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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm clive myrie. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in northeast england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. nissan is going to be creating jobs here, 750 in a factory plus thousands potentially in the supply chains. uk employers will have to hear more of the costs of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. smiles from the american comedian bill cosby after his conviction is overturned — but women who've accused him of sexual assualt say they're shocked and disgusted. and a royal reunion, william and
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harry will come together to reveal a statue of their mother on what would've been her 60th birthday. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the japanese car—maker nissan has announced a major expansion of electric vehicle production at its car plant in sunderland. the development will see the creation of more than 1,500 jobs at the site and several thousand more in the supply chain. most of these will facilitate the manufacture of the company's new—generation, all—electric model at the site. alongside this, partner company, envision aesc, will build a new electric battery plant which it believes will produce enough batteries to power over 100,000 nissan electric
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vehicles each year. nissan hopes the site will be operational by 2024, when the level of uk—made components in cars manufactured in the uk is required to start increasing, in line with the terms of the uk's trade deal with the eu. the development has already received billions of pounds worth of funding, with the government thought to have contributed tens of millions of pounds towards the cost. this morning, prime minister, borisjohnson has said the expansion is a "major vote of confidence in the uk and our highly skilled workers in the north east". our business reporter sarah corker has been on the production line in sunderland. britain's largest car factory is about to get even bigger. nissan bosses flew in from japan to reveal their expansion plans. a £1 billion investment in the sunderland plant. a gigafactory will be built here, making batteries for electric cars at a vast scale. this announcement today is the true renaissance of the british car industry
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where they are saying how we are going to address the system to not only create business but also to create an environmentally friendly society. a new electric model is also coming to sunderland. the prime minister said this was a major vote of confidence in the uk. this is something that is a massive benefit to the uk economy, nissan is going to be creating about 900 jobs alone in the battery gigafactory, a further 750 plus thousands potentially in the supply chains. but what it is also doing is helping to lengthen the lead of this country in green, low—carbon technology. nissan arrived on wayside back in 1986, japan's route into european markets. in recent years, though, it has been a rocky ride. the future sustainability of this plant was questioned in the run—up to brexit. today is being seen as a major turning point.
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this cafe provides catering for the factory. the owner is delighted to have some positive news. it is a boost for the whole region, with the whole supply chain, the battery plant, and hopefully i will get more business. certainly when they launch the new car, maybe when they launch the new factory i will get to do the catering for that. the new factory is set to be built for 2024, and that is when under the brexit trade deal, car—makers will have to source more components locally to avoid tariffs. the uk government is banning the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030, and that means the future is electric. so the uk needs to build more batteries at a vast scale, but at the moment, we are lagging behind other nations like germany. it is a major step forward. we need to make sure that in the uk we have battery production. we make between 1.3 and 1.5 million
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cars a year, so that actually requires something like six or seven gigafactories. so this is a very important first step. it is fantastic news for nissan, for envision, their partner, and for the north—east. the government is contributing to this investment, and the bbc understands it could be as much as £100 million. this is a long—term plan for the sunderland factory, securing jobs for the decades ahead. this is a big investment. sorry, sarah... , , , , sarah... yes, this is been described... _ sarah... yes, this is been described... you - sarah... yes, this is been described... you keep - sarah... yes, this is been - described... you keep going, sarah... yes, this is been _ described... you keep going, sarah. sor , we described... you keep going, sarah. sorry. we have _ described... you keep going, sarah. sorry. we have a _ described... you keep going, sarah. sorry, we have a bit _ described... you keep going, sarah. sorry, we have a bit of _ described... you keep going, sarah. sorry, we have a bit of a _ described... you keep going, sarah. sorry, we have a bit of a delay - described... you keep going, sarah. sorry, we have a bit of a delay on i sorry, we have a bit of a delay on the line, but this is being described as a significant moment for the uk car sector. this is a massive expansion plan and nissan arrived here back in 1986, so three
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decades of car making here. in this investment is a £1 billion project. it is expected to create more than 6000 jobs here and also across the wider supply chain. it is worth remembering this isjust wider supply chain. it is worth remembering this is just a first step because we are expecting that the sale of electric models to release or in the decades ahead, and the uk needs to start ramping up battery production really quickly. 0ne estimate is that to meet this demand, the uk is going to have to build eight gigafactories by 2040. at the moment, we do not have any. sunderland is expected to be the first one, so those in the industry today obviously welcoming this news, but saying much more needs to be done. some critics saying the government needs to step forward and do more to really entrap that investment and make sure there is at
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integrated supply chain so that the uk can really be at the heart of this electric car revolution. sorry about the problems _ this electric car revolution. sorry about the problems on - this electric car revolution. sorry about the problems on the - this electric car revolution. sorry about the problems on the line, what is a gigafactory? that about the problems on the line, what is a gigafactory?— is a gigafactory? that is a very aood is a gigafactory? that is a very good question. _ is a gigafactory? that is a very good question. it _ is a gigafactory? that is a very good question. it is _ is a gigafactory? that is a very good question. it is basically l is a gigafactory? that is a very l good question. it is basically the name of a huge factory that makes all of these batteries for the electric cars, so it is during it at a vast scale and they already make electric cars here at takamaki, they have the electric leaf model, was in the factory earlier saying them roll off the production line, but the difference about the gigafactory is the scale of it and they will make your batteries and a much larger volumes, so hopefully when it is up and running by 2024, it is expected they will make 100,000 of these batteries a year. that goes into feeding the demand for these electric cars. it is also worth pointing out that there have been some big challenges for the uk car sector over the last couple of
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years. it does not seem that long ago that we were outside the factory questioning the long—term future of this plant because a lot of people were predicting that brexit could have been armageddon for the uk industry. that it obviously did not happen, but any pandemic hit and demand has slumped, furloughed workers, the factory produced production, so loads of hurdles to get over. you speak to anyone here today and they are delighted by this news and they have described as a real turning point. triers; news and they have described as a realturning point.— news and they have described as a realturning point. very good news, thank you. — realturning point. very good news, thank you, sarah. _ now you know what a gigafactories. the government is winding down its furlough job support scheme from today with businesses and unions warning it could mean more people being thrown out of work. currently around one and a half million britons are having most of their wages paid by the treasury because of the pandemic. now for the first time, employers will have to shoulder a contribution. labour are calling for the changes to be delayed until after all covid
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restrictions are lifted. here's our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. from today, businesses will have to start paying a 10% slice of the wages of their furloughed staff. how are you guys, good? this person recently returned from furlough. he is optimistic the changes being introduced from today won't have a negative impact on his industry. i'm not really concerned about the changing of the furlough scheme because i can see that now there is loads of people that really want to go out, the industry is going to settle down, so i'm being positive if we are to face the challenges we will be ready for them. currently 1.5 million britons are having 80% of their wages paid by the treasury. from today, employers will have to pay 10% of their furloughed workers' normal salary, while the government will continue to pay the other 70%. from the first of august,
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the employers' contribution rise rises to 20% and the government to 60%. the government has spent £66 billion on furlough, which has supported 11.6 million jobs since march last year, but for this events company, it still hasn't been enough. when the government made an announcement where they were not going to be extending furlough any further, that was the time we had to make the horrific decision of letting 55 of our friends go at that moment in time, and that is something that we are desperate to not have to do again, which is why as this starts to taper down now, we have to find a way of funding that difference somehow. many businesses still remain closed, but the government is hoping they'll be able to reopen on the 19th ofjuly. but with little or no revenue coming in, paying even a fraction of workers' wages put could put a massive strain on those firms. up until yesterday, the cost to an employer keeping on a member of staff on £20,000 annual salary was £155 a month.
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that covers things such as national insurance. but from today, that cost will more than double, to £322, and in august and september, that cost will rise to £489. so while businesses have a reduced capacity to operate, where numbers are smaller in gyms, pubs or on the high street, the support from the government should match that. they've pushed back the timetable for reopening, what they haven't done is put in place the support that businesses need to get by. it's a difficult balanced decision to make. the furlough wasn't going to last forever and as we open up in two weeks' time, this is the right time to think about the balance of payroll, which the government pays, and which employers pay. there are signs the economy is bouncing back, but the scaling back of this scheme and other support packages will be a test on how resilient it actually is. with restrictions still in place, a speedy return to normality will be key. ramzan karmali, bbc news.
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polls are open in the yorkshire constituency of batley and spen, where people are electing a new mp. the vote was called when the former labour member of parliament, tracy brabin, became west yorkshire's first directly—elected mayor. and we will bring you the full coverage of the result in the early hours of tomorrow morning when it happens. we are expecting the results sometime after 4am. meanwhile, the prime minister boris johnson said he sees double vaccination as the �*key to freedom' when asked about foreign travel and the easing of covid—19 restrictions. i'm very confident that the double jabs will be a liberator and they will enable people to travel. we will enable people to travel. we will be setting out a lot more about the detail of that in the course of july and the next few days about how you see it working, but there's no doubt at all once you have two jabs, you are in a much better position.
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as everybody can see, we will be going forward in the autumn with an extra vaccination programme, a booster programme, for the more vulnerable just to give us that extra insulation, that extra security that we need. but to answer your point, everybody who is frustrated about travel over the summer, double jabs will be liberated. i hope people will forgive me if i say that i obviously want to travel to be possible, but i have to stress that this year will not be like every other year because of the difficulties with covid. people should not expect there will be completely hassle—free. 0ur deputy political editor is vicki young. the prime minister really putting his faith in the double jabs, not only to open up the economy but hopefully facilitating foreign
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travel for britons across the continent and beyond. is there a sense that that date, july 19, is fixed? i sense that that date, july 19, is fixed? ~ sense that that date, july 19, is fixed? ~ , , fixed? i think it is interesting listeninu fixed? i think it is interesting listening to _ fixed? i think it is interesting listening to the _ fixed? i think it is interesting listening to the prime - fixed? i think it is interesting l listening to the prime minister fixed? i think it is interesting - listening to the prime minister and the business secretary talking about it as a certainty, when we open up in two weeks' time. what we do not know are the details of exactly what that will look like. there is a lot of question marks about travel, school bubbles, masks, social distancing, so what we do not know is what freedom day, as some are calling it, really means. it is possible i am told that there could be an announcement on that next week, laying out what life look like before then, week before the 19th, giving it the official go—ahead. interesting on travel, the prime minister talking about double jabs. immediately, lots of people will be saying, 0k, immediately, lots of people will be saying, ok, that is fine for those who have that, but not good for those who are not, and what about
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children if it coincides with the holidays? will they get an exemption? he talks about hassle, i'm sure there will still be testing requirements as well. so not normality when it comes to travel, and a lot of our travel is dependent on other countries and what they are willing to accept, what proof are they willing to accept, are they happy to have brits going into the country at all. i think the point here is that the vaccination programme this country has been very successful, it is starting to cover huge percentages of the adult population. that is not necessarily the case in other countries, so height case numbers here might not be such a problem, but they could be in other countries. so there's quite a lot of uncertainty there.- a lot of uncertainty there. exactly one week since _ a lot of uncertainty there. exactly one week since the _ a lot of uncertainty there. exactly one week since the revelations i one week since the revelations considering matt hancock were made public. sajid javid has taken over, what is a sense of how he has taken over the situation? i
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what is a sense of how he has taken over the situation?— over the situation? i think what is interesting _ over the situation? i think what is interesting here _ over the situation? i think what is interesting here is _ over the situation? i think what is interesting here is that _ over the situation? i think what is interesting here is that when - over the situation? i think what is interesting here is that when it i interesting here is that when it comes to the pandemic, he was on the back bench as an mp, he was not on the front line for this, and one cabinet member said to me it is not that he is more or less in favour of restrictions than matt hancock, it is more that he has not been through that experience of being on the front line. he can come into the department of health where we are hopefully in a position that we are at the tail end of the pandemic, hopefully, but i certainly think he has made it very clear how he feels about certain restrictions. i understand that things like school bubbles he thinks that schools are being too over prescriptive about it, they need to be a bit more relaxed about it, not sending home whole school years if one people test positive. so i think the conversation might have changed slightly with him being around, but there are? around what it is going to mean comejuly 19. there are? around what it is going to mean comejuly19. at there are? around what it is going to mean comejuly 19. at the sense that i'm getting is a people feel
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this will be a huge stride towards normal life and there will be very few restrictions, they hope, left in place. few restrictions, they hope, left in lace. , w' the headlines on bbc news. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in northeast england bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. smiles from the american comedian bill cosby after his conviction is overturned — but women who've accused him of sexual assualt say they're shocked and disgusted. lawyers for women who've accused the american comedian bill cosby of sexual assault say they're shocked and disgusted he's been released from prison. cosby was freed after a court in pennsylvania overturned his conviction for drugging and molesting a woman. the judges found an agreement struck
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with a previous prosecutor meant he shouldn't have been charged. michelle fleury reports. this is the moment bill cosby left prison a free man. he had served two years of a 3—10 year sentence. his fall from grace was sealed in 2018 after he was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault for drugging and molesting andrea in 2004. but in a stunning reversal, pennsylvania's highest court said the entertainer should never have been charged. indie the entertainer should never have been charged-— been charged. we love you, bill cosb ! in been charged. we love you, bill cosby! in the — been charged. we love you, bill cosby! in the split _ been charged. we love you, bill cosby! in the split ruling, - been charged. we love you, bill cosby! in the split ruling, the i cosby! in the split ruling, the 'udaes cosby! in the split ruling, the judges wrote _ cosby! in the split ruling, the judges wrote the _ cosby! in the split ruling, the judges wrote the trial - cosby! in the split ruling, the judges wrote the trial should | cosby! in the split ruling, the i judges wrote the trial should not have gone ahead because of an immunity deal he had struck with a previous prosecutor. he cannot be retried. earlier, supporters drove by his home shouting hey, hey, hey, a reference to fat albert, the cartoon character he once played. the comedian who is back with his
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family did not comment to the media, but said in a statement i have always maintained my innocence. the? always maintained my innocence. they were impervious _ always maintained my innocence. they were impervious to _ always maintained my innocence. tue: were impervious to the always maintained my innocence. he were impervious to the court always maintained my innocence. tte:1: were impervious to the court of public opinion, which frankly, the lower courts were not. bill cosby, we knew all along he never should've been prosecuted for this, he had every right to rely only prosecutor's word.- every right to rely only prosecutor's word. every right to rely only rosecutor's word. :, , ., .. , prosecutor's word. for his accuser, it was a bitter _ prosecutor's word. for his accuser, it was a bitter blow. _ prosecutor's word. for his accuser, it was a bitter blow. reacting i prosecutor's word. for his accuser, it was a bitter blow. reacting to i it was a bitter blow. reacting to the decision, she called it not only disappointing, but of concern in that it may discourage those who seek justice for sexual assault in the criminaljustice system. this the criminal 'ustice system. this must be the criminaljustice system. this must be devastating _ the criminaljustice system. this must be devastating to many of the accusers. _ must be devastating to many of the accusers, and my heart especially goes _ accusers, and my heart especially goes out — accusers, and my heart especially goes out to— accusers, and my heart especially goes out to those who bravely testified — goes out to those who bravely testified in both of his criminal cases — testified in both of his criminal cases. and despite the pennsylvania supreme _ cases. and despite the pennsylvania supreme court's position, i want everyone — supreme court's position, i want everyone to know that i do believe that this _ everyone to know that i do believe that this was a very important fight foriustice — that this was a very important fight forjustice and even though the
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court _ forjustice and even though the court did — forjustice and even though the court did overturn the conviction, it was— court did overturn the conviction, it was on— court did overturn the conviction, it was on technical grounds, it did not vindicate bill cosby. bill cosby became known — not vindicate bill cosby. bill cosby became known as _ not vindicate bill cosby. bill cosby became known as america's i not vindicate bill cosby. bill cosby became known as america's data | not vindicate bill cosby. bill cosby i became known as america's data for his role in the cosby show. his conviction was seen as proof that even when the accusers one of the most famous in the world, the voices of the victims of sexual assault could be heard in the usjustice system. now, he has a chance to restore his reputation. bbc news, pennsylvania. princes william and harry will unveil a statue of their mother, princess diana, at kensington palace this afternoon, on what would have been her sixtieth birthday. they commissioned the statue in 2017, saying they hoped it would help visitors 'reflect on her life and legacy�*. all eyes will be on the body language between the brothers amid reports of a growing rift, it will be their first appearance together since the duke
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of edinburgh's funeral in april. sarah campbell is at kensington palace forest. bill sarah campbell is at kensington palace forest.— sarah campbell is at kensington palace forest. all the unveiling is happening. _ palace forest. all the unveiling is happening. if— palace forest. all the unveiling is happening. if you _ palace forest. all the unveiling is happening, if you can _ palace forest. all the unveiling is happening, if you can see - palace forest. all the unveiling is happening, if you can see behind| palace forest. all the unveiling is i happening, if you can see behind me that that green hedge behind there is the sunken garden, and that is where the statue is being unveiled. lots of people, as you can see, in kensington gardens today hoping to catch a glimpse of the unveiling, but it will be disappointed because it is very much happening out of public view. we do hope to have some pictures of the event, certainly within the next hour. this is a statue, programme that was commissioned by the two princes back in 2017, and much has changed and then as agreed with the sunken garden that has been redesigned during lockdown when the palace was closed off to the public. it was redesigned, replanted with 4000 new plants, some of them are some of
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diana's favourites. it was a place that she loved to spend time in and that she loved to spend time in and thatis that she loved to spend time in and that is why they chose this as a location for the statue. it also, as we know all too well, the relationship between the two princes has also changed over those intervening years, what was a very close relationship, they were issuing the joint statements at the time of the commissioning. and now seems so different. prince harry physically is on another continent, he did fly back to the uk on friday. we saw the pictures of him attending a charity event last night, but this will be the first time that we will have seen the brothers together, the first time they will have been together since their grandfather's funeral back in april in windsor. as he resigned, lots of people will be studying the mannerisms —— as a you were saying, people will be looking for signs of reconciliation, hoping that the talk at the breakdown, the
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risk, that perhaps this could be the beginning of rebuilding. of course, their mother died tragically almost 24 years ago. harry was just 12 years old, william was 15, and so this will be incredibly poignant day for them. they commissioned it they said because they wanted some permanent memorial, permanent statue because of the positive impact that diana had in the uk and across the world. i can tell you there have been balloons, birthday balloons, flowers littered around kensington palace today attached the railings because diana remains somebody who has a great personal connection to william and harry. but also to the public, she remains a person in public, she remains a person in public consciousness. the unveiling happening this afternoon we hope to have pictures for you within the hour. :, ~ have pictures for you within the hour. :, ,, , :, have pictures for you within the hour. :, ,, i. :, ., and we'll bring you the images of that unveiling of the statue of princess diana
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at kensington palace a little later. ajudge in los angeles has denied the american pop star britney spears a request to remove herfather from his position as her conservator. the singer's lawyer wanted the court to sackjamie spears from his role as guardian of her estate, leaving her with no control over her life and finances for 13 years. the singer was placed under his guardianship after suffering a series of mental breakdowns. the 39—year—old has said previously that she was traumatised and depressed by the arrangement, with her forced to perform against her will. 0ur arts correspondent rebecca jones has more. it is complicated, and that is because there are two separate legal request year. the first dates back to last november when britney spears and her lawyers applied to a court to end her father's control over her life and estate. he has been in charge since 2008, and they wanted him replaced with a private wealth management company. that is the
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request that has just been denied. then we come to the events of last week, that tearful and explosive testimony from britney spears when she said she had been drugged, that she said she had been drugged, that she had been forced to perform against her will, that she had been prevented from having children. i just want my life back, and there, she was asking for a complete termination of this conservatorship, this complex legal arrangement which governs her life. thejudges have ruled that they cannot and that until she formally applies for it to be removed, and she has not done that yet. it is not going to be easy, herfatherwas that yet. it is not going to be easy, her father was effectively putting control of her state into thousand eight after she suffered mental health issues, and she has approved that she can manage her money in private life as well. it is
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also worth saying that lawyers for her father have denied that he is responsible for any apparent restrictions on his daughter's life. rebecca jones reporting there. still in the united states, the trump organization's chief financial officer, allen weisselberg, has handed himself in to the authorities in new york investigating alleged fraud at the former president's company. the charges are expected to centre on tax—related crime. let's speak to our business correspondent samira hussain in new york. just explain the allegations there. we don't know any of the specifics regarding these allegations, it is still sealed and it is going to be another few hours before we get the exact charges. but the speculation is that it is all related to tax evasion, that allen weisselberg had received these benefits while working at the trump organisation. these benefits could be things like getting free rent in the apartments
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where he lived in manhattan or free tuition at private schools for his grandson. perks are not uncommon, but you knew need to pay taxes on them —— you do need to pay taxes on them, so what prosecutors could be alleging is that intact he did not any taxes on those. allen weisselberg did present himself a few hours ago into the district attorney's office, right behind me, and we have just received a statement from him saying that he intends to plead not guilty and will fight the charges in court. lawyers for the trump organisation will also be present, and they are expected to try and get the charges thrown out saying that the potential financial and reputational damage that could come to the trump organisation far outweighs any alleged crime. stand outweighs any alleged crime. and there is no _ outweighs any alleged crime. and there is no direct link to the president himself?- there is no direct link to the president himself?
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there is no direct link to the resident himself? :, :, president himself? know, the former resident is president himself? know, the former president is not _ president himself? know, the former president is not being _ president himself? know, the former president is not being implicated i president himself? know, the former president is not being implicated in i president is not being implicated in these particular charges, it has already called them, the entire investigation has been going on for years, politically motivated. in fact, we have also heard from a spokesperson from the trump organisation called this a scorched earth attempt to harm the former president. that said, the grand jury here at six until november, so when it is entirely possible, we could see more charges come down the line. and we could possibly see more charges that could come a little bit closer to mr trump himself.- closer to mr trump himself. thank ou for closer to mr trump himself. thank you for that- _ now we have chris fox with the weather. hello there. for many of us this afternoon is looking fine and dry. the sunny skies we have had across scotland will increasingly move into northern england, and elsewhere the cloud will tend to thin and break for many of us. although staying quite cloudy around some of the eastern coasts of england. there will be some
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showers around today. showers in the south—west triggered by the humidity we have here, because it is quite a humid day. and around the central southern england area it is the sea breeze that will kick the showers off. there could be one or two for the south—west, midlands and wales as well. but the majority of you will have a dry afternoon. top temperatures into the low 20s. 0vernight tonight we are looking at dry conditions for most areas. it will turn a little bit cloudier, again, there will be a few mist patches around. temperatures a little bit milder than last night, 12—14 fairly widely. a little cooler across northern scotland. tomorrow, it's another day of sunshine and a few showers. the shower is a little bit more widespread. the highest chance of catching a downpour will be across eastern areas of england on friday afternoon. top temperatures about 23 degrees tomorrow. that's your weather. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle
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and battery production in northeast england bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. smiles from the american comedian bill cosby after his conviction is overturned — but women who've accused him of sexual assualt say they're shocked and disgusted. and a royal reunion — princes william and harry will come together later to unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, on what would have been her 60th birthday. sport now and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's ben. good afternoon, clive. dave four at wimbledon and two brits in action, we have the women's world number one playing as well, all systems go for due temp attack at the all england club. good to see you. a shaky start from cameron norrie. no where near the nerves we had to endure with
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andy murray last night. he the nerves we had to endure with andy murray last night.— the nerves we had to endure with andy murray last night. he is making it look really — andy murray last night. he is making it look really easy _ andy murray last night. he is making it look really easy at _ andy murray last night. he is making it look really easy at the _ andy murray last night. he is making it look really easy at the moment, i it look really easy at the moment, he was 3—0 down in the opening set but thereafter cameron norrie is such a consistent performer, 11 games in a row and he is on the brink of victory at the moment, the second set he won 6—1. and alex bolt, the australian wild card struggling with his game after that initial lightning start. cameron norrie got the better of him and he's been like a brick wall, forcing all kinds of errors out of his opponent and looking very good to make it into round three where he would potentially play roger federer. federer is an action later playing richard gasquet. let's see how cameron norrie is getting on at the moment. these are live pictures you are watching on court number one, 3—2 up, you can see, cameron norrie in that one and dan evans is in action tomorrow, my goodness me,
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that five setter against 0scar 0tte that five setter against 0scar 0tte that had us biting our nails last night, cameron norrie making it look much easier and then it is roger federer against richard gasquet on centre court, last up, and the winner of the match will play cameron norrie. let's see what is happening on centre court. world number one ash barty is in action at the moment, the clearfavourite in that drawer now, with no serena williams or simona halep who had to pull out before the tournament. barty, most consistent player on the women's tour this calendar year, won the first set 6—4. and runner—up at the first set 6—4. and runner—up at the 2019 french open anna blinkova has played well at times but not been able to get into that match and ash barty is in control on centre court. that is live on bbc. emma raducanu for the british women in the singles in action later
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scheduled to play on court number 18 where she won last night against vitalia diatchenko and she has a good chance of making it into the third round. staggering story bearing in mind it is herfirst wimbledon. she is going to be playing, we are thinking whether or not they will move this match for centre court, or court number one, to play marketa vondrousova, the 22—year—old from the czech republic who is a good player but emma raducanu had the home support behind yesterday. svitolina has gone out beaten in straight sets by magda linette. the women's doubles have all got under way now at wimbledon, good with four heather watson and harriet dart. the german fourth seed alexander is fair of making it very easyin alexander is fair of making it very easy in straight sets, for him, victory against tennys sandgren as he reached the third round. this is the one grand slam he has struggled at so far, alexander zverev, but he will hope to make an impact. novak djokovic is the clear favourite of
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course, but alexander zverev, so far so good. irate course, but alexander zverev, so far so aood. ~ ~' :, course, but alexander zverev, so far so aood. ~ ~ :, ., ,, ., so good. we know that stefan tsitsi as so good. we know that stefan tsitsipas has _ so good. we know that stefan tsitsipas has a _ so good. we know that stefan tsitsipas has a better- so good. we know that stefan tsitsipas has a better chance l so good. we know that stefan i tsitsipas has a better chance as well. chetan, many thanks indeed. england's cricketers have made a strong start as they look to wrap up their one day series against sri lanka with a game to spare at the oval. england won the toss, chose to field and three wickets from sam curran helped reduce to 12—3 at one stage. dhananjaya de silva. currently 74—4. bbc radio 5 live sports extra has commentary of that one. the british and irish lions have named an all new starting xv for their opening tour match injohannesburg this weekend. scotland full back. stuart hogg will captain the team with tour skipper conor murray not included. coach warren gatland says he's sure hogg will lead the side by example. louis rees—zammit, chris harris and jonny hill are all set to make their lions debuts against the emirates lions.
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stage six of the tour de france is under way too. mark cavendish is chasing his second win in three days. live text commentary is on the website. chetan, and i will have another update at 3:30pm. thank you for that, ben. the government's furlough scheme begins winding down from today. firms must now pay 10% of their furloughed workers' normal wages. but critics say the scheme shouldn't be changed until all parts of the economy, including travel and hospitality, have opened up fully. let's get more on this with tony wilson who's the director of the institute for employment studies. they research and consult on employment and hr topics. thank you forjoining us. first of all, the furlough scheme is credited with keeping so many businesses going throughout this pandemic. how much of a problem do you think it is going to be now moving forward with it being wound down? i actually think the furlough scheme is starting to wind itself down already. starting to wind itself down alread . :, , , :, already. the latest figures out
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today showed _ already. the latest figures out today showed there _ already. the latest figures out today showed there is - already. the latest figures out today showed there is just i already. the latest figures out | today showed there isjust over already. the latest figures out i today showed there isjust over1 today showed there is just over1 million people who are still fully furloughed, fully of work, that's come down from around 8 million people at the end of last year and those figures cover up to the end of may, so it's quite possible that already we are down into the low hundreds of thousands rather than the millions, and i think assuming we see a fuller reopening on a couple of weeks' time on the 19th of july, it may well be that by august and september we are in the low hundreds of thousands of people who are still left on furlough. i think in all likelihood the scheme will largely wind itself up over the next few months so we will need to then focus on how we can support those people who are still on furlough and don't have jobs to go back to to get the help they need to then find new jobs in the economy.— jobs in the economy. that's the roblem jobs in the economy. that's the problem for _ jobs in the economy. that's the problem for some _ jobs in the economy. that's the problem for some of— jobs in the economy. that's the problem for some of those i jobs in the economy. that's the i problem for some of those working in hospitality and travel and entertainment in some areas, the economy in those sectors hasn't opened up. they still need furlough, don't they? t opened up. they still need furlough, don't the ? ~ ., �* ,
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opened up. they still need furlough, don't the ? ~ :, �*, , don't they? i think that's exactly ri . ht don't they? i think that's exactly right about _ don't they? i think that's exactly right about particular— don't they? i think that's exactly right about particular industries. if you look at travel, as you said, arts and recreation, and also some support services that support offices and support city centre economies, if you like. there is continuing impacts and they may persist for a few more months yet. thejudgment as we persist for a few more months yet. the judgment as we get through to september, august, september time, is whether we need targeted support for people in those industries, to be helped back into those jobs when they do reopen, or whether some of this is broader structural changes as well. we need to shift the focus to the individual, and more active measures to help them find other jobs in the economy. right now, we published research on this yesterday with a job search engine and we think there are a million vacancies in the economy, possibly the highest number we have ever had, so they could be worse at times than now to be trying to focus on how we help people to find otherjobs and get the skills and support they need to take those jobs. you the skills and support they need to take those jobs.— take those 'obs. you are saying there is no— take those jobs. you are saying there is no excuse _ take those jobs. you are saying there is no excuse for- take those jobs. you are saying there is no excuse for the i take those jobs. you are saying i there is no excuse for the furlough scheme? :, ~' there is no excuse for the furlough
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scheme? :, ~ , :, scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course. — scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course. i— scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course, i think— scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course, i think we _ scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course, i think we need - scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course, i think we need it - scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course, i think we need it for i scheme? no, i think it needs to run its course, i think we need it for a l its course, i think we need it for a few more months. essences need certainty and that has been a clear message over the last year, particularly when the threat of the furlough scheme being wound up last year led to really significant increases in redundancies. we need to continue with the plan of keeping furlough until the end of september. but i think also we should not rule out we might need measures like this in future. we are all hoping we don't get more variants and increased hospitalisations and deaths. but god forbid if that were to happen, we would need to know that we could have similar support measures in future if industries had to shut down again and if people were not able to do theirjobs. would you like to hear that kind of commitment actually come from the government, that while everything seems to be going well at the moment, the economy is opening up, everyone is looking forward tojuly 19 and so on, potentially if there is a big spike in infections, if there are targeted lockdowns, or whatever we decide to do as a
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nation, across the four home nations in order to deal with an upsurge in cases, that the government has got to be prepared to step in again? yes. yes is the short answer. the key measure there is hospitalisations and deaths rather than infections. at the moment it does look like that link is breaking between infections and hospitalisations and bend deaths. if that continues to be the case and there is nothing to suggest it isn't there is nothing to suggest it isn't the case, then we should be able to come at the least, continue with this level of restrictions, and one would hope start to ease restrictions over the next few weeks. i think the government needs to be clear, if in future there is a government induced lockdown where the government requires firms to close and requires parts of the economy to close on people to restrict their movements, that we will use measures like this in future. i think that's distinct from wider kind of if there is a downturn we will use wage subsidy and job
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subsidy schemes, that's a different kind of argument, but i think we need to be clear that if we have to lock down again we should be returning to something like thejob retention scheme. tow; returning to something like the job retention scheme.— returning to something like the job retention scheme. tony wilson, thank ou for retention scheme. tony wilson, thank you forjoining — retention scheme. tony wilson, thank you forjoining us. _ retention scheme. tony wilson, thank you forjoining us, director _ retention scheme. tony wilson, thank you forjoining us, director of - retention scheme. tony wilson, thank you forjoining us, director of the i you forjoining us, director of the institute for employment studies. thank you. the official list of covid—19 symptoms should be expanded as the existing one could "miss many covid—19 cases" — so says a group of scientists who have argued their case in the british medicaljournal. let's get more from professor tim spector of king's college london who set up the zoe covid symptom study app for people to report their symptoms. the app has more than four million contributors globally. hello, and thank you forjoining us on bbc news. we all know what the symptoms are we should be looking out for now. what are the other symptoms that you think are part of this? ,, ., , , ., , , this? the sewing app has been collectin: this? the sewing app has been collecting symptoms _ this? the sewing app has been collecting symptoms since i
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this? the sewing app has been collecting symptoms since last| this? the sewing app has been i collecting symptoms since last march and we know what people are reporting everyday and how many of those are testing positive. —— zoe app. in the last month of around 1 million people giving us data, we are seeing a very different pattern to what we saw earlier in the epidemic where the top five symptoms, in a way, regardless of whether you have been vaccinated or not, are really ones that resemble a cold. so, headache, sore throat, runny nose, sneezing, and the last one, numberfive, the least runny nose, sneezing, and the last one, number five, the least frequent is a cough. and in that list there are none of the other classic symptoms. so, loss of smell is down ranked at about number 11 or 12 in our rankings. fever is also much less common than it was, as is
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shortness of breath. so, many people are getting infected, either young people without a vaccine, or those who have had even one or two shots and not thinking they have got covid and not thinking they have got covid and staying at work, or going to the pub infecting other people just thinking they have a mild cold. this is really important. we have been banging on about this lack of symptoms in the uk compared to other countries for over a year now. t countries for over a year now. i understand if it is difficult to do this, but is it possible to put a number on how many people may have been missed in terms of diagnosis? you can only really guess because what we are seeing is that at least half the people currently logging on their symptoms don't have any of the classic one is that the government
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says you need to get a test. if you ring nhs111 and tried to get says you need to get a test. if you ring nhs 111 and tried to get a test you might be told you can't get one because you don't have one of those classic symptoms. so it could be as many as half of the cases are being missed at the moment because of this. but we don't know the exact numbers. it's hard to work that out because you would have to follow everyone with symptoms regardless of whether they are tested or not. share whether they are tested or not. are ou whether they are tested or not. are you convinced of your work in this regard, given that as you have just said a lot of people won't have been able to get a test?— able to get a test? well, i'm convinced — able to get a test? well, i'm convinced that _ able to get a test? well, i'm convinced that we _ able to get a test? well, i'm convinced that we are - able to get a test? well, i'm. convinced that we are missing able to get a test? well, i'm i convinced that we are missing lots of cases, that people are infecting other people unknowingly and don't think they have covid. a great example was andrew marr, works for the bbc, went to the g7, got what he
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thought was a heavy cold and infected probably lots of other colleagues before he eventually got a test and got diagnosed. so it is undoubtedly a problem. how big it is we don't know but let's not wait to find out. let's change the information given to both the public and the doctors and health professionals so that we can make everyone aware that at the moment, in this period of time, cold like symptoms are the predominant one is for people testing positive with covid. brute for people testing positive with covid. ~ :, covid. we will leave it there, professor — covid. we will leave it there, professor tim _ covid. we will leave it there, professor tim specter - covid. we will leave it there, professor tim specter from | covid. we will leave it there, i professor tim specter from king's professor tim specterfrom king's couege professor tim specterfrom king's college london. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which advises the government, says the over—50s and vulnerable should get a boosterfrom september, alongside the flu jab. earlier my colleague martine croxall spoke to professor anthony harnden, deputy chair of thejcvi and also a practising gp.
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what you have to remember is that we have still got a lot of very vulnerable people in our community that have had their second dose of vaccine many, many months ago. and we do know that these older people, the immunity can wane with other infections. it is looking like it is holding up pretty well with covid for at least six months, we just want to have some insurance that those vulnerable groups have the opportunity to receive a booster vaccine to be absolutely sure that they're going to be ok for this winter that is coming up. is it a one—off third jab? how likely is it that it will become an annual thing? that is very difficult to answer, but, yes, it is a one—off programme, this booster programme. and we will then review the data very carefully, but these vaccines are extraordinarily effective. beyond our wildest imagination, right at the start of the programme
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how effective they have been, and we see absolutely no reason why, once you have had a booster dose, it may not last for quite a long time. so you may not need to have an annual booster, we just do not know that yet. this is a new virus, it is a very agile virus and there are all sorts of other factors to be taken into consideration, like the emergence of new variants and vaccine effectiveness and so. and vaccine effectiveness data. so we will look at this data and make judgements in years to come. but for the moment, we believe that our interim advice to allow the nhs to plan is that we have a phase one and phase two, and those vulnerable groups in phase one, those very older people, the immunosuppressed, the clinically extremely vulnerable, the health care workers, get a booster shot first of all. probably alongside their flu immunisation, but that hasn't been fully decided yet. first and second jabs have had to be of the same type,
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so if you have had astrazeneca for the first one, you have to have it for the second one. what will the rules be for this booster? well, that is very interesting question. well, that is a very interesting question. we have got a study called covboost that is going on in oxford at the moment, looking at mixing vaccine schedules and boosting vaccine schedules. so boosting vaccines with many different types of vaccine and boosting vaccines with the same vaccine type. so it is likely that there will be a mix between people that will receive the same vaccine type for their booster and some that will receive different, but as soon as we are clear on what we think is the best policy for those individual groups, we will advise the government accordingly. professor anthony harnden there. and martin. more now on nissan — the japanese car maker has confirmed it will build a huge battery plant and make a new model of electric vehicle at its site in sunderland.
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the move will create more 1,600 jobs at the factory. with me is our business presenter ramzan karmali. notjustjobs at the not just jobs at the factory but also down the supply chain. we are looking at between 6000—7000 jobs, it is a £1 billion investment, huge investment, the prime minister described it as a pivotal full day in the industry. but described it as a pivotal full day in the industry.— in the industry. but there are thins in the industry. but there are things we _ in the industry. but there are things we should _ in the industry. but there are things we should also - in the industry. but there are things we should also look i in the industry. but there are l things we should also look out in the industry. but there are i things we should also look out for as well. in terms of battery production capacity, we are way down on our european neighbours. for example, by 2025 we will have less than a tenth of the battery production germany will have so we have a lot of catching up to do. don't forget that by 2030 we won't be selling any more new petrol and diesel cars so we have really got to get going, so to speak. and then in 2024 the rules between the eu and the uk, the brexit deal, the amount of components we can have in the car from outside the eu, the more we get in from outside the eu and the uk the harder it will be for nissan to
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sell those cars to the eu which is their biggest buyer. so there are all kinds of things down the line we have got to think about as well. and someone who has been thinking about this a lot is professor david bailey from birmingham university. the prime minister described it as a pivotal day. is that your conclusion as well? i think it is a hugely important day for the industry, this is the first concrete investment in a big battery plant in the uk. the uk needs to _ a big battery plant in the uk. the uk needs to do this if it wants to keep— uk needs to do this if it wants to keep a _ uk needs to do this if it wants to keep a mass car industry. the industry— keep a mass car industry. the industry is _ keep a mass car industry. the industry is going electric in a very bil industry is going electric in a very big way — industry is going electric in a very big way. batteries are very heavy things— big way. batteries are very heavy things to — big way. batteries are very heavy things to move around so if you don't _ things to move around so if you don't make _ things to move around so if you don't make batteries upscale, car production— don't make batteries upscale, car production will go to where the batteries— production will go to where the batteries are. as you have said already. — batteries are. as you have said already, big investment taking place in the _ already, big investment taking place in the eu _ already, big investment taking place in the eu. so this is kind of a race to build _ in the eu. so this is kind of a race to build battery capacity. this investment gets us off the starting li’id investment gets us off the starting grid but— investment gets us off the starting grid but we are still several laps behind — grid but we are still several laps behind eu countries. will grid but we are still several laps behind eu countries.— grid but we are still several laps behind eu countries. will we catch u - ? behind eu countries. will we catch up? that's — behind eu countries. will we catch up? that's what _ behind eu countries. will we catch up? that's what we _ behind eu countries. will we catch up? that's what we want - behind eu countries. will we catch up? that's what we want to i behind eu countries. will we catch up? that's what we want to know. j up? that's what we want to know. will we be able to catch up? will we
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be able to get to that 2030 time and not be able to sell petrol and diesel cars?— not be able to sell petrol and diesel cars? that's the danger. unless there _ diesel cars? that's the danger. unless there is _ diesel cars? that's the danger. unless there is big _ diesel cars? that's the danger. unless there is big investment| diesel cars? that's the danger. i unless there is big investment in battery— unless there is big investment in battery production in the uk, and we are going _ battery production in the uk, and we are going to— battery production in the uk, and we are going to lose several of these plants, _ are going to lose several of these plants, we — are going to lose several of these plants, we risk a danger of not keeping — plants, we risk a danger of not keeping a _ plants, we risk a danger of not keeping a mascara industry. some big investment— keeping a mascara industry. some big investment decisions to come from the likes— investment decisions to come from the likes of— investment decisions to come from the likes of vauxhall at ellesmere port, _ the likes of vauxhall at ellesmere port, jaguar land rover, toyota. we are going — port, jaguar land rover, toyota. we are going to— port, jaguar land rover, toyota. we are going to have to see 6—8 of these _ are going to have to see 6—8 of these giant battery plants to produce enough batteries to make the cars that _ produce enough batteries to make the cars that the uk car industry produces _ cars that the uk car industry produces and in a good year at makes 1.5 produces and in a good year at makes 15 million— produces and in a good year at makes 15 million a _ produces and in a good year at makes 1.5 million a year so that will need lots of— 1.5 million a year so that will need lots of batteries.— 1.5 million a year so that will need lots of batteries. indeed. on top of all of this, — lots of batteries. indeed. on top of all of this. we _ lots of batteries. indeed. on top of all of this, we need _ lots of batteries. indeed. on top of all of this, we need this _ all of this, we need this investment. how much incentive do you think nissan received from the government to make this investment? what kind of incentives would they have received to make them confident to put in e1 have received to make them confident to put in £1 billion of investment here? , , �* ., .,
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here? firstly, the brexit trade deal was hu:el here? firstly, the brexit trade deal was hugely important. _ here? firstly, the brexit trade deal was hugely important. i _ here? firstly, the brexit trade deal was hugely important. i think- here? firstly, the brexit trade deal was hugely important. i think that l was hugely important. i think that has kind _ was hugely important. i think that has kind of— was hugely important. i think that has kind of unlocked the possibility of this— has kind of unlocked the possibility of this investment. if there had been _ of this investment. if there had been no — of this investment. if there had been no trade deal i think all bets would _ been no trade deal i think all bets would have been. the government has put substantial funds into this, there _ put substantial funds into this, there is— put substantial funds into this, there is discussion in newspapers of around _ there is discussion in newspapers of around £100 million of government support, _ around £100 million of government support, some of it going via the council, — support, some of it going via the council, to— support, some of it going via the council, to build local energy grid, the funding going to the battery ntaker— the funding going to the battery maker and to the funding going to the battery makerand to nissan. the funding going to the battery maker and to nissan. that's kind of normal— maker and to nissan. that's kind of normal the — maker and to nissan. that's kind of normal the industry. car companies are very— normal the industry. car companies are very good at playing of governments to secure government support— governments to secure government support for— governments to secure government support for new factories and cars. but let's— support for new factories and cars. but let's face it, the government is absolutely— but let's face it, the government is absolutely desperate to make this happen— absolutely desperate to make this happen and it couldn't afford to let nissan— happen and it couldn't afford to let nissan go— happen and it couldn't afford to let nissan go post—brexit so it had to pull out _ nissan go post—brexit so it had to pull out all— nissan go post—brexit so it had to pull out all the stops. it's going to have — pull out all the stops. it's going to have to— pull out all the stops. it's going to have to continue doing that for the rest _ to have to continue doing that for the rest of— to have to continue doing that for the rest of the car industry. indeed _ the rest of the car industry. indeed. and also for nissan is well come up until recently the nissan leaf was the bestselling electric vehicle in the uk but it has been overtaken now. so they desperately need this new vehicle to be a success as well.— need this new vehicle to be a success as well. yes, they do. at
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the nissan _ success as well. yes, they do. at the nissan leaf _ success as well. yes, they do. at the nissan leaf is _ success as well. yes, they do. at the nissan leaf is a _ success as well. yes, they do. at the nissan leaf is a great - success as well. yes, they do. at the nissan leaf is a great car, i the nissan leaf is a great car, pioneer— the nissan leaf is a great car, pioneer in _ the nissan leaf is a great car, pioneer in many ways but getting lon- pioneer in many ways but getting long in— pioneer in many ways but getting long in the tooth and being overtaken by the likes of the tesla model— overtaken by the likes of the tesla model three, which is one of the bestselling cars now. they need a fresh _ bestselling cars now. they need a fresh new — bestselling cars now. they need a fresh new products to be able to compete — fresh new products to be able to compete with the likes of tesla and bmw and _ compete with the likes of tesla and bmw and others. and remember as well that these _ bmw and others. and remember as well that these electric cars are getting better— that these electric cars are getting better and better, the cost is coming — better and better, the cost is coming down, the range is improving and increasingly they will be more attractive — and increasingly they will be more attractive to consumers. so nissan need _ attractive to consumers. so nissan need to— attractive to consumers. so nissan need to get— attractive to consumers. so nissan need to get something new to market pretty— need to get something new to market pretty quickly. need to get something new to market pretty quickly-— pretty quickly. professor david bailey from — pretty quickly. professor david bailey from the _ pretty quickly. professor david bailey from the university i pretty quickly. professor david bailey from the university of. bailey from the university of birmingham, many thanks. thank you. that's the business and i will see you in the next hour. thank you, ramzan karmali. new rules have come into force which should make it easier for people to repair household appliances like washing machines, tvs and fridges. the right to repair will force manufacturers to make spare parts available, so customers can get their products fixed. 1.5 million tonnes of electrical goods are thrown away every year in the uk, as coletta smith reports.
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he's only six, is willie, and he's taken over part of his father's yard as a repair shop for kiddies' bikes, trikes and so on. repairing things might have gone out of fashion for a while. bringing history back to life is what makes the repair shop so special. but it's all the rage again now. it's not a two—minute job doing this. but even if you're wanting to get things repaired at the moment, whether to save money or save the planet, it's pretty hard to get hold of the right parts that you need to replace things. but from today, things will hopefully start to get a little bit easier. manufacturers of white goods and tvs now have to stock and sell replacement parts of each product for ten years. so would it tempt you to try and repair something? my dishwasher and oven was 15 years old, and ijust replaced both of them. maybe if it's a smaller repair, something that's just £60 or £70, like a small part, like an element in an oven, but over and above that, i wouldn't have thought so. a toaster, a kettle, you know, i might even potentially have a look at a hoover. just a very basic repair,
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yeah, but certainly not on a washer or a cooker, ora tumble dryer. they're so cheap to replace, so ijust probably get - a new one, really. door seals can go, and that's an easy thing that a homeowner can replace themselves. similar with shelves. rob's company have 400 engineers. these can quite often come off the runners. something quite simple. making more complex repairs in domestic appliances. but he thinks there's plenty we can try ourselves. it gives customers a choice. we really want consumers to take that opportunity to look at what they need as a repair, whether they can repair it themselves, buy a small component, or if they need to call somebody out like ourselves. a yougov survey suggests we feel most confident with the hoover. 42% feel comfortable repairing vacuum cleaners. 20% would try patching up a broken toaster. and only 4% would try to fix a gas cooker. it's removable, you can separate it. it's cheaper to make
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it in one piece. the uk's only white goods manufacturer say they knew the legislation was coming, and have already made their machines simpler to mend. the secret of products that are easy to repair and last longer is in the design. you've got to start off by saying, the objective here is to make a product that's going to be reliable, easy to maintain or whatever. you've got to design a product that's difficult to make wrong and easy to repair if it needs to be repaired. even though we now have the right to repair, it's a big cultural shift to convince people to fix things rather than fling them. coletta smith, bbc news in newton aycliffe. a man has apologised for his part in the footage that shows england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, being harrassed in a park. 24—year—old lewis hughes has said he is sorry for any upset caused, and that he has 'paid the price' after losing hisjob because of the incident. police say it's been recorded as a common assault.
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new research suggests that covid—19 may be common in cats and dogs whose owners have the virus. scientists in the netherlands and canada found that most of the pets who were infected were asymptomatic, or showed very mild symptoms. pet owners who test positive should avoid close contact with their animals so they don't pass on the infection. more coming up at the top of the hour but now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello. for most of us, the weather continues to brighten up this afternoon, with spells of sunshine becoming increasingly widespread. and it has been a lovely start to the day in scotland. this is where we have seen some of the sunniest weather today, and those sunnier skies are working now into a good part of northern england. but elsewhere, it will tend to brighten up. meanwhile, out in the atlantic, we have gotjust to our western — we have gotjust to our west an area of low pressure. well, that is going to come in our way in time for the weekend, throwing bands of rain across the country, so make the most
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of the dry weather while it lasts. now, today, as i say, most of us will see some spells of sunshine, but there will be a few showers knocking around. wales, the south west midlands, across into southern england. the showers forming here because of the sea breeze and also because of the relatively humid weather we have across just this part of south—west england. but otherwise, it is a fresh feeling day, and in the sunshine, temperatures widely into the high teens and low 20s and it is going to feel warm in thatjuly sunshine. overnight tonight, again, cloud will tend to redevelop, particularly across parts of eastern england, parts of eastern scotland, temperatures for most of us around 12 to 14 degrees, so it is tending to be a little bit milder than it was last night. and tomorrow morning, well, although it starts off cloudy in a number of places, that cloud will thin and break up with spells of sunshine coming through. there will be showers in the afternoon and they will be a bit more widespread, a few more thunderstorms around friday afternoon. they will tend to move over into eastern areas of england as we head into the afternoon. so that is where your highest chance of a downpour is. as far as the weekend is concerned, we have got spells of rain coming our way, widespread heavy showers, most of us will see downpours at some point. on saturday, you can see that rain
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pushing its way northwards. showers then follow. most of us will see a downpour or two during the day, but it is across south—west england where we are going to see a line of showers develop thanks to the winds converging together. that will bring an area of slow—moving thunderstorms, so we could see some localised flooding from some of those. temperatures still into the high teens or low 20s, but it is still coming down a degree or so, so not quite as warm as it will be today and indeed on friday. sunday is another unsettled day. again, showers and thunderstorms will be widespread. won't be raining all the time, definitely not, but most of us will see a shower or two during the course of the day and those showers are likely to be heavy at times, too. that is your weather.
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this is bbc news, i'm clive myrie. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the northeast of england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. you meet some of the employees, their father worked here, they retired from here, their son is working here, they are so proud of working here, so why not to prepare generation after generation in sunderland as a part of the family? and this is what we're going to do. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough, as the government begins winding down its job support scheme. the prime minister says he is confident that those who have had two vaccine jabs will be able to go on holiday later this summer. i am very confident that the double
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jabs will be a liberator, and they will enable people to travel. and a royal reunion, princes william and harry will come together to unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, on what would have been her 60th birthday good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the japanese car—maker, nissan has announced a major expansion of electric vehicle production at its car plant in sunderland. the development will see the creation of more than 1,500 jobs at the site and several thousand more in the supply chain. most of these will facilitate the manufacture of the company's new—generation, all—electric model at the site.
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alongside this, partner company, envision aesc, will build a new electric battery plant which it believes will produce enough batteries to power over 100,000 nissan electric vehicles each year. nissan hopes the site will be operational by 2024, when the level of uk—made components in cars manufactured in the uk is required to start increasing, in line with the terms of the uk's trade deal with the eu. the development has already received billions of pounds worth of funding, with the government thought to have contributed tens of millions of pounds towards the cost. borisjohnson says the expansion is a "major vote of confidence in the uk and our highly skilled workers in the north east". our business reporter sarah corker has been on the production line in sunderland. britain's largest car factory is about to get even bigger. nissan bosses flew in from japan to reveal their expansion plans. a £1 billion investment in the sunderland plant.
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a gigafactory will be built here, making batteries for electric cars at a vast scale. this announcement today is the true renaissance of the british car industry where they are saying how we are going to address the fuel ecosystem to not only create business but also to create an environmentally friendly society. a new electric model is also coming to sunderland. the prime minister said this was a major vote of confidence in the uk. this is something that is a massive benefit to the uk economy, nissan is going to be creating about 900 jobs alone in the battery gigafactory, a further 750 plus thousands potentially in the supply chains. but what it is also doing is helping to lengthen the lead of this country in green, low—carbon technology. nissan arrived on weyside back in 1986, japan's route into european markets.
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in recent years, though, it has been a rocky ride. the future sustainability of this plant was questioned in the run—up to brexit. today is being seen as a major turning point. this cafe provides catering for the factory. the owner is delighted to have some positive news. it is a boost for the whole region, with the whole supply chain, the battery plant, and hopefully i will get more business. certainly when they launch the new car, maybe when they launch the new factory i will get to do the catering for that. the new factory is set to be built for 2024, and that is when under the brexit trade deal, car—makers will have to source more components locally to avoid tariffs. the uk government is banning the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030, and that means the future is electric. so the uk needs to build more batteries at a vast scale,
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but at the moment, we are lagging behind other nations like germany. it is a major step forward. we need to make sure that in the uk we have battery production. we make between 1.3 and 1.5 million cars a year, so that actually requires something like six or seven gigafactories. so this is a very important first step. it is fantastic news for nissan, for envision, their partner, and for the north—east. the government is contributing to this investment, and the bbc understands it could be as much as £100 million. this is a long—term plan for the sunderland factory, securing jobs for the decades ahead. answerr has been updating us on the plans. —— and sarah. this is being described as a significant moment for the uk car sector. this is a massive expansion plan and nissan arrived here back in 1986, so three decades of car making here.
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and this investment is a £1 billion project. it is expected to create more than 6,000 jobs here and also across the wider supply chain. it is worth remembering this is just a first step because we are expecting that the sale of electric models to soar in the decades ahead, and the uk needs to start ramping up battery production really quickly. one estimate is that to meet this demand, the uk is going to have to build eight gigafactories by 2040. at the moment, we do not have any. sunderland is expected to be the first one, so those in the industry today obviously welcoming this news, but saying much more needs to be done. some critics saying the government needs to step forward and do more to really attract that investment and make sure there is at integrated supply chain so that the uk can really be at the heart of this electric car revolution.
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sorry about the problems on the line, what is a gigafactory? that is a very good question. it is basically the name of a huge factory that makes all of these batteries for the electric cars, so it is doing it at a vast scale and they already make electric cars here at nissan, they have the electric leaf model, i was in the factory earlier saying them roll off the production line, but the difference about the gigafactory is the scale of it and they will make your batteries bigged and in much larger volumes, so hopefully when it is up and running by 2024, it is expected they will make 100,000 of these batteries a year. that goes into feeding the demand for these electric cars. it is also worth pointing out that there have been some big challenges for the uk car sector over the last couple of years. it does not seem that long ago that we were outside this factory
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questioning the long—term future of this plant because a lot of people were predicting that brexit could have been armageddon for the uk industry. that obviously did not happen, but then the pandemic hit and demand has slumped, furloughed workers, the factory reduced production, so loads of hurdles to get over. you speak to anyone here today, and they are delighted by this news and they have described it as a real turning point. we are going to take you to kensington palace. and the unveiling there of the thatcher to diana, princess of wales by prince harry and prince william. diana would have been 60 today, and the brothers coming together to make that availing. we have a few moving pictures of those, still picture their comment happened in the last few minutes in the sunken garden. members of the public were not able
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to see it. there we go. the princes arriving a little earlier today in order to unveil that statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, in the sunken garden at kensington palace. they commissioned the work saying they hope it will help visitors reflect on diana's life and legacy. these are live pictures now of well—wishers. the unveiling, there, lots of people... it has to be said referring to the possible chemistry between the two, allegations of a rift between them. these are the latest pictures, i should say. and we have got a glimpse, with the still picture a little bit earlier of the statue itself, commissioned back in 2017. our correspondent sarah campbell is there. i don't think you have had a
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chance to see any of these images yet, but it is an important day with the brothers finally getting back together. the brothers finally getting back touether. , ., ., . together. yes, so i am watching the same pictures _ together. yes, so i am watching the same pictures that _ together. yes, so i am watching the same pictures that you _ together. yes, so i am watching the same pictures that you are - together. yes, so i am watching the same pictures that you are sending | same pictures that you are sending out life now. where they are is the sunken garden, this was one of the favourite places of diana, princess of wales, of course she lived at kensington palace for many years, and over the last couple of years, it has undergone a transformation, replanting, some 4000 extra flowers have gone in, some of them are favourites of the princess. you can see some of them in the background there. as you can see, prince william and prince harry, they came in, you can see them grading members of the spencerfamily in, you can see them grading members of the spencer familyjust before these pictures. it was a small family event, it happened in the last hour. it was attended by
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william and harry, but also diana's brother, hersister, and william and harry, but also diana's brother, her sister, and her other sister. there were also members of the statue committee, a sculptor, thatis the statue committee, a sculptor, that is not the sculptor there, garden designer and the chair of historic royal palaces. so this is just the build up watching now to the availing itself. you can see there on the right hand of your screen that it is covered in these pictures by eight green cloth, and i have some details about the sculpture, not quite sure when these pictures are going to actually unveil it. what it says in a release from kensington palace is that the statue, which as he said was commissioned by the brothers back in 2017, it aims to reflect warmth, the elegance and the energy of diana, princess of wales, and in addition to her work and impact that she had
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on so many people. there is, underneath, with her name written there and the date of the unveiling. and in front of it is a paving stone grade with an extract from the poem the measure of a man, which also featured in the memorial service for the princess. so this is the build—up to the availing, so prince william and prince harry, the first time they have been together since their grandfather's funeral back in windsor in april. it looks like we might be approaching the moment where the statue is unveiled, both brothers there. we knew before this event that there would be a lot of focus on them because of the issues that have been so widely reported over the last three months. prince harry now living in america, and talk of a rift between the two
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brothers, so i think it was important to people to see them come together to see the availing of this, very much their project that they have worked together on. they commissioned together for their mother who died almost 24 years ago. and i think getting ready to unveil the statue as we are looking at these pictures. this event is not life, the pictures were recorded in the last hour, but this is the first opportunity that we have had to feed those pictures to you.— those pictures to you. there it is. with two children _ those pictures to you. there it is. with two children flanking - those pictures to you. there it is. with two children flanking the i with two children flanking the statue. :, ., , statue. little... yeah, that is ri . ht, statue. little... yeah, that is right. so _ statue. little... yeah, that is right. so the _ statue. little... yeah, that is right, so the details - statue. little... yeah, that is right, so the details we i statue. little... yeah, that is| right, so the details we have, kensington palace, diana princess of wales is... the impact of the
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princess's work, the details from keswick ten palace, the portrait and the style of dress was based on the final period of her life as she gained confidence in her role as an ambassadorfor gained confidence in her role as an ambassador for humanitarian causes and aims to convey her character and compassion. there is a joint statement which has been released by the brothers, prince william and prince harry said, today on what would have been our mother's steve birthday, we remember her love, strength and character —— would have been her thick steve birthday, a force for good around the world, changing countless lives for the better. everyday we wish she was still with us and it is a hope that this action will be seen forever as a symbol of her life and her legacy. thank you to the team who designed the statue, to the friends and the donors who made this happen and to
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all of those around the world who keep our mother's memory alive. we have a joint statement from prince william and prince harry at the availing of the statue commemorating the life and work of their mother, diana, princess of wales, who died in 1997. the location is the sunken garden of kensington palace. it is not available to be seen by the public today, the palace is closed, but from tomorrow when the palace reopens is normal, members of the public will be able to come into the area to walk along and get a glimpse of the statue in sunken garden without having to pay for it. it is very much a statue that will be there, and i can tell you that here today there are hundreds of people who have been waiting, hoping to catch a glimpse no doubt of prince william and prince harry. they have not been able to, this has taken place behind the tall edges of the sunken garden, but from tomorrow, this will be open and available for
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the public to go and see. diana, princess of wales, still very much a figure in many people's consciousness, but most of all of course her sons, prince william and prince harry. i think it is worth reflecting again all the talk about their relationship, really today is about them commemorating their mother. prince william was just 15, prince harryjust 12 when she was killed back in 1997. so a very big day for them. killed back in 1997. so a very big day for them-— day for them. you are right, of course. speculation _ day for them. you are right, of course. speculation about i day for them. you are right, of course. speculation about the | course. speculation about the relationship between the princes, but today is about the unveiling of the statue and in order to reveal that likeness of their mother there. but one wonders, are there any other public appearances scheduled while harry is here in the uk for the two of them together? tt is harry is here in the uk for the two of them together?— of them together? it is a good question. _
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of them together? it is a good question, and _ of them together? it is a good question, and the _ of them together? it is a good question, and the simple i of them together? it is a good i question, and the simple answer is we do not know. you will have seen the pictures last night from the awards ceremony, the charity that harry has had a long affiliation with and continues to support. he attended that yesterday. no advance publicity had been given about that, so it was a surprise visit for the children, and we simply do not know when he is planning to return back to the states. that is where his wife meghan, his son archie and daughter lily, who was born last month are, so no doubt he will be returning soon because he want to be reunited with his family. but the question on many people's mines will be what does this mean for the relationship between the brothers. is this day, which is a shared day for them, they have a shared grief, a shared lived experience which is
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impossible for anybody else to understand. standing in front of that image of diana cast in bronze, 1.25 life size, will that bring them together perhaps in a way that has proved challenging over the last three months? we do not know —— over the last few months, but i think a lot of people would like to think that this might be the beginning of building that relationship back up once again. building that relationship back up once aaain. , :, building that relationship back up once aaain. , ., :, :, once again. great to have either, sarah campbell. _ once again. great to have either, sarah campbell. the _ once again. great to have either, sarah campbell. the unveiling i once again. great to have either, sarah campbell. the unveiling ofj once again. great to have either, i sarah campbell. the unveiling of a statue in honour of prince harry and prince william's mum, diana, princess of wales. there it is. the government is winding down its furlough job support scheme from today with businesses and unions warning it could mean more people being thrown out of work. the scheme originally extended support to some
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11.6 million employees. that number has fallen since then — the latest figures show that in may alone, 1.2 million workers came off the scheme. currently around 1.5 million britons are having most of their wages paid by the treasury because of the pandemic. now for the first time, employers will have to shoulder a contribution. labour are calling for the changes to be delayed until after all covid restrictions are lifted. here's our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. from today, businesses will have to start paying a 10% slice of the wages of their furloughed staff. how are you guys, good? this person recently returned from furlough. he is optimistic the changes being introduced from today won't have a negative impact on his industry. i'm not really concerned about the changing of the furlough scheme because i can see that now there is loads of people that really want to go out, the industry is going to settle down, so keep being positive
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if we are to face the challenges we will be ready for them. currently 1.5 million britons are having 80% of their wages paid by the treasury. from today, employers will have to pay 10% of their furloughed workers' normal salary, while the government will continue to pay the other 70%. from the first of august, the employers' contribution rise ——rises to 20% and the government to 60%. the government has spent £66 billion on furlough, which has supported 11.6 million jobs since march last year, but for this events company, it still hasn't been enough. when the government made an announcement where they were not going to be extending furlough any further, that was the time we had to make the horrific decision of letting 55 of our friends go at that moment in time, and that is something that we are desperate to not have to do again, which is why as this starts to taper down now, we have to find a way of funding that difference somehow.
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many businesses still remain closed, but the government is hoping they'll be able to reopen on the 19th ofjuly. but with little or no revenue coming in, paying even a fraction of workers' wages put could put a massive strain on those firms. up until yesterday, the cost to an employer keeping on a member of staff on £20,000 annual salary was £155 a month. that covers things such as national insurance. but from today, that cost will more than double, to £322, and in august and september, that cost will rise to £489. so while businesses have a reduced capacity to operate, where numbers are smaller in gyms, pubs or on the high street, the support from the government should match that. they've pushed back the timetable for reopening, what they haven't done is put in place the support that businesses need to get by. it's a difficult, balanced decision to make. the furlough wasn't going to last forever and as we open up in two weeks' time, this is the right time to think about the balance
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of payroll, which the government pays and which employers pay. there are signs the economy is bouncing back, but the scaling back of this scheme and other support packages will be a test on how resilient it actually is. with restrictions still in place, a speedy return to normality will be key. ramzan karmali, bbc news. angela visciano, is a travel agent who's been on furlough for more than a year. good to see you, thank you for joining us. how does it feel for your employer about them having to pay an extra 10% of your wages? t pay an extra 10% of your wages? i think it is very difficult when there is no income, no revenue coming in. we arejust there is no income, no revenue coming in. we are just cancelling there is no income, no revenue coming in. we arejust cancelling or refunding or moving trips on from bookings we have already made, so there is when the new bookings do come in, it is not an instant return. we do not get paid instantly until the trip goes ahead. so when
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things open up, we would like to think that we are back at work, but it is very difficult because not like the hospitality industry where the doors open and money comes in straightaway, for us, takes about a year. so how do employers carry on paying their staff knowing that they've got to find our wages each month when there is no income coming in at all? find month when there is no income coming in at all? : , :, :, in at all? and it is going to get worse, in at all? and it is going to get worse. from — in at all? and it is going to get worse, from august, - in at all? and it is going to get worse, from august, 2096 i in at all? and it is going to get worse, from august, 2096 thatj worse, from august, 20% that employers have to pay. do you believe that your industry and some others, the travel industry, where it does take time for the opening up of the economy to feed through into the sector, that the government has got a blind spot when it comes to these areas?— these areas? yes, i mean... it is auoin to these areas? yes, i mean... it is going to take _ these areas? yes, i mean... it is going to take a — these areas? yes, i mean... it is going to take a while, _ these areas? yes, i mean... it is going to take a while, so, i these areas? yes, i mean... it is. going to take a while, so, october, will we be back at work, we will have to open up the borders and get
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the world moving because there's so many mixed messages from the government and the goalposts keeps moving and people are so uncertain. they want to go away on holiday, but they do not know whether they book and commit pay and to a travel agent like ourselves, that will the trip go ahead. and we are talking high—end holidays that we tend to take, so it isjust high—end holidays that we tend to take, so it is just the uncertainty and i think the government have to give some clear guidelines as to what is actually happening. because i know that our customers are chomping at the bit to go on holiday, they want to go, we want to book them and get the world moving. especially now most people have been double vaccinated. bhd especially now most people have been double vaccinated.— double vaccinated. and that is exactly what _ double vaccinated. and that is exactly what portions - double vaccinated. and that is exactly what portions it i double vaccinated. and that is exactly what portions it has i double vaccinated. and that is i exactly what portions it has been saying, that he hopes that double vaccinations will mean that people will be able to go abroad —— what borisjohnson has been saying, do you think there is the possibility
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that there are some travel companies that there are some travel companies that might end up having to go to the wall because they cannot afford to continue to pay for low percentages —— furlough percentages? yes, and less they extend the furlough, i cannot see myself that there will be a jump in october. how can there be when you're employer has already carried this so long for 16 months. it has not been one two, or six months, it is nearly 18 months and that is a long time for anybody. their cash flow, even with all the grants that have been offered, to keep going. and it is so sad for the whole industry and i feel that the government have supported the hospitality industries a lot, but they let down the travel industry. it is notjust travel agents comedies airlines, everybody, notjust agents comedies airlines, everybody, not just luxury agents comedies airlines, everybody, notjust luxury holidays, business travel, seeing families, relatives, people are maybe lost a loved one
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abroad and cannot get there. we need to learn to live alongside covid. taste to learn to live alongside covid. we are going to leave it there, thank you forjoining us.— we have some news thatjust came in relating to the latest coronavirus figures for scotland, and there is another big increase in infections, 4234 new cases of covid—19 reported in scotland in the latest 24 hour period. that is another record number of daily cases since the pandemic began. 10.5% of all tests were positive in that period, and this compares to 3887 new cases yesterday, and the vast majority of these new cases likely to be down to these new cases likely to be down to the delta variant. so not great news in scotland, new cases, 4234 new
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cases reported in the latest 24 hour period. that is another daily record high. lawyers for women who've accused the american comedian bill cosby of sexual assault say they're shocked and disgusted he's been released from prison. cosby was freed after a court in pennsylvania overturned his conviction for drugging and molesting a woman. the judges found an agreement struck with a previous prosecutor meant he shouldn't have been charged. michelle fleury reports. this is the moment bill cosby left prison, a free man. he had served two years of a three to ten year sentence. his fall from grace was sealed in 2018 after he was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault, for drugging and molesting andrea constand in 2004. but in a stunning reversal, pennsylvania's highest court said the entertainer should never have been charged. we love you, mr cosby!
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in the split ruling, the judges wrote the trial shouldn't have gone ahead because of an immunity deal mr cosby had struck with the previous prosecutor. he can't be retried. earlier, supporters drove by mr cosby�*s home shouting, "hey, hey, hey," a reference to fat albert, the cartoon character he once played. the comedian, who is back with his family, didn't comment to the media but said in a statement, "i have always maintained my innocence". if they weren't impervious to the court of public opinion, which frankly, the lower courts were not, mr cosby, we knew all along he never should have been prosecuted for this. he had every right to rely on the prosecutor's word. for his accuser, andrea constand, it was a bitter blow. reacting to the decision, she called it...
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this must be devastating to many of the accusers and my heart especially goes out to those who bravely testified in both of his criminal cases. and despite the pennsylvania supreme court's decision, i want everyone to know that i do believe that this was a very important fight forjustice, and even though the court did overturn the conviction, it was on technical grounds. it did not vindicate bill cosby's conduct. bill cosby became known as america's dad for his role as cliff huxtable in the 1980s hit sitcom the cosby show. his conviction was seen as proof that even when the accused is one of the most famous people in the world, the voices of the victims of sexual assault could be heard in the us justice system. now, he has a chance to restore his reputation.
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michelle fleury, bbc news, pennsylvania. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. for many of us this afternoon is looking fine and dry. the sunny skies we have had across scotland will increasingly move into northern england, and elsewhere the cloud will tend to thin and break for many of us. although staying quite cloudy around some of the eastern coasts of england. there will be some showers around today. showers in the south—west triggered by the humidity we have here, because it is quite a humid day. and around the central southern england area it is the sea breeze that will kick the showers off. there could be one or two for the south—west, midlands and wales as well. but the majority of you will have a dry afternoon. top temperatures into the low 20s. overnight tonight, we are looking at dry conditions for most areas. it will turn a little bit cloudier, again, there will be a few mist patches around. temperatures a little bit milder than last night, 12—14 fairly widely. a little cooler across northern scotland. tomorrow, it's another day of sunshine and a few showers. the showers a little bit more widespread. the highest chance of catching a downpour will be across
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eastern areas of england on friday afternoon. top temperatures about 23 degrees tomorrow. that's your weather. hello, this is bbc news. with me clive myrie. the headlines. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the north—east england bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. the prime minister says he is confident that those who have had two vaccine jabs will be able to go on holiday later this summer. i am very confident that the double jabs will be a liberator, and they will enable people to travel. and a royal reunion — princes william and harry come together to unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, on what would have
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been her 60th birthday. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. after andy murray took us all through the wringer last night, it was a lot less nerve—racking for british number two cameron norrie at wimbledon today. he's into round 3 and a potential meeting with roger federer. he weathered a sluggish start to win 11 straight games. he was up against the australian alex bolt eventually winning 6—3, 6-1, 6-2, alex bolt eventually winning 6—3, 6—1, 6—2, only two players on tour have won more matches than cameron norrie this year leading to the brit being seeded at a slam for the very first time. it was a bit of a tricky start, he came out firing and i was down a break and ifelt came out firing and i was down a break and i felt this court was definitely a little bit easier to move on than yesterday on court 2 and i could really trust it and i was moving strongly out of the corners and i didn't give him too
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much today so i was really pleased with everything and definitely a lot of improvement from the other day. yeah, like i said before, just a pleasure to be out here. one australian out on court one, another through on centre. women's top seed asheigh barty has just seen off anna blinkova in straight sets 6—4, 6—3. it wasn't the most comfortable afternoon for the world number one — with numerous double faults — but more than enough for a third straight appearance in round 3. the third seed elina svitolina is out though. she was beaten in straight sets by magda linette. the ukrainian hasn't got a great record at the all england club. only twice making the second week. 2021 will not be her year again. emma raducanu had never played at wimbledon before yesterday but is the sole remaining brit left in the women's singles. she only finished her a—levels a few weeks ago but takes to court in a couple of hours against marketa
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vondrusova. in a couple of hours against marketa vondrousova. raducanu beat vitalia diatchenko to make it to the second round on her wimbledon debut and feels anything else from here on in is a bonus it feels great, vitalia diatchenko beats a big—name a few years ago and i'm really proud to be her and now i just feel i've got absolutely nothing to lose and no pressure so i'm just really enjoying myself here. the whole thing is just an amazing experience. last here. the whole thing is 'ust an amazing experience. last match on court 18 for— amazing experience. last match on court 18 for her. _ jadon sancho's move to manchester united has moved a step closer with both united and his current club borussia dortmund confirming an agreement in principle has been reached. there's still the medical and contract to sort out after the euros but it's expected he'll complete the £73 million move to become the second most expensive englishman in history. it's the second one day international between england and sri lanka at the oval — where victory for england would see them take an unassailable 2—0 lead in the series. the started brightly in south london after winning the toss. sam curran took three early wickets.
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from 12—3, dhananjaya de silva has helped the recovery. he is 81 not out at the moment, 150-5, sri he is 81 not out at the moment, 150—5, sri lanka, in the 33rd over. bbc radio 5 live sports extra has commentary of that one. the british & irish lions will field an all—new 15 for their first tour match in south africa this weekend against the emirates lions. louis rees—zammit, chris harris and jonny hill are all set to make their lions debuts whilst scotland full back stuart hogg will captain the team with tour skipper conor murray not included. coach warren gatland says he's sure hogg will lead the side by example. asa as a kid growing up you watch all the different lines dvds and videos and had a dream of representing them one day but to be given the opportunity to captain the side is absolutely amazing. i'm over the moon. —— lions dvds. iam honoured
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by the opportunity, putting a huge amount of confidence in me to lead the side but it comes easier when you have a lot of experience in the squad. stage six of the tour de france is approaching its conclusion right now. mark cavendish is one of the favourites for the stage win. text commentary is on the website and i'll tell you if he managed it at 4:30pm. nice one, ben, thanks for that. ajudge in los angeles has denied the american pop star britney spears a request to remove herfatherfrom his position as her conservator. the singer's lawyer wanted the court to sackjamie spears from his role as guardian of her estate, leaving her with no control over her life and finances for 13 years. the singer was placed under his guardianship after suffering a series of mental breakdowns. the 39 year—old has said previously that she was traumatised and depressed by the arrangement, which forced her to perform against her will. our arts correspondent rebecca jones has more. it is complicated, and that is because there are two separate legal requests here.
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the first dates back to last november when britney spears and her lawyers applied to a court to end her father's control over her life and estate. he has been in charge since 2008, and they wanted him replaced with a private wealth management company. now, that is the request that has just been denied. then we come to the events of last week, that tearful and explosive testimony from britney spears when she said she had been drugged, that she had been forced to perform against her will, that she had been prevented from having children. "i just want my life back," and there, she was asking for a complete termination of this conservatorship, this complex legal arrangement which governs her life. the judges have ruled that they cannot end that until she formally applies for it to be removed, and she has not done that yet. it is not going to be easy,
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her father was effectively put in control of her estate in 2008 after she suffered mental health difficulties, and she will have to prove that she is capable of not only managing her money, but her private life as well. it is also worth saying that lawyers for her father have denied that he is responsible for any apparent restrictions on his daughter's life. rebecca jones there. the company belonging to donald trump, and its finance chief, are expected to be indicted. it follows a two—year investigation into alleged fraud at the trump organization. mr trump himself is not expected to be implicated. our business correspondent samira hussein says we won't know the exact charges for several hours. the speculation is that the charges
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have to do with tax evasion, that mr weisselberg had received these benefits or perks from the trump organization. perks like being able to perhaps live in a tony manhattan apartment rent—free or potentially receiving free tuition to private schools for his grandson. these kinds of perks are not uncommon, but you do need to pay taxes on those benefits. he presented himself to the manhattan district attorney's office, which isjust behind me, very early this morning here new york time. and we are expecting to hear from them. the trump organization has just released a statement saying that this is a scorched earth attempt to harm the former president. the former president has always alleged that this investigation is politically motivated. and what we're expecting lawyers for the trump organization to say is that the harm, or the potential financial and reputational damage that could come to the trump organization
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as a result of these indictments, would be very, very bad. samira hussain there in new york. the european union has begun rolling out its vaccine passport, which will allow people to move around the continent without having to quarantine. the digital certificate will show whether someone has been vaccinated, tested negative for covid, or recovered from it recently. non—eu nationals living on the continent will be able to get it for free, but it won't be available to british tourists travelling to europe. bethany bell reports. travel during the pandemic has been complicated. you've needed entry forms, test and vaccination certificates, often issued in a variety of different languages which airline staff and border control officials haven't always been able to understand. but now the eu has issued a new digital covid certificate which aims to streamline things. you can print out the document or download it on your phone. here is a sample one from austria.
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it tells you whether you have recovered, been tested, or vaccinated for covid. the certificates are issued by national authorities in europe and they are currently recognised throughout the eu. the travel industry is hoping that eventually other countries will be included too. we appreciate to have the green pass at least within europe which makes our travelling much easier between european countries, especially in holiday season, and we would appreciate if we would have such a system also for third—party countries outside of non—schengen, especially when it comes to long haul destinations. foreign tourists are beginning to return to this vienna cafe. but every european country currently has its own rules on granting entry to travellers. the eu says countries like britain are working with them to try and align covid documents. but with concerns about the delta variant rising, free travel for non—eu tourists could be some way away. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna.
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more now on nissan plans, with the japanese car maker confirming it's to build a huge battery plant and make a new model of electric vehicle at its site in sunderland. the move will create more than 1,600 jobs at the factory. with me is our business presenter ramzan karmali. i know you are a leaf man. you have outed me! — i know you are a leaf man. you have outed me! the _ i know you are a leaf man. you have outed me! the leaf— i know you are a leaf man. you have outed me! the leaf is _ i know you are a leaf man. you have outed me! the leaf is a _ i know you are a leaf man. you have outed me! the leaf is a great i i know you are a leaf man. you have outed me! the leaf is a great car- outed me! the leaf is a great car but other competitors _ outed me! the leaf is a great car but other competitors seem - outed me! the leaf is a great car but other competitors seem to i outed me! the leaf is a great car| but other competitors seem to be doing a bit better.— doing a bit better. there are cars out there that _ doing a bit better. there are cars out there that are _ doing a bit better. there are cars out there that are cheaper- doing a bit better. there are cars out there that are cheaper and i doing a bit better. there are cars l out there that are cheaper and that go further and that's a problem. there are also cars that are more expensive and more desirable to some like the tesla model three that can do way over 100 miles more than the longest range the nissan leaf can do so they are under intense competition. but this investment,
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the prime minister says it is a pivotal day for the industry because it is a £1 billion investment. you mentioned 1600 jobs, we reckon there is another a500 jobs from the supply chain alone so between 6000—7000 jobs so this is a big investment. but nissanjust don't jobs so this is a big investment. but nissan just don't make investments for the sake of making investments, car companies are not just going to invest a lot of money in the uk unless they are going to get something back and they have had to be incentivised and it is a no—brainer that the uk government has welcomed them with open arms to get this investment. earlier professor david bailey from the university of birmingham told us exactly why nissan did make this investment. firstly, the brexit trade deal was hugely important. i think that has unlocked the possibility of this investment. if there had been no trade deal, i think all bets would have been off. the government will have put in substantial resources, substantial funds into this.
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there is discussion in newspapers of about £100 million of government support, some of it going via the council, to build a local energy grid, other funding going to the battery maker here and to nissan. so that is kind of normal in the industry. car companies are very good at playing off governments to secure government support for new factories and new cars, but let's face it, the government was absolutely desperate to make this happen and it could not_ afford to let nissan go post—brexit, so it had to pull out all the stops. it is going to have to continue doing that for the rest of the car industry. interesting, big government commitment there. yet, in another sector, furlough, it is pulling out gradually withdrawing the furlough scheme, and longer term that will be a problem for one particular section of society. a problem for one particular section of socie . ., ~ , , of society. older workers, there is a reort of society. older workers, there is a report from _ of society. older workers, there is a report from the _ of society. older workers, there is a report from the resolution - a report from the resolution foundation today saying all the workers will be hardest hit by this, those between the ages of 55—6a. at the moment it is reckoned around a
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quarter of them are unfurlough and a lot of those people are going to be in trouble at the end of september, that's what the resolution foundation are predicting. but don't forget the government has put in £66 billion worth into this scheme alone and it has, it says supported 11.6 millionjobs in total and in may alone 1.2 million people came off the scheme as well. so it does seem to be working in terms of keeping people employed will stop also, the predictions for unemployment rates have also come down as well. people think thatjobs will be there once the furlough scheme is closed. not alljobs but the furlough scheme is closed. not all jobs but a the furlough scheme is closed. not alljobs but a lot of the jobs will have been saved. but on that note on older workers, we spoke to the resolution foundation early and they explained in particular why oldest workers were hardest hit. older workers are much more spread out throughout the economy, -
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and they might be in those businesses that are still i a little bit hesitant and they have already had that big reopening and all their workers . are still sort of there. so our thought is, well, - they haven't experienced the big reopening, on the other hand, the sectors that they tend - to work in were furloughed at a particularly high rate. i so that has let us also think that - maybe there is something about cost, older workers tend to have more - experience, they might be paid more, and that can be particularly expensive for businesses . who are just sort of struggling with volatile demand. - that was a representative of the resolution foundation. that is your business news.— resolution foundation. that is your business news. . . ., ., business news. ramzan karmali there, thank ou. the headlines on bbc news. here are the headlines. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the north—east england bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. uk employers will have to hear more of the costs of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. the prime minister says he is confident that those who have had two vaccine jabs will be able to go on holiday later this summer.
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new rules have come into force which should make it easier for people to repair household appliances like washing machines, tvs and fridges. the right to repair will force manufacturers to make spare parts available, so customers can get their products fixed. 1.5 million tonnes of electrical goods are thrown away every year in the uk, as coletta smith reports. he's only six, is willie, and he's taken over part of his father's yard as a repair shop for kiddies' bikes, trikes and so on. repairing things might have gone out of fashion for a while. bringing history back to life is what makes the repair shop so special. but it's all the rage again now. it's not a two—minute job doing this. but even if you're wanting to get things repaired at the moment, whether to save money or save the planet, it's pretty hard to get hold of the right parts that you need to replace things. but from today, things will hopefully start to get a little bit easier. manufacturers of white goods and tvs now have to stock and sell replacement parts of each product for ten years. so would it tempt you to try
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and repair something? my dishwasher and oven was 15 years old, and ijust replaced both of them. maybe if it's a smaller repair, something that's just £60 or £70, like a small part, like an element in an oven, but over and above that, i wouldn't have thought so. a toaster, a kettle, you know, i might even potentially have a look at a hoover. just a very basic repair, yeah, but certainly not on a washer or a cooker, ora tumble dryer. they're so cheap to replace, so ijust probably get - a new one, really. door seals can go, and that's an easy thing that a homeowner can replace themselves. similar with shelves. rob's company have a00 engineers. these can quite often come off the runners. something quite simple. making more complex repairs in domestic appliances. but he thinks there's plenty we can try ourselves. it gives customers a choice. we really want consumers to take that opportunity to look at what they need as a repair, whether they can repair it themselves, buy a small component, or if they need to call somebody out like ourselves.
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a yougov survey suggests we feel most confident with the hoover. a2% feel comfortable repairing vacuum cleaners. 20% would try patching up a broken toaster. and only a% would try to fix a gas cooker. it's removable, you can separate it. it's cheaper to make it in one piece. the uk's only white goods manufacturer say they knew the legislation was coming, and have already made their machines simpler to mend. the secret of products that are easy to repair and last longer is in the design. you've got to start off by saying, the objective here is to make a product that's going to be reliable, easy to maintain or whatever. we've got to design a product that's difficult to make wrong and easy to repair if it needs to be repaired. even though we now have the right to repair, it's a big cultural shift to convince people to fix things rather than fling them. coletta smith, bbc news
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in newton aycliffe. china's president has delivered a defiant speech at an event marking the centenary of the ruling communist party on thursday. xijinping warned that "foreign powers will get their heads bashed" — if they attempt to bully or influence his country. it comes as china faces criticism over alleged human rights abuses and its crackdown in hong kong. stephen mcdonell has more. socialism is great, they sank, then no communist party, no new china. in tiananmen square, to mark the 100th anniversary of the communist party, a choreographed event unfolded, where nearly everyone present was part of the performance. it was a nationalist spectacle, dominated by a speech from one man. general secretary xi jinping. he was forceful about china's place in the world under his party's leadership. translation: history and the people
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chose the communist party. _ the communist party has always represented the vast majority of people. in recent times, the party has come under fire over allegations of serious human rights abuses in xinjiang and hong kong. yet this anniversary is being used to draw attention to its achievements, including new military strength. translation: the chinese people | would never allow foreign forces l to oppress or enslave us. anyone who dares to try will have their heads bashed bloodied against a great wall of steel forged by over 1.a billion people.
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the more strident xi's comments were, the louder the applause. ordinary people caught bits of a lengthy speech on their way to work. i asked what they made of it all. translation: it was amazing. translation: it was so good, xi jinping's speech gave huge encouragement to us all. translation: china right now is developing well and has received - international recognition. the communist party's history can be divided into three parts, parts one, seizing power, part two, leadership under chairman mao, with chaos and famine. three, opening up and finally prosperity. now this place is an economic powerhouse and if you speak to most people on the streets here, as long as their lives keep getting better, they seem content enough for the communist party to have a monopoly on power. translation: long live the great, glorious and correct _ communist party of china.
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there is certainly an air of confidence here. stephen donald, bbc news, beijing. wimbledon is hosting its first ever environment day today, to put a spotlight on climate change and sport. the venue hopes to operate at 'net zero' by 2030. with more here's our sports news correspondent, laura scott. last night's five—set victory by andy murray on centre court had tennis fans harking back to the past and his former triumphs here. but today at wimbledon, it's all about the future. the club is hosting its first environment day. and watching on from the royal box will be a series of environment champions. they've got a star—studded line—up on centre court with world number one ashley barty, rising star coco gauff and then roger federer. i'm delighted to say i'm joined by the club's sustainability manager, hattie park, who came up with the concept of environment day. hattie, could you talk about how that concept came about?
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thank you very much. it's good to have the chance to talk to you. this year is a big year for climate, there's a huge climate conference at the end of the year and we want to do our bit here at wimbledon by shining a spotlight on the climate challenge. so, tennis, as you said, it is the main event, but we play on a living surface, we present tennis in an english garden, so on that level, it is really important that we maintain a healthy and resilient environment. and then you add the climate crisis into the mix, we have to take actions. so one of the things we think we can do is use our platform to inspire action, and that is how the day came about and that is why i am standing here talking to you. what do you hope this day achieves? it is about awareness raising, it's about encouraging people to make a positive choice to rise to the challenge. so we have teamed up with the cop team, the met office, with the bbc,
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we will be talking about it through channels on the day. and the chairman, as you said, has invited people to attend the royal box who work hard in the environment field and we hope we can draw attention to the important work that they do and thank them. and i heard that even the pots of strawberries have been changed for this year. could you talk about some of the other changes you've made at the championships? there is a lot we are doing behind—the—scenes, people cannot see or touch our plans to decarbonise our estates, to decarbonise our estate, but what they can see when they come here is they can enjoy the nature and biodiversity around the grounds. they can see that we are doing our bit to tackle single—use plastic by introducing a reusable cup for drinks, and as you said, the card strawberry container. we are hoping to involve people. if they return their cup, then it is washed, and it is bringing people along on the journey with us. fascinating to talk to you, hattie. thank you so much.
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it will be really interesting to see how this first environment day goes at wimbledon and there is more tennis action today on day four of the championships. 0k, l'wren scott there. his pet dog has been the scourge of posties for decades — but the royal mail is still honouring dennis the menace with a set of stamps. the stamps — which are released today — show some of dennis' key moments during his 70 years in the beano. they include his first ever appearance in the comic in 1951, the moment he adopted his famously ferocious dog, gnasher, in 1968, and the arrival of baby sister bea in 1998. i used to love the beano. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello. for most of us, the weather continues to brighten up this afternoon, with spells of sunshine becoming increasingly widespread. and it has been a lovely start to the day in scotland. this is where we have seen some of the sunniest weather today, and those sunnier skies are working now into a good part of northern england. but elsewhere, it will tend to brighten up. meanwhile, out in the atlantic,
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we have gotjust to our western — we have gotjust to our west an area of low pressure. well, that is going to come in our way in time for the weekend, throwing bands of rain across the country, so make the most of the dry weather while it lasts. now, today, as i say, most of us will see some spells of sunshine, but there will be a few showers knocking around. wales, the south west midlands, across into southern england. the showers forming here because of the sea breeze and also because of the relatively humid weather we have across just this part of south—west england. but otherwise, it is a fresh feeling day, and in the sunshine, temperatures widely into the high teens and low 20s and it is going to feel warm in thatjuly sunshine. overnight tonight, again, cloud will tend to redevelop, particularly across parts of eastern england, parts of eastern scotland, temperatures for most of us around 12 to 1a degrees, so it is tending to be a little bit milder than it was last night. and tomorrow morning, well, although it starts off cloudy in a number of places, that cloud will thin and break up with spells of sunshine coming through. there will be showers in the afternoon and they will be a bit more widespread, a few more thunderstorms around friday afternoon.
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they will tend to move over into eastern areas of england as we head into the afternoon. so that is where your highest chance of a downpour is. as far as the weekend is concerned, we have got spells of rain coming our way, widespread heavy showers, most of us will see downpours at some point. on saturday, you can see that rain pushing its way northwards. showers then follow. most of us will see a downpour or two during the day, but it is across south—west england where we are going to see a line of showers develop thanks to the winds converging together. that will bring an area of slow—moving thunderstorms, so we could see some localised flooding from some of those. temperatures still into the high teens or low 20s, but it is still coming down a degree or so, so not quite as warm as it will be today and indeed on friday. sunday is another unsettled day. again, showers and thunderstorms will be widespread. won't be raining all the time, definitely not, but most of us will see a shower or two during the course of the day and those showers are likely to be heavy at times, too. that is your weather.
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this is bbc news, i'm clive myrie. the headlines at a.00pm: nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the northeast of england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. some of the employees, the father worked here. they retired from here. the son is working here. they are proud of working here. so why not prepare generation after generation in sunderland as a part of the family and this is what we are going to do. uk employers will have to hear more of the costs of furlough, and a royal reunion. princes william and harry will come together to unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, on what would have been her 60th birthday. uk employers will have to hear more of the costs of furlough, as the government begins winding down its job support scheme.
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the prime minister says he is confident that those who have had two vaccine jabs will be able to go on holiday later this summer. very confident that the double jabs will be a liberator and they will enable people to travel. and britney spears has lost her legal attempt to win back control of her financial affairs from her father. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the japanese carmaker, nissan, has announced a major expansion of electric vehicle production at its car plant in sunderland. the development will see the creation of more than 1,500 jobs at the site and several thousand more in the supply chain. most of these will facilitate the manufacture of the company's
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new—generation, all—electric model at the site. alongside this, partner company, envision aesc, will build a new electric battery plant which it believes will produce enough batteries to power over 100,000 nissan electric vehicles each year. nissan hopes the site will be operational by 202a, when the level of uk—made components in cars manufactured in the uk is required to start increasing, in line with the terms of the uk's trade deal with the eu. the development has already received billions of pounds worth of funding, with the government thought to have contributed tens of millions of pounds towards the cost. borisjohnson says the expansion is a "major vote of confidence in the uk and our highly skilled workers in the north east". our business reporter, sarah corker, has been on the production line in sunderland. britain's largest car factory is about to get even bigger. nissan bosses flew in from japan to reveal their expansion plans.
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a £1 billion investment in the sunderland plant. a gigafactory will be built here, making batteries for electric cars at a vast scale. this announcement today is the true renaissance of the british car industry where they are saying how we are going to address the system to not only create business but also to create an environmentally friendly society. a new electric model is also coming to sunderland. the prime minister said this was a major vote of confidence in the uk. this is something that is a massive benefit to the uk economy, nissan is going to be creating about 900 jobs alone in the battery gigafactory, a further 750 plus thousands potentially in the supply chains. but what it is also doing is helping to lengthen the lead of this country in green, low—carbon technology. nissan arrived on wayside back
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in 1986, japan's route into european markets. in recent years, though, it has been a rocky ride. the future sustainability of this plant was questioned in the run—up to brexit. today is being seen as a major turning point. this cafe provides catering for the factory. the owner is delighted to have some positive news. it is a boost for the whole region, with the whole supply chain, the battery plant, and hopefully i will get more business. certainly when they launch the new car, maybe when they launch the new factory i will get to do the catering for that. the new factory is set to be built for 202a, and that is when under the brexit trade deal, car—makers will have to source more components locally to avoid tariffs. the uk government is banning the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030, and that means the future is electric.
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so the uk needs to build more batteries at a vast scale, but at the moment, we are lagging behind other nations like germany. it is a major step forward. we need to make sure that in the uk we have battery production. we make between 1.3 and 1.5 million cars a year, so that actually requires something like six or seven gigafactories. so this is a very important first step. it is fantastic news for nissan, for envision, their partner, and for the north—east. the government is contributing to this investment, and the bbc understands it could be as much as £100 million. this is a long—term plan for the sunderland factory, securing jobs for the decades ahead. and sarahjoins us now live. this could not have come at a better time. . �* ,
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this could not have come at a better time. . �*, ,,, ., ~ ., ., ,., time. that's right. speak to anyone here today and _ time. that's right. speak to anyone here today and they _ time. that's right. speak to anyone here today and they will— time. that's right. speak to anyone here today and they will tell - time. that's right. speak to anyone here today and they will tell you . here today and they will tell you they are delighted by this news. it is a long—awaited expansion plan with electric cars at the heart of it. nissan have been making cars here at sunderland since 1986 and these are highly skilled well—paid jobs. this one pill billion pound announcement will create around 6000 new roles and for the economy here it is a massive boost. but it word of caution, this isjust it is a massive boost. but it word of caution, this is just the first step. we have talked a lot about how demand for electric vehicles is set to soar in the years ahead, but what the uk needs to do is ramp up its production of batteries to make sure there is that integrated supply chain around this part of the industry. and when estimate is that the uk will need to build eight gig
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of factories, the big factories that make these batteries, they will need eight of them by 20a0 to meet that demand. at the moment we don't have any. sunderland is expected to be the first one. so a step forward but industry voices will say today that much more needs to be done. and it's im ortant much more needs to be done. and it's important to — much more needs to be done. and it's important to bear _ much more needs to be done. and it's important to bear in _ much more needs to be done. and it's important to bear in mind _ much more needs to be done. and it's important to bear in mind that - much more needs to be done. and it's important to bear in mind that the - important to bear in mind that the government and our tax dollars contributed to this because the incentive was safe in to invest. == incentive was safe in to invest. -- nissan. incentive was safe in to invest. » nissan. ministers were asked today how much the government has contributed to this development. they would not disclose that figure but the bbc understands it could be “p but the bbc understands it could be up to £100 million. i think the idea is very much trying to build that integrated supply chain because as we've said many times, the future is electric. it has been a challenging
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few years for the car industry. warnings in the run—up to brexit about the very future this factory. it doesn't seem long ago we were discussing all of that. then the pandemic hit and that has affected demand. production slumped and people were put on furlough. but speaking to workers here today, unions, all those involved in the sector, they will tell you this is a day to celebrate and it feels like a real turning point for the industry. let's get more on this with doctor andy palmer, who was nissan's former chief operating officer from 1991 to 201a. first of all, will nissan have made this investment if the government hadn't offered a few incentives? it's always important when you are
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investing _ it's always important when you are investing in — it's always important when you are investing in any country that you explore — investing in any country that you explore all— investing in any country that you explore all of the opportunities for hein _ explore all of the opportunities for help. obviously ultimately the investment will have gone on the basis _ investment will have gone on the basis of— investment will have gone on the basis of the efficiency of the factory— basis of the efficiency of the factory and it's a testament to just how efficient the sunderland plant is. how efficient the sunderland plant is but _ how efficient the sunderland plant is. but undoubtedly, the sweeteners if you _ is. but undoubtedly, the sweeteners if you want. — is. but undoubtedly, the sweeteners if you want, the incentives that will have — if you want, the incentives that will have been provided will have made _ will have been provided will have made the — will have been provided will have made the difference between having it in sunderland or having it somewhere else. fire it in sunderland or having it somewhere else.— it in sunderland or having it somewhere else. �* , ., ., somewhere else. are you willing to ut a somewhere else. are you willing to put a figure — somewhere else. are you willing to put a figure on _ somewhere else. are you willing to put a figure on those _ somewhere else. are you willing to put a figure on those sweeteners? | somewhere else. are you willing to | put a figure on those sweeteners? i don't know, but the numbers you have been talking _ don't know, but the numbers you have been talking about in your previous piece _ been talking about in your previous piece i_ been talking about in your previous piece i suspect are somewhere close to the _ piece i suspect are somewhere close to the mark — piece i suspect are somewhere close to the mark. probably something around _ to the mark. probably something around green electricity, low—cost electricity. — around green electricity, low—cost electricity, making batteries is very— electricity, making batteries is very c02 — electricity, making batteries is very c02 heavy and the way of getting — very c02 heavy and the way of getting around that is to use green electricity— getting around that is to use green electricity at the right price. the
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ke is electricity at the right price. the key is that _ electricity at the right price. ila: key is that batteries electricity at the right price. “i1e: key is that batteries are electricity at the right price. i1e: key is that batteries are the future. this is the kind of investment that could potentially lead to the kind of returns that would delight any company. absolutely critical. around about 800,000 people in the uk are employed in the automotive industry. we know— employed in the automotive industry. we know the whole industry is pivoting — we know the whole industry is pivoting to electric. the estimates are that _ pivoting to electric. the estimates are that we need around about eight l|l are that we need around about eight gig of— are that we need around about eight gig of plants —— big factories over the next — gig of plants —— big factories over the next 15— gig of plants —— big factories over the next 15 years. this is one but we need — the next 15 years. this is one but we need more. we are in direct competition with the eu because the eu was— competition with the eu because the eu was also trying to attract plants to europe — eu was also trying to attract plants to europe. big incentives, the eu has already announced 2.9 billion euros _ has already announced 2.9 billion euros in _ has already announced 2.9 billion euros in incentives to bring back —— lrack— euros in incentives to bring back —— back three — euros in incentives to bring back —— back three factories to europe and the uk _ back three factories to europe and the uk needs to compete with that. great _ the uk needs to compete with that. great news — the uk needs to compete with that. great news today but it's just the start _ great news today but it's 'ust the start. , .,, ., great news today but it's 'ust the start. ., ,,
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great news today but it's 'ust the start. ., , , ., start. nissan has two up its game in the vehicle is _ start. nissan has two up its game in the vehicle is that _ start. nissan has two up its game in the vehicle is that it _ start. nissan has two up its game in the vehicle is that it produces. - the vehicle is that it produces. tesla and other companies are producing vehicles that can travel longer on one charge of battery and are cheaper. this longer on one charge of battery and are cheaper-— are cheaper. this is where the battleground _ are cheaper. this is where the battleground for _ are cheaper. this is where the battleground for all _ are cheaper. this is where the battleground for all the - are cheaper. this is where the battleground for all the car. battleground for all the car industry is. nissan have the advantage. i launched one car over ten years— advantage. i launched one car over ten years ago. nissan let that advantage go a bit because it was late in— advantage go a bit because it was late in developing the follow up models — late in developing the follow up models and it allowed companies like tesla to— models and it allowed companies like tesla to overtake it. they are now a real threat — tesla to overtake it. they are now a real threat to — tesla to overtake it. they are now a real threat to companies like nissan _ real threat to companies like nissan. they have all got to pivot to electricity and they will need access— to electricity and they will need access to — to electricity and they will need access to giger plants. we to electricity and they will need access to giger plants. we have got the skills here _ access to giger plants. we have got the skills here in _ access to giger plants. we have got the skills here in this _ access to giger plants. we have got the skills here in this country. - access to giger plants. we have got the skills here in this country. we l the skills here in this country. we have got the plants that are coming. until we have the basic infrastructure for ordinary people to be able to buy one of these vehicles and to charge them they like? ., ., y
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vehicles and to charge them they like? ., ., , ., , . ., , like? no, not yet. that is certainly another area _ like? no, not yet. that is certainly another area where _ like? no, not yet. that is certainly another area where government i like? no, not yet. that is certainly i another area where government has like? no, not yet. that is certainly - another area where government has to play a _ another area where government has to play a role _ another area where government has to play a role and it's particularly important in terms of the so—called levelling _ important in terms of the so—called levelling up. there are far more charging — levelling up. there are far more charging points in london than in the north— charging points in london than in the north and somehow or another in particular— the north and somehow or another in particular fast charging we really need _ particular fast charging we really need to— particular fast charging we really need to make sure that we have got those _ need to make sure that we have got those infrastructures in place. fast charging _ those infrastructures in place. fast charging on— those infrastructures in place. fast charging on the streets and overnight charging where you park, which _ overnight charging where you park, which often means streetside charging. but if you want to move people _ charging. but if you want to move people into electric cars and you don't _ people into electric cars and you don't simply want to do that by incentives, two things have to happen — incentives, two things have to happen. one is you need that charging _ happen. one is you need that charging infrastructure and two, you need the _ charging infrastructure and two, you need the cost of the vehicles to come _ need the cost of the vehicles to come down. that of course comes with the development of batteries and the volume _ the development of batteries and the volume and volume brings the price down _ volume and volume brings the price down. remember, the uk was the inventor— down. remember, the uk was the inventor of— down. remember, the uk was the inventor of the lithium battery so we do _ inventor of the lithium battery so we do have the skills here and we do
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have the _ we do have the skills here and we do have the technology. but we need to make _ have the technology. but we need to make sure _ have the technology. but we need to make sure that we are among the fast runners— make sure that we are among the fast runners in— make sure that we are among the fast runners in terms of getting that infrastructure rolled out. some breaking news — and we've just received the latest uk coronavirus statistics. in the past 2a hours 27,989 new covid cases have been confirmed — that's the highest daily figure since the end of january. and the deaths of a further 22 people have been recorded — that's people who received a positive covid test in the past 28 days. a statue of diana, princess of wales has been unveiled by her sons princes william and harry at kensington palace — on what would have been her 60th birthday. the two princes commissioned the statue of their late mother from the sculptor ian rank—broadley. the bronze statue depicts princess diana with three children — said to represent the "universality and generational impact" of her work.
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in a joint statement the princes said: "every day, we wish she were still with us, and our hope is that this statue will be seen forever as a symbol of her life and her legacy." robert hardman, royal biographer and documentary maker, joins me now from outside kensington palace. it's a pretty big moment because of the princes have come together after some have speculated that they might be an estrangement in their relationship. but also the fact that unveiling a statue to an popular woman and someone that a lot of people, notjust herfamily, look up to. people, not 'ust her family, look up to. , ~' ., people, not 'ust her family, look up to. , ~ ., , . to. yes. i think today was very much about her 60th _ to. yes. i think today was very much
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about her 60th birthday. _ this was about thinking what today would _ this was about thinking what today would have — this was about thinking what today would have been— this was about thinking what today would have been like _ this was about thinking what today would have been like had - this was about thinking what today would have been like had diana - would have been like had diana lived _ would have been like had diana lived and _ would have been like had diana lived. and here _ would have been like had diana lived. and here is— would have been like had diana lived. and here is this - would have been like had diana . lived. and here is this remarkable statue _ lived. and here is this remarkable statue here _ lived. and here is this remarkable statue. here you _ lived. and here is this remarkable statue. here you have _ lived. and here is this remarkable statue. here you have got - lived. and here is this remarkable statue. here you have got a - lived. and here is this remarkable i statue. here you have got a princess who is— statue. here you have got a princess who is very— statue. here you have got a princess who is very much _ statue. here you have got a princess who is very much in _ statue. here you have got a princess who is very much in her— statue. here you have got a princess who is very much in her working - who is very much in her working clothes — who is very much in her working clothes this _ who is very much in her working clothes. this is _ who is very much in her working clothes. this is the _ who is very much in her working clothes. this is the diana - who is very much in her working clothes. this is the diana the i clothes. this is the diana the working _ clothes. this is the diana the working diana _ clothes. this is the diana the working diana the _ clothes. this is the diana the working diana the world - clothes. this is the diana the - working diana the world remembers. i think it's _ working diana the world remembers. i think it's powerful. _ working diana the world remembers. i think it's powerful. she _ working diana the world remembers. i think it's powerful. she was _ working diana the world remembers. i think it's powerful. she was one - working diana the world remembers. i think it's powerful. she was one of- think it's powerful. she was one of the most _ think it's powerful. she was one of the most photographed _ think it's powerful. she was one of the most photographed women. think it's powerful. she was one of the most photographed women of| think it's powerful. she was one of. the most photographed women of all time _ the most photographed women of all time in _ the most photographed women of all time inthat— the most photographed women of all time. in that sense, _ the most photographed women of all time. in that sense, i— the most photographed women of all time. in that sense, i think— the most photographed women of all time. in that sense, i think the - time. in that sense, i think the sculptor— time. in that sense, i think the sculptor has _ time. in that sense, i think the sculptor has had _ time. in that sense, i think the sculptor has had an _ time. in that sense, i think the sculptor has had an impossiblej time. in that sense, i think the - sculptor has had an impossible task because _ sculptor has had an impossible task because everybody _ sculptor has had an impossible task because everybody has _ sculptor has had an impossible task because everybody has got - sculptor has had an impossible task because everybody has got their. sculptor has had an impossible taskl because everybody has got their own diana _ because everybody has got their own diana idea _ because everybody has got their own diana idea but— because everybody has got their own diana idea. but i— because everybody has got their own diana idea. but i think— because everybody has got their own diana idea. but i think this— because everybody has got their own diana idea. but i think this will- diana idea. but i think this will stand — diana idea. but i think this will stand the _ diana idea. but i think this will stand the test _ diana idea. but i think this will stand the test of— diana idea. but i think this will stand the test of time. - diana idea. but i think this will stand the test of time. it - diana idea. but i think this will stand the test of time. it is - stand the test of time. it is striking. _ stand the test of time. it is striking. it's— stand the test of time. it is striking, it's unusual. -
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stand the test of time. it is striking, it's unusual. it - stand the test of time. it is - striking, it's unusual. it doesn't tell a _ striking, it's unusual. it doesn't tell a specific— striking, it's unusual. it doesn't tell a specific story _ striking, it's unusual. it doesn't tell a specific story but - striking, it's unusual. it doesn't tell a specific story but it - striking, it's unusual. it doesn'tl tell a specific story but it speaks to a lot — tell a specific story but it speaks to a lot of — tell a specific story but it speaks to a lot of themes _ tell a specific story but it speaks to a lot of themes of _ tell a specific story but it speaks to a lot of themes of her- tell a specific story but it speaks to a lot of themes of her life - tell a specific story but it speaks| to a lot of themes of her life and both— to a lot of themes of her life and both the — to a lot of themes of her life and both the ltoys— to a lot of themes of her life and both the boys had _ to a lot of themes of her life and both the boys had to _ to a lot of themes of her life and both the boys had to have - to a lot of themes of her life andi both the boys had to have agreed to a lot of themes of her life and - both the boys had to have agreed on this. both the boys had to have agreed on this this— both the boys had to have agreed on this. this would _ both the boys had to have agreed on this. this would not _ both the boys had to have agreed on this. this would not have _ both the boys had to have agreed on this. this would not have taken - this. this would not have taken shape — this. this would not have taken shape if— this. this would not have taken shape if they— this. this would not have taken shape if they hadn't _ this. this would not have taken shape if they hadn't agreed - this. this would not have taken shape if they hadn't agreed onl this. this would not have taken i shape if they hadn't agreed on it. clearly— shape if they hadn't agreed on it. clearly in — shape if they hadn't agreed on it. clearly in their— shape if they hadn't agreed on it. clearly in their view— shape if they hadn't agreed on it. clearly in their view it _ shape if they hadn't agreed on it. clearly in their view it sums - shape if they hadn't agreed on it. clearly in their view it sums up. clearly in their view it sums up diana — clearly in their view it sums up diana and _ clearly in their view it sums up diana and nobody— clearly in their view it sums up diana and nobody knew - clearly in their view it sums up diana and nobody knew her. clearly in their view it sums up. diana and nobody knew her better than those — diana and nobody knew her better than those two _ diana and nobody knew her better than those two boys. _ diana and nobody knew her better than those two boys. it's - diana and nobody knew her better than those two boys.— than those two boys. it's a good description. _ than those two boys. it's a good description, in _ than those two boys. it's a good description, in her— than those two boys. it's a good description, in her working - than those two boys. it's a good . description, in her working clothes. what is her legacy? it description, in her working clothes. what is her legacy?— what is her legacy? it seems. princi al what is her legacy? it seems. principal her _ what is her legacy? it seems. principal her legacy _ what is her legacy? it seems. principal her legacy is - what is her legacy? it seems. principal her legacy is those i what is her legacy? it seems. i principal her legacy is those two young _ principal her legacy is those two young men— principal her legacy is those two young men who _ principal her legacy is those two young men who unveiled - principal her legacy is those two young men who unveiled the - principal her legacy is those two - young men who unveiled the statue today— young men who unveiled the statue today and _ young men who unveiled the statue today and all — young men who unveiled the statue today and all they _ young men who unveiled the statue today and all they have _ young men who unveiled the statue today and all they have done. - young men who unveiled the statue today and all they have done. she l today and all they have done. she was someone, _ today and all they have done. she was someone, people _ today and all they have done. she was someone, people look- today and all they have done. she was someone, people look back. today and all they have done. she. was someone, people look back on today and all they have done. she - was someone, people look back on the more turbulent — was someone, people look back on the more turbulent parts _ was someone, people look back on the more turbulent parts of— was someone, people look back on the more turbulent parts of her— was someone, people look back on the more turbulent parts of her public- more turbulent parts of her public life, more turbulent parts of her public life. but _ more turbulent parts of her public life. but she — more turbulent parts of her public life, but she did _ more turbulent parts of her public life, but she did an _ more turbulent parts of her public life, but she did an awful- more turbulent parts of her public life, but she did an awful lot - more turbulent parts of her public life, but she did an awful lot of i life, but she did an awful lot of good — life, but she did an awful lot of good she _ life, but she did an awful lot of good she very— life, but she did an awful lot of good. she very sadly _ life, but she did an awful lot of good. she very sadly was - life, but she did an awful lot of good. she very sadly was not l life, but she did an awful lot of. good. she very sadly was not alive to see _ good. she very sadly was not alive to see the — good. she very sadly was not alive to see the results, _ good. she very sadly was not alive to see the results, one _ good. she very sadly was not alive to see the results, one of- good. she very sadly was not alive to see the results, one of her- good. she very sadly was not alivei to see the results, one of her most important — to see the results, one of her most important campaigns— to see the results, one of her most important campaigns against - important campaigns against landmines _ important campaigns against landmines when— important campaigns against landmines when it _ important campaigns against landmines when it won - important campaigns against landmines when it won the i important campaigns against - landmines when it won the nobel prize _ landmines when it won the nobel prize after— landmines when it won the nobel prize after her— landmines when it won the nobel prize after her death. _ landmines when it won the nobel prize after her death. she - landmines when it won the nobel prize after her death. she was . landmines when it won the nobel. prize after her death. she was very involved _ prize after her death. she was very involved in— prize after her death. she was very involved in that. _ prize after her death. she was very involved in that. she _ prize after her death. she was very involved in that. she showed - prize after her death. she was very
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involved in that. she showed therej involved in that. she showed there was perhaps— involved in that. she showed there was perhaps a _ involved in that. she showed there was perhaps a different _ involved in that. she showed there was perhaps a different way - involved in that. she showed there was perhaps a different way of - was perhaps a different way of approaching _ was perhaps a different way of approaching royal— was perhaps a different way of approaching royal duties, - was perhaps a different way of approaching royal duties, a . was perhaps a different way of. approaching royal duties, a more informal— approaching royal duties, a more informal way, _ approaching royal duties, a more informal way, and _ approaching royal duties, a more informal way, and that _ approaching royal duties, a more informal way, and that has- approaching royal duties, a more. informal way, and that has rubbed off on— informal way, and that has rubbed off on her— informal way, and that has rubbed off on her boys _ informal way, and that has rubbed off on her boys. i— informal way, and that has rubbed off on her boys. i think— informal way, and that has rubbed off on her boys. i think they - informal way, and that has rubbed off on her boys. i think they are i informal way, and that has rubbed off on her boys. i think they are ai off on her boys. i think they are a great _ off on her boys. i think they are a great credit — off on her boys. i think they are a great credit to _ off on her boys. i think they are a great credit to her _ off on her boys. i think they are a great credit to her and _ off on her boys. i think they are a great credit to her and their- great credit to her and their father _ great credit to her and their father it _ great credit to her and their father. it was _ great credit to her and their father. it was good - great credit to her and their father. it was good today. great credit to her and theiri father. it was good today to great credit to her and their- father. it was good today to see the spencer— father. it was good today to see the spencer family— father. it was good today to see the spencer family all— father. it was good today to see the spencer family all they— father. it was good today to see the spencer family all they are - father. it was good today to see the spencer family all they are paying . spencer family all they are paying their respects _ spencer family all they are paying their respects. today _ spencer family all they are paying their respects. today has - spencer family all they are paying | their respects. today has probably done _ their respects. today has probably done a _ their respects. today has probably done a bit — their respects. today has probably done a bit of— their respects. today has probably done a bit of healing. _ their respects. today has probably done a bit of healing.— done a bit of healing. today is about her— done a bit of healing. today is about her and _ done a bit of healing. today is about her and her— done a bit of healing. today is about her and her legacy - done a bit of healing. today is about her and her legacy and l done a bit of healing. today is - about her and her legacy and what she stood for, that there is inevitably going to be discussion and conjecture about the relationship between the two princes. how would you characterise that relationship now? i princes. how would you characterise that relationship now?— that relationship now? i think at the moment _ that relationship now? i think at the moment it's _ that relationship now? i think at the moment it's under - that relationship now? i think at the moment it's under a - that relationship now? i think at the moment it's under a certain| the moment it's under a certain degree — the moment it's under a certain degree of— the moment it's under a certain degree of stress. _ the moment it's under a certain degree of stress. but _ the moment it's under a certain degree of stress. but that - the moment it's under a certain. degree of stress. but that happens in all_ degree of stress. but that happens in all families. _ degree of stress. but that happens in all families. it's _ degree of stress. but that happens in all families. it's one _ degree of stress. but that happens in all families. it's one of- degree of stress. but that happens in all families. it's one of those -
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in all families. it's one of those things — in all families. it's one of those things they— in all families. it's one of those things. they are _ in all families. it's one of those things. they are grown—ups, i in all families. it's one of those . things. they are grown—ups, they both— things. they are grown—ups, they both have — things. they are grown—ups, they both have very— things. they are grown—ups, they both have very busy— things. they are grown—ups, they both have very busy lives. - things. they are grown—ups, they both have very busy lives. princei both have very busy lives. prince harry— both have very busy lives. prince harry has — both have very busy lives. prince harry has just _ both have very busy lives. prince harry has just become _ both have very busy lives. prince harry has just become a - both have very busy lives. prince harry hasjust become a father. both have very busy lives. prince. harry has just become a father for the second — harry has just become a father for the second time. _ harry has just become a father for the second time. he _ harry has just become a father for the second time. he has- harry has just become a father for the second time. he has a - harry has just become a father for the second time. he has a lot - harry hasjust become a father for. the second time. he has a lot going on. the second time. he has a lot going on the _ the second time. he has a lot going on the duke — the second time. he has a lot going on the duke of— the second time. he has a lot going on. the duke of cambridge - the second time. he has a lot going on. the duke of cambridge is- the second time. he has a lot going on. the duke of cambridge is now. the second time. he has a lot goingj on. the duke of cambridge is now a fully fledged — on. the duke of cambridge is now a fully fledged senior— on. the duke of cambridge is now a fully fledged senior front _ on. the duke of cambridge is now a fully fledged senior front line - fully fledged senior front line royal— fully fledged senior front line royal doing _ fully fledged senior front line royal doing royal— fully fledged senior front line royal doing royal duties. - fully fledged senior front line royal doing royal duties. hei fully fledged senior front line . royal doing royal duties. he was fully fledged senior front line - royal doing royal duties. he was on parade _ royal doing royal duties. he was on parade with — royal doing royal duties. he was on parade with the _ royal doing royal duties. he was on parade with the queen _ royal doing royal duties. he was on parade with the queen earlier- royal doing royal duties. he was on parade with the queen earlier this i parade with the queen earlier this week _ parade with the queen earlier this week~ they— parade with the queen earlier this week they are _ parade with the queen earlier this week. they are following - parade with the queen earlier thisj week. they are following different paths _ week. they are following different paths 0ne — week. they are following different paths. one leads _ week. they are following different paths. one leads inevitably- week. they are following different paths. one leads inevitably to - week. they are following different paths. one leads inevitably to the| paths. one leads inevitably to the throne _ paths. one leads inevitably to the throne and — paths. one leads inevitably to the throne and the _ paths. one leads inevitably to the throne and the other— paths. one leads inevitably to the throne and the other one - paths. one leads inevitably to the throne and the other one is - paths. one leads inevitably to the throne and the other one is in - throne and the other one is in uncharted _ throne and the other one is in uncharted water. _ throne and the other one is in uncharted water. there - throne and the other one is in uncharted water. there are i throne and the other one is in - uncharted water. there are stresses with that, _ uncharted water. there are stresses with that, there _ uncharted water. there are stresses with that, there is— uncharted water. there are stresses with that, there is noting _ uncharted water. there are stresses with that, there is noting that- uncharted water. there are stresses with that, there is noting that —— - with that, there is noting that —— denying — with that, there is noting that —— denying it~ — with that, there is noting that —— denying it but— with that, there is noting that —— denying it but i— with that, there is noting that —— denying it. but i think— with that, there is noting that —— denying it. but i think today- with that, there is noting that ——j denying it. but i think today they were _ denying it. but i think today they were both — denying it. but i think today they were both keen— denying it. but i think today they were both keen to _ denying it. but i think today they were both keen to set _ denying it. but i think today they were both keen to set that - denying it. but i think today they were both keen to set that to - denying it. but i think today they| were both keen to set that to one side and — were both keen to set that to one side and not _ were both keen to set that to one side and not give _ were both keen to set that to one side and not give anybody - were both keen to set that to one. side and not give anybody anything to pick— side and not give anybody anything to pick over~ — side and not give anybody anything to pick over. they _ side and not give anybody anything to pick over. they put _ side and not give anybody anything to pick over. they put on _ side and not give anybody anything to pick over. they put on a - side and not give anybody anything to pick over. they put on a united i to pick over. they put on a united front— to pick over. they put on a united front and — to pick over. they put on a united front and i— to pick over. they put on a united front and i think _ to pick over. they put on a united front and i think that _ to pick over. they put on a united front and i think that is _ to pick over. they put on a united front and i think that is what - to pick over. they put on a united front and i think that is what theyj front and i think that is what they set out _ front and i think that is what they set out to, — front and i think that is what they set out to, was _ front and i think that is what they set out to, was to _
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front and i think that is what they set out to, was to put _ front and i think that is what they set out to, was to put their- set out to, was to put their unsettled _ set out to, was to put their unsettled business - set out to, was to put their unsettled business to - set out to, was to put their unsettled business to one i set out to, was to put their- unsettled business to one side for one day — unsettled business to one side for one day i— unsettled business to one side for one da . . unsettled business to one side for one da . , ., . , unsettled business to one side for oneda. , ., one day. i 'ust wonder, many people over one day. ijust wonder, many people over there hoping _ one day. ijust wonder, many people over there hoping to _ one day. ijust wonder, many people over there hoping to get _ one day. ijust wonder, many people over there hoping to get a _ one day. ijust wonder, many people over there hoping to get a glimpse l over there hoping to get a glimpse of the study. they are not letting until tomorrow, the public. untiltomorrow, the public. that's ri . ht. a untiltomorrow, the public. that's right- a lot _ untiltomorrow, the public. that's right- a lot of _ untiltomorrow, the public. that's right. a lot of disappointed - until tomorrow, the public. that's right. a lot of disappointed people have turned — right. a lot of disappointed people have turned up— right. a lot of disappointed people have turned up and _ right. a lot of disappointed people have turned up and they _ right. a lot of disappointed people have turned up and they thought l right. a lot of disappointed people i have turned up and they thought they could go— have turned up and they thought they could go in— have turned up and they thought they could go in after— have turned up and they thought they could go in after the _ have turned up and they thought they could go in after the ceremony. - have turned up and they thought they could go in after the ceremony. i- could go in after the ceremony. i think— could go in after the ceremony. i think a _ could go in after the ceremony. i think a trit— could go in after the ceremony. i think a bit of— could go in after the ceremony. i think a bit of rearranging - could go in after the ceremony. i think a bit of rearranging has- could go in after the ceremony. i think a bit of rearranging has toi could go in after the ceremony. i. think a bit of rearranging has to be done _ think a bit of rearranging has to be done it's— think a bit of rearranging has to be done it's open— think a bit of rearranging has to be done. it's open to _ think a bit of rearranging has to be done. it's open to everybody - think a bit of rearranging has to be done. it's open to everybody for i done. it's open to everybody for free _ done. it's open to everybody for free you — done. it's open to everybody for free you can— done. it's open to everybody for free. you can buy— done. it's open to everybody for free. you can buy a _ done. it's open to everybody for free. you can buy a ticket - done. it's open to everybody for free. you can buy a ticket and l done. it's open to everybody fori free. you can buy a ticket and go inside _ free. you can buy a ticket and go inside kensington _ free. you can buy a ticket and go inside kensington palace - free. you can buy a ticket and go inside kensington palace but- free. you can buy a ticket and go inside kensington palace but if. free. you can buy a ticket and go l inside kensington palace but if you want to— inside kensington palace but if you want to come — inside kensington palace but if you want to come and _ inside kensington palace but if you want to come and see _ inside kensington palace but if you want to come and see the - inside kensington palace but if you want to come and see the statue, i want to come and see the statue, anybody— want to come and see the statue, anybody can— want to come and see the statue, anybody can do _ want to come and see the statue, anybody can do that _ want to come and see the statue, anybody can do that from - want to come and see the statue, i anybody can do that from tomorrow. there _ anybody can do that from tomorrow. there are _ anybody can do that from tomorrow. there are very— anybody can do that from tomorrow. there are very dedicated _ anybody can do that from tomorrow. there are very dedicated diana - anybody can do that from tomorrow. there are very dedicated diana fansi there are very dedicated diana fans i there are very dedicated diana fans i have _ there are very dedicated diana fans i have just — there are very dedicated diana fans i have just been _ there are very dedicated diana fans i have just been talking _ there are very dedicated diana fans i have just been talking to - there are very dedicated diana fans i have just been talking to who - there are very dedicated diana fansi i have just been talking to who come every— i have just been talking to who come every year— i have just been talking to who come every year on — i have just been talking to who come every year on the _ i have just been talking to who come every year on the anniversary- i have just been talking to who come every year on the anniversary of- i have just been talking to who come every year on the anniversary of her| every year on the anniversary of her death— every year on the anniversary of her death and _ every year on the anniversary of her death and her— every year on the anniversary of her death and her birthday _ every year on the anniversary of her death and her birthday and - every year on the anniversary of her death and her birthday and they- every year on the anniversary of her death and her birthday and they are j death and her birthday and they are here again — death and her birthday and they are here again and _ death and her birthday and they are here again and they— death and her birthday and they are here again and they were _ death and her birthday and they are here again and they were singing i here again and they were singing happy— here again and they were singing happy birthday— here again and they were singing happy birthday to _ here again and they were singing happy birthday to her _ here again and they were singing happy birthday to her earlier- here again and they were singing happy birthday to her earlier on.| happy birthday to her earlier on. they— happy birthday to her earlier on. they wanted _ happy birthday to her earlier on. they wanted to _ happy birthday to her earlier on. they wanted to be _ happy birthday to her earlier on. they wanted to be at _ happy birthday to her earlier on. they wanted to be at the - happy birthday to her earlier on. they wanted to be at the front . happy birthday to her earlier on.| they wanted to be at the front of the queue — they wanted to be at the front of the queue and _ they wanted to be at the front of the queue and they're _ they wanted to be at the front of the queue and they're going - they wanted to be at the front of the queue and they're going to l they wanted to be at the front of. the queue and they're going to start gueueing _ the queue and they're going to start gueueing at — the queue and they're going to start queueing at atm _ the queue and they're going to start queueing at atm tomorrow - the queue and they're going to startl queueing at atm tomorrow morning. the queue and they're going to start. queueing at atm tomorrow morning. i think it's _ queueing at atm tomorrow morning. i think it's going — queueing at atm tomorrow morning. i think it's going to _ queueing at atm tomorrow morning. i think it's going to be _
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queueing at atm tomorrow morning. i think it's going to be one _ queueing at atm tomorrow morning. i think it's going to be one of— queueing at atm tomorrow morning. i think it's going to be one of those - think it's going to be one of those things— think it's going to be one of those things that — think it's going to be one of those things that grows _ think it's going to be one of those things that grows on _ think it's going to be one of those things that grows on people. - things that grows on people. everyone _ things that grows on people. everyone will— things that grows on people. everyone will have _ things that grows on people. everyone will have a - things that grows on people. everyone will have a view. i things that grows on people. i everyone will have a view. but things that grows on people. - everyone will have a view. but i'm sure _ everyone will have a view. but i'm sure a _ everyone will have a view. but i'm sure a tot — everyone will have a view. but i'm sure a tot of — everyone will have a view. but i'm sure a lot of people _ everyone will have a view. but i'm sure a lot of people will— everyone will have a view. but i'm sure a lot of people will want - everyone will have a view. but i'm sure a lot of people will want to l sure a lot of people will want to see it — sure a lot of people will want to see it. ~ . , sure a lot of people will want to see it. a , . the government is winding down its furlough job support scheme from today with businesses and unions warning it could mean more people being thrown out of work. the scheme originally extended support to some 11.6 million employees. that number has fallen since then. the latest figures show that in may alone, 1.2 million workers came off the scheme. currently, around one and a half million britons are having most of their wages paid by the treasury because of the pandemic. now, for the first time, employers will have to shoulder a contribution. labour are calling for the changes to be delayed until after all covid restrictions are lifted. here's our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. from today, businesses will have to start paying a 10% slice of the wages of their furloughed staff. how are you guys, good? this person recently returned from furlough.
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he is optimistic the changes being introduced from today won't have a negative impact on his industry. i'm not really concerned about the changing of the furlough scheme because i can see that now there is loads of people that really want to go out, the industry is going to settle down, so i'm being positive if we are to face the challenges we will be ready for them. currently 1.5 million britons are having 80% of their wages paid by the treasury. from today, employers will have to pay 10% of their furloughed workers' normal salary, while the government will continue to pay the other 70%. from the first of august, the employers' contribution rise rises to 20% and the government to 60%. the government has spent £66 billion on furlough, which has supported 11.6 million jobs since march last year, but for this events company, it still hasn't been enough. when the government made an announcement where they were not
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going to be extending furlough any further, that was the time we had to make the horrific decision of letting 55 of our friends go at that moment in time, and that is something that we are desperate to not have to do again, which is why as this starts to taper down now, we have to find a way of funding that difference somehow. many businesses still remain closed, but the government is hoping they'll be able to reopen on the 19th ofjuly. but with little or no revenue coming in, paying even a fraction of workers' wages put could put a massive strain on those firms. up until yesterday, the cost to an employer keeping on a member of staff on £20,000 annual salary was £155 a month. that covers things such as national insurance. but from today, that cost will more than double, to £322, and in august and september, that cost will rise to £a89. so while businesses have a reduced capacity to operate, where numbers are smaller in gyms, pubs or on the high street,
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the support from the government should match that. they've pushed back the timetable for reopening, what they haven't done is put in place the support that businesses need to get by. it's a difficult balanced decision to make. the furlough wasn't going to last forever and as we open up in two weeks' time, this is the right time to think about the balance of payroll, which the government pays, and which employers pay. there are signs the economy is bouncing back, but the scaling back of this scheme and other support packages will be a test on how resilient it actually is. with restrictions still in place, a speedy return to normality will be key. ramzan karmali, bbc news. a spanish court has ordered that european soccer governing body to
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cancel all legal sanctions imposed on real madrid, barcelona and juventus for playing or planning the creation of the breakaway european super league. the court also ordered uefa not to take any steps to try and exclude the three clubs, who are the last one standing from the 12 teams that were originally behind the breakaway league, from its different competitions including the champions league. one wonders if this might have ramifications for the premier league and the possible sanctions that were being talked about at the time. manchester city, manchester united, liverpool, arsenal, tottenham and chelsea were all involved in this proposed league. the spanish court has said uefa cannot take action against the three clubs still nominally involved in the creation of this league. so that news coming in on the last few minutes.
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polls are open in the yorkshire constituency of batley and spen, where voters are electing a new mp. it comes after the former labour mp, tracy brabin, became west yorkshire's first directly—elected mayor. and we'll bring you full coverage of the result when it happens in the early hours of tomorrow morning. that should be at around 4.00am. meanwhile, borisjohnson said he sees double vaccination as the 'key to freedom' when asked about foreign travel and the easing of covid—i9 restrictions. i'm very confident that the double jabs will be a liberator and they will enable people to travel. we will be sending out a lot more about the detail of that in the course ofjuly and the next few days about how you see it working. but there's no doubt at all that once you have two jabs, you are in a much better position. as everybody can see, we will be going forward in the autumn with an extra vaccination programme,
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a booster programme, for the more vulnerable just to give us that extra insulation, that extra security that we need. but to answer your point, everybody who is frustrated about travel over the summer, double jabs will be a liberator. but i want to repeat a point that i've made before. i hope people will forgive me if i say that i obviously want travel to be possible, but i have to stress that this year will not be like every other year because of the difficulties with covid. people should not expect that it will be completely hassle—free. earlier, i spoke to our deputy political editor, vicki young. she explained to me how much remains unknown about the next easing of restrictions in england onjuly 19th. i think it's interesting listening to the prime minister and the business secretary talking about it as a certainty, when we open up in two weeks' time. what we don't know
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other details of exactly what that will look like. there is still lots of question marks about travel and school bubbles and masks, social distancing. what we don't know is what freedom there is going to mean. it's possible they could be an announcement on that next week, laying out what life will look like before the 19th, giving it the official go—ahead. but interesting on travel, the prime minister talking about double jabs. immediately lots of people will be saying that's fine for those who are double jabs but not so good for those who are not. what about children? will they get some kind of exemption? he talks about hassle. i am sure they will still be testing requirements as well. so not normality when it comes to travel and a lot of our travel is dependent on other countries and what they are willing to accept and what proof
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they are willing to accept. are they happy to have brits going into the country at all? the point here is that the vaccination programme in this country has been very successful and are starting to cover huge percentages of the adult population. that is not necessarily the case in other countries. 50 height —— high case numbers you might not be a problem but they could be in other countries. 50 still a lot of uncertainty. could be in other countries. so still a lot of uncertainty. exactly a week since — still a lot of uncertainty. exactly a week since the _ still a lot of uncertainty. exactly a week since the revelations - still a lot of uncertainty. exactly i a week since the revelations about matt hancock were made public. sajid javid has taken over. what is the sense of how he has handled the situation? i sense of how he has handled the situation? ~ . �* . situation? i think what's interesting _ situation? i think what's interesting is _ situation? i think what's interesting is that - situation? i think what's interesting is that sajid | situation? i think what's - interesting is that sajid javid situation? i think what's _ interesting is that sajid javid when interesting is that sajid javid when it comes to the pandemic of course was on the back benches of the mp. he wasn't on the front line for this. one cabinet minister told me it's not that he is more or less in favour of restrictions than matt hancock, it's more that he hasn't
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been through that experience of being on the front line. so he can come into the department of health when we are in a position hopefully in the tail end of a pandemic. certainly he has made it very clear how he feels about certain restrictions. i understand things like school bubbles, he schools are being so overly prescriptive about it and they need to be a bit more relaxed about it. not sending home whole school years if one pupil tests positive for example. but there are still questions about what is going to mean comejuly the 19th. the sense in whitehall i am getting is that people feel this will be a huge stride towards normal life and they will be very few restrictions left in place. now it's time for a look at the weather, with chris. hello there. for many of us this afternoon
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is looking fine and dry. the sunny skies we have had across scotland will increasingly move into northern england, and elsewhere the cloud will tend to thin and break for many of us. although staying quite cloudy around some of the eastern coasts of england. there will be some showers around today. showers in the south—west triggered by the humidity we have here, because it is quite a humid day. and around the central southern england area it is the sea breeze that will kick the showers off. there could be one or two for the south—west, midlands and wales as well. but the majority of you will have a dry afternoon. top temperatures into the low 20s. overnight tonight we are looking at dry conditions for most areas. it will turn a little bit cloudier, again, there will be a few mist patches around. temperatures a little bit milder than last night, 12—14 fairly widely. a little cooler across northern scotland. tomorrow, it's another day of sunshine and a few showers. the shower is a little bit more widespread. the highest chance of catching a downpour will be across eastern areas of england on friday afternoon. top temperatures about 23 degrees tomorrow. that's your weather. hello, this is bbc
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news with clive myrie. the headlines... nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the northeast of england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. and a royal reunion — princes william and harry have come together to unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, on what would have been her 60th birthday. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough, as the government begins winding down its job support scheme. the prime minister says he is confident that those who have had two vaccine jabs will be able to go on holiday later this summer. i am very confident that the double jabs will be a liberator, and they will enable people to travel. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. another busy and dry day
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at wimbledon and a successful one too for one of the two brits in singles action today. chetan pathak is at the all england club for us — with cameron norrie setting up a potentially mouthwatering third round match. yes, potentially now for nari in round three awaits roger federer. narihas round three awaits roger federer. nari hasjoined federer and murray. it is the first time since 1999. cameron norrie was outstanding today against alex bildt. he cameron norrie was outstanding today against alex bildt.— against alex bildt. he did lose the first two games — against alex bildt. he did lose the first two games and _ against alex bildt. he did lose the first two games and then - against alex bildt. he did lose the first two games and then one - against alex bildt. he did lose the first two games and then one the | first two games and then one the next games. he was too good for bolt in the end. both of them are in the top ten. we know cameron norrie got top ten. we know cameron norrie got to the queen is final and he lost.
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looking very good for him and potentially now roger federer. that is the third match up on centre court. cameron norrie was asked for his feelings after the match. it was a bit of a tricky start, he came out firing and i was down a break and i felt this court was definitely a little bit easier to move on than yesterday on court 2 and i could really trust it and i was moving strongly out of the corners and i didn't give him too much today so i was really pleased with everything and definitely a lot of improvement from the other day. yeah, like i said before, just a pleasure to be out here. a pleasure for the top seed in the women pass might draw as well. bad news for the third seat. tell us more. the latest seat to be blown away this time in straight sets. when you bear in mind we have lost other players were not able to be
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here or have had to retire, that women draw are really looking up. the old number one winning her match in straight sets. she has had her injury issues, hasn't she, this year and had to withdraw from the french open but she hasn't looked and moved really well. she has talked a lot in the past about how she loves playing on grass. she has won the french open back in 2019 and she will fancy her chances for this wimbledon. there are other stories brewing here. the is—year—old who knocked out venus williams in the first round two years ago is looking very good. these are live pictures at the moment. she is taking on the semi finalist from 2016. a multi—double grand slam winner. she reached the quarterfinals at the open this year.
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she had a bit of a barbell after that big breakthrough against venus williams, understandable for a young player. she has been outstanding this year. 3—2 up this year. we have got the only british women remaining in the singles draw later. two months ago she was sitting her a—level exams and in a few hours she will be in court number 18. she won last night. it is her second match today. she is playing against the czech player. it will not be easy for them. she is going to have the support from home behind her. the doubles are under way and i am also looking at the number two seed men, they are looking to go through in that one in straight sets. many
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thanks. in the last few minutes, mark cavendish has won stage six of the tour de france, his second at this year's race — his 32nd victory at the tour wearing the greenjersey of the leader of the sprinters' competition. the stage finished in chateauroux, where he won his first ever stage back in 2008 — but 13 years later he's stilljust as fast, he's now two wins away from equalling eddy merckx's all time record. mathieu van der poel finished in the main bunch to keep the leader's yellow jersey. it looked pretty bleak for sri lanka in the second one day international against england when sam curran reduced them to 12 for 3 but they've made a solid recovery at the oval — led by dhananjaya de silva's run—a—ball 91. the touring side are now 218—8 in the 14th over. bbc radio 5 live sports extra has commentary of that one with highlights on bbc two later. that is all for now. thank you for that. ajudge in los angeles has denied
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the american pop star britney spears a request to remove herfather from his position as her conservator. the singer's lawyer wanted the court to sackjamie spears from his role as guardian of her estate, leaving her with no control over her life and finances for thirteen years. the singer was placed under his guardianship after suffering a series of mental breakdowns. the 39—year—old has said previously that she was traumatized and depressed by the arrangement, which forced her to perform against her will. our arts correspondent rebecca jones has more. it is complicated, and that is because there are two separate legal requests here. the first dates back to last november when britney spears and her lawyers applied to a court to end her father's control over her life and estate. he has been in charge since 2008, and they wanted him replaced with a private wealth management company. now, that is the request that has just been denied. then we come to the events of last week, that tearful and explosive
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testimony from britney spears when she said she had been drugged, that she had been forced to perform against her will, that she had been prevented from having children. "i just want my life back," and there, she was asking for a complete termination of this conservatorship, this complex legal arrangement which governs her life. the judges have ruled that they cannot end that until she formally applies for it to be removed, and she has not done that yet. it is not going to be easy, her father was effectively put in control of her estate in 2008 after she suffered mental health difficulties, and she will have to prove that she is capable of not only managing her money, but her private life as well. it is also worth saying that lawyers for her father have denied that he is responsible for any apparent restrictions on his daughter's life.
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steroid creams that should be used to treat skin conditions are being misused for cosmetic skin lightening according to the british association of dermatologists. they say enforcement needs improving to target the illegal sale of ?prescription products in shops and online. a bbc undercover investigation found the creams, which can seriously damage the skin if used incorrectly, were widely available across independent hair and beauty shops in yorkshire. ghazal abbasi reports. i am not used to seeing myself as i was when i was 18. i was a totally different person, totally different skin colour and everything. i used to think i was ugly. grazia is now 29 and used steroid—based skin lightening creams for ten years to change her appearance. my dad actually once
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said to me he did not recognise me because we haven't seen each other for two years and when he saw me, he was shocked because i was really, really light. he was a little bit disappointed and sad and he actually begged me to stop. during our investigation, we were being told these creams are easy to buy and widely available from black and asian beauty shops, so we went undercover to put it to the test. so i havejust been into the first shop of the day and i have managed to get a skin lightening cream with steroids in it. it was so easy and it is the first shop. let's see what the rest of the shops are like today. you know skin lightening creams with steroids in them — do you have any? how much is that? 3.99. there are so many sold. are there? thank you so much. see you later. bye. i have just come out of a cosmetic shop.
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we have visited seven across four cities in yorkshire. in six of them, i have been able to buy skin lightening creams with steroids in them. seven said they were out of stock. these creams are only meant to be sold in pharmacies. it is really, really worrying, if i am honest with you. these are prescription only medications. as a dermatologist, it is really important there are regulations of these products and important they are taken away to be given without regulation. you should not be able to go and buy them over the counter, they can have serious consequences for patients.
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doctor hussain agreed to examine grazia to see if using those cream to ten years has affected her skin. i have been lucky so far to not have contracted any serious damage on my skin. it is better to stop using them, definitely. the chartered trading standards institute, who regulate the sale of steroids creams, tell us trading standards across the country have undertaken investigations of companies selling dangerous products and have given hefty fines and prison sentences in the last few years. however, they say there is still much more to do in the public must report concerns to the authorities. more now on nissan plans, with the japanese car maker confirming it's to build a huge battery plant and make a new model of electric vehicle at its site in sunderland. the move will create more than 16 hundred jobs at the factory. . .. great news for the north—east but nissan have to keep updating, haven't they?— nissan have to keep updating, haven't they? others are in the market and _ haven't they? others are in the market and can _ haven't they? others are in the market and can do _ haven't they? others are in the market and can do it _ haven't they? others are in the market and can do it cheaper. l haven't they? others are in the i market and can do it cheaper. the traditional car _ market and can do it cheaper. tie: traditional car makers as market and can do it cheaper. tt9 traditional car makers as well have put lots of money into their new models, vauxhall have got new models, vauxhall have got new models, peugeot, renault, there is a
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lot of competition out there. it is a huge investment. 1600 jobs. that will be more because another supply chain and there will be more jobs. this is a huge investment of money. 24 this is a huge investment of money. 2a million will go towards a new battery plant which won't be ready until 202a. battery plant which won't be ready until2024. don't battery plant which won't be ready until 202a. don't forget, battery plant which won't be ready until2024. don't forget, by battery plant which won't be ready until 202a. don't forget, by 2030 you won't be able to sell brand—new diesel or petrol cars any more in this country. me to get this technology up and running and the uk is falling behind its european neighbours. it is estimated by 2025, the uk will have a tenth of the battery production that germany has. we have to get going with this. don't forget, the brexit deal, by 2024, a certain amount of components that we have that come from outside of the eu and outside of the uk, that has to start coming down. nissan says the coast of europe. they desperately need this to work
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and these batteries to start being made and going on the cards. earlier i spoke to professor bailey and he explained how important this deal was. , :, , y �* explained how important this deal was. , :, , , : . . was. obviously the brexit trade deal was. obviously the brexit trade deal was huael was. obviously the brexit trade deal was hugely important. _ was. obviously the brexit trade deal was hugely important. that - was. obviously the brexit trade deal was hugely important. that has - was hugely important. that has untocked — was hugely important. that has unlocked the possibility of this investment. if there had been no trade _ investment. if there had been no trade deat. — investment. if there had been no trade deal, it would have been. the government will put on substantial funds— government will put on substantial funds and — government will put on substantial funds and resources in this. there is a discussion of about £100 million — is a discussion of about £100 million of— is a discussion of about £100 million of support, some of it going to cancel— million of support, some of it going to cancel two grew a great and others — to cancel two grew a great and others going to the car manufacturers. car companies are good _ manufacturers. car companies are good at _ manufacturers. car companies are good at playing off governments for support _ good at playing off governments for support for new factories and cars. the government is absently desperate to make _ the government is absently desperate to make this happen. it could not afford _ to make this happen. it could not afford to— to make this happen. it could not afford to let nissan goalpost brexit — afford to let nissan goalpost brexit. they are going to have to pull brexit. they are going to have to putt out — brexit. they are going to have to putt out att— brexit. they are going to have to pull out all of the stops. they are going _ pull out all of the stops. they are going to — pull out all of the stops. they are going to have to do it for the rest of the _
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going to have to do it for the rest of the car— going to have to do it for the rest of the car industry.— of the car industry. government investment _ of the car industry. government investment in _ of the car industry. government investment in that _ of the car industry. government investment in that particular- investment in that particular sector. when it comes to the furlough, the government is pulling back from today. it is furlough, the government is pulling back from today.— back from today. it is from today. it is a back from today. it is from today. it is a huge _ back from today. it is from today. it is a huge investment. - back from today. it is from today. it is a huge investment. £66 - back from today. it is from today. | it is a huge investment. £66 billion had gone into it, spotted 11.6 millionjobs in total. you know, this furlough scheme has to end and it is a balancing act government is trying to play. we are meant to reopen properly on the 19th ofjuly. if it does go ahead, they are hoping the firms that are affected by this, the firms that are affected by this, the impact will be minimal. there are of people who are being targeted, they think, people are being unfairly targeted, does that. in february if you were aged between 55 and 64 and you are put on furlough, the chances of you being still on furlough inmate was 26%. if you were aged between 35 and 44, that chance is only 6%. it definitely seems that order workers will be part on furlough for longer and the chance of them eventually
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becoming unemployed is a lot higher as well. earlier we spoke to the resolution foundation and the explained why older people are being unfairly treated.— unfairly treated. older workers are more spread _ unfairly treated. older workers are more spread out _ unfairly treated. older workers are more spread out throughout - unfairly treated. older workers are more spread out throughout the i more spread out throughout the economy— more spread out throughout the economy and they might be in those businesses — economy and they might be in those businesses that are still a little bit hesitant and they have already had that _ bit hesitant and they have already had that big reopening, older workers — had that big reopening, older workers are still there, so our thaw is they— workers are still there, so our thaw is they haven't experienced the big reopening, but the sectors they tend to work— reopening, but the sectors they tend to work in— reopening, but the sectors they tend to work in weren't furloughed at hi-h to work in weren't furloughed at high rates — to work in weren't furloughed at high rates so we are thinking it is something — high rates so we are thinking it is something about cost. they tend to have more — something about cost. they tend to have more experience, they may be paid more _ have more experience, they may be paid more and that can be expensive for businesses who are struggling with volatile demand. that for businesses who are struggling with volatile demand.— for businesses who are struggling with volatile demand. that was cut in from the — with volatile demand. that was cut in from the resolution _ with volatile demand. that was cut in from the resolution foundation. | in from the resolution foundation. six £6 billion has gone to the furlough scheme. there are other packages that are being burned down as well, the stamp duty incentive. —— turned down. as these schemes are
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being wound down, the issue as well our economy withstand all of the packages being withdrawn? there are signs the economy is bouncing back better than expected. the unemployment rate is expected to be lower than first thought. the real testis lower than first thought. the real test is now, as this money is being peeled, how will the economy recover? will people being going back intojobs? is our recover? will people being going back into jobs? is our economy going to get back to normal? goad back into jobs? is our economy going to get back to normal?— to get back to normal? good to see ou aaain. steroid creams that should be used to treat skin conditions are being misused for cosmetic skin lightening according to the british association of dermatologists. heather nelson is a chief executive officer, committee engagement organisation working to nationally aiming to deliver quality in health and social care. hello to you. thank you forjoining us. where are you surprised, are you surprised, at how
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easily our bbc investigation revealed that these creams were so easy to get? right, heather. there we go. easy to get? right, heather. there we to, , easy to get? right, heather. there weuo. , :, . , we go. sorry. unfortunately, i wasn't surprised _ we go. sorry. unfortunately, i wasn't surprised at _ we go. sorry. unfortunately, i wasn't surprised at all. - we go. sorry. unfortunately, i wasn't surprised at all. this i we go. sorry. unfortunately, i. wasn't surprised at all. this has been a long going issue for many people for a number of years. i people for a number of years. i mean, how widespread is the use of these creams? it is mean, how widespread is the use of these creams?— mean, how widespread is the use of these creams? it is very widespread. when ou these creams? it is very widespread. when you look— these creams? it is very widespread. when you look at _ these creams? it is very widespread. when you look at it, _ these creams? it is very widespread. when you look at it, it _ these creams? it is very widespread. when you look at it, it is _ these creams? it is very widespread. when you look at it, it is a _ these creams? it is very widespread. when you look at it, it is a $1- when you look at it, it is a $1 billion industry worldwide. it happens in the uk, on the african continent, the caribbean, south asian continent. it is widespread. many people aspire to have a eurocentric view of bt, which is based on lighter skin. 50 eurocentric view of bt, which is based on lighter skin.— eurocentric view of bt, which is based on lighter skin. so that is the fundamental _ based on lighter skin. so that is the fundamental reason - based on lighter skin. so that is the fundamental reason that. based on lighter skin. so that is the fundamental reason that is| the fundamental reason that is taking place, is it?— the fundamental reason that is taking place, is it? usually, yes. there are _ taking place, is it? usually, yes. there are a _ taking place, is it? usually, yes.
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there are a few— taking place, is it? usually, yes. there are a few people - taking place, is it? usually, yes. there are a few people who - taking place, is it? usually, yes. there are a few people who use | there are a few people who use pigment creams because they have scarring, etc, but when we look at it on a whole, this skin bleaching creams are doing just that, they are bleaching people's skin who want to become fair in complexion. these are creams that — become fair in complexion. these are creams that are _ become fair in complexion. these are creams that are legitimately - become fair in complexion. these are creams that are legitimately passed l creams that are legitimately passed over the counter, sold over the counter, as it were, for other cosmetic reasons. how do you deal with the situation, then?— with the situation, then? there are some creams _ with the situation, then? there are some creams that _ with the situation, then? there are some creams that are _ with the situation, then? there are some creams that are not - with the situation, then? there are some creams that are not actuallyl some creams that are not actually following the regulations, and that is the issue. they are full of toxins and causing skin problems, as well as psychological problems, from the effect of using those new products. the ones that are legitimately there, there is very little we can do to stop them being abused, like with anything else that is out there. it is the ones that are not regulated that are causing the major issues and the major
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health problems that we are now seeing. health problems that we are now seeina. : :. health problems that we are now seeina. : . . health problems that we are now seeina. : :, . i. health problems that we are now seeint. : :, . i. health problems that we are now seein. : :, . i. :, seeing. and what are you calling on the authorities _ seeing. and what are you calling on the authorities to _ seeing. and what are you calling on the authorities to do _ seeing. and what are you calling on the authorities to do about - seeing. and what are you calling on the authorities to do about those i the authorities to do about those who are breaking the law? i the authorities to do about those who are breaking the law? i think we need to perhaps _ who are breaking the law? i think we need to perhaps install— who are breaking the law? i think we need to perhaps install something i need to perhaps install something like secret shoppers who can go in and see whether you can buy these non—regulated creams over the counter, and actually take those who are selling those creams to court. and actually prosecute them. this is a public health issue, though, isn't it? ~ , . a public health issue, though, isn't it? ~ ,~ ., a public health issue, though, isn't it? ,~ ., , a public health issue, though, isn't it? absolutely. we are seeing people now who are — it? absolutely. we are seeing people now who are presenting _ it? absolutely. we are seeing people now who are presenting with - it? absolutely. we are seeing people now who are presenting with skin - now who are presenting with skin cancers, psychologically as well, mental ill—health. we are seeing so many different skin problems that are being presented that this now causing a major issue for the nhs as well as people who are presenting with those issues and problems. heather nelson from the black health initiative, based in the sunni leads, thank you.
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—— based in south leeds. more now on the statue of diana, princess of wales being unveiled by her sons princes william and harry at kensington palace on what would have been her 60th birthday. the two princes commissioned the statue of their late mother from the sculptor ian rank—broadley. well, he's been explaining how he created the work. uppermost in my mind was to do something for the princes. the princess was a very public figure in many respects an icon, but she was somebody�*s mother. that is what i paid the greater is he to. it feels a collaborative effort and made a huge contribution. in an many ways, i could see the sculpture belongs to them as well, they helped make it. it is going to be the children that princess diana is with. why did you make you sculpture with her with the children? it is make you sculpture with her with the children? . make you sculpture with her with the children? , : , , children? it is felt the princess
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stood on her _ children? it is felt the princess stood on her own _ children? it is felt the princess stood on her own any - children? it is felt the princess stood on her own any solitary i stood on her own any solitary fashion. one of the things that came across from talking to her friends and was she was such a friendly and gregarious person and she had a particular love for children. in many ways, it goes to her humanitarian work and shows that she was a great comfort. also visually, children are not of adult size, so they are not competing with the princess. 50 very much it is a pyramid structure. from that point of view, it is comfortable for her. you mentioned the involvement the princes had. explain how that worked. what kind of involvement that they have in the whole process? well, unfortunately i never knew the princess, never met her. i was reliant on what friends and family said. one gets the flavour. it may be anecdotes, reminiscences, particular views. they contributed in that way. they described their
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mother. in many ways, they describe the private moments. one certainly got the feeling she was an enormous sense of fun and enjoyed playing jokes. that helped to create a person so when i am on my own in the studio and i are modelling the clay, i got the feeling i was beginning to know somebody. towards the end of the commission, i really felt as though i knew a diana. new rules have come into force which should make it easier for people to repair household appliances like washing machines, tvs and fridges. the "right to repair" will force manufacturers to make spare parts available, so customers can get their products fixed. one and a half million tonnes of electrical goods are thrown away every year in the uk, as coletta smith reports. he's only six, is willie, and he's taken over part of his father's yard as a repair shop for kiddies' bikes,
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trikes and so on. repairing things might have gone out of fashion for a while. bringing history back to life is what makes the repair shop so special. but it's all the rage again now. it's not a two—minute job doing this. but even if you're wanting to get things repaired at the moment, whether to save money or save the planet, it's pretty hard to get hold of the right parts that you need to replace things. but from today, things will hopefully start to get a little bit easier. manufacturers of white goods and tvs now have to stock and sell replacement parts of each product for ten years. so would it tempt you to try and repair something? my dishwasher and oven was 15 years old, and ijust replaced both of them. maybe if it's a smaller repair, something that's just £60 or £70, like a small part, like an element in an oven, but over and above that, i wouldn't have thought so. a toaster, a kettle, you know, i might even potentially have a look at a hoover. just a very basic repair, yeah, but certainly not on a washer or a cooker, ora tumble dryer. they're so cheap to replace, so ijust probably get -
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a new one, really. door seals can go, and that's an easy thing that a homeowner can replace themselves. similar with shelves. rob's company have 400 engineers. these can quite often come off the runners. something quite simple. making more complex repairs in domestic appliances. but he thinks there's plenty we can try ourselves. it gives customers a choice. we really want consumers to take that opportunity to look at what they need as a repair, whether they can repair it themselves, buy a small component, or if they need to call somebody out like ourselves. a yougov survey suggests we feel most confident with the hoover. 42% feel comfortable repairing vacuum cleaners. 20% would try patching up a broken toaster. and only 4% would try to fix a gas cooker. it's removable, you can separate it. it's cheaper to make it in one piece. the uk's only white goods manufacturer say they knew the legislation was coming, and have already made their machines simpler to mend.
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the secret of products that are easy to repair and last longer is in the design. you've got to start off by saying, the objective here is to make a product that's going to be reliable, easy to maintain or whatever. we've got to design a product that's difficult to make wrong and easy to repair if it needs to be repaired. even though we now have the right to repair, it's a big cultural shift to convince people to fix things rather than fling them. coletta smith, bbc news in newton aycliffe. now for a look at the weather. for most of us, the weather continues to brighten up this afternoon. spells of sunshine becoming widespread. a lovely start to the day in scotland. this has seen the sunniest weather today. the sunny skies are working into northern england. elsewhere, it will brighten up. out in the atlantic, we have got to our western
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area of low pressure. that is going to come in our way in time for the weekend. bands of rain across the country. make the most of the dry weather whilst it lasts. today, most of us will see spells of sunshine. showers knocking around wales, into southern england. the showers farming here because of the sea breeze and also because of the relatively humid weather that we have across south—west england. otherwise, a fresh feeling day. in the sunshine, temperature is not widely into the high teens and 20s. it is going to develop cloud over night tonight. for most of us around 12 to 14 celsius. milder than it was last night. and tomorrow morning, although we started off quite cloudy and a number of places, that cloud will break up and spells of sunshine. showers in the afternoon. a bit more widespread and more thunderstorms around on friday afternoon. they will tend to move
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over into eastern areas of england as we head into the afternoon. that is where the highest chance of a damper is. as far as the weekend is concerned, spells of rain coming our way. widespread heavy showers and downpours at some point. that when pushing northwards. showers father. most of us will see a downpour during the day. it is across south—west england we are going to see a line of showers developed, thanks to the wind is converging together. that will bring an area of slow—moving thunderstorms and localised flooding. temperatures, still into the high teens or early 20s. still into the high teens or early 205. still still into the high teens or early 20s. still coming down a degree or so. not quite as warm as it will be today and on friday. sunday, and on another unsettled day. showers. it will not be running all of the time. definitely not. most of us will see a shower or two during the course of the day. there were showers are heavy at times, too. that is your weather.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines: the prime minister says he hopes england will return to as close to the pre—pandemic normal as possible from 19thjuly. we can see that even the cases are going up, young people, it is not feeding through into serious disease and death. daily covid cases reported in scotland have surpassed 4 thousand for the first time since mass testing began. uk employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough, as the government begins winding down its job support scheme. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in the northeast of england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region.

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