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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 1, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines... at a court hearing in manhattan, lawyers for the trump organisation and its chief financial officer have pleaded not guilty to tax fraud. the prosecutor said there had been a sweeping and audacious illegal payment scheme at the former president's company. president biden has been meeting the families of people who've died or are missing after the collapse of a huge apartment block in miami last week. he also met rescue workers, calling their efforts incredible. hundreds of people have been forced to leave their homes in a town in canada after a wildfire. lytton in british columbia has recorded the country's highest—ever temperature, 49.6 celsius on tuesday. and princes william and and prince harry have unveiled a statue of their mother, diana, on what would have been her 60th birthday. the brothers, whose relationship has been strained in recent months, met for the first time since the duke of edinburgh's funeral in april.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political writer and academic, maya goodfellow, and the scottish political editor for the times scotland, kieran andrews. let's ta ke let's take a look at tomorrow's front pages. the i leads on borisjohnson�*s warning that "some" precautions may still be needed following the lifting of covid restrictions in england on 19july — but those who've been double jabbed may be able to travel abroad more freely. but the telegraph suggests the european covid passport scheme may not recognise millions of astrazeneca doses administered in the uk which were manufactured in india. the paper also carries borisjohnson�*s call for parents to be patient over the ending of the bubbles system in schools.
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the metro dedicates its front page to the reunion of princes william and harry, who put aside their differences to unveil a statue in kensington palace of their mother, princess diana, on what would have been her 60th birthday. that story also the lead for the mail, which has the headline "together, but still so far apart". the news that nissan has announced an expansion of its electric vehicle production at its sunderland plant is on the front page of the ft. the guardian features the record breaking heatwave in the united states and canada — with a quote from climate scientists who say "nowhere is safe" from similar weather events. let's kick off if we can. my, do you want to start us off with the i, freedom day? 50 want to start us off with the i, freedom day?— want to start us off with the i, freedom day? so this is really coverin: freedom day? so this is really covering a _ freedom day? so this is really covering a few _ freedom day? so this is really covering a few different - freedom day? so this is really| covering a few different things. freedom day? so this is really - covering a few different things. the first being the speculation around
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the planned lifting of some of the lock down restrictions on 19july, and borisjohnson saying there may need to be some extra precautions as well as the i pointing out that the cases are high of the delta variant, and this discussion around whether people will be able to travel abroad for the summer holidays. i think that, like everyone or like many people, you know, living under these restrictions is not what any of us really want. but i do think exercising caution is necessary, given how little has been done to limit the spread of this variant even though it seems like the vaccine reduces the seriousness of covid—i9. it's still not an ideal place to be, and one of the things i would say is that an academic row in the guardian today that the three things we need to really be watching out for an understanding before we have this big lifting of restrictions is one, this wave in
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young people will be followed by an increase in young people, two what happened with hospitalisations, keeping an eye on that, and three, what level of protection does two doses provide in particularfor old people and vulnerable people? moving forward, these are serious questions that need to be asked, so be a lot of eyes looking at the 19th and ahead of that of what the announcements will be. i think exercising caution is necessary given how high the rates are. fine given how high the rates are. one wa to given how high the rates are. one way to interpret _ given how high the rates are. one way to interpret the phrase that the paper uses, used by borisjohnson himself when he called the 19th freedom day, it's about whether or not you take the measures. and i think a lot of people will still feel pretty cautious, which will affect how people behave. so normal is defined by what was normal for the individual themselves. absolutely, and that's one of the interesting things that we will find
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out from _ interesting things that we will find out from the uk government, from boris _ out from the uk government, from borisjohnson in the coming days. how much — borisjohnson in the coming days. how much of these additional restrictions will be involved? will you be _ restrictions will be involved? will you be instructed to socially distance _ you be instructed to socially distance and wear face coverings? or will this_ distance and wear face coverings? or will this be _ distance and wear face coverings? or will this be guidance from the government, saying, "we think you should _ government, saying, "we think you should be _ government, saying, "we think you should be doing this but ultimately it's your— should be doing this but ultimately it's your choice, you have the freedom _ it's your choice, you have the freedom to make that choice." i think— freedom to make that choice." i think if— freedom to make that choice." i think if that is the case, the language around freedom day signals a shift _ language around freedom day signals a shift in _ language around freedom day signals a shift in tone as sajid javid is the health secretary. he is more hawkish— the health secretary. he is more hawkish than matt hancock was in that role, — hawkish than matt hancock was in that role, who often post a —— pushed — that role, who often post a —— pushed a _ that role, who often post a —— pushed a safety first approach. how does that pushed a safety first approach. firm? does that compare with the tone in scotland, with the tone struck by nicola sturgeon and her colleagues? because there will be some lifting of restrictions mid july, but august
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is now really the more important time for scotland. how is that contrast playing out?— time for scotland. how is that contrast playing out? quite right we have to wait — contrast playing out? quite right we have to wait till _ contrast playing out? quite right we have to wait till the _ contrast playing out? quite right we have to wait till the 9th _ contrast playing out? quite right we have to wait till the 9th of _ contrast playing out? quite right we have to wait till the 9th of august i have to wait till the 9th of august for our— have to wait till the 9th of august for our freedom day, presuming that .oes for our freedom day, presuming that goes as— for our freedom day, presuming that goes as planned. there are significant restriction real actions in mid _ significant restriction real actions in mid july— significant restriction real actions in mid july but not as much of the rest of— in mid july but not as much of the rest of the — in mid july but not as much of the rest of the uk. the tone from nicola sturgeon _ rest of the uk. the tone from nicola sturgeon has been a lot more cautious— sturgeon has been a lot more cautiousjust generally sturgeon has been a lot more cautious just generally through the pandemic. she refused to pencil in dates— pandemic. she refused to pencil in dates up— pandemic. she refused to pencil in dates up until last week for relaxing _ dates up until last week for relaxing restrictions as the third wave _ relaxing restrictions as the third wave driven by the delta variant built _ wave driven by the delta variant built up — wave driven by the delta variant built up a — wave driven by the delta variant built up a head of steam. we also have _ built up a head of steam. we also have in— built up a head of steam. we also have in scotland, despite this more cautious— have in scotland, despite this more cautious rhetoric, we have by far the highest rate of coronavirus in the highest rate of coronavirus in the uk _ the highest rate of coronavirus in the uk at — the highest rate of coronavirus in the uk at the moment, and we talked the uk at the moment, and we talked the record _
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the uk at the moment, and we talked the record of 40,000 cases, the highest — the record of 40,000 cases, the highest in — the record of 40,000 cases, the highest in the past few months. let's _ highest in the past few months. let's continue the theme of covid with two stories. the front of the telegraph, "pm asks for patients as crisis grows in schools." he doesn't need to ask parents to be patient very long because school breaks up in june, term very long because school breaks up injune, term ends in england later injune, term ends in england later injuly, so it's probably only three weeks or so left in schools. the impression given is, although gavin williamson talk yesterday about wanting to see the policy ending, it's all going to happen this term? what this the telegraph story is about two things intertwined. one is that boris johnson about two things intertwined. one is that borisjohnson says parents in particular need to be patient in relation to ending the bubbles. another notes that they are waiting... where children are tested every day and for a week, after one
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of their classmates tests positive for covid, the thinking is that this would replace self isolation. but the other thing this is about is potential divides in the conservative party of people who want the bubbling to and now. and i think there's two things to say here. one, it's really awful that we are in the situation at all, the lack of containment strategy means it is rife in school and a lot more could've been done to try to limit the of the delta variant — things like better test and trace, and sick pay is so low. but the other thing is, as you say, the term and is fast approaching, and i don't say this because i was a primary school teacher, but there's been a lot —— lack of clarity in schools. and there's confusion over what the plans will become september, far too much has been left unclear for the
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heads to decide. i much has been left unclear for the heads to decide.— much has been left unclear for the heads to decide. i don't know what our heads to decide. i don't know what your partner's _ heads to decide. i don't know what your partner's view _ heads to decide. i don't know what your partner's view on _ heads to decide. i don't know what your partner's view on this - heads to decide. i don't know what your partner's view on this and - your partner's view on this and whether or not you've discussed of this, but actually having the infrastructure in every school where you tested children every day will be expensive, and it requires a lot of people. for every school the country, that's a significant amount of investment.— of investment. there is two things here. one of investment. there is two things here- one is _ of investment. there is two things here. one is the _ of investment. there is two things here. one is the frustration - of investment. there is two things | here. one is the frustration around the spread in the first place that we are even in this situation again, and two is that it's not only about those testing plans which are obviously important if that's the way they end up wanting to move forward. it would then be about implementing that in a really smooth and clear way. but one of the problems has been, and i know this from a lot of our conversations, has been a lack of clarity around what schools are supposed to do in
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certain instances. making schools more safe. at the end of last year, the absolute mess in the way the government were teaching staff and teachers when they were raising the alarm of covid in schools, and they were dismissed — then days later there was a lockdown and one of the things was that there hadn't been enough infrastructure put in place to make sure schools could manage risks as best as possible. obviously children missing school is much less on a big scale because it's a shorter time period. but it's really detrimental to have to move to online learning, for those children who've already lost out so much on their education is a real concern for many teachers, and there could've been much more to support the teachers and to do some of these things in the best way possible. house this summer term been for schools in scotland with the intense
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focus on covid and the rise of the transmissibility of the delta variant? ., , , variant? there two things. one, 'ust touchin: variant? there two things. one, 'ust touching on — variant? there two things. one, 'ust touching on howfi variant? there two things. one, 'ust touching on how difficult * variant? there two things. one, 'ust touching on how difficult the i variant? there two things. one, just touching on how difficult the term i touching on how difficult the term has been. — touching on how difficult the term has been, there's another fiasco around — has been, there's another fiasco around exam grades and people sitting _ around exam grades and people sitting exams that have been incredibly stressed by the pressure of the _ incredibly stressed by the pressure of the conduct as they're trying to catch _ of the conduct as they're trying to catch up. — of the conduct as they're trying to catch up. so— of the conduct as they're trying to catch up, so many have missed by not being _ catch up, so many have missed by not being in— catch up, so many have missed by not being in the _ catch up, so many have missed by not being in the classrooms for this past _ being in the classrooms for this past yeah — being in the classrooms for this past year. secondly, around the spread — past year. secondly, around the spread theory, what we saw in scotland — spread theory, what we saw in scotland towards the end of term, 'ust scotland towards the end of term, just a _ scotland towards the end of term, just a week or so ago, increasing numbers— just a week or so ago, increasing numbers of— just a week or so ago, increasing numbers of pupils staying off school or being _ numbers of pupils staying off school or being kicked off school —— kept out of _ or being kicked off school —— kept out of school — the thought of it is people _ out of school — the thought of it is people could get away and enjoy
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staycation and may be not have to self—isolate, because pupils have been _ self—isolate, because pupils have been mixing in the last term. that's part of— been mixing in the last term. that's part of the _ been mixing in the last term. that's part of the difficulties that come with isolation. a part of the difficulties that come with isolation.— with isolation. a thought that wouldn't have _ with isolation. a thought that wouldn't have occurred - with isolation. a thought that wouldn't have occurred to - with isolation. a thought that - wouldn't have occurred to parents in england as well, either. let's move on, the other story on the front of the telegraph, there is an interesting story about the astrazeneca jab which will have people checking their nhs apps to see whether or not they've had the astrazeneca jab, they are caught up in the batches, apparently the eu will not recognise something to do with their production in india, you'll have to look at the telegraph in the morning to find out more on that and the batch numbers. but this is an interesting story about angela merkel�*s trip to the uk which has just been confirmed that she's going to be visiting borisjohnson tomorrow, and shall also be addressing a meeting of the cabinets, as well, which could be interesting. i'd love to know if
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they would do with the ukrainian cabinet did, which was all turn up in theirfootball cabinet did, which was all turn up in their football strips. i cabinet did, which was all turn up in theirfootball strips. i don't know how angela merkel would respond to that, it might not be a friendly gesture in that case. laughter. it says gesture in that case. laughter. it sastohnson will gesture in that case. laughter. it says johnson will confront angela merkel over quarantine for the fully vaccinated. is confrontation going to be the tone of this meeting, do you think? i’m to be the tone of this meeting, do ou think? �* ., , . , you think? i'm not sure. certainly confrontation _ you think? i'm not sure. certainly confrontation is, _ you think? i'm not sure. certainly confrontation is, you _ you think? i'm not sure. certainly confrontation is, you know, - you think? i'm not sure. certainly confrontation is, you know, the i confrontation is, you know, the thing _ confrontation is, you know, the thing that— confrontation is, you know, the thing that governments grasp onto moments — thing that governments grasp onto moments like this to make sure they are strong _ moments like this to make sure they are strong and standing up for citizens — are strong and standing up for citizens i_ are strong and standing up for citizens. i know angela merkel and how she _ citizens. i know angela merkel and how she operates, and the chancellor will be _ how she operates, and the chancellor will be stepping down now — it is probably— will be stepping down now — it is probably more constructive for boris johnson _ probably more constructive for boris johnson to— probably more constructive for boris johnson to operate it a more constructive fashion here. there is
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a greater— constructive fashion here. there is a greater story in the times tomorrow— a greater story in the times tomorrow which suggests that there is headway being made and that germany— is headway being made and that germany is willing to listen to boris — germany is willing to listen to borisjohnson to perhaps germany is willing to listen to boris johnson to perhaps start opening — boris johnson to perhaps start opening things up. the delta variant is rising _ opening things up. the delta variant is rising in— opening things up. the delta variant is rising in germany, it's not the dominant— is rising in germany, it's not the dominant strain yet, but the numbers are increasing. also german vaccination numbers are going up, around _ vaccination numbers are going up, around half— vaccination numbers are going up, around half of germans have had their— around half of germans have had their first — around half of germans have had their first dose in a quarter. —— a quarter— their first dose in a quarter. —— a quarter have _ their first dose in a quarter. —— a quarter have had their second. there also more _ quarter have had their second. there also more open to letting british travellers — also more open to letting british travellers come into germany, the unity— travellers come into germany, the unity that— travellers come into germany, the unity that we saw from the eu, in having _ unity that we saw from the eu, in having an — unity that we saw from the eu, in having an almost total ban on travellers _ having an almost total ban on travellers on the uk, has fractured significantly... like the balearic
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islands — significantly... like the balearic islands opening up to tourists, and that traction with the eu makes it more _ that traction with the eu makes it more difficult for the larger companies to really dig in and stick to those _ companies to really dig in and stick to those entrenched positions. let�*s to those entrenched positions. let's move on to — to those entrenched positions. let's move on to the _ to those entrenched positions. let's move on to the ft, _ to those entrenched positions. let's move on to the ft, maia, _ to those entrenched positions. let�*s move on to the ft, maia, this is the corporate tech story we've heard the number of countries who've signed up to these proposals on a minimum corporate tax rate, for any country to undercut its tax competitors by giving favourable tax treatment, and also the rules effectively stop companies operating in one place, but actually paying their tax and a place with a lower tax take. does this look like it'll happen? this comes off _ this look like it'll happen? this comes off the _ this look like it'll happen? this comes off the back _ this look like it'll happen? to 3 comes off the back of a few weeks ago, the g20 agreements, now there's
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130 countries, which i think is

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