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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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play on a li'sfing surface, today. we play on a living surface, we present — today. we play on a living surface, we present tennis _ today. we play on a living surface, we present tennis in _ today. we play on a living surface, we present tennis in an _ today. we play on a living surface, we present tennis in an english - we present tennis in an english garden — we present tennis in an english garden and _ we present tennis in an english garden and on— we present tennis in an english garden and on that _ we present tennis in an english garden and on that level - we present tennis in an english garden and on that level it - we present tennis in an english garden and on that level it is l garden and on that level it is really— garden and on that level it is really important _ garden and on that level it is really important that - garden and on that level it is really important that we - garden and on that level it is - really important that we maintain a healthy— really important that we maintain a healthy and — really important that we maintain a healthy and resilient _ really important that we maintain a healthy and resilient environment i healthy and resilient environment and then— healthy and resilient environment and then you _ healthy and resilient environment and then you add _ healthy and resilient environment and then you add the _ healthy and resilient environment and then you add the climate - healthy and resilient environment i and then you add the climate crisis into the _ and then you add the climate crisis into the mix — and then you add the climate crisis into the mix and _ and then you add the climate crisis into the mix and we _ and then you add the climate crisis into the mix and we have - and then you add the climate crisis into the mix and we have to - and then you add the climate crisis into the mix and we have to take . into the mix and we have to take action _ into the mix and we have to take action one _ into the mix and we have to take action one of— into the mix and we have to take action. one of the _ into the mix and we have to take action. one of the things - into the mix and we have to take action. one of the things we - into the mix and we have to takel action. one of the things we think we can— action. one of the things we think we can do— action. one of the things we think we can do is— action. one of the things we think we can do is use _ action. one of the things we think we can do is use our— action. one of the things we think we can do is use our platform - action. one of the things we think we can do is use our platform to i we can do is use our platform to inspire _ we can do is use our platform to inspire action~ _ we can do is use our platform to inspire action.— inspire action. the royal box on centre court _ inspire action. the royal box on centre court today _ inspire action. the royal box on centre court today will - inspire action. the royal box on centre court today will be - inspire action. the royal box on centre court today will be filled | centre court today will be filled with environment champions and among them bear grills and representatives of the kop 26 climate conference. they will be watching one of the all—time greats in roger federer but they will also be watching one of they will also be watching one of the rising stars of the sport, coco gauff and they might be following the progress of the young reddish player who is playing on court 18 later. the initiative shows that wimbledon is focusing on the next generation off the court as well. laura, many thanks. laura scott at wimbledon. at the weather.
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we are dry at wimbledon and for most of the uk, it is also looking fine and dry this afternoon. we have had the best of the sunshine in scotland, increasingly the sunny skies are moving into parts of northern england and elsewhere the cloud will to murray pin and break but looking out to the south west, an area of low pressure and it will be chucking bands of rain our way in time for the weekend. make the most of the relatively dry weather that we have over the next couple of days. i say relatively, because today although most of you will have a dry day, a few showers brewing. south west england is humid, the humidity is a few storms and a sea breeze breeze bringing a few showers near to the south coast, one or two for wales and the south west midlands as well, but apart from that, it is looking dry with spells of sunshine and it will feel warm in the sunshine, temperatures as high as 22 degrees. no problem with the weather today at wimbledon, the chance of showers tomorrow and i think we will definitely see some interruptions to play as we head
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into this weekend. overnight tonight, it is looking like a dry night, some patchy cloud reforming, a few mist and fog patches, generally a bit milder than last night, temperatures around 12 or 1a degrees, coolerfor the north of scotland on the far north—east of england and tomorrow, a similar kind of weather day, cloudy to start, mist or fog patches lifting later, spells of sunshine developing and into the afternoon, showers, a bit more widespread and this time the majority of them will be across the east of england, with thunderstorms developing through the day. temperatures a little bit higher, 21-23 , temperatures a little bit higher, 21—23 , pretty widely, one in the sunshine, but into the weekend it turns increasingly unsettled, bam suffering and widespread showers all in the forecast, and as the first band of rain passes northwards on saturday, it will be followed by further downpours. the showers will tend to move through, bright spells in between, the downpours across south west england could be long—lived and a pretty torrential actually, here at the winds are converging together to give that
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line of storms and could bring some localised surface water flooding. temperatures a little bit down, given there is more cloud in the sky and were showers, looking at highs of around 18—21. not bad in the brighter moments between the rain and showers. moving on to sunday, unsettled, showers widespread, heavy and thundery, one of those days were most of you will see a downpour or two at some point. those temperatures a little bit below par for the time of year but in the sunshine not feeling too bad, high is up to about 20 celsius. next couple of days, not too bad, it does turn increasingly unsettled with a greater chance of rain and downpours as we head into this weekend. chris, thank you very much indeed. that is all from the bbc news and it is goodbye for me and on bbc one now we willjoin the bbc news teams where you are. have a very
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good afternoon. you're watching bbc news channel. i'm ben croucher with a round—up from the bbc sports centre. after all the excitement, tension and drama from andy murray last night, it's cameron norrie's turn to try to make it to the third round at wimbledon, hopefully without putting the crowd through quite so much. chetan pathak is taking it all in at the all england club. hopefully we will be able to see live pictures from court one, where he is playing at the moment. he is taking on his australian opponent right now and this is the live scene. we can see this on bbc two at the moment. he did indeed lose the first three games in this one, but he has made a positive comeback. he is now a break to the good at the moment, 11—3 up in that one. you can follow that one on court one. you can follow that one on court one.
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chetan, good to see you. what's the latest? yes, here we are at wimbledon, where the sun is shining and the forecast is looking good. no rain on the horizon we are told, meaning play will happen on the outside courts as well as the show courts, everybody catching their breath from last night's drama. andy murray made us bite our nails to the bone in that incredible five set match. let's jump incredible five set match. let's jump into cameron norrie if we can, he is on court one at the moment, taking on alex bolt, and he made a lightning start, the australian was 3-0 lightning start, the australian was 3—0 up. but cameron norrie is now 4-3 3—0 up. but cameron norrie is now 11—3 up at the moment, live on the bbc as i speak. the remaining british woman who is left in the
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singles is 18—year—old, who was 4—1 down yesterday before she came back to win that sent on a tie—breaker and then 6—0 in the second. she was only doing her a—level exams a couple of weeks ago. she said she couldn't believe it. it couple of weeks ago. she said she couldn't believe it.— couldn't believe it. it feels great and i think— couldn't believe it. it feels great and i think that _ couldn't believe it. it feels great and i think that she _ couldn't believe it. it feels great and i think that she took - couldn't believe it. it feels great and i think that she took out - and i think that she took out sharapova here a few years ago and grassy— sharapova here a few years ago and grassy tag _ sharapova here a few years ago and grassy tag game, so i'm really proud of being _ grassy tag game, so i'm really proud of being able to beat her and now i feel i_ of being able to beat her and now i feel i have — of being able to beat her and now i feel i have nothing to lose, no pressure. _ feel i have nothing to lose, no pressure, so i'm really enjoying myself— pressure, so i'm really enjoying myself here. the whole thing is an amazing _ myself here. the whole thing is an amazing experience. and myself here. the whole thing is an amazing experience.— amazing experience. and emma raducanu will— amazing experience. and emma raducanu will be _ amazing experience. and emma raducanu will be back _ amazing experience. and emma raducanu will be back out - amazing experience. and emma raducanu will be back out on i amazing experience. and emma i raducanu will be back out on court eight and is currently scheduled to be last up this evening, against her opponent who has reached the grand slam finals eight times. but that'll be a great chance to go back out in
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front of the home fans. the women's favourite is asha barty, back out on centre court at the moment. nothing happening there, they are just approaching the start of play. you are watching live pictures. ash barty, she has won one grand slam, the french open, with serena williams having to retire. others had to withdraw and barty is a clear favourite, she says she loves playing on grass. i will tell you before i hand back that heather watson is in the women's doubles and she and her partner have won their opening match, and the numberfour seed is into the next round of the men's singles as well.— men's singles as well. thank you very much- _ england can wrap up their one—day series against sri lanka with a game
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to spare at the oval this afternoon. jason roy is back in the side for the second game of three, but he'll have to wait his turn to bat as england won the toss and chose to field. sri lanka currently 24—1 in the sixth over. sri lanka currently 24—1 in the sixth over. sam curran grabbed captain kusal perera with just his second ball. avishka fernando went two balls later. david will he has picked up a wicket in the last couple of minutes as well. 24—1 sri lanka as they bid to avoid a series defeat. 24—1 sri lanka as they bid to avoid a series defeat. the british and irish lions have named an all new starting 15 for their opening tour match injohannesburg this weekend. scotland full—back stuart hogg will captain the team with tour skipper conor murray not included. coach warren gatland says he's sure hogg will lead the side by example. louis rees—zammit, chris harris and jonny hill are all set to make their lions debuts against the emirates lions. that's all the sport for now. don't forget, you can follow the cricket and tennis on the website and app, and the sixth stage of the tour de france shortly, too.
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bbc.co.uk/sport — more from me throughout the afternoon. thank you very much indeed. the prime minister borisjohnson said he sees double vaccination as the �*key to freedom' when asked about foreign travel and the easing of covid—19 restrictions. during a visit to a nissan plant in sunderland, he also praised the car firm's plan for a new battery plant in the uk, saying that electric vehicles are the future. there are ongoing discussions about ways we can support people who are going to bring fantastic green technology into this country. they are obviously confidential. but this is something that is a massive benefit to the uk economy, nissan will create about 900 jobs with a further 750, plus thousands potentially in the supply chains. but what it is also doing is helping to lengthen the lead of this country
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in green low carbon technology. and by increasing the number of batteries we can make in the uk, increasing the number of electric vehicles we can make, getting those economies of scale so that the price of electric vehicles comes down and they become more affordable for families than petrol vehicles and diesel vehicles, and that will happen far quicker than people are currently expecting. irate happen far quicker than people are currently expecting.— currently expecting. we are way behind germany, _ currently expecting. we are way behind germany, way _ currently expecting. we are way behind germany, way behind i currently expecting. we are way | behind germany, way behind our european partners, will you offer more of these financial incentives to other countries to catch up? are to other countries to catch up? we have £1 to other countries to catch up? "he: have £1 billion to other countries to catch up? we: have £1 billion in investment coming in from nissan and this plant makes more electric vehicles than virtually anything else in europe. it is a fantastic vote of confidence in sunderland, in the north—east and
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this work force here. and it is a very important step forward for our green industrial revolution. do very important step forward for our green industrial revolution.- green industrial revolution. do you have an electric— green industrial revolution. do you have an electric car? _ green industrial revolution. do you have an electric car? at _ green industrial revolution. do you have an electric car? at the - green industrial revolution. do you i have an electric car? at the moment, i am driven — have an electric car? at the moment, i am driven in — have an electric car? at the moment, i am driven in a _ have an electric car? at the moment, i am driven in a variety _ have an electric car? at the moment, i am driven in a variety of— i am driven in a variety of machines, most of which are still ran on hydrocarbons, but i can tell you we will be phasing it out as soon as we conveniently an economic elite can. what we must also do is make sure that we get value for money. and the great thing about this investment and the creation of this investment and the creation of this gigafactory is, as i say, it will drive down the cost of electric vehicles, notjust for people who are currently buying them, but ordinary families who can buy them as well, that will happen in just a few years time. thousands of children are currently isolating. why wait until next term to end the bubbles? why not get the kids back in school now?
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we have already cost them months of education. parents are desperate, why not act now? i want to say a massive thank you to parents and to teachers, to pupils for everything they have been going through throughout the pandemic, and i understand people's frustration when whole classes, whole bubbles are sent home and people are asked to isolate. so what is happening now is public health england and the scientists are looking at the advantages, the possibilities of going to testing rather than isolation. they haven't concluded yet, so what i want to do is just to be cautious as we go forward to that natural firebreak of the summer holidays, when i think the risk in schools will greatly diminish, just ask people to be a little bit patient. but in the meantime, what we must do is keep on vaccinating the adults of the population so they are protected against the infection. and that is going well,
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and you can see that even though cases are going up in young people, it is not feeding through into serious disease and death in the older generation. also frustrated are those that have had double vaccines waiting for a dividend from this. they have done what you asked, they have had both jabs, they still can't go on holiday. will they be able to travel from the 26th ofjuly, as is reported? i'm very confident that the double jabs will be a liberator and they will enable people to travel. we will be setting out a lot more about the detail of that in the course ofjuly in the next few days, about how we see it working. there is no doubt at all that when you have got two jabs, you are in a much better position. obviously, as everybody can see, we will be going forward in the autumn with an extra vaccination programme, a booster
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programme for the more vulnerable, just to give us that extra insulation, that extra security that we need, but certainly, to answer your point, everybody who is frustrated about travel over the summer, double jabs will be a liberator. i want to repeat the point that i have made before and i hope people will forgive me if i say that i do want... ..obviously i want to travel to be possible, but i have to stress that this year will not be like every other year because of the difficulties with covid and people shouldn't expect that it'll be completely hassle—free. you may have watched wimbledon last night, the roof is closed, it is a giant indoor event with thousands of people not wearing masks. if it is good enough for wimbledon and good enough for them, why can't pubs, clubs, theatres get on with opening up, drop the restrictions, masks, and do what people are clearly allowed to do at the tennis? because
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what they do — allowed to do at the tennis? because what they do at _ allowed to do at the tennis? because what they do at those _ allowed to do at the tennis? because what they do at those pilot _ allowed to do at the tennis? because what they do at those pilot events i what they do at those pilot events is they have a special testing regime and make sure everybody who comes in is properly tested and there is very little risk of infection. i know people are impatient for us to open up faster and of course i want to do that, but what i will say to people is we are now in the final furlong. i really believe that. we have to look very carefully at the data and at the moment what we are seeing is a big increase in cases, 26,000, as you will have seen. but that is not translating into a big increase in serious illness and death. and so it looks ever clearer that we have broken the vaccination programme, the speed of that vaccine roll—out has broken that link between infection and mortality. that is an
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amazing thing and that gives us the scope on the 19th ofjuly to go ahead cautiously, irreversibly, to go ahead. fin ahead cautiously, irreversibly, to no ahead. ' ' , :, ahead cautiously, irreversibly, to no ahead. " ,, . go ahead. on the 19th, will you have the courage — go ahead. on the 19th, will you have the courage of _ go ahead. on the 19th, will you have the courage of your _ go ahead. on the 19th, will you have the courage of your convictions - go ahead. on the 19th, will you have the courage of your convictions and i the courage of your convictions and say that distancing will go, masks will go, and it will actually be normal rather than a neutered version of real life? i normal rather than a neutered version of real life?— normal rather than a neutered version of real life? i know how impatient _ version of real life? i know how impatient people _ version of real life? i know how impatient people are _ version of real life? i know how impatient people are to - version of real life? i know how impatient people are to get - version of real life? i know howl impatient people are to get back version of real life? i know how - impatient people are to get back to normality, as indeed and i come and we will be setting out in the course of the next few days what step four will look like exactly. but i think i have said it before, we will be wanting to go back to a world that is as close to the status quo not covid as possible, back to life as close to it was before covid. but there may be some things we must do, some extra precautions we have to take, but i will be setting all of
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that out. ~ , that out. the prime minister answering — that out. the prime minister answering questions - that out. the prime minister answering questions there i that out. the prime minister| answering questions there on that out. the prime minister i answering questions there on a that out. the prime minister - answering questions there on a range of issues at the nissan plant in sunderland. of issues at the nissan plant in sunderland. the headlines on bbc news... nissan announcing a major expansion of vehicle and battery production in north—east england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. uk employers will have to bear thousands of newjobs to the region. uk employers will have to hear more of the cost of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job as the government starts to wind down itsjob support as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. tough message on the 100th anniversary of the chinese communist party, president xijinping once the chinese communist party, president xi jinping once foreign powers will get their heads bashed if they attempt to belief the country. —— president shejim ping warns foreign powers. —— xijinping warns foreign powers. —— xijinping warns foreign powers. —— xijinping warns foreign powers. now for a look at some of the stories being covered by our colleagues across the uk. we start in scotland where talks between the greens to involve them in government are continuing. but
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some farmers believe that it will damage the industry. the greens co—leader says that the business must work harder to prevent environmental damage. our correspondent is at holyrood. you have been hearing from some of those fish farmers. have been hearing from some of those fish farmers-— fish farmers. yes, the greens want to hase fish farmers. yes, the greens want to phase out _ fish farmers. yes, the greens want to phase out what _ fish farmers. yes, the greens want to phase out what is _ fish farmers. yes, the greens want to phase out what is called - fish farmers. yes, the greens want to phase out what is called open i to phase out what is called open cage fish farming, which is how they rate most of the salmon up and down the west coast of scotland and in orkney and shetland. we do not know for sure that aquaculture is going to be part of any agreement between the snp and the greens at this stage. but certainly salmon farmers want some reassurance on that. what are the two parties are trying to do is reach a power—sharing agreement that does not go as far as our full cooperation, they are not going to
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agree a full programme for government, but i think the snp would like to be sure that the greens would back them in budget votes and if there are confidence votes and if there are confidence votes in future, the greens in return would want some of their key priorities in the government programme. you can see where the two parties might come together to tackle climate change and perhaps move more quickly to cut carbon emissions, oranother move more quickly to cut carbon emissions, or another independence referendum for instance, but there are lots of areas they don't agree. the greens will not sign up to the snp's road—building plans, the snp would have some difficulty with green proposals on extra taxation. what is happening today is talked are entering a more detailed phase and they will continue over the summer and we should get more news when parliament returns. if they do reach an agreement, it could mean for the first time anywhere in the
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uk, green ministers, greens and government. uk, green ministers, greens and government-— uk, green ministers, greens and rovernment. :, ,, , :, , , government. thank you, glenn. sorry about the line — government. thank you, glenn. sorry about the line quality _ government. thank you, glenn. sorry about the line quality there. - government. thank you, glenn. sorry about the line quality there. glen - about the line quality there. glen campbell at holyrood. i don who are saved and rehomed by the rspca after he and 3a other dogs were living in terrible conditions in east yorkshire has now won his first agility competition. bbc look north leanne brown has this report. these are the moves that have made this dog and ability champion. —— an agility champion. taste dog and ability champion. -- an agility champion.— dog and ability champion. -- an agility champion. we are the very start of our— agility champion. we are the very start of our agility _ agility champion. we are the very start of our agility career. - agility champion. we are the very start of our agility career. we - agility champion. we are the very | start of our agility career. we have had three petitions in total so far, we have had affairs, a second, third and then another first. but we must go upgrades before we can go to any serious competitions. i would love to go to crufts and go further from that. it is definitely now my dream. a two—year—old spinal didn't have
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the best start in life, but luckily he was rescued by an rspca officer who is now his owner. he he was rescued by an rspca officer who is now his owner.— he was rescued by an rspca officer who is now his owner. he was about 12 weeks old — who is now his owner. he was about 12 weeks old when _ who is now his owner. he was about 12 weeks old when we _ who is now his owner. he was about 12 weeks old when we found - who is now his owner. he was about 12 weeks old when we found him - who is now his owner. he was about 12 weeks old when we found him at| who is now his owner. he was about | 12 weeks old when we found him at a property and there were 36 dogs in total and he was in a litter of four puppies. it was horrendous, no food, no water, no clean bedding, there were faeces everywhere, the dogs were faeces everywhere, the dogs were matted, they had no place that was dry to lie down. i fell in love with him, i had a choice after that. he has clearly come on in leaps and bounds and is now preparing for the final in his next competition. the european union has begun rolling out its vaccine passport, which will allow people to move around the
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content without having to quarantine. the digital certificate will show whether somebody has been vaccinated, tested negative for covid or indeed recovered from it recently. non—eu nationals living on the continent will be able to get it for free but it won't be available to british tourists travelling to europe. travel during the pandemic has been complicated. you've needed entry forms, test and vaccination certificates, often issued in a variety of different languages, which airline staff and border control officials have not always been able to understand. but now the eu has issued a new digital covid certificate which aims to streamline things. you can print out the document or download it on your phone. here's a sample one from austria. it tells you whether you've recovered, been tested, or vaccinated for covid. the certificates are issued by national authorities in europe and they're currently recognised throughout the eu. the travel industry is hoping that eventually other countries will be included, too.
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well, we appreciate we have the green pass, at least within europe, which makes travelling much easier between european countries, especially in the holiday season, and we would appreciate if we were to have such a system also for third—party countries outside of non—schengen, especially when it comes to long haul destinations. foreign tourists are beginning to return to this vienna cafe, but every european country currently has its own rules on granting entry to travellers. the eu says countries like britain are working with them to try and align covid documents, but with concerns about the delta variant rising, free travel for non—eu tourists could be some way away. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. new research suggests that covid—19 may be common in cats and dogs whose owners have the virus.
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scientists in the netherlands and canada found that most of the pets who were infected were asymptomatic, or showed very mild symptoms. pet owners who test positive should avoid close contact with their animals so they don't pass on the infection. the original source code for the world wide web has been sold at auction for more than $5 million. the data took the form of a non—fungible token — or nft — a certificate of ownership for digital assets. i should stress only the source code, and not the web itself, has been sold. tim allman explains. it doesn't look all that impressive. a collection of words and symbols that would seem pretty meaningless to most people. but these are no ordinary words and symbols. they did in fact change everything. this is the source code for the world wide web. in effect, the basic rules of how
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the modern internet works. devised by the british scientist sir tim berners—lee, it has now been sold as a completely unique form of data. the owner of this work will absolutely fundamentally be buying something that has come from sir tim, is authenticated as being from sir tim, but equally is uniquely their own and their ownership will be recorded in the blockchain as well. sir tim wrote the original source code in 1989, revolutionising the way computers and people interacted with each other, creating a system that was patent free, royalty free and designed to be collaborative. i wanted something which was both a way of tracking information but also a form of communication so one of the goals was i could use it to collaborate with the people i worked with. some have criticised non—fungible tokens as get—rich—quick schemes that are bad for the environment, but at least one bidder,
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who forked out more than $5 million, thinks this one is worth every penny. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello. for most of us, the weather continues to brighten up this afternoon, with spells of sunshine becoming increasingly widespread. and it has been a lovely start to the day in scotland. this is where we have seen some of the sunniest weather today, and those sunnier skies are working now into a good part of northern england. but elsewhere, it will tend to brighten up. meanwhile, out in the atlantic, we have gotjust to our western — an area of low pressure. well, that is going to come in our way in time for the weekend, throwing bands of rain across the country, so make the most of the dry weather while it lasts. now, today, as i say, most of us will see some spells of sunshine, but there will be a few showers knocking around. wales, the south west midlands,
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across into southern england. the showers forming here because of the sea breeze and also because of the relatively humid weather we have across just this part of south—west england. but otherwise, it is a fresh feeling day, and in the sunshine, temperatures widely into the high teens and low 205 and it is going to feel warm in thatjuly sunshine. overnight tonight, again, cloud will tend to redevelop, particularly across parts of eastern england, parts of eastern scotland, temperatures for most of us around 12 to 1a degrees, so it is tending to be a little bit milder than it was last night. and tomorrow morning, well, although it starts off cloudy in a number of places, that cloud will thin and break up with spells of sunshine coming through. there will be showers in the afternoon and they will be a bit more widespread, a few more thunderstorms around friday afternoon. they will tend to move over into eastern areas of england as we head into the afternoon. so that is where your highest chance of a downpour is. as far as the weekend is concerned, we have got spells of rain coming our way, widespread heavy showers, most of us will see downpours at some point. on saturday, you can see that rain pushing its way northwards. showers then follow.
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most of us will see a downpour or two during the day, but it is across south—west england where we are going to see a line of showers develop thanks to the winds converging together. that will bring an area of slow—moving thunderstorms, so we could see some localised flooding from some of those. temperatures still into the high teens or low 205, but it is still coming down a degree or so, so not quite as warm as it will be today and indeed on friday. sunday is another unsettled day. again, showers and thunderstorms will be widespread. won't be raining all the time, definitely not, but most of us will see a shower or two during the course of the day and those showers are likely to be heavy at times, too. that is your weather.
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this is bbc news, i'm clive myrie. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle and battery production in northeast england, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. nissan is going to be creating jobs here, 750 in a factory plus thousands potentially in the supply chains. uk employers will have to hear more of the costs of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. smiles from the american comedian bill cosby after his conviction is overturned — but women who've accused him of sexual assualt say they're shocked and disgusted. and a royal reunion, william and
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harry will come together to

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