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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2021 10:45pm-11:01pm BST

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tourists, and islands opening up to tourists, and that traction with the eu makes it more _ that traction with the eu makes it more difficult for the larger companies to really dig in and stick to those _ companies to really dig in and stick to those entrenched positions. let�*s to those entrenched positions. let's move on to — to those entrenched positions. let's move on to the _ to those entrenched positions. let's move on to the ft, _ to those entrenched positions. let's move on to the ft, maia, _ to those entrenched positions. let�*s move on to the ft, maia, this is to those entrenched positions. let�*s move on to the ft, maia, this is the corporate tech story we've heard the number of countries who've signed up to these proposals on a minimum corporate tax rate, for any country to undercut its tax competitors by giving favourable tax treatment, and also the rules effectively stop companies operating in one place, but actually paying their tax and a place with a lower tax take. does this look like it'll happen? this comes off _ this look like it'll happen? this comes off the _ this look like it'll happen? this comes off the back _ this look like it'll happen? “in 3 comes off the back of a few weeks ago, the 620 agreements, now there's 130 countries, which i think is
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promising, there were nine who were part of the discussions that didn't agree with these proposals. and i think this is really significant and important because what it would mean is companies would have to pay more tax than other countries where they are selling their products or services, and our existing system is totally rotten, there's all kinds of innovation going on in terms of — there's all kinds of accounting tricks that go on that mean there's all sorts of avoidance. when these proposals were initially announced by the 620, there were two key criticisms from tax justice campaigners. one is that it's too low, 15%, joe biden adjusted to 21% — but the bigger problem is, if these planes are similar, we need to see the details still, is that they'll potentially primarily benefit richer countries, and it ignores where production is. that
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tends to be an poor countries which will then potentially miss out on tax revenues that they really should be able to access. 50 i think the devil will be in the details with this in terms of what those proposals look like and how the mechanisms will function, if they are able to proceed with that. absolutely, when i was last on, there _ absolutely, when i was last on, there is— absolutely, when i was last on, there is a — absolutely, when i was last on, there is a discussion about the eu agreement— there is a discussion about the eu agreement ahead of the 67, and a lot of points— agreement ahead of the 67, and a lot of points still stand. it's about whether— of points still stand. it's about whether this is something that can be whether this is something that can he built— whether this is something that can be built on, it's obviously not perfect, _ be built on, it's obviously not perfect, it's a start, and i think it significant so many countries are signed _ it significant so many countries are signed up — it significant so many countries are signed up for this — although interestingly not ireland signing up to the _ interestingly not ireland signing up to the agreement, and i think it'll be interesting to see what knock on effect _ be interesting to see what knock on effect that — be interesting to see what knock on effect that has on... they can get access— effect that has on... they can get access to — effect that has on... they can get access to the uk very easily from
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there _ access to the uk very easily from there so — access to the uk very easily from there. so the devil will be in the detail, _ there. so the devil will be in the detail, but— there. so the devil will be in the detail, but again, just seeing international cooperation after recent— international cooperation after recent years where it has appeared that they've kept away nationalism is a real— that they've kept away nationalism is a real shift in tone from the bigger— is a real shift in tone from the bigger nations across the globe. just ending with a couple picture stories, i think this one is a very striking image — this is the guardian front page which shows firefighters out at the santa fe dam in california — that whole stretch of the western coast of united states and canada facing serious temperatures in the resulting spontaneous fires. but let's and on the statue, harry and william with
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the statue, harry and william with the statue, harry and william with the statue of their late mother unveiled on what would've been her 60th birthday, which in itself is kind of a jerk of a reminder that she's been dead for more than 20 years and she would've been a lady leaving middle age and heading towards old age now. that in itself is a shock to the system when you realise how much time is past. these ictures realise how much time is past. these pictures and — realise how much time is past. these pictures and stories _ realise how much time is past. these pictures and stories on _ realise how much time is past. these pictures and stories on quite - realise how much time is past. these pictures and stories on quite a - realise how much time is past. these pictures and stories on quite a few. pictures and stories on quite a few front pages, it must�*ve been a really poignant moment for prince harry and prince william. they said they hope the statue will help people reflect on her life and legacy, but i find it hard when you see images of princess diana or the statute out and i also think about the circumstances in which she died and really question the stuff that prince harry has had recently around the press and people being hounded by parts of the press. so i think thatis by parts of the press. so i think that is also something to reflect on and think about in these moments. it's interesting that she was asked
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why she wasn't just it's interesting that she was asked why she wasn'tjust photographed alone — sculpting is a solitary statue rather than with children. his view was that that's exactly the image that would be the wrong image for her, this idea of isolation when that wasn't the person she was. bath that wasn't the person she was. both the statue and _ that wasn't the person she was. both the statue and the _ that wasn't the person she was. both the statue and the inscription on itself— the statue and the inscription on itself focused very much on diana, the person— itself focused very much on diana, the person that human, not diana the royai _ the person that human, not diana the royai and _ the person that human, not diana the royal. and again, just striking that tone of— royal. and again, just striking that tone of inclusivity and, again, the human_ tone of inclusivity and, again, the human side — tone of inclusivity and, again, the human side of princess diana, which is something that is worth reflecting on when we think about how we _ reflecting on when we think about how we view the royal family and other— how we view the royal family and other people in public life, they are humans and people.- other people in public life, they are humans and people. thank you both very much. — are humans and people. thank you
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both very much, will _ are humans and people. thank you both very much, will be _ are humans and people. thank you both very much, will be back- are humans and people. thank you both very much, will be back in - both very much, will be back in about a0 minutes or so. maya and kieron will be back in just over half an hour to look at more of the stories being covered by newspapers and websites here. all back with a full summary of the national and international news at 11pm —— i'll be back. good evening, i'm tulsen tollett, and this is your sports news — where we start with tennis, as british wild card emma raducanu's remarkable wimbledon continues. after making her debut yesterday, she's through to the third round after a straight sets win over the czech republic's marketa vondrousova. the 18—year—old, who only finished her a levels two months ago, stunned the former french open finalist, winning 6—2, 6—a, and will now play romanian sorana cirstea for a place in the last 16. earlier, top seed asheigh barty saw
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off russia's anna blinkova in straight sets 6—a, 6—3. it wasn't the most comfortable afternoon for the world number one from australia — with numerous double faults — but she had more than enough for a third straight appearance in the last 32. the third seed, elina svitolina, is out, though, after she was beaten in straight sets by poland's magda linette. the ukrainian hasn't got a great record at the all england club, having only twice made the second week. coco gauff overcame her nerves to book a place in the last 32 with a straight sets 6—a, 6—3 win over russian elena vesnina. the 17—year—old was back where she defeated venus williams two years ago, and eventually cruised through winning on a double fault. in the mens' draw, british number two cameron norrie has set up a third—round meeting with 20—times grand slam champion roger federer. norrie recovered from a sluggish start to win 11 straight games on court one against alex bolt of australia, eventually winning 6—3, 6—1, 6—2. only two players on tour have won
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more matches than norrie this year — leading to the brit being seeded at a slam for the first time. his next round opponent, roger federer, moved through to the third round after the eight—time champion eased past france's richard gasquet in straight sets. norrie will need to be at his absolute best to challenge federer. the 39—year—old withdrew from the french open recently to give himself the best chance of winning another championship at the all england club, as he continues to look for a 21st grand slam singles title. it looks as though he has plenty of respect for norrie, though. he's had a wonderful year, played great in queens, sol he's had a wonderful year, played great in queens, so i know it'll be a tough match and i'm really happy for them that it's going well. but enough now, cast to go out and i need to go through.— need to go through. laughter. bell we will see what happens. i'm looking forward to the game, of course, and i hope you do too.
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what a story at the tour de france today. mark cavendish continues to defy expectations — the manxman was only called up to race the tour five days before it started. on tuesday, he achieved his first win there in five years. and today, he did it again. in chateauroux, the same place where he won his first tour stage back in 2008. drew savage reports. whatever happened today, stage six was always going to be all about mark cavendish. as the race headed back to where all for him. 100 miles from the stage start in tours to the end in chateauroux, everyone was expecting a sprint finish. that suited geraint thomas — 12th overall and still recovering from his crash on monday. for him, an easy day before the race hits the hills tomorrow and the mountains on saturday. he just needed to ride with the peloton to the finish. the same for mathieu van der poel, to keep the leader's yellowjersey. since his win on tuesday, cavendish has worn the green, of the leader of the sprinter�*s competition. everybody knew what he was likely to do. it's just that, at the age of 36, the manx missile is miraculously back up to top speed. nobody could catch him.
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cavendish does it again! the celebration just the same as it was in 2008, his 32nd stage win. he's not talking about eddy merckx's record of 3a. you're in the form of your life, for once! _ just happy to be back here, and back on that podium. drew savage, bbc news. england's cricketers have taken an unassailable 2—0 lead in their one day series against sri lanka, after comfortably beating sri lanka by eight wickets at the oval. sam curran was the star with the ball, skittling the top order and reducing sri lanka to 12 for three. he ended with a career best five—wicket haul. sri lanka recovered to post 2a1 for nine, but eoin morgan then built on the good foundation laid by england's earlier batsmen to take the game away from sri lanka. it was captain morgan who hit the winning runs guiding england to victory with seven overs to spare. we played a lot of cricket in front
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of anti—stadiums for a lot of reasons. but today come in front of my home crowd, in terms of being the oval, my first time seeing the new stand and stuff like that was really special you get the extra bit of buzz. it's one of my favourite grounds in the world, and today was really special. i thought it was a great week and a great game a great batch of fans. norway's karsten warholm set a new world record in the a00m hurdles at the diamond league meeting in oslo tonight. in front of a partizan home crowd, 25—year—old warholm clocked a6.70 seconds to beat the previous best of a6.78 seconds, set by american kevin young back in 1992. the crowd of 5,000 in the bislett stadium were on their feet as the two—time reigning world champion lay down a marker for this year's tokyo olympics. in the women's 100m, all eyes were on the second—fastest british woman in history, daryl neeta, who went up against mareejose taloo of the ivory coast. but it was the african who won out in a season—best 10.91 seconds, while neeta came home
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second in 11.06. finally, the rugby league world cup later this year is still scheduled to go ahead with talks ongoing due to concerns over quarantining. while in the super league tonight, there were wins for leaders catalans dragons over huddersfield, while leeds rhinos condemned leigh to a 13th successive defeat. all that on the website, along with plenty more. but that is all your support for now. apart from a few showers which developed later in the afternoon across southern england. for friday, though, it looks like we could see a few more showers around generally. but that said, there should still be quite a bit of sunshine around, feeling quite warm too. in between whether systems for friday, but this area of low pressure will be moving in just in area of low pressure will be moving
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injust in time area of low pressure will be moving in just in time for the weekend, could bring quite a bit of rain at times and even some thunderstorms. so we start this morning off rather cloudy for many, a bit of mist and fog around. that should tend to melt away quite quickly, and there'll be some sunshine as we head into the afternoon. but a scattering of showers will develop, some could turn out to be heavy and thundery, but the focus is toward central and eastern parts of the country. some areas avoiding them completely and staying dry, but it'll be quite warm too, top temperatures around 2a celsius. though showers continue into the evening, pushing their way further north roots. we start to see the influence of that low—pressure arriving across the southwest, sending rain across wales, the west country, into the midlands. some rain could be heavy and thunder by the end of the night. generally double figure values, it'll be a mild night. so this weekend looks pretty unsettled as low—pressure will be nearby. here it is, very slowly moving its way north eastwards as it pushes against this area of high pressure. likely to
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bring spells of heavy rain, it longer spells of rain at times on saturday, and into sunday, widespread showers develop and some of these could really be quite intense. this band of rain will continue to journey into a northwards across england and wales through saturday morning, some of it could be thundery. scotland could start to cry with spells of sunshine before salary rain arrives later on. further south there will be some later on, but showers will develop when they reach highs of 21—22 c. sunday generally looking more unsettled across the board, we will start off with some sunshine but the showers will get going, so these will be heavy, some thunderstorms mixed in there, could see localised flooding in places. temperatures a degree or so down, 17—21 c. into the start of next week, low—pressure sticks nearby, we could see a deep low to see some wet and windy weather for a time.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the trump organization and the company's chief financial officer are charged in court with tax fraud. both the company and the cfo have pleaded not guilty. the uk announced almost 28,000 new covid cases on thursday, but prime minister borisjohnson says he's increasingly confident about the impact of the vaccines. the speed of that vaccine roll—out has broken that link between infection and mortality. and that's an amazing thing. that gives us the scope we think on the 19th to go ahead. wildfires in canada force residents to evacuate from the region that recorded the country's highest ever temperature this week.
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president biden travels to miami to thank first responders

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