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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines: the prime minister says he hopes england will return to as close to the pre—pandemic normal as possible from 19thjuly. we can see that even the cases are going up, young people, it is not feeding through into serious disease and death. daily covid cases reported in scotland have surpassed 4 thousand for the first time since mass testing began. uk employers will have to hear more of the costs of furlough, as the government begins winding down its job support scheme. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the northeast of england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region.
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some of the employees, their father worked here. they retired from here. the son is working here. they are proud of working here. so why not prepare generation after generation in sunderland as a part of the family and this is what we are going to do. a royal reunion — princes william and harry have come together to unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, on what would have been her 60th birthday. borisjohnson has said he hopes life in england will return to as close to its pre—pandemic state as possible onjuly the 19th. the prime minister said he'd set out in the next few days what the final step out of lockdown
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would look like. but he warned that some "extra precautions" might still be needed and called for patience over the possibility of scrapping isolation for children in school bubbles. here he is talking more about the 19th ofjuly. i know people are impatient for us to open— i know people are impatient for us to open up — i know people are impatient for us to open up. up faster. and of course i want _ to open up. up faster. and of course lwant to— to open up. up faster. and of course lwant to do— to open up. up faster. and of course i want to do that but what i would say to _ i want to do that but what i would say to them if we are now in the final_ say to them if we are now in the final furlong i really believe. we have _ final furlong i really believe. we have to — final furlong i really believe. we have to look very carefully at the data and — have to look very carefully at the data and at the moment, what we are seeing _ data and at the moment, what we are seeing is _ data and at the moment, what we are seeing is a _ data and at the moment, what we are seeing is a big increase in cases, 26.000 — seeing is a big increase in cases, 26.000 as— seeing is a big increase in cases, 26,000 as you will have seen, but that is— 26,000 as you will have seen, but that is not— 26,000 as you will have seen, but that is not translating into a big increase — that is not translating into a big increase in— that is not translating into a big increase in serious illness and death — increase in serious illness and death 50 _ increase in serious illness and death. so it looks ever clearer that we have _ death. so it looks ever clearer that we have broken the vaccination programme. the speed of that roll-out — programme. the speed of that roll—out has broken that link between _
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roll—out has broken that link between infection and mortality. and that is— between infection and mortality. and that is an _ between infection and mortality. and that is an amazing thing, they gives us the _ that is an amazing thing, they gives us the scope that we think of the 19th to— us the scope that we think of the 19th to go— us the scope that we think of the 19th to go ahead, cautiously come irreversibly to go ahead. gn 19th to go ahead, cautiously come irreversibly to go ahead.— irreversibly to go ahead. on the 19th, are irreversibly to go ahead. on the 19th. are you — irreversibly to go ahead. on the 19th, are you going _ irreversibly to go ahead. on the 19th, are you going to - irreversibly to go ahead. on the 19th, are you going to have - irreversibly to go ahead. on the 19th, are you going to have the| 19th, are you going to have the courage and conviction is saying distancing, no mass, it will be normal rather than a neutered version of real life? i normal rather than a neutered version of real life?— normal rather than a neutered version of real life? i know how impatient _ version of real life? i know how impatient people _ version of real life? i know how impatient people are _ version of real life? i know how impatient people are to - version of real life? i know how impatient people are to get - version of real life? i know howl impatient people are to get back version of real life? i know how - impatient people are to get back to total normality is indeed mi, and we will be _ total normality is indeed mi, and we will be setting out in the course of the next _ will be setting out in the course of the next two days what step four will took — the next two days what step four will look like exactly, but i think i will look like exactly, but i think i have _ will look like exactly, but i think i have said — will look like exactly, but i think i have said it before, we will be wanting — i have said it before, we will be wanting to _ i have said it before, we will be wanting to go back to a world that is as close — wanting to go back to a world that is as close to the status quo anti-covid _ is as close to the status quo anti—covid as possible to try and -et anti—covid as possible to try and get ttack— anti—covid as possible to try and get back to life as close to it was before _ get back to life as close to it was before covid. but there may be something we have to do, some extra
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precautions— something we have to do, some extra precautions we have to take, but i will be _ precautions we have to take, but i will be setting all of that out. let's talk to our political correspondent damian grammaticas. he says he will set it out in the next few days. what can we expect? take from that two things. first, that clear message that they want to go ahead if possible on the 19th, but, that was the but at the end, the signal there may still be some precautions that people with the prime minister said that he would be laying out the details of what that we don't know what that is without that may be to do with the social distancing measures, masked some situations, maybe some limits on some sorts of gatherings, but that date of the 1951 to remove the final restrictions of social contact with “p restrictions of social contact with up —— the 19th ofjuly. some indoor gatherings and events, nightclubs, large—scale outdoors, things like
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that, i think we can see the, looking at the data come he was talking about the case is going up but the overall but not hospitalisations and deaths in such a fast rate, that is what they see the breathing space, the question is more around i think those extra precautions that might still be in place, so there is still some caution around that and that is i think where we might see the detail coming out, perhaps a week or so ahead of that opening date. he also talked about — ahead of that opening date. he also talked about double _ ahead of that opening date. he also talked about double vaccinations . talked about double vaccinations being a liberator.— talked about double vaccinations being a liberator. again, he talked about it being _ being a liberator. again, he talked about it being a _ being a liberator. again, he talked about it being a liberator- being a liberator. again, he talked about it being a liberator saying i being a liberator. again, he talked | about it being a liberator saying he knew people where wanting to travel and one thing to go back to normal, but come and again, he said that things would not be hassle—free, and we knowjust ten days ago downing street was talking about the idea coming up about double vaccinations and opening up the possibility of travel it was saying things were at
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an early stage and needed to see more data needed to see what was happening in other countries, needed to understand the impact of being double vaccinated or your ability to then pass on the virus to others, and we are looking at the results of trials on how double vaccinations could be used as an alternative to quarantine when you come back from travel. that was just ten days ago. so there is still the need, they also talked about the need to see the results come up with an idea and not implement to get probably for quite a few weeks, so he is still living open that sort of timescale, possibly an announcement about what they hope to do, but it can still be a few weeks before anything comes into play and remember, a lot of this, they are question marks around how would children be treated, who cannot at the many give vaccines, how would you take them and bring them back to my wet certification, how would you prove your status, how
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other countries respond in the uk says you can go and come back and not quarantine for several other countries except the uk proof of vaccination status, will they want to leading uk citizens and how will that all be, that is beyond the government control so there are many aspects i think that will take time work out. . ~ aspects i think that will take time work out. ., ,, , ., , aspects i think that will take time work out. ., ,, i. , . work out. thank you very much indeed. dr duncan robertson is a covid modeller and analyst from loughborough univeristy — he's also a fellow at st catherine's college in oxford. thank you very much for being with us. they prime minister is very hopeful and confident we can live restrictions in england on the 19th but that would you agree with that? the prime minister can do that. whether it is wise is a different story because it is essentially about risk. we have been through a lockdown wine, locked onto come on three, and really i don't think
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anybody wants to go into lockdown number four, anybody wants to go into lockdown numberfour, so of anybody wants to go into lockdown number four, so of course anybody wants to go into lockdown numberfour, so of course if anybody wants to go into lockdown number four, so of course if we do reduce all or substantially all restrictions, you are increasing the risk of hospitalisations and essentially pressure on the nhs and potential of going into another lockdown, so... brute potential of going into another lockdown, so...— potential of going into another lockdown, so... ~ ~ , ., lockdown, so... we keep hearing we have broken — lockdown, so... we keep hearing we have broken the _ lockdown, so. .. we keep hearing we have broken the link— lockdown, so... we keep hearing we have broken the link between - lockdown, so... we keep hearing we have broken the link between cases | have broken the link between cases and hospitalisation and death. that is the point of so many people being vaccinated. , , ., vaccinated. interesting listening to the prime minister _ vaccinated. interesting listening to the prime minister and _ vaccinated. interesting listening to the prime minister and talking - vaccinated. interesting listening to l the prime minister and talking about the prime minister and talking about the breaking of the link between cases and deaths. i think what was not mentioned there was the link between cases and hospitalisations and what you can see is the growth rates of those who are actually not that dissimilar from each other. they are both going up and both increasing and the rate that they are going up. so i think to say we have broken this link between case and hospitalisations entirely i think is wrong. and of course, the pressure isn't really on deaths at
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the moment come inevitably there will be some but the real pressure comes in hospitals becoming overloaded in the unsustainable pressure on the nhs.— overloaded in the unsustainable pressure on the nhs. having said isn't the ease. — pressure on the nhs. having said isn't the case, correct _ pressure on the nhs. having said isn't the case, correct me - pressure on the nhs. having said isn't the case, correct me if- pressure on the nhs. having said isn't the case, correct me if i'm i isn't the case, correct me if i'm wrong, people going in the are staying in hospital not for as long as they were because they are much, many more therapies to treat them, doctors are much better at treating coronavirus now and they know how to do it or have the drugs like that to mix it on, so people are going in but not staying as long. that mix it on, so people are going in but not staying as long.- but not staying as long. that is absently right. _ but not staying as long. that is absently right. -- _ but not staying as long. that is absently right. -- the -- - but not staying as long. that isj absently right. -- the -- that's but not staying as long. that is l absently right. -- the -- that's a absently right. —— the —— that's a mix of the home. that is great for the people i generally staying in less time. but if you look at the number of people in you and high dependency units, that is also increasing. so that is not going down. you're still getting increase in the number of people and icu beds and of course, this is, they are very low rate compared to the first and second wave, but they are
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increasing and of course if things start increasing exponentially, which they are, you only have a very small percentage of people they go in the hospital, that it still means that hospitalisations are increasing exponentially. and this is the risk and of course all these things are hopefully balanced, hopefully we won't get to the same levels as we did and january where we had the awful various font that we have the delta variant now which much higher transmissibility and increase tra nsmissibility and increase vaccines transmissibility and increase vaccines effectiveness with that —— decrease vaccine effectiveness. ii decrease vaccine effectiveness. if you were down to you, and your decision, you would not live restrictions on the 19th ofjuly? there are ways of lifting restrictions that you can either go and say everybody, no clubs are open —— nightclubs open with the vesting pair ports —— with the vaccine passports but you can say there is a real risk here and we want everybody
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to have as best a time as they can. it's been awful during the lockdown but the risk is still there. i think it is important for people to know, particular people who are vulnerable, to know the risk is still there and of course there is a difference in ethnicity. if you look at the number of over 50s in the black african and black british communities about 60% of those are fully vaccinated compared to just over 90% of white people. so delta will find the vulnerable and it is not going to be equal across the country, but there is still a risk out there. country, but there is still a risk out there-— country, but there is still a risk out there. there are risk issues taken lifting — out there. there are risk issues taken lifting restrictions. - out there. there are risk issues taken lifting restrictions. but. out there. there are risk issues l taken lifting restrictions. but also risk in not lifting restrictions. aren't there? all the people with other illnesses who have been made going to hospital was that we know that with cancer and so on. and of course the rest of the economy and people possiblyjobs, wrecks the people's mental health. huge number of other risk. you people's mental health. huge number of other risk-—
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of other risk. you are absolutely riuht. of other risk. you are absolutely right. hospitals _ of other risk. you are absolutely right. hospitals are _ of other risk. you are absolutely right. hospitals are full - of other risk. you are absolutely right. hospitals are full of - of other risk. you are absolutely| right. hospitals are full of people who have not had the care they perhaps should have done because the virus had been pretty bad in january. so you have a huge backlog of cases who are in hospitals at the moment, if you then get the pressure from the virus, the delta variant on top of that, people have to make a decision, who do you treat, covid patients are elective patients. the rest of the economy, time and time again, if you don't come if you're not prudent, the risk is you will have longer lockdowns and i think we have longer lockdowns and i think we have seen that up until now. we don't want that to happen again. it is not inevitable. but of course, how you release restrictions is very important. you can ignore the data and say we don't want to publish the data but there will be this pressure because people are mixing and it is very much up to the government, and the messaging that goes on about what happens next.—
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the messaging that goes on about what happens next. doctor duncan robertson. — what happens next. doctor duncan robertson, many _ what happens next. doctor duncan robertson, many thanks _ what happens next. doctor duncan robertson, many thanks for - what happens next. doctor duncan robertson, many thanks for your l robertson, many thanks for your time. —— duncan robinson. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus data for the uk. a further 27,989 people have tested positive for the virus in the last 2a hour period. there have been 22 more deaths from coronavirus — that's within 28 days of a positive test. and more than 33 million people — 62.7% of uk adults — have now been fully vaccinated against coronavirus. a statue of diana, princess of wales has been unveiled by her sons princes william and harry at kensington palace — on what would have been her 60th birthday. the two princes commissioned the statue of their late mother from the sculptor ian rank—broadley. the bronze statue depicts princess diana with three children — said to represent the "universality and generational impact" of her work.
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in a joint statement the princes said: "every day, we wish she were still with us, and our hope is that this statue will be seen forever as a symbol of her life and her legacy." someone who's been there today is roya nikkhah, the royal editor at the sunday times. good to talk to you. thank you for being with us. just striking will talk about the statue in a minute. everybody was waiting to see with the statue will look like. but also waiting to see the two brothers, side by side, reunited at least for a day. what did you make of their body language?— a day. what did you make of their body language? laughter. ben, i miaht body language? laughter. ben, i might leave _ body language? laughter. ben, i might leave that _ body language? laughter. ben, i might leave that to _ body language? laughter. ben, i might leave that to other - body language? laughter. ben, i might leave that to other people . body language? laughter. ben, i| might leave that to other people to analyse their body language but i think the key images of them together, walking out, there were smiles, that imagery will i think do an enormous amount to try and turn
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the narrative about that riff which is been so public. the good thing is they were able to come together, the joint statement was very interesting, i thought that said a lot the fact there were able to agree a statement together about their mother. but i think it went off as we thought it would. they put on a united front, whether or how united they are behind—the—scenes remains to be seen, still a lot of tension there. the main thing is they came togetherfor tension there. the main thing is they came together for their mother and that is what they really wanted today. and that is what they really wanted toda . , . �* and that is what they really wanted toda. , ., �* .,, and that is what they really wanted toda. ,~ today. they haven't actually been seen together _ today. they haven't actually been seen together in _ today. they haven't actually been seen together in public— today. they haven't actually been seen together in public since - today. they haven't actually been seen together in public since the | seen together in public since the duke of edinburgh's funeral. that is riuht. of duke of edinburgh's funeral. that is right. of course. _ duke of edinburgh's funeral. that is right. of course. and _ duke of edinburgh's funeral. that is right. of course. and that _ duke of edinburgh's funeral. that is right. of course. and that was - duke of edinburgh's funeral. that is right. of course. and that was the l right. of course. and that was the most difficult of times in the weeks before that have been incredibly difficult with the interview the they gave to oprah and how that went down in the royalfamily. the last few weeks if you must have been difficult and i think whatever we saw today, it will take more time than just saw today, it will take more time thanjust a saw today, it will take more time than just a day from a one—day
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reunion to hill the fight but at least we now have imagery of them together, those pictures of them walking together and towards the garden, they were smiling, the joint statement is significant to i think. we are led to understand that they had a big hand and the creation of the statue. what do you make of it, this image of diana, later on in her life with three children? it is life with three children? it is interesting. _ life with three children? it is interesting. the _ life with three children? it 3 interesting. the narrative that came from kensington palace was that this image was chosen later in our life because it is the time an ally for the princess feel she was gaining confidence, that is the phrase used in the background. —— a time of her life the fact, people always talk so much about william and harry's touch with children and how bringing they are with them and that is something they got from their mother. and i think the setting is quite interesting. it is quite timely.
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i've been assigned the garden to see it up close. there is something quite timeless about the children with her. she is very much of a time, you can see in the 90s but i think for william and harriet was very important prayer for them to show her the things that she was most famous for her car her him at the come her passion and you see this in the setting. —— very important to show her. this in the setting. -- very important to show her. they both talked a lot _ important to show her. they both talked a lot about _ important to show her. they both talked a lot about the _ important to show her. they both talked a lot about the trauma - important to show her. they both l talked a lot about the trauma heard that and the impact of her death on their mental health, she would've been 60 today. she their mental health, she would've been 60 today-— their mental health, she would've been 60 today. she would've been. and i been 60 today. she would've been. and i suppose _ been 60 today. she would've been. and i suppose that _ been 60 today. she would've been. and i suppose that and _ been 60 today. she would've been. and i suppose that and it _ been 60 today. she would've been. and i suppose that and it is - been 60 today. she would've been. i and i suppose that and it is someone who for so many of us is frozen in time because she was so young when she tragically died. he think now that the princess has —— the princes have been without her for longer than they were with her. this can be a more important day for them. two of the statue would've been her 60th birthday is a way for them to share those memories with the public and also invite people who were not around when she was around who didn't know about her work to learn a little bit more about what she did
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and achieved in her lifetime. she was and still is described as the ultimate royal rumble.- was and still is described as the ultimate royal rumble. really good to talk to you- _ ultimate royal rumble. really good to talk to you. thank _ ultimate royal rumble. really good to talk to you. thank you _ ultimate royal rumble. really good to talk to you. thank you so - ultimate royal rumble. really good to talk to you. thank you so much. l to talk to you. thank you so much. —— the ultimate royal rumble. a lovely sunday evening there at kensington palace tonight. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister says he hopes england will return to as close to the pre—pandemic normal as possible from 19thjuly. daily covid cases reported in scotland have surpassed four thousand for the first time since mass testing began. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough, a real reunion. the prince is coming together to unveil a statue of them mother on what would have been her 60th birthday. the government is winding down its furlough job support scheme from today with businesses and unions warning it could mean more people being thrown out of work. the scheme originally
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extended support to some 11.6 million employees. that number has fallen since then — the latest figures show that in may alone, 1.2 million workers came off the scheme. currently around one and a half million britons are having most of their wages paid by the treasury because of the pandemic. now for the first time, employers will have to shoulder a contribution. labour are calling for the changes to be delayed until after all covid restrictions are lifted. here's our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. from today, businesses will have to start paying a 10% slice of the wages of their furloughed staff. how are you guys, good? this person recently returned from furlough. he is optimistic the changes being introduced from today won't have a negative impact on his industry. i'm not really concerned about the changing of the furlough scheme because i can see that now there is loads of people that really want to go out, the industry is going to settle down, so i'm being positive
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if we are to face the challenges we will be ready for them. currently 1.5 million britons are having 80% of their wages paid by the treasury. from today, employers will have to pay 10% of their furloughed workers' normal salary, while the government will continue to pay the other 70%. from the first of august, the employers' contribution rise rises to 20% and the government to 60%. the government has spent £66 billion on furlough, which has supported 11.6 million jobs since march last year, but for this events company, it still hasn't been enough. when the government made an announcement where they were not going to be extending furlough any further, that was the time we had to make the horrific decision of letting 55 of our friends go at that moment in time, and that is something that we are desperate to not have to do again, which is why as this starts to taper down now, we have to find a way of funding that difference somehow.
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many businesses still remain closed, but the government is hoping they'll be able to reopen on the 19th ofjuly. but with little or no revenue coming in, paying even a fraction of workers' wages put could put a massive strain on those firms. up until yesterday, the cost to an employer keeping on a member of staff on £20,000 annual salary was £155 a month. that covers things such as national insurance. but from today, that cost will more than double, to £322, and in august and september, that cost will rise to £a89. so while businesses have a reduced capacity to operate, where numbers are smaller in gyms, pubs or on the high street, the support from the government should match that. they've pushed back the timetable for reopening, what they haven't done is put in place the support that businesses need to get by. it's a difficult balanced decision to make. the furlough wasn't going to last forever and as we open up in two weeks' time, this is the right time
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to think about the balance of payroll, which the government pays, and which employers pay. there are signs the economy is bouncing back, but the scaling back of this scheme and other support packages will be a test on how resilient it actually is. with restrictions still in place, a speedy return to normality will be key. ramzan karmali, bbc news. abena oppong—asare is the shadow exchequer secretary. shejoins me now. thank you very much for being with us. is this the right time to wind down the furlough scheme? goad down the furlough scheme? good evenina. down the furlough scheme? good evening- this— down the furlough scheme? good evening. this is _ down the furlough scheme? good evening. this is a _ down the furlough scheme? good evening. this is a really _ down the furlough scheme? (13mm evening. this is a really tough time for businesses. what we are saying is a reduction in the furlough, the support around the business rates have also been reduced, so we believe that public health measures should go hand—in—hand with economic support, and that is not happening here. we have seen a delay to the
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timetable around reopening because the government have failed to secure borders come and get businesses are being expected to pay the price for that. $5 being expected to pay the price for that. �* , . being expected to pay the price for that. . , ., ., ., that. as we heard of that report, this furlough _ that. as we heard of that report, this furlough scheme _ that. as we heard of that report, this furlough scheme cannot - that. as we heard of that report, this furlough scheme cannot lastj this furlough scheme cannot last forever. initially anyway, employers are only being asked to chip in 10% of wages rising to 20% in august and september. surely that is not too much to ask? the september. surely that is not too much to ask?— september. surely that is not too much to ask? , , ., much to ask? the problem is we are seeinu much to ask? the problem is we are seeing many — much to ask? the problem is we are seeing many businesses _ much to ask? the problem is we are seeing many businesses operating l much to ask? the problem is we are i seeing many businesses operating way below capacity, so for example, in my constituency, we have seen gyms that haven't been able to operate where they haven't been able to let many people and because of covid restrictions, also as you see as many high streets as well, firms, independent travel companies, they also struggling as well. and the point of the high streets, what we see as more people going online, buying things, that is because of during the lockdown we haven't been
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able to move or be mobile as possible when a lot of those businesses have really struggled on that aspect, and i know this from having spoken to the cost of constituents of mine. last week i spoke to one, they work in the independent travel company and they are really struggling. i have a coach company in my constituency and they can't return to how things were before. ~ . ,, they can't return to how things were before. ~ . i. , , they can't return to how things were before. ~ . , , , before. which you can see this is been a very _ before. which you can see this is been a very generous _ before. which you can see this is been a very generous gain - before. which you can see this is been a very generous gain was . before. which you can see this is i been a very generous gain was met the chancellor rishi sunak said this scheme is naturally winding down as the economy reopens, but we are continuing to support those businesses and employees that need our help? that is with the chancellor says? i our help? that is with the chancellor says?- our help? that is with the chancellor says? i have to say thou:h chancellor says? i have to say though that — chancellor says? i have to say though that government - chancellor says? i have to say though that government has l chancellor says? i have to say - though that government has been reckless and negligent in terms of the approach to border controls, which unfortunately british businesses are paying the price for this. , , . ~
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businesses are paying the price for this. , , ., ,, ., , this. just talking about this particular— this. just talking about this particular furlough - this. just talking about this particular furlough scheme | this. just talking about this - particular furlough scheme and has been generous, hasn't it? they spent billions on this from a man many more than other governments. the reali is more than other governments. the reality is that _ more than other governments. tie: reality is that there more than other governments. tte: reality is that there are more than other governments. tt9 reality is that there are businesses that are struggling, which the government does need to provide support to. i think really what the government could be doing is looking at taking lessons from labour watch government wear what they have done as they have given a vast majority of businesses support in terms of business rate relief for the financial year, and unfortunately we are not saying the support being given to service. but are not saying the support being given to service.— are not saying the support being given to service. but there is not a bottomless _ given to service. but there is not a bottomless pit _ given to service. but there is not a bottomless pit of _ given to service. but there is not a bottomless pit of government - given to service. but there is not a - bottomless pit of government money, is there? it bottomless pit of government money, is there? , :, ,:, :_ :, is there? it is about saying that they should _ is there? it is about saying that they should be _ is there? it is about saying that they should be able _ is there? it is about saying that they should be able to -- - is there? it is about saying that they should be able to -- we i is there? it is about saying that l they should be able to -- we are is there? it is about saying that - they should be able to -- we are not they should be able to —— we are not saying this to be a bottomless pit. the fact is that government has put restrictions in place, they need to look at what support businesses can be given so they can continue operating during this difficult time. :, ~' ,:, operating during this difficult time. :, ~' y:. , operating during this difficult time. :, ~' , : operating during this difficult time. :, ~ , : :, operating during this difficult time. :, , : :, , time. thank you very much for being with us.
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president biden has arrived in miami to meet the families of those who died were missing at the last week's collapse of apartment block. he spent time with members of the emergency services who were the to the disaster, 18 people have so far been confirmed dead. with145 still been confirmed dead. with 145 still missing. officials been confirmed dead. with145 still missing. officials confirmed yesterday that the bodies of two more children have been found in the rubble without rescuers have been working 12 hour shifts are still hoping they could find some survivors. our correspondent sophie long joins us live from there right now. just give us the latest efforts by the rescue team there. they are continuing and they are still hopeful that they could find somebody alive.— hopeful that they could find somebody alive.
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hopeful that they could find somebod alive. ~ �* :, :, somebody alive. well, ben, i have to sa that somebody alive. well, ben, i have to say that people _ somebody alive. well, ben, i have to say that people are _ somebody alive. well, ben, i have to say that people are of— somebody alive. well, ben, i have to say that people are of course - somebody alive. well, ben, i have to say that people are of course still- say that people are of course still clinging the hope that hope is fading at the moment, not least because they've had to halt the rescue operation in the early hours of this morning. there have been tropical storms here and that was a partial building collapsed on thursday and there are fears, the remaining part of the building could fall. there's been some movement due to the amount of rainfall here in the amount and the 30 foot pile of twisted metal has now deemed to be too unsafe for the rescue workers who currently with the operation. that is the worst thing that the families which president biden is currently speaking to some of them and trying to come of this has been agonising way for the families of the 145 people who are still unaccounted for stop they know better than anyone that every second counts. we don't have anywhere to get exit when they will resume that rescue operation it will continue at the earliest opportunity. in rescue operation it will continue at the earliest opportunity.— the earliest opportunity. in the last few days —
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the earliest opportunity. in the last few days as _ the earliest opportunity. in the last few days as we _ the earliest opportunity. in the last few days as we got - the earliest opportunity. in the last few days as we got more l the earliest opportunity. in the - last few days as we got more details about this block, it has emerged that there had been reports about structural problems with it and people were concerned about and alarmed about. that people were concerned about and alarmed about.— people were concerned about and alarmed about. that is right, ben. the families _ alarmed about. that is right, ben. the families of— alarmed about. that is right, ben. the families of those _ alarmed about. that is right, ben. the families of those unaccounted j the families of those unaccounted for our desperate notjust for news of their loved ones but answers. it is emerged of last few days that there was a report carried out an investigation in 2018, so some three years ago and they found there will structural damage to the concrete that repairs totalling some $9 million needed to be carried out, a letter is now emerge right into the residents of that building in april of this year saying those repairs now urgently needed to take place and they would cost up to $15 million. overnight, us media has been reporting a couple from a taurus couple staying opposite the apartment building saw water gushing into the garage area. it's become clear over the last few days they are notjust alarm bells ringing by
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sirens that something had to be done. very difficult for the families of those unaccounted for to deal with that in many of them either speaking to over the past few days have very angry, saying this was not an earthquake, it wasn't a disaster, this was something that something could've been done about and they are not talking about negligence of course. very difficult time forfamilies, that time for families, that investigation into what caused the building to collapse so quickly, a 12—storey building that came down less than 15 seconds, they of course are demanding to know why that happened in america. in are demanding to know why that happened in america. in america indeed for _ happened in america. in america indeed for the _ happened in america. in america indeed for the p1 _ happened in america. in america indeed for the p1 or _ happened in america. in america indeed for the p1 or what - happened in america. in america indeed for the p1 or what the - indeed for the p1 or what the residents and other blocks and other cities in america might be nervous too and wondering about the structural safety of their blog. == structural safety of their blog. -- of their buildings. there are excuse nervousness or for the faceless champlain towers north that came down, the south tower is still standing. that is basically an identical building it was builtjust
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one year after, the same model and same contractors, so there's been a voluntary evacuation order issued for that property, some people have decided to remain and others quite understandably have decided to move out. this apartment building was built in a condo boom of the 1980s and there are many similar buildings of this coastline, so that is great nervousness in miami—dade county where this building stands has issued a recommendation that every building over six stories high and over 40 years old should be inspected immediately by structural engineers. they have a 45 day response time to do that. just an indication really of the nervousness thatis indication really of the nervousness that is being felt here but that we talk about what caused this to happen, one building identical building is still standing, we have spoken to neighbours in the vicinity, talking about the ground shaking at the other buildings were constructed, alsojust shaking at the other buildings were constructed, also just metres away from the scene, the coastal areas are dynamic areas always changing, some people still trying to find out exactly what happened here and that
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investigation will continue and it is happening in parallel with the rescue operation. as rescue workers have been painstakingly removing rubble from the amount to my bit by bit, that is being considered so they can be used as evidence to find out exactly what happened and to prevent it from ever happening again. prevent it from ever happening aain. , prevent it from ever happening aaain. :, ,, prevent it from ever happening aaain. , :, ,, ,:, prevent it from ever happening aaain. , :, ,, y:, , prevent it from ever happening aaain. :, ,, , : again. sophie, thank you very much for the again. sophie, thank you very much forthe update- _ again. sophie, thank you very much for the update. sophie _ again. sophie, thank you very much for the update. sophie long, - again. sophie, thank you very much for the update. sophie long, our. for the update. sophie long, our correspondent in miami. now, chris fawkes has the weather. hello there. for many of us this afternoon is looking fine and dry. the sunny skies we have had across scotland will increasingly move into northern england, and elsewhere the cloud will tend to thin and break for many of us. although staying quite cloudy around some of the eastern coasts of england. there will be some showers around today. showers in the south—west triggered by the humidity we have here, because it is quite a humid day. and around the central southern england area it is the sea breeze that will kick the showers off. there could be one or two for the south—west, midlands and wales as well. but the majority of you will have a dry afternoon. top temperatures into the low 20s. overnight tonight we are looking at dry conditions for most areas.
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it will turn a little bit cloudier, again, there will be a few mist patches around. temperatures a little bit milder than last night, a little cooler across northern scotland. tomorrow, it's another day of sunshine and a few showers. the shower is a little bit more widespread. the highest chance of catching a downpour will be across eastern areas of england on friday afternoon. top temperatures about 23 degrees tomorrow. that's your weather. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines.... the prime minister says he hopes england will return to as close to the pre—pandemic normal as possible from 19th july. we can see that even though cases are going up in young people, it is not feeding through into serious disease and death. daily covid cases reported in scotland have surpassed 4,000 for the first time since
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mass testing began. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough, as the government begins winding down its job support scheme. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the northeast of england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. a royal reunion. princes william and harry have come together to unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, on what would have been her 60th birthday. sport now and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. let's bring you right up to speed with everything that's been happening today at wimbledon, shall we? roger federer is on court as we speak, bidding to reach the third round for the 18th time. chetan pathak is our man on the ground at the all england club, where one briton in particular will be paying close
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attention to centre court. yes, the british number two, cam norrie is is going to be watching this one very closely after making it through to round 3. either fedor that awaits him. let's show you live from centre court where the 20 time grand slam champion, roger federer potentially may be, as he? playing his final wimbledon, we don't know. taking on a familiar winning back in 2007. he has had his injury issues as well, groin surgery two years ago. we know about fred's injuries that have kept him out of tennis. he has beaten him the last tennis. he has beaten him the last ten times they have played each other. it is cameron norrie who awaits the winner of this match, the
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british number two doing really well earlier today. british number two doing really well earliertoday. he british number two doing really well earlier today. he was playing the australian alex bolt who made a really good start in that one, winning the first matches, norrie 111 11 in a winning the first matches, norrie 11111 in a row. winning the first matches, norrie 111 11 in a row. effortless, only to players have won more matches on the tour this year, to surpass and read live, rafa rafa nadal stopped him at the last two grand slams. it could be federer. a very happy man afterwards. it was a bit of a tricky start, he came out firing and i was down at break and i felt this court was definitely a little bit easier to move on than yesterday on court 2 and i could really trust it and i was moving strongly out of the corners and i didn't give him too much today so i was really pleased with everything and definitely a lot
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of improvement from the other day. yeah, like i said before, just a pleasure to be out here. and the last brit standing emma raducanu plays soon as well but what else has been happening in the women's draw? it has been a day for some of the top seeds where things have gone to plan. one of those is ash barty, the world number one who is a favourite to win the title here. she was on centre court first of all taking on an uplink overand centre court first of all taking on an uplink over and winning that match in straight sets. she was forced to withdraw made french open but she has looked really good on the grass since her opening match and on the whole, really convincing win for her and when you consider elina svitolina going out, it's opening up for her. coco gauff is through to the next round as well,
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she exploded onto the scene two years ago when she beat venus williams in the opening round, played really well, serving fantastically, reach the quarterfinals of the french open and i ,as , as you mention, should be happening here on court 18 where emma raducanu was able to emerson, the only surviving british women in the signals at the moment will be feeling confident. and unit; will be feeling confident. and only one set of eyes — will be feeling confident. and only one set of eyes to _ will be feeling confident. and only one set of eyes to watch it all. thank you. mark cavendish described his second victory in three days at the tour de france as pretty special as he closes in on the all—time record for stage wins at the famous race. wearing the green jersey into the finish in chateuroux, the same place he won his first stage back in 2008, he showed that he'd lost none of the speed or hunger to power across the line. it's his 32nd win at the tour
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in total, just two behind eddy merckx's record. mathieu van der poel finished in the main bunch to keep the leader's yellow jersey. england's cricketers are chasing just 242 to win the second one day international against sri lanka at the oval and with it the series. sam curran was the star with the ball, skittling the top order and reducing sri lanka to 12 for three. he ended with five wickets. david willey grabbed four himself leaving sri lanka in a state of disarray. dhananjiya da silva fired back with 91 as thy recovered to post a respectable total. in reply, england are 21 in the 4th over. lots more as always on the website, including the lions team to start their tour of south africa. gavin will have more on that in sportsday at 6.30.
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the japanese car—maker, nissan has announced a major expansion of electric vehicle production at its car plant in sunderland. the development will see the creation of more than 1,5000 jobs at the site and several thousand more in the supply chain. borisjohnson says the expansion is a "major vote of confidence in the uk and our highly skilled workers in the north east". our business reporter sarah corker has been on the production line in sunderland. it believes it will for enough to power 100,000 vehicles. it hopes to be operational by 2024 when the level of uk made components is required to start increasing in line with the terms of the uk's trade deal with the eu, development has already received billions of pounds worth of funding with the government thought to have contributed tens of millions towards the cost. borisjohnson says the expansion
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is a "major vote of confidence in the uk and our highly skilled workers in the north east". our business reporter sarah corker has been on the production britain's largest car factory is about to get even bigger. nissan bosses flew in from japan to reveal their expansion plans. a £1 billion investment in the sunderland plant. a gigafactory will be built here, making batteries for electric cars at a vast scale. this announcement today is the true renaissance of the british car industry where they are saying how we are going to address the system to not only create business but also to create an environmentally friendly society. a new electric model is also coming to sunderland. the prime minister said this was a major vote of confidence in the uk. this is something that is a massive benefit to the uk economy, nissan is going to be creating about 900 jobs alone in the battery gigafactory, a further 750 plus thousands potentially in the supply chains.
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but what it is also doing is helping to lengthen the lead of this country in green, low—carbon technology. nissan arrived on weirside back in 1986, japan's route into european markets. in recent years, though, it has been a rocky ride. the future sustainability of this plant was questioned in the run—up to brexit. today is being seen as a major turning point. this cafe provides catering for the factory. the owner is delighted to have some positive news. it is a boost for the whole region, with the whole supply chain, - the battery plant, and hopefully i will get more business. - certainly when they launch _ the new car, maybe when they launch the new factory i will get to do the catering for that. - the new factory is set to be built for 2024, and that is when under the brexit trade deal, car—makers will have
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to source more components locally to avoid tariffs. the uk government is banning the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030, and that means the future is electric. so the uk needs to build more batteries at a vast scale, but at the moment, we are lagging behind other nations like germany. it is a major step forward. we need to make sure that in the uk we have battery production. we make between 1.3 and 1.5 million cars a year, so that actually requires something like six or seven gigafactories. so this is a very important first step. it is fantastic news for nissan, for envision, their partner, and for the north—east. the government is contributing to this investment, and the bbc understands it could be as much as £100 million. this is a long—term plan for the sunderland factory, securing jobs for the decades ahead.
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the town in canada which recorded the country's highest—ever temperature this week has now been engulfed by a wildfire. lytton recorded a temperature of 49.6 celsius on tuesday. 400 metres six people have died because of the heatwave. in the united states, the company belonging to former president donald trump, and its finance chief, are expected to be indicted. it follows a two—year investigation into alleged fraud at the trump organisation. mr trump himself is not expected to be implicated. our business correspondent samira hussein we won't the full charges till later on. the speculation is that the charges have to do with tax evasion, that mr weisselberg received these benefits or perks from the trump organization.
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perks like being able to perhaps live in a tony manhattan apartment rent—free or potentially receiving free tuition to private schools for his grandson. these kinds of perks are not uncommon, but you do need to pay taxes on those benefits. he presented himself to the manhattan district attorney's office, which isjust behind me, very early this morning here new york time. and we are expecting to hear from them. the trump organization has just released a statement saying that this is a scorched earth attempt to harm the former president. the former president has always alleged that this investigation is politically motivated. and what we're expecting lawyers for the trump organization to say is that the harm, or the potential financial and reputational damage that could come to the trump organization as a result of these indictments, would be very, very bad.
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samira hussein reporting from new york. ajudge in los angeles has denied the american pop star britney spears a request to remove herfather from his position as her conservator. the singer's lawyer wanted the court to sackjamie spears from his role as guardian of her estate, leaving her with no control over her life and finances for 13 years. the singer was placed under his guardianship after suffering a series of mental breakdowns. she has said previously that she was traumatized and depressed by the arrangement, which forced her to perform against her will. our arts correspondent rebecca jones has more. it is complicated, and that is because there are two separate legal requests here. the first dates back to last november when britney spears and her lawyers applied to a court to end her father's control over her life and estate.
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he has been in charge since 2008, and they wanted him replaced with a private wealth management company. now, that is the request that has just been denied. then we come to the events of last week, that tearful and explosive testimony from britney spears when she said she had been drugged, that she had been forced to perform against her will, that she had been prevented from having children. "i just want my life back," and there, she was asking for a complete termination of this conservatorship, this complex legal arrangement which governs her life. the judges have ruled that they cannot end that until she formally applies for it to be removed, and she has not done that yet. it is not going to be easy, her father was effectively put in control of her estate in 2008 after she suffered mental health difficulties, and she will have to prove
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that she is capable of not only managing her money, but her private life as well. it is also worth saying that lawyers for her father have denied that he is responsible for any apparent restrictions on his daughter's life. polls are open in the yorkshire constituency of batley and spen, where voters are electing a new mp. it comes after the former labour mp, tracy brabin, became west yorkshire's first directly—elected mayor. and we'll bring you full coverage of the result when it happens in the early hours of tomorrow morning. that should be at around 4am. a man has apologised for his part in the footage that shows england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, well, jobs being created there in sunderland, but there are also jobs being lost today because the clothing store, gap, is closing all 81 of its stores in the uk and ireland by the end
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of september — after that it will only trade online. it hasn't said how many staff will be affected. the american retailer has been a major presence on the british high street as emma simpson reports. it has been on our high streets for more than 40 years, but gap is now calling it a day. all these stores will be shot by the autumn. yet another big chain bidding a retreat, unable to make the sums add up. they are always discounting on top of 5% if you have a loyalty card. they still sell the same jumpers they sold in the '805, same jeans, same t—shirts, so they haven't really moved on, don't think. it is sad, it's very sad. people losing theirjobs. you generally go in and you kind of think this is may be too expensive or nothing that you really want to buy, so, yeah. yeah. a bit generic i think. how times have changed. gap was famous for its casual clothes, from khakis to hoodies, and it did well, but then the competition grew and the business did not adapt. i think that the writing has been
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on the wall for many years, - and what we are seeing now is that the pandemic - has simply accelerated - the demise of mediocre retail. it's accelerated the demise of those retailers who have struggled to stay relevant to shoppers. the uncomfortable truth is _ that we simply have too many stores. we have an oversupply of retail space, we have retail space - that isjust no longer fit for purpose. - and unfortunately, it has left retailers like gap - looking very vulnerable. lots of big retailers have either collapsed, shut stores or disappeared from our towns and city centres altogether. too weak to survive. now anotherfamous name is going online only. here is a chain, though, that has no problem pulling shoppers in. they were queuing around the block when nonessential retail reopened. today, primark said its sales have now risen above pre—pandemic levels, contrasting fortunes after a turbulent 15 months. emma simpson, bbc news.
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more now on the statue of diana, princess of wales being unveiled by her sons princes william and harry at kensington palace on what would have been her 60th birthday. the two princes commissioned the statue of their late mother from the sculptor ian rank—broadley. well he's been explaining how he created the work. uppermost in my mind was to do something for the princes. the princess was a very public figure in many respects an icon, but she was somebody�*s mother. that is what i paid the greatest heed to both princes. it feels a collaborative effort and made a huge contribution. in an many ways, i could say the sculpture belongs to them as well, they helped make it. explained to me the children she is
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with and why you chose to make a sculpture of her plus three children? t sculpture of her plus three children?— sculpture of her plus three children? ,, :, , , children? i think it was felt if she stood on her _ children? i think it was felt if she stood on her own _ children? i think it was felt if she stood on her own in _ children? i think it was felt if she stood on her own in a _ children? i think it was felt if she stood on her own in a solitary - stood on her own in a solitary fashion she might appear isolated. one of the things that came across intact to her friends and family was she was such a friendly, gregarious person and she had a particular one for children and i think it also in many ways alludes to her humanitarian work and shows that she was a great comfort. also visually, children are not of adult size, so they are not competing with the princess. very much it is a sort of pyramid structure. from that point of view, it's company for her. you mentioned _ of view, it's company for her. you mentioned the _ of view, it's company for her. you mentioned the involvement the princess had. how does that work? from the moment of the commission through to today, —— princes. what involvement did they have in the process? involvement did they have in the rocess? :, :, , ~' process? unfortunately, i never knew the princess. — process? unfortunately, i never knew the princess. i— process? unfortunately, i never knew the princess, i never— process? unfortunately, i never knew the princess, i never met _ process? unfortunately, i never knew the princess, i never met her- process? unfortunately, i never knew the princess, i never met her so -
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process? unfortunately, i never knew the princess, i never met her so i - the princess, i never met her so i was reliant on friends and family. one gets a flavour. it might be anecdotes, particular views, they contributed in that way. they described their mother and in many ways, private moments that were related, one certainly got the feeling that she had an enormous sense of fun and playing jokes. that helped to create a person. so that when i am on my own in the studio, andi when i am on my own in the studio, and i amjust when i am on my own in the studio, and i am just modelling quickly, i got a feeling i'm beginning to know somebody. what is the end of the commission i felt as though i knew diana. also attending the ceremony, was pip morrison, the landscape architect in charge of the layout and planting scheme of the memorial garden which features the statue. we wanted to create enough space for the statue _ we wanted to create enough space for the statue that it really... a calm and tranquil _ the statue that it really... a calm and tranquil space more reflective
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than it— and tranquil space more reflective than it was— and tranquil space more reflective than it was quite busy before with fountains— than it was quite busy before with fountains and planters and we wanted to calm _ fountains and planters and we wanted to calm it _ fountains and planters and we wanted to calm it down and create a really beautiful _ to calm it down and create a really beautiful setting for the statue. the garden originally was divided into narrow bands of lawn and the border— into narrow bands of lawn and the border and — into narrow bands of lawn and the border and paving in into narrow bands of lawn and the borderand paving in a into narrow bands of lawn and the border and paving in a repeated edwardian pattern and thinking about how to _ edwardian pattern and thinking about how to change the design we didn't want to— how to change the design we didn't want to lose that character the princess — want to lose that character the princess knew from when she came here, _ princess knew from when she came here, but— princess knew from when she came here, but wanted to vary it more so we have _ here, but wanted to vary it more so we have actually changed so that a tower— we have actually changed so that a lower level is just lawn and then have _ lower level is just lawn and then have paving so that people can walk around _ have paving so that people can walk around the — have paving so that people can walk around the garden and have a much bigger— around the garden and have a much bigger more generals flower border. early on _ bigger more generals flower border. early on with the princes we had a conversation about what can the flowers — conversation about what can the flowers she liked, she liked lily of the valley. — flowers she liked, she liked lily of the valley, so it was developing that, _ the valley, so it was developing that, using the plants, but thinking this is— that, using the plants, but thinking this is a _ that, using the plants, but thinking this is a garden that has seen throughout the year so it really needed — throughout the year so it really needed to be plants that look good.
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, as long _ needed to be plants that look good. , as long as— needed to be plants that look good. , as long as possible. new rules have come into force which should make it easier for people to repair household appliances like washing machines, tvs and fridges. the "right to repair" will force manufacturers to make spare parts available, so customers can get their products fixed. 1.5 million tonnes of electrical goods are thrown away every year in the uk, as coletta smith reports. archive: he's only six, is willie, and he's taken over part - of his father's yard as a repair shop for kiddies' bikes, trikes and so on. repairing things might have gone out of fashion for a while. bringing history back to life is what makes the repair shop so special. but it's all the rage again now. it's not a two—minute job doing this. but even if you want to get things repaired at the moment, whether to save money or save the planet, it's pretty hard to get hold of the right parts that you need to replace things. but from today, things
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will hopefully start to get a little bit easier. manufacturers of white goods and tvs now have to stock and sell replacement parts of each product for ten years. so would it tempt you to try and repair something? my dishwasher and oven was 15 years old, and ijust replaced both of them. maybes a smaller repair, something that's just £60 or £70, like a small part, like an element in an oven, but over and above that, i wouldn't have thought so. a toaster, a kettle, you know, i might even potentially have a look at a hoover. just a very basic repair, yeah, but certainly not on a washer or a cooker, ora tumble dryer. they're so cheap to replace, so ijust probably get - a new one, really. door seals can go, and that's an easy thing that a homeowner can replace themselves. similar with shelves. rob's company have 400 engineers. these can quite often come off the runners. something quite simple. making more complex repairs in domestic appliances. but he thinks there's plenty we can try ourselves. it gives customers a choice. we really want consumers to take
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that opportunity to look at what they need as a repair, whether they can repair it themselves, buy a small component, or if they need to call somebody out like ourselves. a yougov survey suggests we feel most confident with the hoover. 42% feel comfortable repairing vacuum cleaners. 20% would try patching up a broken toaster. and only 4% would try to fix a gas cooker. it's removable, you can separate it. it's cheaper to make it in one piece. the uk's only white goods manufacturer say they knew the legislation was coming, and have already made their machines simpler to mend. the secret of products that are easy to repair and last longer is in the design. you've got to start off by saying, the objective here is to make a product that's going to be reliable, easy to maintain or whatever. we've got to design a product that's difficult to make wrong and easy to repair if it needs to be repaired. even though we now have the right to repair, it's a big cultural shift to convince people to fix things rather than fling them.
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coletta smith, bbc news in newton aycliffe. sophie is coming up with the bbc news at 6. first the weather with chris fawkes. for most of us the weather continues to brighten up this afternoon with spells of sunshine becoming increasingly widespread and it has been a lovely start to the day in scotland. this is where we have seen some of the sunniest weather so far today and the sunniest scraps working into a good part of northern england but elsewhere, out on the atlantic, we have got to the western area of low pressure, that will come in in time for the weekend, throwing bands of rain across the country. make the most of the dry weather while it lasts. today, most of us will see spells of sunshine but there will be a few showers knocking around, wales, south—west met midlands, southern england, showers forming here because of the sea breeze and because of the relatively humid weather across just as part of
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south—west england, otherwise a fresh feeling day and in the sunshine, temperatures widely into the high teens, low 20s, it will feel warm in thatjuly sunshine. overnight tonight, cloud will tend to redevelop, particularly across parts of eastern england, eastern scotland, temperatures for most of us around 12—14, tending to be a bit milder than it was last night. tomorrow morning, although it starts off quite cloudy in a number of places, that cloud will thin and bright with spells of sunshine coming through. shares in the afternoon, a bit more widespread, thunderstorms around friday afternoon, they will tend to move over into eastern areas of england as we head into the afternoon, that's where the highest chance of a downpour is. as far as the weekend is concerned, spells of rain, widespread heavy showers, most of us will see downpours. you could see that rain pushed north on saturday, showers follow, most will see a downpour in the day but across south—west england, we will see a
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line of showers developed thanks to the wind converging together to bring an area of slow—moving thunderstorms, could see localised flooding for some of those. temperatures still into the high teens are low 20s, still coming down a degree or so, not as warm as today and friday. sunday is unsettled again, showers will be widespread, won't be raining all the time, definitely not but most of us will see a shower during the course of the day and those showers likely to be heavy at times. that's your weather.
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at six — lifting england's lockdown. the prime minister says he hopes to get life back as close to normality as possible onjuly the 19th. almost 28,000 new cases recorded today in the uk, but borisjohnson says he's increasingly confident about the impact of the covid jabs. the speed of that vaccine roll—out has broken that link between infection and mortality and that's an amazing thing. that gives us the scope, we think, on the 19th to go ahead. but a warning for football fans ahead of england's clash this weekend — experts say to watch the match outdoors to help reduce the spread. it comes as the government begins
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winding down the furlough scheme which has supported milions ofjobs through the pandemic.

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