50096 _ before. the world bank estimates we will need a 500% increase _ before. the world bank estimates we will need a 50096 increase in - before. the world bank estimates we will need a 50096 increase in the - will need a 500% increase in the global production of lithium by 2050. ferrule global production of lithium by 2050. , ., global production of lithium by 2050. . , ., ., 4' global production of lithium by 2050. , ., ., ~ ., ., , global production of lithium by 2050. , ., ., ~ ., ., 2050. we should work towards a circular economy _ 2050. we should work towards a circular economy where - 2050. we should work towards a circular economy where we - 2050. we should work towards a circular economy where we just i circular economy where we just recycle — circular economy where we just recycle the _ circular economy where we just recycle the metals _ circular economy where we just recycle the metals we - circular economy where we just recycle the metals we use, - circular economy where we just recycle the metals we use, but| circular economy where we just . recycle the metals we use, but at this moment _ recycle the metals we use, but at this moment in _ recycle the metals we use, but at this moment in time _ recycle the metals we use, but at this moment in time we - recycle the metals we use, but at this moment in time we can't - recycle the metals we use, but at this moment in time we can't doi this moment in time we can't do that _ this moment in time we can't do that it — this moment in time we can't do that it is — this moment in time we can't do that it isjust— this moment in time we can't do that. it isjust the _ this moment in time we can't do that. it isjust the growth- this moment in time we can't do that. it isjust the growth is- this moment in time we can't do that. it isjust the growth is tool that. it isjust the growth is too fast. _ that. it isjust the growth is too fast. it— that. it isjust the growth is too fast. it is— that. it isjust the growth is too fast. it is too— that. it isjust the growth is too fast, it is too rapid, _ that. it isjust the growth is too fast, it is too rapid, and - that. it isjust the growth is too fast, it is too rapid, and to- that. it isjust the growth is too fast, it is too rapid, and to hit. fast, it is too rapid, and to hit the target _ fast, it is too rapid, and to hit the target of _ fast, it is too rapid, and to hit the target of net _ fast, it is too rapid, and to hit the target of net zero, - fast, it is too rapid, and to hit the target of net zero, we - fast, it is too rapid, and to hit. the target of net zero, we need those _ the target of net zero, we need those technologies— the target of net zero, we need those technologies now, - the target of net zero, we need those technologies now, so - the target of net zero, we need those technologies now, so i i the target of net zero, we need i those technologies now, so i think it is inevitable _ those technologies now, so i think it is inevitable we _ those technologies now, so i think it is inevitable we will _ those technologies now, so i think it is inevitable we will continue - it is inevitable we will continue mining — it is inevitable we will continue mininu. �* mining. but mining in the future will have to _ mining. but mining in the future will have to be _ mining. but mining in the future will have to be different - mining. but mining in the future will have to be different to - will have to be different to minimise and repairany minimise and repair any environmental damage. minimise and repairany environmental damage. experts say a green revolution is pointless unless the planet is protected in the process.
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the planet is protected in the rocess. . ,. . the planet is protected in the rocess. ., ,. ., , ' process. fascinating stuff, especially _ process. fascinating stuff, especially after _ process. fascinating stuff, especially after the - process. fascinating stuff, - especially after the announcement process. fascinating stuff, _ especially after the announcement of the big battery production factory in sunderland yesterday. like so many england football fans lucky enough to get a ticket to wembley earlier this week, joe white took to social media after the match to post a celebratory selfie. whatjoe, who is non—binary, didn't expect, was the impact their tweet would have. let's take a look at it now. thanking other supporters, they wrote — "today was my first game at wembley in full makeup", adding they were "absolutely petrified" before the game, but had "no issues from fans and some lovely chats". well, more than 23,000 people liked the tweet — and it also had a direct response from england starjordan henderson, who wrote — "no one should be afraid to go and support their club we can speak tojoe now
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on wembley way. he is on his england shirt. we have met before when you wear an england fan back out in russia, following the england team then. your visit to wembley this week was different. just explain why. i wembley this week was different. just explain why-— wembley this week was different. just explain why. i mean, russia was a whole different _ just explain why. i mean, russia was a whole different experience, - just explain why. i mean, russia was a whole different experience, but - just explain why. i mean, russia was a whole different experience, but in l a whole different experience, but in january— a whole different experience, but in january last year, i came out as non-binary— january last year, i came out as non—binary and i haven't been to a football— non—binary and i haven't been to a football game since february of last year because of the pandemic, so going _ year because of the pandemic, so going to _ year because of the pandemic, so going to wembley on tuesday was my first proper— going to wembley on tuesday was my first proper game in a stadium in full make—up, is very overtly queer and non—binary, and that obviously brought— and non—binary, and that obviously brought some challenges and concerns before _ brought some challenges and concerns before the _ brought some challenges and concerns before the game when i realised that might— before the game when i realised that might not— before the game when i realised that might not be the possibly safest option. —
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might not be the possibly safest option, given we have had issues before _ option, given we have had issues before when we were in portugal for the nations— before when we were in portugal for the nations league, we had a lot of homophobia from apparent england fans, homophobia from apparent england fans. and _ homophobia from apparent england fans, and so from a safety perspective when you are in a full face of— perspective when you are in a full face of make—up, you can't really hide _ face of make—up, you can't really hide that~ — face of make—up, you can't really hide that. so there was a bit of concern — hide that. so there was a bit of concern beforehand when i realise that. _ concern beforehand when i realise that. but — concern beforehand when i realise that, but as i put in the tweet, it was an— that, but as i put in the tweet, it was an absolutely amazing afternoon and evening with nothing but support from fellow england fans. good mornin: from fellow england fans. good morning to _ from fellow england fans. good morning to you. _ from fellow england fans. good morning to you. it _ from fellow england fans. good morning to you. it is _ from fellow england fans. good morning to you. it is charlie - from fellow england fans. (ems morning to you. it is charlie here. so good that this is a positive story about these issues because there are a lot of problems people face, as you have. when did you realise the kind of response you are getting? j realise the kind of response you are caettin ? ~' ., , , getting? i think for me i put up the tweet more — getting? i think for me i put up the tweet more because _ getting? i think for me i put up the tweet more because my _ getting? i think for me i put up the tweet more because my friends - getting? i think for me i put up the i tweet more because my friends knew that i tweet more because my friends knew that l was— tweet more because my friends knew that i was going and had seen that i had sent— that i was going and had seen that i had sent some pictures of me in my make _ had sent some pictures of me in my make up— had sent some pictures of me in my
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make up and — had sent some pictures of me in my make up and they were all very complementary, as you would hope friends _ complementary, as you would hope friends to— complementary, as you would hope friends to be. and so ijust put up more _ friends to be. and so ijust put up more to— friends to be. and so ijust put up more to say— friends to be. and so ijust put up more to say to them that i had had a really— more to say to them that i had had a really lovely — more to say to them that i had had a really lovely day and even before i went to _ really lovely day and even before i went to bed at night, it had hit 300. _ went to bed at night, it had hit 300, which for my twitter is quite a lot, 300, which for my twitter is quite a lot. but— 300, which for my twitter is quite a lot, but when i woke up it had gone up lot, but when i woke up it had gone up into— lot, but when i woke up it had gone up into the — lot, but when i woke up it had gone up into the thousands and then to see jordan — up into the thousands and then to see jordan henderson tweeting as well. _ see jordan henderson tweeting as well. it— see jordan henderson tweeting as well, it hasjust rocketed since then— well, it hasjust rocketed since then and — well, it hasjust rocketed since then and predominantly all of the responses have been really, really lovely— responses have been really, really lovely and — responses have been really, really lovely and very supportive. i've had a lot of— lovely and very supportive. i've had a lot of messages as well of support and people saying that this means a lot, and people saying that this means a lot. havinq — and people saying that this means a lot, having people being visible and being _ lot, having people being visible and being themselves. and lot, having people being visible and being themselves.— lot, having people being visible and being themselves. and how important is that support — being themselves. and how important is that support from _ being themselves. and how important is that support from the _ being themselves. and how important is that support from the footballers i is that support from the footballers themselves? because harry kane was wearing the rainbow captain because my armband as was the german captain as well and thenjordan henderson, who i think it is known to be a real ally of lgbtq i plus people, what does that mean to you? j
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ally of lgbtq i plus people, what does that mean to you?— does that mean to you? i think it can't be understated _ does that mean to you? i think it can't be understated how - does that mean to you? i think it i can't be understated how important it is having — can't be understated how important it is having the support of players and even — it is having the support of players and even the official england twitter— and even the official england twitter ended up responding to me as well, twitter ended up responding to me as well. and _ twitter ended up responding to me as well. and i_ twitter ended up responding to me as well, and i think having that support— well, and i think having that support from your club, your national— support from your club, your national team and the players is really. _ national team and the players is really, really important because it shows— really, really important because it shows two— really, really important because it shows two other fans that this is something that matters across football — something that matters across football and that if you are being homophobic there is no room in the game _ homophobic there is no room in the game for— homophobic there is no room in the game for that and players are not 20 stand _ game for that and players are not 20 stand for— game for that and players are not 20 stand for it _ game for that and players are not 20 stand for it either. and i think havinq — stand for it either. and i think having those role models of people using _ having those role models of people using their platforms for such a positive — using their platforms for such a positive message is a really important thing and a positive thing for everyone. important thing and a positive thing for everyone-— important thing and a positive thing foreve one. ., ., , for everyone. speaking of platforms, ou are for everyone. speaking of platforms, you are right — for everyone. speaking of platforms, you are right there _ for everyone. speaking of platforms, you are right there at _ for everyone. speaking of platforms, you are right there at wembley - for everyone. speaking of platforms, you are right there at wembley now. | you are right there at wembley now. this is your opportunity to talk to us about what is going to happen next for england. talk about you
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first of all. where will you be for the game and what you think is going to happen? j’m the game and what you think is going to ha en? �* ., the game and what you think is going to hauen? �* ., ., , to happen? i'm going to meet up with one of my friends, _ to happen? i'm going to meet up with one of my friends, cash, _ to happen? i'm going to meet up with one of my friends, cash, and - to happen? i'm going to meet up with one of my friends, cash, and watch i one of my friends, cash, and watch it with _ one of my friends, cash, and watch it with her— one of my friends, cash, and watch it with her and hopefully be celebrating a wonderful england victory— celebrating a wonderful england victory in — celebrating a wonderful england victory in the a southgate masterclass. it will be a difficult game _ masterclass. it will be a difficult game we — masterclass. it will be a difficult game. we can't underestimate ukraine and also _ game. we can't underestimate ukraine and also the _ game. we can't underestimate ukraine and also the difference of not having — and also the difference of not having the fans in the stadium. but ithink— having the fans in the stadium. but i think we _ having the fans in the stadium. but i think we have obviously got a very good _ i think we have obviously got a very good chance. we haven't conceded yet and i good chance. we haven't conceded yet and i think— good chance. we haven't conceded yet and i think that is a very important thing _ and i think that is a very important thing and — and i think that is a very important thing and i— and i think that is a very important thing and i am going to be praying and putting everything on the line for an— and putting everything on the line for an england victory. i think we will probably edge through to— one. ithink— will probably edge through to— one. ithink ukraine will probably edge through to— one. i think ukraine have a goal in them as we _ i think ukraine have a goal in them as we have — i think ukraine have a goal in them as we have seen across this tournament so far, but i think we have _ tournament so far, but i think we have got— tournament so far, but i think we have got the talent that we need to progress _ have got the talent that we need to progress and then hopefully be back here next— progress and then hopefully be back here next week for the semifinal and
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seeing _ here next week for the semifinal and seeing england going onto hopefully a final— seeing england going onto hopefully a final performance. haste seeing england going onto hopefully a final performance.— a final performance. have you got for the semifinal? _ a final performance. have you got for the semifinal? i _ a final performance. have you got for the semifinal? i haven't - a final performance. have you got for the semifinal? i haven't yet, i for the semifinal? i haven't yet, but i'm waiting _ for the semifinal? i haven't yet, but i'm waiting on _ for the semifinal? i haven't yet, but i'm waiting on the _ for the semifinal? i haven't yet, but i'm waiting on the england i but i'm waiting on the england ballot — but i'm waiting on the england ballot if— but i'm waiting on the england ballot if we go through. if we go through. — ballot if we go through. if we go through. i— ballot if we go through. if we go through, i am ballot if we go through. if we go through, iam part ballot if we go through. if we go through, i am part of the travel supporters club so i get my tickets through— supporters club so i get my tickets through their and they will be balloting for the semifinal and final if— balloting for the semifinal and final if we get there, so fingers crossed — final if we get there, so fingers crossed l _ final if we get there, so fingers crossed. . , final if we get there, so fingers crossed. ., , ., , final if we get there, so fingers crossed. . , ., , , ., final if we get there, so fingers crossed. ., , .,~ crossed. i really hope you make there as well. _ crossed. i really hope you make there as well. so _ crossed. i really hope you make there as well. so nice _ crossed. i really hope you make there as well. so nice to - crossed. i really hope you make there as well. so nice to talk. crossed. i really hope you make there as well. so nice to talk to | there as well. so nice to talk to you this morning and best of luck. take care. j you this morning and best of luck. take care. ~ you this morning and best of luck. take care-— take care. i like it when people come u- take care. i like it when people come up with — take care. i like it when people come up with a _ take care. i like it when people come up with a very _ take care. i like it when people come up with a very specific i come up with a very specific prediction. very clear. to — one. all worked out. jkla prediction. very clear. to - one. all worked out.— prediction. very clear. to - one. all worked out. for generations, farmers have relied on traditional methods to guide their cattle across their grazing land — but all that could be about to change. a new conservation project is using the latest tchnology to control cows by smartphone app. so how does that work?
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paul murphy explains. these lincoln red cattle are highly efficient grazers, devouring grasses, shrubs and bushes with enthusiasm. the colours they are wearing allow for the remote control of where they graze. filth wearing allow for the remote control of where they graze.— of where they graze. on the map ear, we of where they graze. on the map year. we have — of where they graze. on the map year. we have a _ of where they graze. on the map year, we have a satellite - of where they graze. on the map year, we have a satellite map i of where they graze. on the map| year, we have a satellite map and of where they graze. on the map i year, we have a satellite map and we can see the pasture.— can see the pasture. unlike so many thins can see the pasture. unlike so many things nowadays. — can see the pasture. unlike so many things nowadays, there _ can see the pasture. unlike so many things nowadays, there is _ can see the pasture. unlike so many things nowadays, there is an - things nowadays, there is an application to help with it. thea;t application to help with it. they aet a application to help with it. they get a boundary _ application to help with it. they get a boundary and _ application to help with it. they get a boundary and they - application to help with it. jje: get a boundary and they get this audible warning so they know to walk back into the main herd. if they do carry on through those audible warnings, then they get a really small pulse, just a fraction of what an electric fence would be. this nature reserve _ an electric fence would be. this nature reserve is _ an electric fence would be. this nature reserve is dominated by its dunes, the flower and insect life here is unique but it is also under threat. the cattle have a key role to play in removing unwanted vegetation. brute to play in removing unwanted vegetation-— to play in removing unwanted veaetation. ~ ., ., vegetation. we can manage when their land is flat and — vegetation. we can manage when their land is flat and the _ vegetation. we can manage when their land is flat and the june _ vegetation. we can manage when their land is flat and the june system -
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vegetation. we can manage when their land is flat and the june system is i land is flat and the june system is flat, land is flat and the june system is flat. but— land is flat and the june system is flat, but when it is so undulated like here. — flat, but when it is so undulated like here, we can only do it through the animal— like here, we can only do it through the animal grazing.— like here, we can only do it through the animal grazing. these dunes need to be grazed — the animal grazing. these dunes need to be grazed if — the animal grazing. these dunes need to be grazed if they _ the animal grazing. these dunes need to be grazed if they are _ the animal grazing. these dunes need to be grazed if they are to _ the animal grazing. these dunes need to be grazed if they are to survive, i to be grazed if they are to survive, and of course conservationists could just put fences everywhere to direct the cattle, but that doesn't give them the precision and control of a gps collar. and what about those who will have concerns about using this electric pulse on cattle? the will have concerns about using this electric pulse on cattle?— electric pulse on cattle? the cattle have been checked _ electric pulse on cattle? the cattle have been checked out _ electric pulse on cattle? the cattle have been checked out by - electric pulse on cattle? the cattle have been checked out by vets. i electric pulse on cattle? the cattle| have been checked out by vets. we had a vet there when we fitted the colours and they have been studied elsewhere as well. they have been found to have no impact on the cows. the technology is on trial here, a first for a uk nature reserve. if successful, we will be seeing many more remote—controlled cattle playing a key role in conservation. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. our headlines today. a narrow win for labour in the batley and spen by—election after a closely fought battle. kim leadbeater, sister of murdered mp jo cox, thanked herfamily in an emotional victory speech. without them, i could not have got through the last five years, never mind the last five weeks. my amazing parents and my wonderful partner. and i want to give a special shout out to my niece and nephew, who i cannot wait to hug, as soon as i see them. harry dunn's parents start legal proceedings in the us, against the woman involved
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in the crash that killed their son. good morning. if football really is coming home, it can provide a big boost for business. i am looking at the economic impact of success at the economic impact of success at the euros here at this rooftop bar in london. britain's teenage tennis star stuns wimbledon again —18—year—old emma raducanu is now into the third round on her tournament debut, only two months after completing her a—levels. plus, as summer weather slips into changeable mode, get ready for sunshine up and plenty of showers and the odd thunderstorm. full forecast here. good morning. it's friday, july 2nd. our top story. labour has narrowly held its seat in the batley and spen by—election. the party's candidate, kim leadbeater, saw off a strong conservative challenge, to win by 323 votes.
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the seat was previously held by her sister, jo cox, who was murdered in 2016. our political correspondent, nick eardley, was at the count and sent this report. ido hereby i do hereby declare that kim leadbeater is duly elected. it was the narrowest _ leadbeater is duly elected. it was the narrowest of _ leadbeater is duly elected. it was the narrowest of wins. _ leadbeater is duly elected. it was the narrowest of wins. but - leadbeater is duly elected. it was the narrowest of wins. but one i leadbeater is duly elected. it was i the narrowest of wins. but one that was met with a mighty sense of relief by labour. kim leadbeater is the new mp here. she beat her conservative rival byjust over 300 votes. but in a seat many thought would turn blue over night, labour are delighted. the campaign here has been heated, with allegations of harassment and the police sometimes accompanying candidates. the new mp said she wanted to heal some of the divisions. j said she wanted to heal some of the divisions. ., , , , , ., divisions. i will do my very best to reresent divisions. i will do my very best to represent the _ divisions. i will do my very best to represent the whole _ divisions. i will do my very best to represent the whole of _ divisions. i will do my very best to represent the whole of batley i divisions. i will do my very best to represent the whole of batley and | represent the whole of batley and spen as their new mp. i'm absolutely delighted that the people of batley and spen have rejected division and they have voted for hope. this result has _
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they have voted for hope. this result has extra _ they have voted for hope. this result has extra significance for kim leadbeater. hersister, result has extra significance for kim leadbeater. her sister, jo cox, used to be the mp here. she was murdered in 2016 by a far right extremist. jl murdered in 2016 by a far right extremist-— murdered in 2016 by a far right extremist. , ., , ., ., extremist. it is inevitable not to think about _ extremist. it is inevitable not to think about joe _ extremist. it is inevitable not to think about joe and _ extremist. it is inevitable not to think about joe and mum - extremist. it is inevitable not to think about joe and mum and i extremist. it is inevitable not to i think about joe and mum and dad and think aboutjoe and mum and dad and particularlyjoe's children. obviously, as i said before, it was a big decision to put myself forward. it has been a very emotional campaign and today is very emotional campaign and today is very emotionalfor me for lots emotional campaign and today is very emotional for me for lots of reasons, but if i can we have the mp thatjoe was, i know that i will do her pride and my family proud. angus crossed that i do a fantasticjob just as she did. we crossed that i do a fantastic 'ob just as she didi just as she did. we are all incredibly _ just as she did. we are all incredibly proud _ just as she did. we are all incredibly proud of- just as she did. we are all incredibly proud of what i just as she did. we are all i incredibly proud of what kim has done _ incredibly proud of what kim has done she — incredibly proud of what kim has done. she was incredibly brave to step forward into it, notjust around — step forward into it, notjust around the sort of security side of things. _ around the sort of security side of things, given what happened tojoe, but also _ things, given what happened tojoe, but also the context of a very bruising — but also the context of a very bruising and a pretty horrible campaign at times, and to put yourself— campaign at times, and to put yourself into that, to try to keep positive. — yourself into that, to try to keep positive, to try to keep a vision focused — positive, to try to keep a vision
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focused on _ positive, to try to keep a vision focused on what you want to change and how _ focused on what you want to change and how you bring people together, i think she _ and how you bring people together, i think she has done, win or lose, i would _ think she has done, win or lose, i would have — think she has done, win or lose, i would have beenjust as proud of her. would have been 'ust as proud of her. . . would have been 'ust as proud of her. , , ., ., , , her. the result is a massive relief for the labour _ her. the result is a massive relief for the labour leader. _ her. the result is a massive relief for the labour leader. keir - her. the result is a massive relief. for the labour leader. keir starmer has faced pressure in recent weeks over his strategy. if labour had lost, the criticism would have increased. some think his job would have been in question. but instead, his allies think this was a referendum on his leadership, he has won. nick airlie, bbc news, batley and spen. and we can speak to nick now. this is a must as close as it gets for a by—election result. what does it tell us about the bigger picture? morning. you heard a lot about some of the _ morning. you heard a lot about some of the local— morning. you heard a lot about some of the local factors there. i am in the marketplace here. there is a building — the marketplace here. there is a building down they're named afterjo cox. jo— building down they're named afterjo cox. jo cox _ building down they're named afterjo cox. jo cox house, the community centre _ cox. jo cox house, the community centre but — cox. jo cox house, the community centre. but as much as those local factors— centre. but as much as those local factors matter, a lot is going to be
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read into— factors matter, a lot is going to be read into this about what it means for the _ read into this about what it means for the national political picture, because — for the national political picture, because we had seen the conservatives take hartlepool from the labour party, and there had been many— the labour party, and there had been many expecting that they would win here as _ many expecting that they would win here as well. obviously that has not happened — here as well. obviously that has not happened. and the labour party is really. _ happened. and the labour party is really, really happy that it has managed to hold on here, even if it was by— managed to hold on here, even if it was by the — managed to hold on here, even if it was by the narrowest of margins. let me show— was by the narrowest of margins. let me show you — was by the narrowest of margins. let me show you first what shabana mahmood, from the labour party, told breakfast _ mahmood, from the labour party, told breakfast area. mahmood, from the labour party, told breakfast area-— breakfast area. wherever those grumblings _ breakfast area. wherever those grumblings are _ breakfast area. wherever those grumblings are from, _ breakfast area. wherever those grumblings are from, i - breakfast area. wherever those grumblings are from, i hope i breakfast area. wherever those i grumblings are from, i hope they stop. keir starmer is the leader of the liberal party. under his leadership we are making progress. we know the mountain we have to climb if we are to win the next general election. we have to pull off a feat even beyond what we achieved in 1997. here is very clear eyed about the scale of the challenge in front of us. what we have seen in the local elections and beyond is that we are making progress in some parts of the country and we still have a challenge in other parts of the
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country. challenge in other parts of the count . . challenge in other parts of the count _ ., , , challenge in other parts of the count . ., , , ., country. so, a big sigh of relief for sir keir— country. so, a big sigh of relief for sir keir starmer. _ country. so, a big sigh of relief for sir keir starmer. it - country. so, a big sigh of relief for sir keir starmer. it doesn't| for sir keir starmer. it doesn't mean — for sir keir starmer. it doesn't mean he — for sir keir starmer. it doesn't mean he does not have questions to answer _ mean he does not have questions to answer. labour still has a long road if it wants _ answer. labour still has a long road if it wants to — answer. labour still has a long road if it wants to win back power. but he will _ if it wants to win back power. but he will be — if it wants to win back power. but he will be happy with this result. i wouldn't _ he will be happy with this result. i wouldn't be surprised if we don't see him. — wouldn't be surprised if we don't see him. i— wouldn't be surprised if we don't see him, iwouldn't wouldn't be surprised if we don't see him, i wouldn't be surprised if we do _ see him, i wouldn't be surprised if we do see — see him, i wouldn't be surprised if we do see him, rather, in the next few hours— we do see him, rather, in the next few hours celebrating. the conservatives will be disappointed because _ conservatives will be disappointed because they thought they were very close to _ because they thought they were very close to taking this seat. but they are trying — close to taking this seat. but they are trying to play down the significance of the result, saying that governing parties don't very often _ that governing parties don't very often take seats from the opposition when there is a by—election, when actually. _ when there is a by—election, when actually, historically that is pretty— actually, historically that is pretty true. have a listen to the tory— pretty true. have a listen to the tory chair. _ pretty true. have a listen to the tory chair, amanda milling. iwill— tory chair, amanda milling. i will be _ tory chair, amanda milling. i will be honest with you, the issue with matt did come up on the doorstep. but it was a whole wide range of different issues. we have to come back to the fact that governing partiesjust to come back to the fact that governing parties just don't gain by—elections. it is unprecedented to
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do so, and it was unprecedented in hartlepool. so, that is the big political picture _ so, that is the big political picture. labourare so, that is the big political picture. labour are pretty happy but still with— picture. labour are pretty happy but still with work to do. the tories disappointed but not too downbeat. there _ disappointed but not too downbeat. there is— disappointed but not too downbeat. there is also that big significance locally— there is also that big significance locally as— there is also that big significance locally as well, that the sister of the former mp here, jo cox, has been elected _ the former mp here, jo cox, has been elected as— the former mp here, jo cox, has been elected as the new mp, kim leadbeater, the narrowest of margins. _ leadbeater, the narrowest of margins, 300 votes in it. seven minutes past — margins, 300 votes in it. seven minutes past eight _ margins, 300 votes in it. seven minutes past eight at _ margins, 300 votes in it. seven minutes past eight at the i margins, 300 votes in it. seven minutes past eight at the time. | anticipation is growing ahead of one of england's biggest matches in recent history — tomorrow's quarterfinals clash with ukraine in the euros. jon watson is in rome ahead of the game and joins us now. give us an idea of the build up there in rome?— give us an idea of the build up there in rome? ., ., there in rome? good morning. hello from rome- — there in rome? good morning. hello from rome- in _ there in rome? good morning. hello from rome. in the _ there in rome? good morning. hello from rome. in the shadow _ there in rome? good morning. hello from rome. in the shadow of - there in rome? good morning. hello from rome. in the shadow of the - from rome. in the shadow of the vatican — from rome. in the shadow of the vatican i— from rome. in the shadow of the vatican. i say the state is said here, — vatican. i say the state is said here, it — vatican. i say the state is said here, it is _ vatican. i say the state is said here, it is a _ vatican. i say the state is said here, it is a slightly strange
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experience because you would imagine arriving _ experience because you would imagine arriving irr— experience because you would imagine arriving in a— experience because you would imagine arriving in a city before a huge quarterfinal like this in a major tournament, you would be seeing footbail— tournament, you would be seeing football related adverts, banners, flags, _ football related adverts, banners, flags, fans congregating. to be honest— flags, fans congregating. to be honest with you, my way to the hotel yesterday. _ honest with you, my way to the hotel yesterday, there was very little of that _ yesterday, there was very little of that that — yesterday, there was very little of that. that is inevitable, i guess, with— that. that is inevitable, i guess, with the — that. that is inevitable, i guess, with the way the tournament is being staged _ with the way the tournament is being staged across europe and, most importantly, the lack of fans. we know _ importantly, the lack of fans. we know that — importantly, the lack of fans. we know that the england fans have been told not _ know that the england fans have been told not to— know that the england fans have been told not to travel from england. there _ told not to travel from england. there are — told not to travel from england. there are only going to be 2500 tickets— there are only going to be 2500 tickets made available. those are not to _ tickets made available. those are not to fans — tickets made available. those are not to fans travelling from the uk. those _ not to fans travelling from the uk. those are — not to fans travelling from the uk. those are for people living here in italy those are for people living here in itaiv or _ those are for people living here in italy or elsewhere in europe. it is a slightly— italy or elsewhere in europe. it is a slightly strange build—up. that is not to— a slightly strange build—up. that is not to devalue the game. we know the significance, _ not to devalue the game. we know the significance, especially when you consider— significance, especially when you consider the result that england produced against germany to qualify. and having _ produced against germany to qualify. and having beaten and old rivals like germany, they will not want to slip up— like germany, they will not want to slip up against ukraine, who, it is worth— slip up against ukraine, who, it is worth pointing out, they have a good record _ worth pointing out, they have a good record against. they have only lost once _ record against. they have only lost once to _ record against. they have only lost once to ukraine in the past, that was in _ once to ukraine in the past, that was in 2009 when they played them in european _ was in 2009 when they played them in european championship before, in
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2012. _ european championship before, in 2012, when they won, ukraine were hosts _ 2012, when they won, ukraine were hosts then, — 2012, when they won, ukraine were hosts then, and they knocked them out of _ hosts then, and they knocked them out of the _ hosts then, and they knocked them out of the tournament. interesting nratchup _ out of the tournament. interesting matchup between the two managers. andrei _ matchup between the two managers. andrei shevchenko and gareth southgate. they actually played for england _ southgate. they actually played for england and ukraine when the teams first faced _ england and ukraine when the teams first faced each other in 2000. they were on— first faced each other in 2000. they were on the — first faced each other in 2000. they were on the same pitch that day. contrasting fortunes as players. verv— contrasting fortunes as players. very different now, having moved into management, especially for gareth— into management, especially for gareth southgate, when you consider that he _ gareth southgate, when you consider that he has— gareth southgate, when you consider that he has really built such a great — that he has really built such a great team environment, such a great culture _ great team environment, such a great culture within that squad. and you consider— culture within that squad. and you consider the way he has spoken so eloquently— consider the way he has spoken so eloquently about racism and inclusivity. while there were some questions — inclusivity. while there were some questions about his tactical approach, and i am sure people have been _ approach, and i am sure people have been screaming at the tv saying, let the brakes— been screaming at the tv saying, let the brakes off, just go for it, he hasn't — the brakes off, just go for it, he hasn't and _ the brakes off, just go for it, he hasn't. and it seems as though he hasn't. and it seems as though he has got _ hasn't. and it seems as though he has got every big decision right. and that — has got every big decision right. and that is what has got england to where _ and that is what has got england to where they are now. certainly changing _ where they are now. certainly changing the perception around the team, _ changing the perception around the teanr, the — changing the perception around the team, the way that england have been viewed _ team, the way that england have been viewed in _ team, the way that england have been viewed in this tournament. and you 'ust viewed in this tournament. and you just wonder— viewed in this tournament. and you just wonder if they can get past ukraine, — just wonder if they can get past ukraine, with the way the tournament
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has opened _ ukraine, with the way the tournament has opened up for them on this side of the _ has opened up for them on this side of the draw. — has opened up for them on this side of the draw, who knows what they can io of the draw, who knows what they can go on _ of the draw, who knows what they can go on and _ of the draw, who knows what they can go on and achieve? as far as the game _ go on and achieve? as far as the game tomorrow is concerned, england arriving _ game tomorrow is concerned, england arriving later this afternoon. that result, _ arriving later this afternoon. that result, and — arriving later this afternoon. that result, and whatever england can produce _ result, and whatever england can produce going forward in this tournament, is going to be a defining _ tournament, is going to be a defining moment. notjust forthe england _ defining moment. notjust forthe england team, but certainly for gareth— england team, but certainly for gareth southgate as england manager. cheers. _ gareth southgate as england manager. cheers, john. us presidentjoe biden has said it's essential to find out what caused a block of flats to collapse in miami last week. so far, 18 people have been confirmed dead, and 140 people are still unaccounted for. mr biden and his wife, jill, met emergency service workers and families of the victims in the town of surfside. borisjohnson will meet with chancellor angela merkel today, on her last visit to the uk as head of the german government. the two leaders are expected to discuss coronavirus travel restrictions and post—brexit relations between the uk and germany. let's get some more detail now from our correspondent, sanchia berg.
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tell us a little bit more about what is on the agenda?— is on the agenda? well, first of all, chancellor _ is on the agenda? well, first of all, chancellor merkel- is on the agenda? well, first of all, chancellor merkel will - is on the agenda? well, first of. all, chancellor merkel will attend is on the agenda? well, first of- all, chancellor merkel will attend a cabinet _ all, chancellor merkel will attend a cabinet meeting, which is a rare privilege — cabinet meeting, which is a rare privilege for a visiting head of state — privilege for a visiting head of state. then she will be talking to the prime — state. then she will be talking to the prime minister about coronavirus travel— the prime minister about coronavirus travel restrictions, as you said. germany— travel restrictions, as you said. germany has currently got some of the strictest rules for british visitors, _ the strictest rules for british visitors, even if double vaccinated you still— visitors, even if double vaccinated you still have to quarantine for 14 days _ you still have to quarantine for 14 days. germany has also been encouraging other european countries to ctanrp _ encouraging other european countries to clamp down on british holiday makers — to clamp down on british holiday makers. they are very worried about the spread _ makers. they are very worried about the spread of the delta variant. so obviously. — the spread of the delta variant. so obviously, the prime minister will be addressing that and trying to get the german chancellor to move her position _ the german chancellor to move her position. the times newspaper this morning _ position. the times newspaper this morning says that germany is planning _ morning says that germany is planning to relax those restrictions. we will obviously have to wait _ restrictions. we will obviously have to wait and — restrictions. we will obviously have to wait and see what comes out of those _ to wait and see what comes out of those taiks — to wait and see what comes out of those talks which many would be british— those talks which many would be british tourists will be watching ctosety. — british tourists will be watching ctosety. i— british tourists will be watching closely, i suspect. after that, the chanceiior— closely, i suspect. after that, the chancellor will go to see the queen at windsor. somebody she has met
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many— at windsor. somebody she has met many times— at windsor. somebody she has met many times before. the german officiat— many times before. the german official spokesman says this is a visit she — official spokesman says this is a visit she is— official spokesman says this is a visit she is looking forward to with excitement, that he is honoured to be visiting — excitement, that he is honoured to be visiting the queen again. we don't _ be visiting the queen again. we don't know what they are going to be talking _ don't know what they are going to be talking about. but who knows, maybe they will— talking about. but who knows, maybe they will be _ talking about. but who knows, maybe they will be talking about the football? because after all, the queen's— football? because after all, the queen's great grandson, prince george. — queen's great grandson, prince george, was in the crowd for the match— george, was in the crowd for the match this — george, was in the crowd for the match this week.— george, was in the crowd for the match this week. yes, of course. there you _ match this week. yes, of course. there you 90- — match this week. yes, of course. there you go- a _ match this week. yes, of course. there you go. a little _ match this week. yes, of course. there you go. a little bit - match this week. yes, of course. there you go. a little bit of - match this week. yes, of course. there you go. a little bit of extra j there you go. a little bit of extra detail there.— detail there. thank you. an icebreaker_ detail there. thank you. an icebreaker potentially, - detailthere. thank you. an - icebreaker potentially, although icebrea ker potentially, although diplomatically icebreaker potentially, although diplomatically also quite sensitive. it could be. now the weather. how is it looking? is a picture from this morning, the padstow picture? it is a picture from this morning, the padstow picture?— is a picture from this morning, the padstow picture? it looks gorgeous. it is indeed- — padstow picture? it looks gorgeous. it is indeed. fog _ padstow picture? it looks gorgeous. it is indeed. fog starting _ padstow picture? it looks gorgeous. it is indeed. fog starting to - it is indeed. fog starting to disperse, sunshine overhead. it is one of those days were some of the gloom will clear to sunny spells.
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some sunshine through the day into the weekend. but as we go through the weekend. but as we go through the weekend, more showers around. yes, a flash of lightning, a rumble of thunder to go with them as well. the wet weather this morning is around the borders of scotland and england. that is starting to break up england. that is starting to break up into lighter showers. they will be a few showers cropping up here and they are later in the day. the odd rumble of thunder. you will notice some of the cloud is breaking up. more in the way of sunshine. warming up in that sense and. temperatures into the low 20s, quite widely. it is going to be murkier in some of the coast. a few showers putting into orkney and shetland as we going to the second half of the day. take a look around this evening, heavy and thundery showers across the north of scotland. sunny spells away from north—east coast. more showers in southern scotland and northern ireland. this is where it is most likely to be heavy and thundery. forthe it is most likely to be heavy and thundery. for the rest of england and wales, most will be dry. this
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evening and overnight at the showers will slowly start to fade for some. more wet weather arriving into the south—west, which will bring us a fairly changeable weekend. it does not just fairly changeable weekend. it does notjust finish at fairly changeable weekend. it does not just finish at the weekend. fairly changeable weekend. it does notjust finish at the weekend. it even goes into next week as well. hit and miss showers. some heavy and thundery. i love july! thundery. ilovejul! . ~ thundery. ilovejul! ., ,, the time is 14 minutes past eight. in november 2019, saskia jones was volunteering at a prisoner rehabilitation conference in central london when she was attacked and killed by convicted terrorist, usman khan. now, in herfamily�*s first interview, saskia's uncles, phil and petejones, have been speaking about the impact of her death. they've been telling their story to zoe conway. we want to represent how she saw the world, how she interacted with people, how much we loved her and still love her. people need to know what has actually happened here. the enormity of what's happened,
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and what a devastating effect it has had on ourfamily and a number of other people. convicted terrorist usman khan surrounded on london bridge. three men armed with a fire extinguisher and a narwhal tusk, tackle him to the ground. nearby in fishmongers' hall, saskia jones and jack merritt lay dying. khan had stabbed them with knives strapped to his wrists. just two hours earlier, he was sat at a table chatting to saskia. both were guests at a prison education event. it's actually emotionally difficult to come to terms with anyone sitting almost next to someone for that amount of time, and then a person, whatever the human being, whoever the human being is, doing what they did to that person. that's very difficult to take. once in a while, we realise that these things are not good for the problems we are seeing. this is saskia taking
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part in a discussion at the fishmongers' hall event. she believed in prisoner rehabilitation, and had been a volunteer for learning together. how do you want to remember her? we have so many memories of saskia that contribute to remembering her. she was vibrant. i always remember her as being challenging, actually, because whatever i said to her, she would challenge it, and she'd make sure that i was on firm ground, and she would make sure that there was justice, notjust in the wider sphere ofjustice, butjustice in everyday dealings with people. i've lived for 20 years longer than saskia did, and i view what she achieved in her short life as far greater value than anything i've achieved so far. and building upon that is something that we're focused upon. as a teenager, usman khan
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was convicted of plotting to set up a terrorist training camp and went to prison. shortly before his release in 2018, m15 had intelligence he was planning another attack. he was monitored in the community by the probation service, the police and m15. they allowed him to go to fishmongers' hall that day without a police escort. learning together is a theoretically informed, values—led educational mission. amy ludlow and ruth armstrong are the directors of the cambridge university learning together programme, which teaches prisoners and university students side by side, and which held the event at fishmongers' hall. i'm going to explain to you how- i got introduced to learn together. khan became one of their students in prison. amy and ruth, amongst others, saw him as a success story. they put him on their leaflets. they gave him a computer. i think people saw the advantage of having him as somebody they had
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involved in their programme, showing some capability to deal with even the highest category of offender. theyjust lost sight of the danger to the public, their employees and anyone else associated with the programme. at the inquest into saskia's death, learning together said it was the responsibility of the prison and probation service to assess khan's risk, and they'd relied on those agencies' expertise. something that was put to amy ludlow, if, after everything that's happened, learning together would rule out working with categories of prisoner terrorist offenders. and her answer was no, because there's no research evidence to support that. yeah, and we heard a number of times there's no research evidence for this and no research evidence for that. i suggest that the main evidence we have now is that it wasn't a wise idea. the arrogance in thinking that academics necessarily can on their own deal with the types
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of prisoners that usman khan was, to the point where, you know, someone can manipulate that. amy ludlow and ruth armstrong received several awards for their work, which was also praised by the prisons inspectorate. but the organisation is now suspended whilst cambridge university carries out a review. do you think ruth armstrong and amy ludlow can continue to lead this organisation? they shouldn't be leading an organisation that got something badly and tragically wrong. from a family point of view, we'd be very distressed, upset and frankly insulted, if they did. in a statement, cambridge university said...
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saskia was passionate about improving justice for rape victims, and her dissertation on the subject was recently cited in a government report. there's now a phd in her name at anglia ruskin university, where she was once a student. saskia obviously will be forever young in our eyes, but her legacy is already far bigger than she would ever have hoped for, if she had thought about her legacy, which she actually wouldn't have done. at the end of the day, we want to represent how saskia is positioned in our hearts as well as in our minds. it is desperately difficult for the
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family. let's speak now to peter clarke, who previously served as the chief inspector of prisons and head of counter—terrorism command at new scotland yard. do you understand, peter, what saskia's uncles are saying here, and that there is a real issue around ensuring the protection of people who work with prisoners who are rehabilitating?— who work with prisoners who are rehabilitating? who work with prisoners who are rehabilitatin: ? , ., rehabilitating? yes, good morning. i comletel rehabilitating? yes, good morning. i completely understand _ rehabilitating? yes, good morning. i completely understand what - rehabilitating? yes, good morning. i j completely understand what saskia's relatives _ completely understand what saskia's relatives are saying there. they have _ relatives are saying there. they have brought home in extraordinary and touching and graphic terms the tragedy— and touching and graphic terms the tragedy of— and touching and graphic terms the tragedy of what occurred. i listened to and _ tragedy of what occurred. i listened to and read — tragedy of what occurred. i listened to and read every single word of evidence — to and read every single word of evidence given at the inquest. and subsequently, wrote a report for the poiicy— subsequently, wrote a report for the policy exchange think tank. i said what _ policy exchange think tank. i said what had — policy exchange think tank. i said what had happened came about because of a mixture _ what had happened came about because of a mixture of ignorance and complacency and incompetence. and i'm complacency and incompetence. and i'm afraid _ complacency and incompetence. and i'm afraid that is certainly the case — i'm afraid that is certainly the case it— i'm afraid that is certainly the case. it was a failure across many, many—
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case. it was a failure across many, many systems. intelligence wasn't shared. _ many systems. intelligence wasn't shared. as— many systems. intelligence wasn't shared, as it should have been. but ithink— shared, as it should have been. but i think the _ shared, as it should have been. but i think the worst thing was that senior— i think the worst thing was that senior criminologists who should know _ senior criminologists who should know better refused to differentiate between _ know better refused to differentiate between risks posed by someone like usman _ between risks posed by someone like usman khan, a deceitful, violent prisoner, — usman khan, a deceitful, violent prisoner, who had been injail for eight _ prisoner, who had been injail for eight years— prisoner, who had been injail for eight years and had been violent, in violent— eight years and had been violent, in violent radicalisation throughout that time, they refused —— where they— that time, they refused —— where they refused to differentiate between the risk he posed under the prisoners— between the risk he posed under the prisoners they had been working for -- working — prisoners they had been working for —— working with to for some time on the learning — —— working with to for some time on the learning together programme. they were — the learning together programme. they were lessons hard learned 20 years _ they were lessons hard learned 20 years ago — they were lessons hard learned 20 years ago by the risks posed by istamist— years ago by the risks posed by islamist terrorist. doctor ludlow herself, — islamist terrorist. doctor ludlow herself, in— islamist terrorist. doctor ludlow herself, in evidence to the inquest, said her— herself, in evidence to the inquest, said her area herself, in evidence to the inquest, said herarea of herself, in evidence to the inquest, said her area of expertise was not counterterrorism or extremism. it begs _ counterterrorism or extremism. it begs the — counterterrorism or extremism. it begs the question, what on earth were _ begs the question, what on earth were they— begs the question, what on earth were they doing trying to work with someone _ were they doing trying to work with someone like usman khan and trusting him, someone like usman khan and trusting him. when _ someone like usman khan and trusting him, when he was in the top 0.1% of
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the most _ him, when he was in the top 0.1% of the mostare— him, when he was in the top 0.1% of the most are as assessed prisoners? he was— the most are as assessed prisoners? he was a _ the most are as assessed prisoners? he was a high risk category prisoner~ _ he was a high risk category prisoner. it is a must unheard—of for somebody of his level of dangerousness to be released from prison _ dangerousness to be released from prison we — dangerousness to be released from rison. ~ , ., ., ., prison. we should point out that there was a _ prison. we should point out that there was a lot _ prison. we should point out that there was a lot of _ prison. we should point out that there was a lot of criticism - prison. we should point out that there was a lot of criticism of. prison. we should point out that| there was a lot of criticism of the learning together project, that it was suspended after the attack. its future remains unclear. it has not started again. but the jurors at the inquest into these deaths also found that those involved with usman khan had been blinded by his poster boy image for the programme. is it true to say that almost it is possible for anyone to cheat the system, if they have the wherewithal, the weight, to do that?— they have the wherewithal, the weight, to do that? well, i think it's possible _ weight, to do that? well, i think it's possible for _ weight, to do that? well, i think it's possible for people - weight, to do that? well, i think it's possible for people to - weight, to do that? well, i think it's possible for people to cheat | it's possible for people to cheat the system if there is not sufficient scepticism and rigour in assessing — sufficient scepticism and rigour in assessing all the available information. it is notable that there — information. it is notable that there was— information. it is notable that there was one person who did see exactly— there was one person who did see exactly what usman khan was doing
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throughout his sentence, and that was a _ throughout his sentence, and that was a prison psychologist. she produced — was a prison psychologist. she produced a very long and detailed report, _ produced a very long and detailed report, which basically said he was deceiving — report, which basically said he was deceiving people, gaming the system, and when _ deceiving people, gaming the system, and when he was released from prison the threat _ and when he was released from prison the threat he posed to the public would _ the threat he posed to the public would actually increase. now why more _ would actually increase. now why more notice was not taken of that report, _ more notice was not taken of that report, is— more notice was not taken of that report, is something that needs to be clearly— report, is something that needs to be clearly understood. and people who run— be clearly understood. and people who run programmes in which dangerous prisoners such as usman khan _ dangerous prisoners such as usman khan are _ dangerous prisoners such as usman khan are involved, really need to understand the risks they are running _ understand the risks they are running. and the jeopardy which they are facing _ running. and the jeopardy which they are facing -- — running. and the jeopardy which they are facing —— which they are placing members _ are facing —— which they are placing members of— are facing —— which they are placing members of the public and their own staff _ members of the public and their own staff. �* members of the public and their own staff. . , ., members of the public and their own staff. �* ,. ._ members of the public and their own staff. . ,., members of the public and their own staff. . staff. are you saying it is a most impossible _ staff. are you saying it is a most impossible to — staff. are you saying it is a most impossible to rehabilitate - staff. are you saying it is a most. impossible to rehabilitate prisoners like this with re—dash—mac extremist views? like this with re-dash-mac extremist views? ., ., ., , views? no, i am not saying it is impossible _ views? no, i am not saying it is impossible at — views? no, i am not saying it is impossible at all. _ views? no, i am not saying it is impossible at all. what - views? no, i am not saying it is impossible at all. what i - views? no, i am not saying it is impossible at all. what i am - views? no, i am not saying it is- impossible at all. what i am saying is there _ impossible at all. what i am saying is there has— impossible at all. what i am saying is there has to be a very thorough risk assessment based upon each individual— risk assessment based upon each individual prisoner. in this case no risk assessment i'd always carried
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out about— risk assessment i'd always carried out about this event. that is extraordinary in itself. that was all compounded as well by the fact that intelligence about what usman khan might be intending to do after he left _ khan might be intending to do after he left prison was not properly shared — he left prison was not properly shared. this is indicative of the fact that — shared. this is indicative of the fact that managing a person, a prisoner— fact that managing a person, a prisoner of his dangerousness, using 'ust prisoner of his dangerousness, using just local— prisoner of his dangerousness, using just local resources, in this case it is clear— just local resources, in this case it is clear that the local probation team _ it is clear that the local probation team and — it is clear that the local probation team and the local police officers who were — team and the local police officers who were assigned to monitor his behaviour— who were assigned to monitor his behaviour after prison, they were simply— behaviour after prison, they were simply not — behaviour after prison, they were simply not experienced enough or knowledgeable enough to know how to deal with _ knowledgeable enough to know how to deal with somebody like him and what to look— deal with somebody like him and what to look for _ deal with somebody like him and what to look for. . ~ deal with somebody like him and what to look for. ., ,, , ., deal with somebody like him and what to look for. . ~' , ., , . to look for. thank you very much, peter clarke. _ to look for. thank you very much, peter clarke, the _ to look for. thank you very much, peter clarke, the former - to look for. thank you very much, | peter clarke, the former inspector of prisons. a ministry ofjustice spokesperson said: our sympathies remain with the families of saskia jones and jack merritt, whose lives were tragically cut short while pursuing their passion for helping others turn
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their lives around. the prison service has paused all activity with learning together and a carefully—considered decision on its future will be taken in due course. you are watching bbc breakfast. 25 and is passed out. let's look ahead to tomorrow night. saturday night. one of the big questions ahead of england's euros match tomorrow — where will you watch it and what snacks do you need to buy? ben's at a rooftop bar in east london to find out how football is helping our country's finances too. it is potentially a big boost for places like the one you are in this morning. places like the one you are in this morninu. . .., , places like the one you are in this morninu. ., .., , ., morning. yeah, it could be a huge economic boost. _ morning. yeah, it could be a huge economic boost. good _ morning. yeah, it could be a huge economic boost. good morning. i morning. yeah, it could be a huge i economic boost. good morning. take morning. yeah, it could be a huge - economic boost. good morning. take a look at the glorious view we have here from our rooftop position in london. all eyes will be on the big screen tomorrow, where they will be showing the football. for bars and restaurants that have had a pretty tough year, the euros has been big business. they are doing pretty well. overall the tournament could boost the size of the uk economy by 150 million quid. now that's not a huge
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amount in the big scale of things but it helps. but it is very welcome to get customers back in. 19 million pints of beer are going to be consumed on a saturday. again, a great number, but it would be even higher, 24 million, if the restrictions were still, had been removed, were not in place. it means big groups cannot gather. so the amount of money bars and residents can make does fall somewhat. in about 5.5 billion will be spent in shops, whether that is merchandise, new telly, may be food and drink. this is a very welcome boost. but by no means is it business as usual. let me introduce you to keep —— kate nichols, chief executive of uk hospitality. great to get people back have a big event that people can gather around. but the restrictions mean it is not business as usual? ~ , ,., , ,
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as usual? absolutely. it is encouraging _ as usual? absolutely. it is encouraging to _ as usual? absolutely. it is encouraging to see - as usual? absolutely. it isj encouraging to see people as usual? absolutely. it is - encouraging to see people back. it is the _ encouraging to see people back. it is the closest thing you can get to expose _ is the closest thing you can get to expose the atmosphere of a match, to come _ expose the atmosphere of a match, to come to— expose the atmosphere of a match, to come to a _ expose the atmosphere of a match, to come to a bar. the bars like this are fully— come to a bar. the bars like this are fully booked. they are fully booked — are fully booked. they are fully booked at half capacity. nowhere near like — booked at half capacity. nowhere near like the significant lift in sales— near like the significant lift in sales we _ near like the significant lift in sales we would see from a normal match, _ sales we would see from a normal match, particularly when the home nations— match, particularly when the home nations progress in the tournament. so yes, _ nations progress in the tournament. so yes, we — nations progress in the tournament. so yes, we are sales uplift of 50%. you would — so yes, we are sales uplift of 50%. you would normally get 200 to 3% on match _ you would normally get 200 to 3% on match day~ _ you would normally get 200 to 3% on match day. we you would normally get 200 to 396 on match da . ~ . ., ~ you would normally get 200 to 396 on match da . ~ . ., ,, ., ., match day. we have talked lot about the difficulties _ match day. we have talked lot about the difficulties the _ match day. we have talked lot about the difficulties the hospitality - the difficulties the hospitality industry is facing. people still reluctant to go out. not back to the number is the industry needs? ihla. number is the industry needs? no, foot fault still— number is the industry needs? no, foot fault still down. even in those match _ foot fault still down. even in those match days — foot fault still down. even in those match days we're still seeing footfall — match days we're still seeing footfall and capacity 20% to 30% down _ footfall and capacity 20% to 30% down in — footfall and capacity 20% to 30% down in 2019. we have a long way to recovery _ down in 2019. we have a long way to recovery. untilwe down in 2019. we have a long way to recovery. until we get all of those restrictions— recovery. until we get all of those restrictions lifted, we are not going — restrictions lifted, we are not going to _ restrictions lifted, we are not going to get back to full strength. kate, _ going to get back to full strength. kate, for— going to get back to full strength. kate, for now, thank you. come with me. as we said, it is bars and restaurants that may do quite well out of all of this. but there are
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shops doing pretty well as well. claire is with me, retail expert and a familiarface. all the merchandise is here. they stop flying off the shelves. it's good news for retail, isn't it? ~ , , shelves. it's good news for retail, isn't it? �* , isn't it? absolutely. the feel-good factor isn't — isn't it? absolutely. the feel-good factor isn't just _ isn't it? absolutely. the feel-good factor isn't just on _ isn't it? absolutely. the feel-good factor isn'tjust on this _ isn't it? absolutely. the feel-good factor isn'tjust on this kind - isn't it? absolutely. the feel-good factor isn'tjust on this kind of- factor isn'tjust on this kind of merchandise england branding. it .oes merchandise england branding. it goes beyond that. people are going out and _ goes beyond that. people are going out and about, they are going to other— out and about, they are going to other shops, there is an uplift in things— other shops, there is an uplift in things like — other shops, there is an uplift in things like barbecue products, drinks, — things like barbecue products, drinks, as— things like barbecue products, drinks, as people celebrate in their gardens _ drinks, as people celebrate in their gardens. even things like tvs, fridges, — gardens. even things like tvs, fridges, projector screens and projectors, so they can get together and socialise after a time when they haven't— and socialise after a time when they haven't been able to do so.- haven't been able to do so. there is a feel-good — haven't been able to do so. there is a feel-good factor _ haven't been able to do so. there is a feel-good factor as _ haven't been able to do so. there is a feel-good factor as well, - haven't been able to do so. there is a feel-good factor as well, isn't - a feel—good factor as well, isn't there? even if it is not all of this stuff, if it is not fridges and tellies, we are more likely to put our hands in her pocket if we are feeling excited?— feeling excited? yes, it boost consumer— feeling excited? yes, it boost consumer confidence - feeling excited? yes, it boost consumer confidence and - feeling excited? yes, it boost consumer confidence and it . feeling excited? yes, it boost - consumer confidence and it boosts football _ consumer confidence and it boosts football -- — consumer confidence and it boosts football —— but footfall. that has a positive _ football —— but footfall. that has a positive effect for all the high street— positive effect for all the high street businesses, notjust the one linked _ street businesses, notjust the one linked to— street businesses, notjust the one linked to sport. nice to see. you have it. business
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really excited as we all are, of course, before the games this weekend. the further england progress, of course, the longer that economic boost goes on. in the meantime, bars, restaurantand economic boost goes on. in the meantime, bars, restaurant and shops really trying to cash in after a tough year. really trying to cash in after a tough year-— really trying to cash in after a tou~h ear. �* .,, ., ., ~' really trying to cash in after a tou~h ear. �* .,, ., ., ~ ., tough year. it. ben has the look of an england — tough year. it. ben has the look of an england goalkeeper, _ tough year. it. ben has the look of an england goalkeeper, i - tough year. it. ben has the look of an england goalkeeper, i would . tough year. it. ben has the look of. an england goalkeeper, i would say. he has got the reach. look an england goalkeeper, i would say. he has got the reach.— time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. you good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. you a man has been left in a critical condition in hospital after being stabbed last night at oxford circus. a 25—year—old man was arrested after being detained by members of the public at the scene. anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to contact the police. meanwhile, city hall and the metropolitan police have set out plans to work with multiple agencies to tackle violence in london ahead of the school summer holidays. more areas will see an increased police presence,
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especially in open spaces and parks. and there'll be additional funding for programmes run by london's violence reduction unit in places like brent, redbridge and camden. almost 200,000 newjob adverts were posted in the last week ofjune — with many of them for roles in london. latest figures by the recruitment and employment confederation said there were now over 1.5 million vacancies being advertised, being driven by sectors recently re—opening after being closed due to the pandemic. jobs in professional and skilled sectors were particularly in demand— including it to haulage. the capital's role in hosting euro 2020 games, and the people that make up the city are being celebrated on posters around london. more than 3,000 faces of londoners have been put up, to showcase individual achievements throughout the pandemic as well as celebrate a sense of community. they can be seen temporarily at tower bridge, in king's cross, the royal docks, catford
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and in tottenham. we've had some people, we've asked them to put the faces on the wall, and they almost seem like, some of them think they are not worthy to go on the wall, and it's quite strange that they have that reaction, but everyone is worthy because we are all one community. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good ervice on the tubes this morning on the roads oxford circus has now reopened after being shut overnight following the stabbing there. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, it is a mild start. temperatures in double figures. high—pressure to the south of the uk. we still have sunshine today, but notice waiting in the wings is this low pressure system for the weekend. any mist this morning will burn back, cloud breaking. some decent sunny spells, but those sunny spells can spark off one or two heavy, slow—moving showers. it is going to be warm today too. temperatures getting up to 23—24 celsius. into this evening, they showers peter out. we get some clear spells to start with, but moving in
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that low—pressure system flinging towards us, so we are looking at rain as we head into saturday morning. minimum temperature mild, between 13 and 15. so that rain spreading in tomorrow, but for play at wimbledon today, it's not looking too bad. there is the risk of a shower, but it's fairly slim. plenty of dry weather, temperatures getting up to 24. now for tomorrow, those outbreaks of rain heavy, slow moving. you might get a rumble of thunder. sunday as well, further outbreaks of rain. and that low—pressure still influencing as we head into the first part of next week. it's not exactly a dry picture, with things getting a bit breezy for monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. gethinjones and sara davies can
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tell us what's in store. thank you. dragons' den star sara davies is firing up your friday with me today. she's here in the swivel chair! but if your finances are putting you in a spin, and you're worried about your money, finance expert alice tapper will be telling us three quick and easy ways you could save hundreds of pounds this weekend. and doing up your bathroom is a great way to add value to your home. so diy expert wayne perrey is here with some simple tricks of the trade that will spruce up the grubbiest of bathrooms in no time. plus, football fans will be desperate to get their diy done and dusted before england's euros quarter—final match on saturday — i'm sure a fair few will be packing out the pubs too. but we meet the villagers in cumbria who didn't have a local for two and a half years, until they decided to team up to buy it. we find out how the lowther arms is now the heart of their community. dr punam is here to explain why five million people who've had a certain type of the astrazeneca vaccine might be
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banned from holidays in europe — even after having both doses! and staying with health, we'll be finding out how the nation's favourite vicar reverend kate bottley is putting her sunday morning live co—presenter sean fletcher to the test with freezing cold showers. don't get any ideas, sara! but to keep things warm and toasty in the studio this morning, katya jones will be here for strictly fitness. we'll see you at 9.15. the parents of teenage motorcyclist harry dunn have given evidence against the woman suspected of causing his death in 2019. charlotte charles and tim dunn flew to washington dc earlier this week ahead of legal proceedings against the suspect, anne sacoolas. david willis has this report.
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harry dunn died after a car travelling on the wrong side of the road hit his motor bike outside raf croughton in northamptonshire. the driver, anne sacoolas, pictured here on her wedding day, was charged with causing death by dangerous driving but a the country and claimed diplomatic immunity. officials here have refused to extradite her. last month, at the g7 summit in cornwall, borisjohnson reiterated to president biden his desire to see justice done, and there are now plans for ms sacoolas to attend a virtual civil trialfrom her home in the state of virginia. with the process gathering pace, harry's parents have come here to give evidence under oath. there has got to be a proper end to this. there's got to be justice of some description. this cannot be just left as it is. we will keep going. we will keep going, even if it takes us forever, we will keep going. are you any more confident after today justice will be served? yeah, absolutely. you know, like i said, everything we do is a step in the right direction.
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so, we are confident that what we are doing will all go towards getting justice for our boy. it is nearly two years since harry dunn's death, and his parents know they may have to wait another six months before they get a big day in court. david willis, bbc news, washington. we'rejoined now by charlotte and tim. good morning. thank you for your time. tim, iwonder good morning. thank you for your time. tim, i wonder if you could bring people into the picture as to quite what it is that has happened so far in terms of you giving evidence. so far in terms of you giving evidence-— so far in terms of you giving evidence. �* , ,., .., so far in terms of you giving evidence. �* , ,., .. ., evidence. it's something called a deposition. _ evidence. it's something called a deposition, where _ evidence. it's something called a deposition, where we _ evidence. it's something called a deposition, where we speak - evidence. it's something called a deposition, where we speak to l evidence. it's something called a i deposition, where we speak to the lawyer who, asked us questions about harry, basically, and we try and give answers to the best of our ability to the questions. it's been
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quite tough. we tried to prep for it with our lawyers. and it's been a tough few weeks getting ready for this. but we have managed —— meant we are glad we have had the opportunity to do this and hopefully put across how harry meant to us as a family and hopefully they can see that. ., ., ., , ., that. charlotte, iwonder if you could pick— that. charlotte, iwonder if you could pick pp — that. charlotte, iwonder if you could pick up on _ that. charlotte, iwonder if you could pick up on what - that. charlotte, iwonder if you could pick up on what tim - that. charlotte, iwonder if you could pick up on what tim was | could pick up on what tim was saying, could you give us a sense of the kind of questions you are being asked about? infer?r the kind of questions you are being asked about?— the kind of questions you are being asked about? , , . ., , . asked about? very difficult ones. we are answering _ asked about? very difficult ones. we are answering about _ asked about? very difficult ones. we are answering about everything - asked about? very difficult ones. we are answering about everything we . are answering about everything we talk about. it's painful. it is difficult _ talk about. it's painful. it is difficult. we have to be brutally honest — difficult. we have to be brutally honest. about everything we have
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endured _ honest. about everything we have endured since losing harry. and in a month, _ endured since losing harry. and in a month, having to do that deposition. we were _ month, having to do that deposition. we were required to come out to the us to _ we were required to come out to the us to do _ we were required to come out to the us to do that in person. which was difficult _ us to do that in person. which was difficult and a lot of things have been _ difficult and a lot of things have been done via zoom and other video means~ _ been done via zoom and other video means~ we — been done via zoom and other video means. we followed up on their request— means. we followed up on their request and we came out here and we have done _ request and we came out here and we have done that in person, but getting — have done that in person, but getting out here during the pandemic is not _ getting out here during the pandemic is not easy _ getting out here during the pandemic is not easy. we have had tojump through— is not easy. we have had tojump through covid loopholes and have pcr tests and _ through covid loopholes and have pcr tests and have waivers from the state _ tests and have waivers from the state department and all of that has been added to the fact that we have then got— been added to the fact that we have then got to sit there for many hours — then got to sit there for many hours i— then got to sit there for many hours. i don't want to diminish the hours. idon't want to diminish the amount— hours. idon't want to diminish the amount of— hours. i don't want to diminish the amount of time that we were with the other lawyers. because it has been a very long. _ other lawyers. because it has been a very long, arduous process. but on
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the other— very long, arduous process. but on the other hand, we are grateful to have _ the other hand, we are grateful to have that — the other hand, we are grateful to have that process. we know the us government did not want this. they were desperate to kick it back to the uk — were desperate to kick it back to the uk. they did not want us to be able to— the uk. they did not want us to be able to carry — the uk. they did not want us to be able to carry through our civil claim — able to carry through our civil claim in— able to carry through our civil claim in the us. so we are not in any means— claim in the us. so we are not in any means complaining, but it is not easy and _ any means complaining, but it is not easy and we — any means complaining, but it is not easy and we are grateful to the us public— easy and we are grateful to the us public and — easy and we are grateful to the us public and the us authorities for finally— public and the us authorities for finally allowing this to go through, but we _ finally allowing this to go through, but we are — finally allowing this to go through, but we are very much looking forward to getting _ but we are very much looking forward to getting on the plane tomorrow night _ to getting on the plane tomorrow night and — to getting on the plane tomorrow night and coming home. find to getting on the plane tomorrow night and coming home. and people understand that _ night and coming home. and people understand that the _ night and coming home. and people understand that the emotions - night and coming home. and people understand that the emotions are i understand that the emotions are very raw for you, absolutely we understand that. tim, can you just explain to us, as part of this procedure, i my writing understanding that it is possible that you could be in the same room as anne sacoolas for the first time? yes, that was a possibility. we
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talked about it and we accepted that that could happen. we said to ourselves to be as strong as we could. we would concentrate on harry to get us through that if that was the case. and just be as honest and as truthful as we can and explain how much harry meant to us and how much we needed them to understand how much we were hurting and why we thought it was so wrong. bind how much we were hurting and why we thought it was so wrong.— thought it was so wrong. and as you mentioned. — thought it was so wrong. and as you mentioned. you _ thought it was so wrong. and as you mentioned, you come _ thought it was so wrong. and as you mentioned, you come back- thought it was so wrong. and as you mentioned, you come back to - thought it was so wrong. and as you mentioned, you come back to the i thought it was so wrong. and as you | mentioned, you come back to the uk thought it was so wrong. and as you l mentioned, you come back to the uk i think you said this evening or by tomorrow. i imagine leaving their when you know there is a legal process beginning which you have taken part in now, that in itself, i know you want to be home, but i imagine leaving this process,
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knowing that you have contributed in starting it, that will also be difficult. , ., ., . starting it, that will also be difficult. ., . , difficult. yes and no. we believe in our us lawyer _ difficult. yes and no. we believe in our us lawyer team. _ difficult. yes and no. we believe in our us lawyer team. we _ difficult. yes and no. we believe in our us lawyer team. we have - difficult. yes and no. we believe in - our us lawyer team. we have meetings with them _ our us lawyer team. we have meetings with them everyday. we have built up a very— with them everyday. we have built up a very very— with them everyday. we have built up a very very strong relationship with them _ a very very strong relationship with them they— a very very strong relationship with them. they have got good communication with the other side, for want _ communication with the other side, for want of— communication with the other side, for want of a better expression. due to covid, _ for want of a better expression. due to covid, we — for want of a better expression. due to covid, we have learned, all of us have _ to covid, we have learned, all of us have learned, how to communicate via zoom _ have learned, how to communicate via zoom and _ have learned, how to communicate via zoom and were not afraid of leaving here~ _ zoom and were not afraid of leaving here we _ zoom and were not afraid of leaving here we do — zoom and were not afraid of leaving here. we do desperately need to come home _ here. we do desperately need to come home i_ here. we do desperately need to come home. i need to come home. we need to get— home. i need to come home. we need to get home _ home. i need to come home. we need to get home to our families. this has not _ to get home to our families. this has not been easy for us to do. it's
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been _ has not been easy for us to do. it's been an— has not been easy for us to do. it's been an extremely long day, but i think— been an extremely long day, but i think having said that we would go to the _ think having said that we would go to the ends of the earth to get justice — to the ends of the earth to get justice for— to the ends of the earth to get justice for harry. he deserves it. and we — justice for harry. he deserves it. and we deserve it. anyone that has been _ and we deserve it. anyone that has been wronged deserves to know how we can achieve _ been wronged deserves to know how we can achieve to get that wrong put right, _ can achieve to get that wrong put right, so— can achieve to get that wrong put right, so as — can achieve to get that wrong put right, so as hard as it is, 22 months _ right, so as hard as it is, 22 months on. _ right, so as hard as it is, 22 months on, the desire is still there to achieve — months on, the desire is still there to achieve that promise that i made to achieve that promise that i made to my— to achieve that promise that i made to my boy — to achieve that promise that i made to my boy. it's never goes away. it is not — to my boy. it's never goes away. it is not going _ to my boy. it's never goes away. it is not going to go away. and we do finally— is not going to go away. and we do finally feel— is not going to go away. and we do finally feel that we are making more steps _ finally feel that we are making more steps in _ finally feel that we are making more steps in the right direction. we know ou steps in the right direction. a know you have had an emotionally draining day. thank you for staying up draining day. thank you for staying up with us and taking us through the proceedings as they happen. have a good journey home and thank you.
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their courage and determination is pretty mind blowing. extraordinary. it is 843 and this is bbc breakfast. time for some sport and a bright british star making all of the headlines.— british star making all of the headlines. , . ., .., british star making all of the headlines. , ., ., _, ~ .,, headlines. yes, emma raducanu. most --eole headlines. yes, emma raducanu. most people won't — headlines. yes, emma raducanu. most people won't have _ headlines. yes, emma raducanu. most people won't have heard _ headlines. yes, emma raducanu. most people won't have heard of— headlines. yes, emma raducanu. most people won't have heard of her- people won't have heard of her because she only made her maiden appearance on the women's tourjust last month after doing her a—levels. this is her first last month after doing her a—levels. this is herfirst wimbledon last month after doing her a—levels. this is her first wimbledon and she has stunned the tournament again, becoming the only british woman into round three. 18 year old, stunned the former french open finalist, marketa vondrousova, to become, the only british woman, into round 3, of the singles, at wimbledon. while in the men's draw, there's a big name awaiting cameron norrie, in the 3rd round.. our sports correspondent joe wilson reports. you can look at every match scheduled for a wimbledon day and thenit scheduled for a wimbledon day and then it happens, early evening. out on court 12, emma raducanu, huge breakthrough. keep in mind the british player is just 18, breakthrough. keep in mind the british player isjust18, ranked 338 in the world, and that our opponent, vondrousova, once reached a grand slam final. at match point
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on the verge of the third round in herfirst major on the verge of the third round in her first major tournament, would she collapse? well, only once the match was won. emma raducanu, a—level students just months ago, britain's remaining woman at wimbledon. mr; britain's remaining woman at wimbledon-— britain's remaining woman at wimbledon. g ., ., ., , ., , , wimbledon. my motivation is honestly 'ust to kee wimbledon. my motivation is honestly just to keep staying — wimbledon. my motivation is honestly just to keep staying here. _ wimbledon. my motivation is honestly just to keep staying here. i _ wimbledon. my motivation is honestly just to keep staying here. ijust - just to keep staying here. ijust love being here. the selection of food isjust like incredible. the whole surroundings. i'm just taking it in and ijust really want to prolong my experience here. it in and i just really want to prolong my experience here. well, cameron norrie _ prolong my experience here. well, cameron norrie is _ prolong my experience here. well, cameron norrie is one _ prolong my experience here. well, cameron norrie is one of _ prolong my experience here. well, cameron norrie is one of three - cameron norrie is one of three british men in round three. that is him there as the camera. seeded 29 here, his straight sets victory over alex bolt was full of confidence, decisive. he also seemed to revel in the atmosphere. that's encouraging. who would want to play him next? well, this guy. roger federer set up a match with cameron norrie by
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beating richard gasquet, gently. and it was straight sets. friday night is scheduled for another andy murray night. you have been warned. and murray's match ius against a canadian. with his opponent ranked 12th in the world. murray knows he's in for a tough day. is definitely a shotmaker. he likes playing in front of big crowds and stuff, so the thing i have got on my side is the experience and obviously having played a lot on centre court. i'm not saying that we will definitely play on their but i imagine there will be a good chance of that. so we will be quite — it will be quite new for him.
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england's cricketers, have taken an unbeatable 2—0 lead in the one—day series against sri lanka, after a comfortable eight—wicket win at the oval. sam curran was the star with the ball, he took five wickets, as sri lanka posted a target of 242. in response, england were never troubled, captain owen morgan, built on the good foundation, laid by the opening batsmen, guiding his side to victory with 7 overs to spare. played a lot of cricket in front of empty stadiums for obvious reasons but today in front of my home crowd if you say in terms of being at the oval, first time actually seeing that new stand and stuff like that, it was really special, you get that extra bit of buzz. it is one of my favourite rounds in the world and i really saw that today. it was a great game and great to have the fans back in. the second quarter—final, at euro 2020. lets take a look at the full quarter—final line up. first of all, in st petersburg, switzerland who knocked out the world champions france, take on, spain.
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that's followed by the big clash in munich between the world number one team belgium, and italy. then tomorrow tea time, the czech republic go head—to—head with denmark in baku before it's to rome, where ukraine will take on england. gareth southgate will be focusing only on that match, but let's have a look at what could come next. if england make it through tomorrow, they would face the czech republic, whom england beat in the group phase, or denmark, in the semi finals, at wembley next wednesday. and beyond that, the final, against you'd think belgium, italy or spain, again at wembley — ?a week on sunday, but in this tournament, where there have been upsets, you cannot rule out switzerland, and that's a long way off. many fans will be feeling that england have not beaten ukraine yet and this kind of hype has backfired. like david beckham. no, that was david on twitter who said that, he told me of four looking to far ahead and he's right because it has
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happened before. euro 2000, england beat germany 1—0 and there was all the hype and then in the next match it went horribly wrong and then they went out and did not even meet the knockout stage. i went out and did not even meet the knockout stage.— knockout stage. i forgot that one. that is the — knockout stage. i forgot that one. that is the one _ knockout stage. i forgot that one. that is the one we _ knockout stage. i forgot that one. that is the one we don't - knockout stage. i forgot that one. that is the one we don't talk - knockout stage. i forgot that one. i that is the one we don't talk about. fair point. he is a sage man, isn't he? i didn't know that. matt has the weather. can i ask you, rome, of a july evening, that can be quite warm, couldn't it? i am just putting this one out there but i would have thought it could be quite hot? it will be, 28 or 29. hot conditions in italy at the moment and it will be slowly cooling off into the evening, unlike where we have been. yesterday, in aberdeenshire, braemar got 222 in the afternoon. overnight, a massive turnaround and dropped below freezing. welcome to july the
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uk. temperature variability and also whether variability over the next few days. have a healthy dose of optimism and have some indoor plants as well. while we have some sunshine and warmth, that could come with some heavy and thundery showers as well. out there at the moment, we do have some rain on the borders of scotland and england which will break up into some showers. elsewhere, largely dry. mr martin places. most of that will clear. there will be some still around the coasts and into the afternoon but inland we will see some showers develop. a bit more sunshine. temperatures into the low 20s and thatis temperatures into the low 20s and that is where the down peers will begin. heavy storms. hit and miss elsewhere. most places missing them and hopefully missing them at wimbledon but if we are going to see some showers, most likely as we go to the end of the afternoon and evening but it will feel warm where the strong sunshine is overhead. this evening and overnight, showers for a time will be drifting northwards. and then from the
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south—west, we see something much more changeable. heavy rain. not a cold start, with temperatures in double figures. the chart will be one which shows low pressure out towards the west. rain at times. saturday, across england, heavy rain. heaviest in central and eastern parts. brighter towards the west. not too many showers in northern ireland and across scotland we will see showers later in the day. some could be heavy. better chance of sunshine with some in northern scotland staying dry. saturday evening, showers for some. across in italy, no such issues. 29. 27 when we start the match. sunday,
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light winds. showers through the day. slow—moving, torrential. rainfall will vary. some places may stay dry. cooler than the next few days. stay dry. cooler than the next few da s. . ~ stay dry. cooler than the next few da s. . ,, , ., now about this for a comeback story — only a year ago, injury and illness forced mark cavendish to rethink his career as a professional cyclist. but now he's back to his best, having captured two stages of this year's tour de france. drew savage reports. no hiding the smile behind the mask. mark cavendish, back on the podium where he first won in 2008. two weeks ago, he wasn't even expecting to race the tour, but after winning
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his first stage in five years on tuesday, here he was, going for win number 32. tuesday, here he was, going for win number32. stage tuesday, here he was, going for win number 32. stage six was mainly flat, which helped goring to thomas, 12 overall and still recovering from his crash on monday. for him, the mercy of a relatively easy day before the race hits the hail today in the mountains tomorrow. even if safely, as did the leader. for mark cavendish, the colour will always be green, the shade of the race's leading sprinter. everyone knew what he can do on top form, no one can stop him doing it. the 36—year—old manx missile had earned the right to reminisce. the celebration just the same as it was 13 years ago. he is not talking about the record of 34 stage winds. just happy to be back here doing what he loves. we'rejoined now by fomer olympic cycling she champion, chris boardman. how can you not be engaged and
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invigorated by the story? it is phenomenal. it invigorated by the story? it is phenomenal-— invigorated by the story? it is phenomenal. invigorated by the story? it is -henomenal. , ., , . invigorated by the story? it is henomenal. , . , . ., phenomenal. it is remarkable. we had civen u- phenomenal. it is remarkable. we had given pp writing _ phenomenal. it is remarkable. we had given up writing him _ phenomenal. it is remarkable. we had given up writing him off— phenomenal. it is remarkable. we had given up writing him off and _ phenomenal. it is remarkable. we had given up writing him off and totally - given up writing him off and totally given— given up writing him off and totally given up— given up writing him off and totally given up and he had the epstein—barr virusand— given up and he had the epstein—barr virus and then he came in at the last minute _ virus and then he came in at the last minute. he was announced as a replacement for sam bennett and then he won— replacement for sam bennett and then he won two— replacement for sam bennett and then he won two tour stages and he was back in— he won two tour stages and he was back in green and suddenly his career— back in green and suddenly his career has _ back in green and suddenly his career has been rebooted. he might not be _ career has been rebooted. he might not be talking about the record, but we are _ not be talking about the record, but we are because he is only two away. he has— we are because he is only two away. he has had — we are because he is only two away. he has had over 150 career wins and is literally— he has had over 150 career wins and is literally the best road splinter of all— is literally the best road splinter of all time. is literally the best road splinter of all time-— of all time. for the non-cycling audience. _ of all time. for the non-cycling audience, the _ of all time. for the non-cycling audience, the record _ of all time. for the non-cycling audience, the record holder, i of all time. for the non-cyclingl audience, the record holder, we of all time. for the non-cycling i audience, the record holder, we are going back to the 60s, aren't we? to someone who is a legend in cycling and we are getting to a point where and we are getting to a point where
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a rider like mark cavendish is going to get close to what many people may be thought was impossible to ever reach again. be thought was impossible to ever reach again-— be thought was impossible to ever reach again. well, that is the point of records- — reach again. well, that is the point of records. they _ reach again. well, that is the point of records. they are _ reach again. well, that is the point of records. they are there - reach again. well, that is the point of records. they are there to i reach again. well, that is the point of records. they are there to be i of records. they are there to be broken — of records. they are there to be broken as— of records. they are there to be broken as the cliche goes and he has 'ust broken as the cliche goes and he has just got— broken as the cliche goes and he has just got to _ broken as the cliche goes and he has just got to make to go to equal the record _ just got to make to go to equal the record of— just got to make to go to equal the record of eddy merckx. coincidentally, serendipity, whatever you want to look at, it has eight _ whatever you want to look at, it has eight sprint — whatever you want to look at, it has eight sprint all stages, so he has five left — eight sprint all stages, so he has five left to— eight sprint all stages, so he has five left to have a go at that record _ five left to have a go at that record. he is not thinking about that _ record. he is not thinking about that he — record. he is not thinking about that he is— record. he is not thinking about that. he is thinking about green. he has only— that. he is thinking about green. he has only had — that. he is thinking about green. he has only had it a couple of days in his life _ has only had it a couple of days in his life so — has only had it a couple of days in his life so to— has only had it a couple of days in his life so to take that to paris is a massive — his life so to take that to paris is a massive deal. if he just keeps winning, — a massive deal. if he just keeps winning, the possibilities are there. — winning, the possibilities are there, but he has got to get over there, but he has got to get over the mountains. he did not come here prepped _ the mountains. he did not come here prepped for— the mountains. he did not come here prepped for the three—week race because — prepped for the three—week race because he was a last—minute substitution, so the big test is not the sprint — substitution, so the big test is not the sprint stages, it is the mountains between them. and the sprint stages, it is the mountains between them. and he will rel on his mountains between them. and he will rely on his team _ mountains between them. and he will rely on his team for _ mountains between them. and he will rely on his team for loads _ mountains between them. and he will rely on his team for loads of— rely on his team for loads of support and i know he has been effusive in referring to his team
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members to say without you, every time he passes the line there, he is straight to them, thanking them. it is a wonderfulfriendship straight to them, thanking them. it is a wonderful friendship to see. well, i think that is properly the story that isn't told, that his team, probably the most remarkable of all is the faith and the work that they put into him to make sure that they put into him to make sure that he is correctly positioned and looking after him all through the day and through the stage. and he hasn't been winning. earlier this year, he had a couple of smaller wins and i think he would say that himself, and there might be some life in him and theyjust invested fully in him and i think it is a lovely story of camaraderie and it is a genuine team effort. just give us a sense of what it takes. when you see those final stages that you watch him and he pops out from behind whoever is in front and he takes over the line, how hard is
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that, just physically? how hard is it to do that time and time again as he has over so many years? i he has over so many years? i personally never got involved. i am too much _ personally never got involved. i am too much of— personally never got involved. i am too much of a coward. the end of a sprint _ too much of a coward. the end of a sprint stages — too much of a coward. the end of a sprint stages not for the faint—hearted. when you say, how does _ faint—hearted. when you say, how does he _ faint—hearted. when you say, how does he do — faint—hearted. when you say, how does he do it? we in the studio have to look— does he do it? we in the studio have to look at— does he do it? we in the studio have to look at replace to work out how he did _ to look at replace to work out how he did it — to look at replace to work out how he did it it— to look at replace to work out how he did it. it is so instinctive. the decisions — he did it. it is so instinctive. the decisions are not teens but second, it is fractions — decisions are not teens but second, it is fractions of a second, just working — it is fractions of a second, just working out where to be unjust this environment and all of that when you're _ environment and all of that when you're producing one and have thousand _ you're producing one and have thousand watts of power, you're probably— thousand watts of power, you're probably producing 100 going to the shops— probably producing 100 going to the shops so— probably producing 100 going to the shops so the whole thing coming together— shops so the whole thing coming together isjust a shops so the whole thing coming together is just a piece shops so the whole thing coming together isjust a piece of art. what — together isjust a piece of art. what about the burn? to just explode like that right at the finish, how do you recover from that? well, that comes after- — do you recover from that? well, that comes after- lt _ do you recover from that? well, that comes after. it is _ do you recover from that? well, that comes after. it is the _ do you recover from that? well, that comes after. it is the noise - do you recover from that? well, that comes after. it is the noise of- do you recover from that? well, that comes after. it is the noise of the i comes after. it is the noise of the
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crowd _ comes after. it is the noise of the crowd and — comes after. it is the noise of the crowd and then you appreciate or suffer— crowd and then you appreciate or suffer after it. they can go much deeper— suffer after it. they can go much deeper than endurance athletes. they would _ deeper than endurance athletes. they would take _ deeper than endurance athletes. they would take probably a minute and then there breeding is normal. a sprinter— then there breeding is normal. a sprinter is— then there breeding is normal. a sprinter is still on the floor because _ sprinter is still on the floor because they can do so much damage in a short— because they can do so much damage in a short period of time. as i mentioned _ in a short period of time. as i mentioned earlier, the bit that people — mentioned earlier, the bit that people don't think about is they have _ people don't think about is they have also— people don't think about is they have also got to be able to climb all of— have also got to be able to climb all of the — have also got to be able to climb all of the mountains in order to be there _ all of the mountains in order to be there to _ all of the mountains in order to be there to sprint and there's a of half an— there to sprint and there's a of half an hour today so they have to be at _ half an hour today so they have to be at climbing mountains. you are newly chair _ be at climbing mountains. you are newly chair of _ be at climbing mountains. you are newly chair of sport _ be at climbing mountains. you are newly chair of sport england, i be at climbing mountains. you are| newly chair of sport england, aren't you? there is quite a lot of stuff going on. you have the football, may be looking at the tennis, and now with the cycling as well. the cricket as well. they have quite a good feel about things at the moment. ~ ~ ., , moment. well, i think in the last few weeks. _ moment. well, i think in the last few weeks, everybody _ moment. well, i think in the last few weeks, everybody is - moment. well, i think in the last few weeks, everybody is really i moment. well, i think in the last i few weeks, everybody is really happy with england, cycling, tennis. we
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realised _ with england, cycling, tennis. we realised just what sport does for us. realised just what sport does for us we — realised just what sport does for us we go— realised just what sport does for us. we go to work to live but sport and the _ us. we go to work to live but sport and the arts— us. we go to work to live but sport and the arts is what life is actually _ and the arts is what life is actually for. to see it and to be involved. — actually for. to see it and to be involved, particularly after the year _ involved, particularly after the year that — involved, particularly after the year that everyone has had, has been so welcome _ year that everyone has had, has been so welcome and everyone is collectively enjoying watching it and watching some trials and it's so important — and watching some trials and it's so important i— and watching some trials and it's so important. lam honoured and watching some trials and it's so important. i am honoured to take the 'ob. important. i am honoured to take the job i_ important. i am honoured to take the job i don't _ important. i am honoured to take the job. i don't actually start for a couple — job. idon't actually start for a couple of— job. i don't actually start for a couple of weeks but i am already getting _ couple of weeks but i am already getting across everything. i already was because i come from the world of sport and _ was because i come from the world of sport and so— was because i come from the world of sport and so i think it is great. thank— sport and so i think it is great. thank you _ you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. labour narrowly win the batley and spen by—election by just 323 votes. the seat was won by kim leadbeater — sister ofjo cox — who represented the area until she was murdered in 2016. i'm absolutely delighted that the people of batley and spen have rejected division and they've voted for hope. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is in the uk today for talks with hopes that strict quarantine rules for britons travelling to the eu will be eased. the parents of teenage motorcyclist harry dunn give evidence in the united states against the woman suspected of causing his death two years ago.

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