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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 1, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today. almost three years after he was sent to prison for sexual assault, the american entertainer bill cosby is released after his conviction was overturned. the fashion chain gap confirms plans to close all its 81 stores in the uk and ireland. good morning. a major boost for electric cars as nissan is set to announce a big investment in batteries. the government is involved but critics say they are ahead on promises but behind on investment. andy murray has done it again.
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the two time wimbledon champion battled through a late night five set epic on centre court to make it into the third round. on the day princess diana would have turned 60, her sons william and harry unveil a statue in her honour. good morning. today again, part of the east will have a bit of crowd round, thick enough for some drizzle but for many of us, we are looking at a drier and sunny day with a few showers, some of us could see sharp showers. it's thursday, july the 1st. our top story. after more than two years behind bars, the american actor and comedian, bill cosby, has been released from prison. judges at the highest court in pennsylvania overturned his conviction for sexual assault, ruling the 83—year—old should be freed because the correct legal processes hadn't been followed. michelle fleury has this report. this is the moment bill cosby left prison, a free man. he had served two years of a three
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to ten year sentence. his fall from grace was sealed in 2018 after he was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault, for drugging and molesting andrea constand in 200a. but in a stunning reversal, pennsylvania's highest court said the entertainer should never have been charged. in the split ruling, the judges wrote the trial shouldn't have gone ahead because of an immunity deal mr cosby had struck with the previous prosecutor. he can't be retried. earlier, supporters drove by mr cosby�*s home shouting, "hey, hey, hey". a reference to fat albert, the cartoon character he once played. the comedian, who is back with his family, didn't comment to the media but said in a statement, "i have always maintained my innocence". for his accuser, andrea constand, it was a bitter blow. reacting to the decision, she called it...
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bill cosby became known as america's dad for his role as bill huxtable in the 19805 hit sitcom the cosby show. his conviction was seen as proof that even when the accused is one of the most famous people in the world, the voices of the victims of sexual assault could be heard in the us justice system. now, he has a chance to restore his reputation. michelle fleury, bbc news. the clothing retailer, gap, has announced it's closing all 81 of its stores in the uk and ireland and will trade only online. ben boulos is outside the company's flagship store on london's oxford street and can tell us more. how have they come to this decision? well, this is part of the problem. heavy discounting is something that gap has relied on to get shoppers
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coming into the stores and spending money, even before the pandemic it. so when lockdown came in and the stores had to shut, it was already in a rather weak position. its flagship store and the other 80 that it has across the uk and ireland will close by the end of september. it will become an online only retailer in this country, reflecting a very definite trend in the way that we are all now shopping. once a common sight on the british high street. but by the end of september this year, all 81 gap clothes shops in the uk and ireland will have shut their doors for the final time. the warning signs were already there. last month, the company announced the closure of 19 stores as their leases were expiring. in a statement, gap said it planned to stay trading online but hasn't yet made clear how many of its staff will be affected by the plans. the consultation with workers is under way. we heard from gap earlier this year that they were undergoing strategic review of all of their retail operations in europe and that it could of all the stores in the uk.
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could mean the closure of all the stores in the uk. whilst it's a massive gap on the high street, because it's another brand gone, i think it's understandable because the organisation have not only had to endure the same on and off lockdowns that the rest of retail have, and they were dependent on those numbers, but it's also a brand that's going through a big change. they were having challenging times before the pandemic hit. gap's announcement comes as the latest blow to uk high streets, already reeling from the collapse of debenhams and retail group arcadia during the pandemic. and with online retail sales continuing to rise, and footfall remaining sluggish, it's unlikely gap will be the last of the big clothing chain to move permanently to cyberspace. the lights are still on and the display windows are still full here, but it will close. you might think that here on 0xford but it will close. you might think that here on oxford street it would be easy to find someone to take over this store but on the way up i walked past seven�*s old track ship store, that is still boarded—up and
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empty. —— i walked past debenhams old flagship store. and over here is another retail shopping location to let in the uk's prime location for shopping. the japanese car—maker nissan is due to confirm a major expansion of its sunderland plant this morning, creating thousands of jobs locally. it's expected that a new factory will be built, capable of producing more than 100,000 batteries for electric vehicles every year by 202a. nina is there for us. tell us what we might hear a little later on. ,., ., ., �*, tell us what we might hear a little later on. ., �*, . ., later on. good morning. it's nice to be at a car— later on. good morning. it's nice to be at a car plant — later on. good morning. it's nice to be at a car plant announcing - later on. good morning. it's nice to be at a car plant announcing somel be at a car plant announcing some growth for once rather than job losses. this could be a major day for sunderland and the british car industry and for our pledge to get rid of diesel and petrol cars by 2030. if, as we expect, nissan does
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announce this major boost in battery production. nissan, the site here in sunderland, this is the japanese car—maker �*s biggest site in europe, it has been here since 1986 and employs 6000 people. at the moment they make the electric leaf model and the batteries that go in it, but the government wants more, more electric cars and more batteries with more power in them. i'll be expecting to see the announcement today of something called a gigafactory? a factory that makes a capacity of battery three times the size of the current one here. they make more of them faster and pump them out at a huge rate. we might hear about a new electric model being launched. nissan are not doing this alone, they have the help from the government, but we don't know
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how much that will be. the overall fee is expected to be £500 million, perhaps the government investment will be tens of millions, we will wait and see. but they do need this to happen, they are hostage to their own promises about phasing out petrol and diesel cars by 2030 and have the uk carbon neutral by 2050 and critics say they have over promised but are under delivering on measures. 2.5 million electric charging power points are needed and critics say that if this announcement goes ahead this morning, it will be nowhere near enough. morning, it will be nowhere near enou:h. . ~ morning, it will be nowhere near enou:h. ., ~ ,, morning, it will be nowhere near enou:h. . ~ ,, ., dozens of people have died in western canada during an unprecedented heatwave that's lasted almost a week. cities across the north west of the us are also experiencing the intense heat which president biden has blamed on climate change. here's our science editor, david shukman. a sign of trouble in a world that's getting hotter. an emergency cooling centre in a region that never normally needs one. the western united states and canada
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are experiencing heat they're just not used to. i think it's incredibly important that we set up these spaces so people can come in, feel taken care of, feel safe, get cool, and get some water and a bite to eat if they need it. you know, the hotels seem to be sold out as well because people are running away, they need to go somewhere cool with ac. it's just unbearable. it's impossible to be out. it's most dangerous for the homeless. helping them with shade and water is essential. in canada, which is famous for its cold, the heatwave has been blamed for more than 100 deaths. it's the elderly who are less able to regulate their body temperature who are most vulnerable. whether you have heart or breathing problems, or if you are an elderly person, sometimes you just don't cope as well quite as well in the heat of the sun. and the hotter it gets, the more wildfires are likely to start. this one was filmed in california a few days ago. president biden has warned
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the rising temperatures bring all kinds of dangers. the extreme heat we're seeing in the west is not only a risk amplifier for wildfires, it's a threat in and of itself. people are hurting. it's more dangerous for kids to play outside. roads are buckling under the heat. again, i need not tell all of you. so, what's causing this heat? well, there's a vast dome of high pressure above western canada. it's like a lid in the atmosphere, trapping warm air and pushing it down where it gets even hotter. and the heat is held in place by the path of the jet stream, so temperatures have kept climbing. and this is really unusual. the dark red area is far warmer than average. and scientists say that it's human activity, the burning of fossilfuels, that's made this far more likely. my analysis of the temperatures that we are seeing in the western side of north america just wouldn't have been feasible in the natural course of events.
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we've analysed the climate that you would expect, without emissions of greenhouse gases, and you just don't see these sorts of extraordinary temperatures that we are seeing at the moment. the next big worry is farmland, and whether crops will survive the punishing temperatures. the heatwave won't last forever, but it is a reminder of what climate change can really mean. david shukman, bbc news. we will talk to a couple of brits in canada about what it's like out there at the moment and how they are managing with the heat before 7am. the number of migrants crossing the channel by boat in the first half of this year has more than doubled compared with the same period last year. almost 6,000 people have made the journey since january. meanwhile this last month ofjune saw a record numberfor a single month, with more than 2,000 people making the crossing. simonjones reports. crossing the busiest shipping lane in the world. for the people on board this boat, the destination is dover.
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the government has repeatedly pledged to make this route unviable, but the numbers have continued to grow. the boats are getting bigger, and the smugglers organising thejourneys are packing more and more people onto them. injune, more than 2000 people made the crossing from france to the uk, a record figure for a single month. it brings the total so far this year to just under 6000 migrants. that's an increase on the first half of last year when almost 2500 made the journey. it's a highly visible route. though last year asylum applications in the uk actually fell by a quarter. the un refugee agency has previously described numbers arriving as manageable. a familiar sight in dover, people being brought to shore by the border force after being picked up in the channel. next week the nationality and borders bill comes before parliament. the government says its new plan for immigration will tackle the criminal gangs behind the crossings who are putting profits before people's lives.
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but charities supporting refugees say what's needed is more safe and legal ways for migrants to be able to claim asylum in the uk from abroad, without having to risk their lives on the water. simon jones, bbc news. the nhs has been given the green light to roll out a booster vaccine programme this autumn. the extra dose will be given to the over—50s and anyone eligible for a flu jab. flu numbers are expected to be higher than normal this year, meaning extra protection against covid is likely to be needed to prevent too many hospital admisisons. changes to the government's furlough scheme take effect today as the treasury starts to wind down economic support for companies hit by the pandemic. employers will now be able to claim back only 70% of their workers' wages rather than 80%, and will need to cover the 10% shortfall themselves. business groups, trade unions and labour have urged the government not to press ahead with the changes. a covid certificate which aims to ease travelling between eu countries has been launched today.
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the document has a qr code which shows whether someone has been vaccinated, recovered from the virus, or has had a recent negative test result. it's hoped it will reduce the need for eu residents to quarantine when they travel. talks about the uk joining the scheme remain ongoing. a man has apologised for his part in the footage that shows england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, being harrassed in a park. 24—year—old lewis hughes has said he is sorry for any upset caused, and that he has "paid the price" after losing hisjob because of the incident. police say it's been recorded as a common assault. voters will head to the polls in a parliamentary by—election in the west yorkshire seat of batley and spen today. it was held by labour at the last election, and the contest is seen as a big test for the party and sir keir starmer�*s leadership. there are 16 candidates running for the seat.
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0ur expecting results at some stage in the morning tomorrow. let's get the weather with carol. good morning. the weatherfor the next few days is sunshine and showers, there will also be areas of low cloud but today for many, it will be drier with fewer showers. we start on a murky note, some mist and fog around the coasts of northern ireland, wales come into the south—west, the channel islands, some could drift into the corner of south—east england through the day. murky to start to the north of scotland and we have this cloud across the east of england which will be thick enough now and again to produce some drizzle here and there. away from these areas, a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine and the odd shower. 0ne of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine and the odd shower. one or two could well prove to be sharp as we go through the day. top temperatures up to 22. for wimbledon for the rest of the week, a lot of
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dry weather but the risk of a shower that increases through tomorrow and then again on into the weekend. tonight, we see a lot of clear skies. we also have some cloud, mist and fog, coming in across the southeast and kent as well, and you will find we will start to see some murky conditions developed through the night as the showers fade. it will not be a particularly cold night for most of us, but in some sheltered glands, we could see temperatures down into —— in some sheltered glands, we some temperatures into single figures. princes william and harry will come together today to unveil a statue of their mother, princess diana, on what would have been her 60th birthday. princess diana, on what would have it will be the first time the brothers have seen each other since the funeral of their grandfather, the duke of edinburgh, amid reports of a family rift. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph reports. in place, but hidden from view until its unveiling this afternoon.
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the statue of diana princess of wales will stand here in the sunken garden of kensington palace. it was a favourite location of diana's. over the past two years, the layout of the garden has been redesigned and replanted to create a calmer and more reflective setting for the statue. it was commissioned by princes william and harry to mark the positive impact their mother had during their life. they've been involved at every stage, to ensure the statue captures their mother in the way they remember her. yesterday, harry, fresh out of self isolation, afterflying in from california, was a surprise guest at a charity event for seriously ill children. another reminder of the kind of work his mother did. today will be filled with emotion for her sons. i think the statue is another form of legacy. it's celebrating everything that she stood for, for the 36 years that she lived. it will capture the thoughts
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of her sons around her. i think that will be hugely, that will be so meaningful. the statue has been created by sculptor ian rank—broadley. his work, a major part of the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. he already has a royal connection as well, having designed the image of the queen that appears on all our coins. oh, my god. get this on camera. you forgot your boots! the days of banter and teasing between william and harry are gone for now, amid family conflict. their relationship remained strained. the tension lingers between them. 0ur british royal family is not supposed to be a perfect family. if somehow out of this split comes some kind of reconciliation, that will presumably hold a lesson for all of us. many around them hope that under the gaze of their mother today, there is a chance of some reconciliation. daniela relph, bbc news.
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there is quite a lot of talk in the papers this morning about whether the rift between the brothers has been healed, the daily mail suggesting that they have had text conversations, in particular about the england result over germany, in the england result over germany, in the fitful, so maybe football will be the thing that bridges them, who knows. —— the result over germany in the football. let's take a look at today's papers. the times front page is about the covid vaccine booster programme. it says all adults aged over 50 will be offered a third jab alongside the flu vaccine from september. the daily mail goes with the same story, which it says could be a "mix and match" approach. meanwhile, the guardian reports of fears over the safety of mass events after hundreds of scotland fans, who travelled to london for a euro 2020 match, tested positive for coronavirus. the data was published by public health scotland. and andy murray's thrilling five—set match
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win against 0scar 0tte is one of most read stories on the bbc news website. if you missed any of it orjust want to see it all again, there's a highlights film on the website. and michael give us all of the details on bring us up to speed on it all. —— mike will bring is that it all. —— mike will bring is that it has. i noticed that wayne rooney and his mrs are going on a canal boat holiday. they grabbed themselves a bargain holiday according to the sun newspaper, treating therefore children to a peaceful canal break which is very different to the sorts of pictures we usually see of them on a beach in barbados. nice in a very calming way, i imagine. barbados. nice in a very calming way. i imagine-— barbados. nice in a very calming way, i imagine. only one captain on the shi - , way, i imagine. only one captain on the ship. you _ way, i imagine. only one captain on the ship, you know, _ way, i imagine. only one captain on the ship, you know, rachel. - way, i imagine. only one captain on the ship, you know, rachel. i'm - way, i imagine. only one captain on the ship, you know, rachel. i'm not auoin to the ship, you know, rachel. i'm not going to argue _ the ship, you know, rachel. i'm not going to argue with _ the ship, you know, rachel. i'm not going to argue with you _ the ship, you know, rachel. i'm not going to argue with you on - the ship, you know, rachel. i'm not going to argue with you on that - the ship, you know, rachel. i'm not| going to argue with you on that one. i draw your attention to this story, about sweet caroline, and how much it is sung. a classic neil diamond
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song, i didn't realise it has been used by dozens of fitful clubs all over the world many times —— football clubs. it has gone back many years. if you want a bit of doubt detail about the song, why was it sweet caroline? did you know all this? sweet caroline is the name of the song. it wasn't going to be sweet caroline, his wife at the time, this says, he was talking in 2014, his wife at the time's name was marcia, but he could not find a rhythm for equity, it wouldn't scan. he was watching tv and caroline kennedy, she was on tv, and he went, oh, caroline. the song existed. marcia didn't get the song, caroline did. , , ,., marcia didn't get the song, caroline did. , , ., ., did. there must be something about a erfect did. there must be something about a perfect formula _ did. there must be something about a perfect formula for _ did. there must be something about a perfect formula for cloud _ did. there must be something about a perfect formula for cloud singing - did. there must be something about a perfect formula for cloud singing a - perfect formula for cloud singing a song that works, because even the
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most tuneless football fan can bang out sweet —— there must a perfect formula for crowd singing songs. sweet marcia just doesn't work. your washing machine, fridge or tv could last another ten years or so, thanks to a new law which comes into force today. it's all about manufacturers being forced to make spare parts available so that appliances can be fixed instead of heading straight to the tip. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith is at a waste recycling centre on merseyside to tell us more. this is a really interesting story. who hasn't had an occasion where they wanted to mend something and lo and behold, no parts available. so what will you do next? yes. and behold, no parts available. so what will you do next?— what will you do next? yes, good mornin: , what will you do next? yes, good morning, charlie _ what will you do next? yes, good morning, charlie and _ what will you do next? yes, good morning, charlie and rachel, - what will you do next? yes, good| morning, charlie and rachel, that what will you do next? yes, good i morning, charlie and rachel, that is exactly the situation that loads of people find themselves in. either it is too expensive to repair things like this or theyjust can't get the parts, whether it is a draw say for
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a washing machine, ora new parts, whether it is a draw say for a washing machine, or a new door, new one is going in and out of the dishwasher. 0ften new one is going in and out of the dishwasher. often if you're item is more than a couple of years old, the manufacturerjust more than a couple of years old, the manufacturer just does more than a couple of years old, the manufacturerjust does not stock it any more, they make new designs. this law is designed to try and help that. the whole point is that for now it will be available for ten years so when a new product is sold from today, you be able to be getting spare parts for ten years. this isn't about who is responsible for repairing it, so if you are outside of a warranty, you will probably have to pay for a new part or somebody to fit it, probably, especially if it is a more complicated electrical or gas item within the product itself. at least you know you will be able to get hold of it. it's designed to try and cut down on the 1.5 million tonnes of electrical waste we make every yearin of electrical waste we make every year in the uk. we talk about white goods but it also applies to tvs. have a look in here. this is the kind of culture that we are trying
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to shift in the uk, moving from a throwaway culture to one of repairing things. he's only six, is willie, but he's got a mechanical mind, and he's taken over part of his father's yard as a repair shop for kiddies' bikes, trikes and so on. repairing things might have gone out of fashion for a while. bringing history back to life is what makes the repair shop so special. but it's all the rage again now. it's not a two minute job doing this, so patience is definitely the key. but even if you're wanting to get things repaired at the moment, whether to save money or save the planet, it's pretty hard to get hold of the right parts that you need to replace things. but from today, things will hopefully start to get a little bit easier. manufacturers of white goods and tvs now have to stock and sell replacement parts of each product for ten years. so would it tempt you to try and repair something? my dishwasher and oven was 15 years old, and ijust replaced both of them. maybe if it's a smaller repair, something that's just £60 or £70,
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like a small part, like an element in an oven, but over and above that, i wouldn't have thought so. a toaster, kettle, you know, i might even potentially have a look at a hoover. just a very basic repair, yeah, but certainly not on a washer or a cooker, ora tumble dryer. they're so cheap to replace, so ijust probably get - a new one, really. door seals can go, and that's an easy thing that a homeowner can replace themselves. similar with shelves. rob's company has 400 engineers. washing machines are a huge part of our business. it's what we see day in and day out. making more complex repairs in domestic appliances. these can sometimes come off the runners, quite easily fixable, you just click them back in. but he thinks there's plenty we can try ourselves. it gives customers a choice. we really want consumers to take that opportunity to look at what they need as a repair, whether they can repair it themselves via a small component, or if they need to call somebody out like ourselves. a yougov survey suggests we feel most confident with the hoover.
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42% feel comfortable repairing vacuum cleaners. 20% would try patching up a broken toaster. and only 4% would try to fix a gas cooker. in all the statistics, men consistently reported feeling more confident in trying to repair household items than women. but does that mean they do a betterjob? no, not when you've got a partner like me, no. he attempts it but for me, if you've had something for six years, off you pop. and get a new one. it's removable, you can separate it. it's cheaper to make it in one piece. but we make it like that. the uk's only white goods manufacturers say they knew the legislation was coming, and have already made their machines simpler to mend. the secret of products that are easy to repair and last longer is in the design. you've got to start off by saying,
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the objective here is to make a product that's going to be reliable, easy to maintain or whatever. you've got to design a product that's difficult to make wrong and easy to be repaired if it needs to be repaired. even though we now have the right to repair, it's a big cultural shift to convince people to fix things rather than fling them. that's one of the big question is, whether products will get a little bit more expensive if manufacturers are going to have to start stocking parts for longer, and also making them more repairable in the first place. the thing is, the thought of waiting a couple of weeks spare part for an everyday item like a fridge or your washing machine that you use all the time is maybe too much for a lot of people to tolerate, they need a new one immediately when something breaks, without hanging around waiting for an engineer and a new part. thank you so much. we had this recently, charlie, the hinge went on
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ourfridge door, so recently, charlie, the hinge went on our fridge door, so we called recently, charlie, the hinge went on ourfridge door, so we called up recently, charlie, the hinge went on our fridge door, so we called up the company, said, it needs a new part and they would not do that. they insisted on bringing a whole new fridge which was crazy, they said it wasn't worth the cost of the repair. if you have any patched up appliances, things you have repaired over and over again that you want to share with us, we would love to see them. you can contact us on twitter or by e—mail. i5 them. you can contact us on twitter or by e-mail-— or by e-mail. is it the most opened door in the — or by e-mail. is it the most opened door in the house, _ or by e-mail. is it the most opened door in the house, the _ or by e-mail. is it the most opened door in the house, the fridge - or by e-mail. is it the most openedj door in the house, the fridge door? probably is. door in the house, the fridge door? probably le— probably is. particularly at the moment with _ probably is. particularly at the moment with so _ probably is. particularly at the moment with so many - probably is. particularly at the | moment with so many children probably is. particularly at the - moment with so many children self isolating, yes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a parliamentary inquiry into policing at the sarah everard vigil in march, has found there were multiple failings by officers. the met was criticised for being heavy handed during the vigil on clapham common, but cleared of any wrongdoing by inspectors.
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but the all parliamentary group said the right to peaceful protest must be supported, not suppressed by the law. her majesty s inspectorate of constabulary has rejected the findings of the parliamentary group, saying its own review found officers acted proportionately. chelsea and westminster hospital has opened a new state—of—the—art expansion to its intensive care unit. the ribbon was cut by three and a half year—old theo hutton, who was born prematurely atjust 23 weeks and looked after by doctors and nurses at the hospital. the new neonatal intensive care unit will allow the hospital to treat 150 more sick babies every year. intensive care is a very technical care process, lots of machines, lots of noise, lots of beeps, lots of staff, lots of very skilled interventions. but actually, what makes a big difference to recovery and a big difference to family is that kind of comfort level, the human issues around light, the space, the feeling that this is a home from home environment. parliament is to re—open its doors to the public once again for tours
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of the house of commons. tickets will be on sale from the end ofjuly, for a 90—minute covid secure tour that includes the house of commons and house of lords chambers. households in london have experienced an increase in calorie consumption over the course of the pandemic, according to the institute for fiscal studies. largely down to more working from home, calorie intake was up 10% more than usual unto the end of last year, with experts claiming that associated changes in people's lifestyles had exacerbated the challenges of reducing obesity levels. let's take a look at the travel situation now. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a bright start this morning, and we should see a little bit more in the way of sunshine compared to yesterday. perhaps a little bit of mistiness first thing, but that should start to lift to these decent spells of sunshine. we are at risk of maybe one or two showers. towards end of the afternoon many places staying dry
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and temperatures 22 celsius, so feeling a little bit more warmth in that sunshine. that shower risk will peter out overnight. dry with some clear spells to start with, but we'll see low cloud and potentially some mist and fog coming up from the south through the night, minimum temperature between 11 and 14 celsius. so it is going to be quite a murky start tomorrow morning. we should still see some sunshine, but we start to notice the influence of this low—pressure system coming in from the atlantic. so the risk of one or two showers. looking to wimbledon for today, we should get a full day's play. a 10% chance of a shower. uv levels are high and the pollen count very high as well, temperatures around 22 celsius as a maximum. so as we head towards the weekend, that low—pressure system, some showers potentially for friday. but then saturday, spells of rain. and more showers on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and charlie stayt. coming up this morning. a new drivetime presenting team has been announced for bbc radio one — jordan north is taking over alongside vick hope. and we're speaking to jordan later on the show. dennis the menace turns 70 this year, and the royal mail is marking the occasion with a new set of stamps. we'll hear from the current dennis illustrator, nigel parkinson, on how he brings him to life. and the musicianjack savoretti will be with us, talking about the album he recorded in lockdown that he hopes has captured that summer holiday feeling. millions of people could be given a coronavirus boosterjab to protect against new variants, with the over 50s and clinically vulnerable being prioritised.
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this plan would be for it to roll—out alongside the flu jab in september. but can gp surgeries cope with the increased workload? we can speak now to dr fari ahmad, who's in cheshire. morning to you. do you know anything about exactly what is going to be required of you during these autumn months? have you been told anything yet? months? have you been told anything et? ., . �* months? have you been told anything et? ., ., �* , yet? no, we haven't been given the detailwe yet? no, we haven't been given the detail we need _ yet? no, we haven't been given the detail we need to _ yet? no, we haven't been given the detail we need to be _ yet? no, we haven't been given the detail we need to be able _ yet? no, we haven't been given the detail we need to be able to - yet? no, we haven't been given the detail we need to be able to look. yet? no, we haven't been given the detail we need to be able to look at| detail we need to be able to look at this. detail we need to be able to look at this i_ detail we need to be able to look at this ithink— detail we need to be able to look at this. i think this isjust a warning that people who have had their two doses, _ that people who have had their two doses, and — that people who have had their two doses, and particularly the over 705, _ doses, and particularly the over 70s, people living in care homes, front-line — 70s, people living in care homes, front—line workers and other people over 50, _ front—line workers and other people over 50, would need a booster in september, which is also around the time september, which is also around the lime thal— september, which is also around the time that we started to give most of these _ time that we started to give most of these people their flu jab. the details — these people their flu jab. the details are not clear as to whether we can— details are not clear as to whether we can do— details are not clear as to whether we can do that together or whether we can do that together or whether we need _ we can do that together or whether we need to— we can do that together or whether we need to space it. they have not
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said for— we need to space it. they have not said for sure — we need to space it. they have not said for sure either if they are not -- if_ said for sure either if they are not -- if they— said for sure either if they are not -- iftheyare _ said for sure either if they are not —— if they are going to go ahead with— —— if they are going to go ahead with it — —— if they are going to go ahead with it. they want to see what impact — with it. they want to see what impact the booster would have, the people _ impact the booster would have, the people who had theirjabs around january. — people who had theirjabs around january, are there levels dropping enough? — january, are there levels dropping enough? we are being asked to get prepared _ enough? we are being asked to get prepared and the details will be given— prepared and the details will be given in— prepared and the details will be given in time. we prepared and the details will be given in time.— prepared and the details will be iven in time. ~ ., ., ., ,, .,~ given in time. we are going to speak to the jcvi given in time. we are going to speak to the ch later. — given in time. we are going to speak to the ch later. we _ given in time. we are going to speak to the ch later. we don't _ given in time. we are going to speak to the jcvi later. we don't know- given in time. we are going to speak to the jcvi later. we don't know howj to thejcvi later. we don't know how long immunity lasts from these jabs. this idea that you get a jab, one in each arm, has not been tested? is it safe and effective? we each arm, has not been tested? is it safe and effective?— safe and effective? we don't know all of that information. _ safe and effective? we don't know all of that information. that's - all of that information. that's really— all of that information. that's really important if we are planning and we _ really important if we are planning and we are — really important if we are planning and we are going to try and get all this set— and we are going to try and get all this set up— and we are going to try and get all this set up ready to roll out in september. i would this set up ready to roll out in september. iwould hope this set up ready to roll out in september. i would hope as they get more information they do pass it along, _ more information they do pass it along, 50— more information they do pass it along, so we can get going with we are really— along, so we can get going with we are really busy. so having the
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information as quickly as possible would _ information as quickly as possible would be — information as quickly as possible would be really helpful for us to start _ would be really helpful for us to start planning. flu would be really helpful for us to start planning-— would be really helpful for us to start planning. flu was effectively eliminated last _ start planning. flu was effectively eliminated last winter _ start planning. flu was effectively eliminated last winter because i start planning. flu was effectively eliminated last winter because of| eliminated last winter because of blogs and social distancing restrictions. why are they so worried? clearly things have up much more. why are they so worried about the resurgence of flu this winter? we think as people pass micro—restrictions will reduced, the chances _ micro—restrictions will reduced, the chances of— micro—restrictions will reduced, the chances of people contracting flu will go _ chances of people contracting flu will go up. we are expecting this year through levels to be higher. i think— year through levels to be higher. i think what— year through levels to be higher. i think what will happen is we know the covid — think what will happen is we know the covid levels will increase as we io the covid levels will increase as we go indoors — the covid levels will increase as we go indoors, as the weather starts getting _ go indoors, as the weather starts getting colder. and it is having quite _ getting colder. and it is having quite serious respiratory viruses circulating — quite serious respiratory viruses circulating and the impact they would — circulating and the impact they would have. we know this is going to be a problem, so we are definitely focused _ be a problem, so we are definitely focused on — be a problem, so we are definitely focused on our flu and will have to manage _ focused on our flu and will have to manage the covid as well. just
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focused on our flu and will have to manage the covid as well.- focused on our flu and will have to manage the covid as well. just to be clear, this booster _ manage the covid as well. just to be clear, this boosterjab, _ manage the covid as well. just to be clear, this boosterjab, the - manage the covid as well. just to be clear, this boosterjab, the flu - clear, this boosterjab, the flu jab, will probably apply to people deemed vulnerable, so anybody over 50 and anybody in the vulnerable categories that we have become familiar with in recent months. what about the symptoms people are presenting with when they are testing positive for covid at the moment? that has changed significantly. there has been a lot of discussion this week about whether the government officially needs to recognise this?- needs to recognise this? yeah, ou're needs to recognise this? yeah, you're right- — needs to recognise this? yeah, you're right. we _ needs to recognise this? yeah, you're right. we have, - needs to recognise this? yeah, you're right. we have, for- needs to recognise this? yeah, you're right. we have, for a - needs to recognise this? yeah, l you're right. we have, for a long time, _ you're right. we have, for a long time, e3— you're right. we have, for a long time, e3 symptoms are a new cough, a fever— time, e3 symptoms are a new cough, a fever or— time, e3 symptoms are a new cough, a fever or a _ time, e3 symptoms are a new cough, a fever or a loss — time, e3 symptoms are a new cough, a fever or a loss of sense of smell or taste' _ fever or a loss of sense of smell or taste. you — fever or a loss of sense of smell or taste, you need to get tested. we are getting lots of reports that people's— are getting lots of reports that people's symptoms this time, either with variant — people's symptoms this time, either with variant or when they have been vaccinated. — with variant or when they have been vaccinated, people are getting headaches, runny nose, sore throat, feeling _ headaches, runny nose, sore throat, feeling tired — headaches, runny nose, sore throat, feeling tired. so is it time to look at the _ feeling tired. so is it time to look at the symptoms you need before you
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can get— at the symptoms you need before you can get a _ at the symptoms you need before you can get a test? if you had a bit of a sore _ can get a test? if you had a bit of a sore throat and you thought, it is not covid, — a sore throat and you thought, it is not covid, you went about doing your daily business, would you then be infecting — daily business, would you then be infecting other people without realising it and helping the pandemic spread? i think it is important _ pandemic spread? i think it is important to learn more about it, we focus _ important to learn more about it, we focus on _ important to learn more about it, we focus on this — important to learn more about it, we focus on this and we try and change things _ focus on this and we try and change things. 0ther focus on this and we try and change things. other countries for a while have _ things. other countries for a while have used — things. other countries for a while have used a — things. other countries for a while have used a slightly different criteria — have used a slightly different criteria to us in the uk. it might be time — criteria to us in the uk. it might be time to— criteria to us in the uk. it might be time to look at what we classify as symptoms of covid.— be time to look at what we classify as symptoms of covid. thank you so much. as as symptoms of covid. thank you so much- as i — as symptoms of covid. thank you so much. as i mentioned, _ as symptoms of covid. thank you so much. as i mentioned, we - as symptoms of covid. thank you so much. as i mentioned, we will- as symptoms of covid. thank you so much. as i mentioned, we will talk. much. as i mentioned, we will talk to adam finn, from thejcvi, later. we are also going to talk to callum semple about the issue of the definition of covid symptoms. he is from sage. b. definition of covid symptoms. he is from sane. �* ., ., , , from sage. a lot of expertise “oininu from sage. a lot of expertise joining us _ from sage. a lot of expertise joining us this _ from sage. a lot of expertise joining us this morning. - from sage. a lot of expertise joining us this morning. and | from sage. a lot of expertise - joining us this morning. and then there's mike! _ joining us this morning. and then there's mike! my, _ joining us this morning. and then there's mike! my, if— joining us this morning. and then there's mike! my, if ever - joining us this morning. and then there's mike! my, if ever there i joining us this morning. and then i there's mike! my, if ever there was a time when _ there's mike! my, if ever there was a time when a _ there's mike! my, if ever there was a time when a big _ there's mike! my, if ever there was
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a time when a big sporting - there's mike! my, if ever there was| a time when a big sporting occasion is delivering come is the time. andy murray now living up is the time. andy murray now living up to his expectation. it was like one of the great nights as if he was lifting the title again, that roar, this excitement. this is what he went through those operations, all those months of recovery, and refused to give up. he wanted to taste of this kind of excitement again with the fans because they live every point with him. we have to relish it. classic andy murray blockbuster again on centre court until half past ten at night. fans relishing every second. we don't know how many more we will see like this. he is through to the third round at wimbledon. in fact, there were four british winners to celebrate. 0ur sports correspondent joe wilson has more. we may look at him and wonder how much more. we only know how much he's given. there were times on centre court when andy murray looked like a champion, but times when he didn't. oh, no! germany's 0scar 0tte could see his big opportunity, of course he could. he took a two sets to one lead. now, hang on, what about the grass?
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bottom of the screen, murray. oh, no. now, wimbledon spent the day explaining the courts are normal, just need to firm up. was that the end? no. murray played on... ..for worse, or better. roof on, fourth set renaissance. yeah, right there. he does it this time. suddenly, only a power cut would stop him. gentle touch, and then the noise. cheering. was that metal hip now fitted with some kind ofjet engine? oh, that is brilliant! and that is vintage murray again. 6—2 in the fifth, it felt like a wind to match any of murray's here. but was that court really only half full? i needed, i needed everyone's help tonight. and, yeah, they did a greatjob. and, yeah, i've hit some great shots at the end to finish it,
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but it was a tough match. well, he said it. the hill was first henman's. and if you're here to cheer british players, well, you must remember there are others. there are seeds. a dominant performance from dan evans against dusan lajovic. he's seeded 22 for a reason. life on track, straight sets win. evans into the third round. and that's it. keep waving. the 29th seed, cameron norrie, won today, and he's enjoying an outstanding year. well, we could glimpse court 18 for emma raducanu, not 19 until november. great potential for british tennis. joe wilson, bbc news, wimbledon. just 18, incredible. kate cross took five wickets, as england's women india by five wickets in the second one—day international in taunton. they were chasing 222, and looking shaky at 133—5. but a composed innings from sophia dunkley saw them home. she made an unbeaten 73, and katherine brunt hit the winning runs.
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england are now six points to two up in the multi—format series. a controversial managerial appointment has been confirmed. rafa benitez, the former liverpool boss, has taken over at everton. benitez replaces carlo ancelotti, who left last early last month, and he'll need to win over fans, who took offence when he described everton as a "small club" when he was in charge at liverpool. and tottenham's 72 days search for a new manager is finally over — they've appointed former wolves boss nuno espirito santo. he replaces his portuguese compatriotjose mourinho, who was sacked in april. jadon sancho is on england duty at the euros. and it looks as though he's heading for manchester united, who've agreed a deal in principle to sign him from borussia dortmund. it's understood united will pay around £73 million for the winger, who's still only 21, and who joined the german side from manchester city in 2017.
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he's been given the go—ahead to discuss personal terms. they don't water volleyball for the england players. the players that started the historic 2—0 win over germany at wembley, were given the day off training yesterday. and as well as the fun in the water, they took a stroll around st george's park. tomorrow it will be time to pack their bags and fly to rome. raheem sterling, who's scored three goals so far, says there's a good feeling, but much more work, still has to be done. up to this point, it's been a good campaign so far, notjust for me, but for the whole team as well. but as i said, you know, it was a great victory against germany. eh, but now, you know, for it to be even better, you know, we need to keep pushing. while uk—based england fans are not able to travel to the game, those supporters who do not live in the uk have a chance to buy tickets for the quarter final. have a chance to buy tickets for the quarterfinal. 2300
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have a chance to buy tickets for the quarter final. 2300 tickets went on sale last night. we can speak to some lucky england fans who will be there. they live in italy. nigel, lucas and rebecca join us. very big grins, not surprisingly. rebecca, you never even realised this was going to be happening on your doorstep until tuesday evening and it is your first england your doorstep until tuesday evening and it is yourfirst england game. how you are feeling? shifter and it is your first england game. how you are feeling? after watching the football l — how you are feeling? after watching the football i was _ how you are feeling? after watching the football i was as _ how you are feeling? after watching the football i was as surprised i how you are feeling? after watching the football i was as surprised as i the football i was as surprised as everybody else in the uk that england got through. when they said wrong with the end, i thought, i am near wrong. wrong with the end, i thought, i am nearwrong. i did my wrong with the end, i thought, i am near wrong. i did my covid maths. then i realise nobody could get there. i could have a chance to get a ticket. here i am going to be football for the first time. you get to take your partner, _ football for the first time. you get to take your partner, who - football for the first time. you get to take your partner, who is i football for the first time. you get | to take your partner, who is dutch. with the netherlands out, is he going along with gritted teeth or is he converted? he going along with gritted teeth or is he converted?— he converted? he is a little bit reluctant about _ he converted? he is a little bit reluctant about coming. i i he converted? he is a little bit| reluctant about coming. i think he converted? he is a little bit i reluctant about coming. i think he is a little bit grumpy about the whole thing. holland usually do quite well. 0nce whole thing. holland usually do quite well. once he sees all of the
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other expats there and the spirit of the think i think you will love it. nigel and lucas, the think i think you will love it. nigeland lucas, i can the think i think you will love it. nigel and lucas, i can see your big grins. what a weekend, what a saturday night it is going to be for a father and son. nigel, this is his first ever england game? yes. a father and son. nigel, this is his first ever england game? yes, this is lucas's first _ first ever england game? yes, this is lucas's first ever _ first ever england game? yes, this is lucas's first ever game. - first ever england game? yes, this is lucas's first ever game. we i first ever england game? yes, this is lucas's first ever game. we try l is lucas's first ever game. we try to get— is lucas's first ever game. we try to get back— is lucas's first ever game. we try to get back to england last year to .et to get back to england last year to get to— to get back to england last year to get to a _ to get back to england last year to get to a premier league game. this is better— get to a premier league game. this is better for— get to a premier league game. this is better for us. quite excited. yeah, — is better for us. quite excited. yeah, brilliant.— is better for us. quite excited. yeah, brilliant. lucas, and a scale of one to ten. _ yeah, brilliant. lucas, and a scale of one to ten, how— yeah, brilliant. lucas, and a scale of one to ten, how excited - yeah, brilliant. lucas, and a scale of one to ten, how excited are i yeah, brilliant. lucas, and a scale| of one to ten, how excited are you feeling? of one to ten, how excited are you feelin: ? of one to ten, how excited are you feeling? ten. who is your favourite -la er? feeling? ten. who is your favourite player? kalvin _ feeling? ten. who is your favourite player? kalvin phillips. _ feeling? ten. who is your favourite player? kalvin phillips. i— feeling? ten. who is your favourite player? kalvin phillips. i can i feeling? ten. who is your favourite player? kalvin phillips. i can tell. player? kalvin phillips. i can tell b our player? kalvin phillips. i can tell by your accenss _ player? kalvin phillips. i can tell by your accenss you _ player? kalvin phillips. i can tell by your accenss you are - player? kalvin phillips. i can tell by your accenss you are leeds i player? kalvin phillips. i can tell- by your accenss you are leeds fans. what have you made of england's progress? what is your prediction? i am pretty confident we are going to win it _ am pretty confident we are going to win it but— am pretty confident we are going to win it but ltaly— am pretty confident we are going to win it. but italy are _ am pretty confident we are going to win it. but italy are pretty- am pretty confident we are going to win it. but italy are pretty good. i win it. but italy are pretty good. belgium — win it. but italy are pretty good. belgium are _ win it. but italy are pretty good. belgium are good. _ win it. but italy are pretty good.
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belgium are good. but- win it. but italy are pretty good. belgium are good. but i'm i win it. but italy are pretty good. i belgium are good. but i'm pretty good _ belgium are good. but i'm pretty good -- — belgium are good. but i'm pretty good -- you're— belgium are good. but i'm pretty good —— you're confident - belgium are good. but i'm pretty good —— you're confident we i belgium are good. but i'm prettyl good —— you're confident we won't win it _ good -- you're confident we won't win it. �* ., ., ,., good -- you're confident we won't win it. �* ., ., , win it. and how loud can you be? there are — win it. and how loud can you be? there are 2000 _ win it. and how loud can you be? there are 2000 300 _ win it. and how loud can you be? there are 2000 300 england i win it. and how loud can you be? | there are 2000 300 england fans win it. and how loud can you be? i there are 2000 300 england fans in their inner capacity of 15,000. you will have to sing your hearts out to try to make up? i will have to sing your hearts out to try to make up?— will have to sing your hearts out to try to make up? i think quite often, it ma be try to make up? i think quite often, it may be their— try to make up? i think quite often, it may be their only _ try to make up? i think quite often, it may be their only 2000 _ try to make up? i think quite often, it may be their only 2000 england i it may be their only 2000 england fans, _ it may be their only 2000 england fans. it _ it may be their only 2000 england fans, it wouldn't surprise me if it was full— fans, it wouldn't surprise me if it was full of— fans, it wouldn't surprise me if it was full of england fans. they always — was full of england fans. they always manage to here somehow. rebecca, — always manage to here somehow. rebecca, i— always manage to here somehow. rebecca, i have been looking at your lovely location. what is the feeling like among locals in rome, milan? 0bviously they will be excited about the italy belgium quarterfinal tomorrow night. are they taking much notice of england as yet? plat tomorrow night. are they taking much notice of england as yet?— notice of england as yet? not so far. i notice of england as yet? not so far- i have _ notice of england as yet? not so far. i have been _ notice of england as yet? not so far. i have been watching - notice of england as yet? not so far. i have been watching the i far. i have been watching the football with my italian friends. 0n football with my italian friends. on tuesday i watched the football completely on my own because they refuse to watch any england matches. they were a little bit shocked when england got through. they are very patriotically but they love
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football. i think they started to take a little bit of notice of the england team, that they are actually a serious contender in the competition. now i think they will be interested to see what happens on saturday. you be interested to see what happens on saturda . ., ~ ., ._ be interested to see what happens on saturda . ., ~' ., ., , saturday. you never know it may be an england — saturday. you never know it may be an england ltaly _ saturday. you never know it may be an england italy final. _ saturday. you never know it may be an england italy final. thank - saturday. you never know it may be an england italy final. thank you. i an england italy final. thank you. enjoy it. what a game and what a chance to see your first england game. how about that? flying the flag for england on saturday night. a bit early for any child to get wildly enthusiastic though. like the en . land wildly enthusiastic though. like the england team. _ wildly enthusiastic though. like the england team, you _ wildly enthusiastic though. like the england team, you have _ wildly enthusiastic though. like the england team, you have to - wildly enthusiastic though. like the england team, you have to keep i wildly enthusiastic though. like the england team, you have to keep it| england team, you have to keep it under check. i england team, you have to keep it under check-— under check. i am sure you will be bubbfinu under check. i am sure you will be bubbling up _ under check. i am sure you will be bubbling up by _ under check. i am sure you will be bubbling up by saturday. - the american entertainer, bill cosby, has left prison after his conviction for sexual assault was overturned by the supreme court of pennsylvania. the 83—year—old had served more than two years of his sentence at a state prison near philadelphia. let's get more on this now from entertainment reporter, sean mandell, who joins us from los
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angeles. good morning to you. the conviction has been overturned. bill cosby, we understand, is back in his own home. what do we know about what had happened since his release? absolutely. he was released very quickly _ absolutely. he was released very quickly after the supreme court past that decision. the important thing we have _ that decision. the important thing we have to — that decision. the important thing we have to take away from this ruling — we have to take away from this ruling is — we have to take away from this ruling is that it really comes down to what— ruling is that it really comes down to what is— ruling is that it really comes down to what is more or less a technicality. the supreme court did not rule _ technicality. the supreme court did not rule on — technicality. the supreme court did not rule on the merits of the case. they— not rule on the merits of the case. they did _ not rule on the merits of the case. they did not — not rule on the merits of the case. they did not have any qualms or disagreements with how the jury saw the points— disagreements with how the jury saw the points brought against mr cosby as to the _ the points brought against mr cosby as to the allegations of molestation. however, what they did say is _ molestation. however, what they did say is that— molestation. however, what they did say is that cosby's right for a due process— say is that cosby's right for a due process under the us constitution was denied because a previous prosecutor had made an agreement with cosby— prosecutor had made an agreement with cosby not to prosecute, and that allowed a civil suit to be filed — that allowed a civil suit to be filed against him by the woman at
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the centre — filed against him by the woman at the centre of all of this, andrea constand — the centre of all of this, andrea constand. she was the only woman who could bring _ constand. she was the only woman who could bring charges against bill cosby— could bring charges against bill cosby because of the statute of limitations. in the united states certain— limitations. in the united states certain crimes can only be prosecuted within a certain number of years— prosecuted within a certain number of years after they had happened. even _ of years after they had happened. even though over 60 women came forward, _ even though over 60 women came forward, starting in about 2015, publicly, — forward, starting in about 2015, publicly, there was only one case that could — publicly, there was only one case that could be prosecuted in case. that was— that could be prosecuted in case. that was the case of andrea constand in pennsylvania. now because of prosecute — in pennsylvania. now because of prosecute to —— prosecutorial malfeasance, this case has been dismissed — malfeasance, this case has been dismissed. cosby is back at home. there _ dismissed. cosby is back at home. there cannot be a retrial. the supreme _ there cannot be a retrial. the supreme court ruled there cannot be a retrial. _ supreme court ruled there cannot be a retrial. the — supreme court ruled there cannot be a retrial, the trial cannot be conducted again, so this is pretty final~ _ conducted again, so this is pretty final. ~ ., ., conducted again, so this is pretty final. ., ., ., final. what sort of reaction has there been? — final. what sort of reaction has there been? it— final. what sort of reaction has there been? it has _ final. what sort of reaction has there been? it has been i final. what sort of reaction has i there been? it has been absolutely devastatin: there been? it has been absolutely devastating for _ there been? it has been absolutely devastating for the _ there been? it has been absolutely devastating for the victims, - there been? it has been absolutely devastating for the victims, who i devastating for the victims, who have _ devastating for the victims, who have been— devastating for the victims, who have been so vocal in public and have _ have been so vocal in public and have that — have been so vocal in public and have that courage to come forward to speak— have that courage to come forward to speak about their experience with cosby _ speak about their experience with cosby. there has been utter disbelief— cosby. there has been utter
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disbelief as well. far and wide. not 'ust disbelief as well. far and wide. not just in_ disbelief as well. far and wide. not just in the — disbelief as well. far and wide. not just in the entertainment community. if just in the entertainment community. if you _ just in the entertainment community. if you look— just in the entertainment community. if you look on social media, or talk to people — if you look on social media, or talk to people here in the united states, it boggles— to people here in the united states, it boggles the imagination of so many— it boggles the imagination of so many people because it was not something that was expected at all. even cosby's family and supporters were surprised when this decision came _ were surprised when this decision came down. there was a controversial moment— came down. there was a controversial moment that — came down. there was a controversial moment that happened when his former co-star_ moment that happened when his former co-star from _ moment that happened when his former co—star from the cosby show tweeted thatjustice, an injustice had been overturned — thatjustice, an injustice had been overturned by cosby being released. that obviously god a lot of attention because of the fact that somebody people do believe these women _ somebody people do believe these women. again, we should say there are over— women. again, we should say there are over 60 — women. again, we should say there are over 60 women who came forward. she has— are over 60 women who came forward. she has received quite a backlash as well. she has received quite a backlash as walk i_ she has received quite a backlash as well. ~ ., ., , ,, , well. i know the legal process is complicated. — well. i know the legal process is complicated, but _ well. i know the legal process is complicated, but you _ well. i know the legal process is complicated, but you mention i well. i know the legal process is i complicated, but you mention before that he can't be retried. is it clear at this point whether that means he cannot be retried in connection with any other allegations that may have already been made, or come forward in the
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future? ., , , been made, or come forward in the future? ., ,, ., , future? so, the retrial issue only a- lies to the there was enough hard evidence _ to the there was enough hard evidence to be able to convince a 'ury evidence to be able to convince a jury or— evidence to be able to convince a jury or the — evidence to be able to convince a jury or the statute of limitations had expired. andrea constand's case happened _ had expired. andrea constand's case happened in 2004. even though cosby's — happened in 2004. even though cosby's sexual wrongdoing dated back to the _ cosby's sexual wrongdoing dated back to the 70s. _ cosby's sexual wrongdoing dated back to the 70s, this was the most recent example _ to the 70s, this was the most recent example and one that could still be prosecuted under the law. i am sure there _ prosecuted under the law. i am sure there will— prosecuted under the law. i am sure there will be — prosecuted under the law. i am sure there will be a lot of prosecutors who are — there will be a lot of prosecutors who are going back and looking at their case — who are going back and looking at their case logs to see if there is any way— their case logs to see if there is any way that they can bring some of the other— any way that they can bring some of the other cases back to the court. the other— the other cases back to the court. the other thing that could happen is legislators may be able to change
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their laws — legislators may be able to change their laws to change the statute of limitations. that has happened in the past — limitations. that has happened in the past. for example, with michael jackson— the past. for example, with michael jackson and — the past. for example, with michael jackson and some of the accused that came _ jackson and some of the accused that came forward with him, they were able to— came forward with him, they were able to file — came forward with him, they were able to file a civil not criminal suit~ — able to file a civil not criminal suit~ there _ able to file a civil not criminal suit. there is a possibility something could happen with one of the other— something could happen with one of the other accusers, or if someone you were — the other accusers, or if someone you were to— the other accusers, or if someone you were to come forward. however, i’ilht you were to come forward. however, right now— you were to come forward. however, right now that does not seem likely and there _ right now that does not seem likely and there does not seem to be a singular— and there does not seem to be a singular instant that could happen, that could — singular instant that could happen, that could crystallise into.- that could crystallise into. thank ou for that could crystallise into. thank you for your _ that could crystallise into. thank you for your time _ that could crystallise into. thank you for your time this _ that could crystallise into. thank you for your time this morning. | that could crystallise into. thank i you for your time this morning. sean mundell in los angeles. brute you for your time this morning. sean mundell in los angeles.— you for your time this morning. sean mundell in los angeles. we are going to find out about _ mundell in los angeles. we are going to find out about the _ mundell in los angeles. we are going to find out about the extreme - to find out about the extreme weather in los angeles in the moment. carol has the weather. good morning. forthe moment. carol has the weather. good morning. for the next few days it is going to be a mixture of sunshine and also showers. today, some of us are starting off on a fairly murky note with some mist and fog. this weather watchers picture
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was taken in shropshire. basically what has happened is the low pressure that has brought all the cloud and rain across the south—east has moved away. high pressure is starting to take charge. there is hardly a nice bar in the chart, so if you do catch a shower today it will be slow moving. murky conditions, mist and fog adjacent to the irish sea coastline. also some across the channel islands. that could affect south—eastern counties of england through the day. we still have all these cloud parts of south—east england into north—east as well. that is thick enough for some drizzle. in between, for a bit of sunshine and a few showers. temperatures today peaking at about 22 degrees. much brighter in essex and kent and it was yesterday. pollen levels today are high or very high across much of the uk. if you are heading to wimbledon today, there
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is the —— it is not going to be a particularly cold night for most of us. in sheltered areas of the north—east of england we could see... as we head into friday, still a lot of quiet weather. not much wind to move the showers. again, the showers will be few and far between. as we go through the afternoon we will see some heavier ones across parts of north—east england and scotland. temperatures up to 23 degrees. the first signs of something coming in from the atlantic later on. into the weekend, the forecast is a much more unsettled one. on saturday we are likely to see widespread showers coming in across the south of england first of all, pushing north
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eastwards through the course of the day. as we head into sunday, once again looking like quite a showery picture. as a result of all of this, it does mean temperatures won't be as high as they are going to be today or tomorrow, but not too far away from where they should be at this stage injuly. i can't believe it is saying —— but i am saying it is july. what it is saying —— but i am saying it isjuly. what happened for the first six months of this year? we temperatures in canada are so extreme? absolutely. i have had the highest temperatures ever recorded in parts of canada. we are focusing a lot on the british. 0ver in parts of canada. we are focusing a lot on the british. over 121 a lot on the british. 0ver121 fahrenheit. it was a searing dry a dangerous heat. let's speak now to richard and sarah burton, who are both
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british, but have lived in alberta in canada for the past 13 years. is itfairat is it fair at the moment? 0bviously evening time. it must feel cooler. despite what it feels like it is a bit cooler in the evening. it is difficult to — bit cooler in the evening. it is difficult to sleep. _ bit cooler in the evening. it is difficult to sleep. it's - bit cooler in the evening. it is difficult to sleep. it's been around 37, 38— difficult to sleep. it's been around 37, 38 during difficult to sleep. it's been around 37,38 during the difficult to sleep. it's been around 37, 38 during the day. difficult to sleep. it's been around 37,38 during the day. and night time _ 37,38 during the day. and night time we — 37,38 during the day. and night time we have all been struggling to sleep _ time we have all been struggling to sleep the — time we have all been struggling to sleep. the house is hot. are time we have all been struggling to sleep. the house is hot.— sleep. the house is hot. are you havin: sleep. the house is hot. are you having to — sleep. the house is hot. are you having to work _ sleep. the house is hot. are you having to work for _ sleep. the house is hot. are you having to work for have. - sleep. the house is hot. are you having to work for have. we i sleep. the house is hot. are you | having to work for have. we have been working- — having to work for have. we have
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been working. fortunately. i having to work for have. we have been working. fortunately. avoid heat stroke. and heat exhaustion. | heat stroke. and heat exhaustion. i work heat stroke. and heat exhaustion. work at a heat stroke. and heat exhaustion. i work at a golf course and it has affected — work at a golf course and it has affected the _ work at a golf course and it has affected the amount _ work at a golf course and it has affected the amount of - work at a golf course and it has affected the amount of players| affected the amount of players coming — affected the amount of players coming to _ affected the amount of players coming to play— affected the amount of players coming to play on _ affected the amount of players coming to play on the - affected the amount of players coming to play on the golf i affected the amount of players i coming to play on the golf course. they— coming to play on the golf course. they come — coming to play on the golf course. they come out— coming to play on the golf course. they come out early— coming to play on the golf course. they come out early in _ coming to play on the golf course. they come out early in the - coming to play on the golf course. . they come out early in the morning. today— they come out early in the morning. today date _ they come out early in the morning. today date is — they come out early in the morning. today date is pretty _ they come out early in the morning. today date is pretty much _ they come out early in the morning. today date is pretty much dead. i they come out early in the morning. today date is pretty much dead. iiritt�*ej today date is pretty much dead. we are today date is pretty much dead. are seeing pictures of some of the legs. a lot of people heading out of town trying to find cooler conditions anywhere they can. do you have any plans to do the same? it is canada day — have any plans to do the same? it is canada day tomorrow, so we are off work _ canada day tomorrow, so we are off work. ordinarily they would be a lot of events _ work. ordinarily they would be a lot of events on. but because we are 'ust of events on. but because we are just coming — of events on. but because we are just coming out of the covid restrictions, there is not too much on. restrictions, there is not too much on~ we _ restrictions, there is not too much on~ we are — restrictions, there is not too much on. we are going to be doing what i think— on. we are going to be doing what i think most— on. we are going to be doing what i think most families in okotoks are going _ think most families in okotoks are going to _ think most families in okotoks are going to be doing. we are going to .et going to be doing. we are going to get inflatables and float down the river and — get inflatables and float down the river and trying to keep cool that way _ river and trying to keep cool that way i_ river and trying to keep cool that wa . , river and trying to keep cool that wa , , , ., , river and trying to keep cool that
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wa . , , ., , ., , , river and trying to keep cool that wa., ., ,, ., way. i believe people are spending a lot of time in — way. i believe people are spending a lot of time in supermarkets - way. i believe people are spending a lot of time in supermarkets at i way. i believe people are spending a lot of time in supermarkets at the i lot of time in supermarkets at the moment as welljust lot of time in supermarkets at the moment as well just to lot of time in supermarkets at the moment as welljust to experience the cool air. milo, moment as welljust to experience the coolair. milo, is moment as welljust to experience the cool air. milo, is any of this good weather pleasurable at all? are you spending a lot of time outdoors with your friends?— you spending a lot of time outdoors with your friends? well, sometimes i am with my — with your friends? well, sometimes i am with my friends _ with your friends? well, sometimes i am with my friends but _ with your friends? well, sometimes i am with my friends but it _ with your friends? well, sometimes i am with my friends but it is _ with your friends? well, sometimes i am with my friends but it is mainly i am with my friends but it is mainly once _ am with my friends but it is mainly once again — am with my friends but it is mainly once again down by the river. places that are _ once again down by the river. places that are cook — once again down by the river. places that are cool. you can't go into fields_ that are cool. you can't go into fields where you would normally too hard _ fields where you would normally too hard. �* ., ., ,., fields where you would normally too hard. �* ., ., _, fields where you would normally too hard. �* ., ., i” , hard. and what about you, tyler? what works _ hard. and what about you, tyler? what works best _ hard. and what about you, tyler? what works best for _ hard. and what about you, tyler? what works best for you? - hard. and what about you, tyler? what works best for you? i - hard. and what about you, tyler? what works best for you? i went l hard. and what about you, tyler? | what works best for you? i went to hard. and what about you, tyler? i what works best for you? i went to a ool what works best for you? i went to a pool party- — what works best for you? i went to a pool party- it — what works best for you? i went to a pool party- it was — what works best for you? i went to a pool party. it was nice _ what works best for you? i went to a pool party. it was nice to _ what works best for you? i went to a pool party. it was nice to be - what works best for you? i went to a pool party. it was nice to be in - pool party. it was nice to be in april~ — pool party. it was nice to be in aril. �* , . , pool party. it was nice to be in aril.�* , . , ., pool party. it was nice to be in aril. , . , ., ., , april. any excuse for a pool party sounds pretty _ april. any excuse for a pool party sounds pretty good. _ april. any excuse for a pool party sounds pretty good. thank - april. any excuse for a pool party sounds pretty good. thank you i april. any excuse for a pool party | sounds pretty good. thank you so much. look after yourselves out there because we know the temperatures are extreme, particularly for elderly and vulnerable people. thank you for talking to us. the burton family in alberta. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria home. a parliamentary inquiry into policing at the sarah everard vigil in march, has found there were multiple failings by officers. the met was criticised for being heavy handed during the vigil on clapham common, but cleared of any wrongdoing by inspectors. but the all parliamentary group said the right to peaceful protest must be supported, not suppressed by the law. her majesty s inspectorate of constabulary has rejected the findings of the parliamentary group, saying its own review found officers acted proportionately. some commuters face paying—out over £50 a day more for train travel if they use the new flexible tickets, according to analysis by the labour party. they found that some would pay more per day if they used the flexible tickets three days a week rather than a traditional annual season ticket. a govenment spokesperson said most part—time commuters would benefit and that passengers should consider which product best suits
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their travel pattern. a man from east london — who three years ago achieved the record for oldest climber of the 02 arena at age 97 — has beaten his own record by climbing it again on his 100th birthday. harry white scaled the 'up at the 02�* attraction in his wheelchair. and it wouldn't be a birthday without a little party and that all—importa nt birthday cake. i was born in silver town and i have lived mostly round and about this area all the time. so it was quite nice. the last time i came up, i turned round and said, i'd like to do it if i reach 100. to do it again. and i've done it. true to his word. again. and i've done it. true to his word- let's — again. and i've done it. true to his word- let's get _ again. and i've done it. true to his word. let's get a _ now the weather with kate kinsella.
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good morning. it's a bright start this morning, and we should see a little bit more in the way of sunshine compared to yesterday. perhaps a little bit of mistiness first thing, but that should start to lift to these decent spells of sunshine. we are at risk of maybe one or two showers. towards end of the afternoon many places staying dry and temperatures 22 celsius, so feeling a little bit more warmth in that sunshine. that shower risk will peter out overnight. dry with some clear spells to start with, but we'll see low cloud and potentially some mist and fog coming up from the south through the night, minimum temperature between 11 and ia celsius. so it is going to be quite a murky start tomorrow morning. we should still see some sunshine, but we start to notice the influence of this low—pressure system coming in from the atlantic. so the risk of one or two showers. looking to wimbledon for today, we should get a full day's play. a 10% chance of a shower. uv levels are high and the pollen count very high as well, temperatures around 22 celsius as a maximum. so as we head towards the weekend, that low—pressure system, some showers potentially for friday.
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but then saturday, spells of rain. and more showers on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today. almost three years after he was sent to prison for sexual assault, the american entertainer bill cosby is released after his conviction was overturned. the fashion chain gap confirms plans to close all its 81 stores in the uk and ireland. good morning. a major boost for electric cars as nissan is set to announce a big investment in batteries. the government is involved but critics say they are ahead on promises but
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behind on investment. another behind on investment. night of murray mania on centre another night of murray mania on centre court. the two time wimbledon champion battled through a late night five set epic on centre court to make it into the third round. on the day princess diana would have turned 60, her sons william and harry unveil a statue in her honour. good morning. for many of us today, a murky start, a bit of clout, mist and fog around, most of that will lift allowing a lot of us to have a dry and sunny days with a few showers. in eastern england, cloud and drizzle at times. it's thursday, july the 1st. our top story. after more than two years behind bars, the american actor and comedian, bill cosby, has been released from prison. judges at the highest court in pennsylvania overturned his conviction for sexual assault, ruling the 83—year—old should be freed because the correct legal processes hadn't been followed.
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michelle fleury has this report. this is the moment bill cosby left prison, a free man. he had served two years of a three to ten year sentence. his fall from grace was sealed in 2018 after he was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault, for drugging and molesting andrea constand in 200a. but in a stunning reversal, pennsylvania's highest court said the entertainer should never have been charged. in the split ruling, the judges wrote the trial shouldn't have gone ahead because of an immunity deal mr cosby had struck with the previous prosecutor. he can't be retried. earlier, supporters drove by mr cosby's home shouting, "hey, hey, hey". a reference to fat albert, the cartoon character he once played. the comedian, who is back with his family, didn't comment to the media but said in a statement, "i have always maintained my innocence". for his accuser, andrea constand,
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it was a bitter blow. reacting to the decision, she called it... bill cosby became known as america's dad for his role as cliff huxtable in the 1980s hit sitcom the cosby show. his conviction was seen as proof that even when the accused is one of the most famous people in the world, the voices of the victims of sexual assault could be heard in the us justice system. now, he has a chance to restore his reputation. michelle fleury, bbc news, pennsylvania. the clothing retailer, gap, has announced it's closing all 81 of its stores in the uk and ireland and will trade only online. ben boulos is outside the company's flagship store
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on london's oxford street and can tell us more. why tell us more. have they decided to close all of why have they decided to close all of the high street stores? the liuhts of the high street stores? the lights are _ of the high street stores? the lights are still— of the high street stores? the lights are still on _ of the high street stores? ins lights are still on here of the high street stores? “11s lights are still on here for of the high street stores? 11s lights are still on here for now but not for much longer. part of the problem is this, heavy discounting, it's something that gap has relied on to get customers are spending money in its stores, even before the pandemic. when lockdown came in and the stores had to shut, it was already in a weak position. this flagship store in the other 80 it has around the uk and ireland will close for good by the end of september, it will become an online only retailer here, reflecting a very definite trend in the way that we are all now shopping. once a common sight on the british high street. but by the end of september this year, all 81 gap clothes shops in the uk and ireland will have shut their doors for the final time. the warning signs were already there. last month, the company announced the closure of 19 stores as their leases were expiring.
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in a statement, gap said it planned to stay trading online but hasn't yet made clear how many of its staff will be affected by the plans. the consultation with workers is under way. we heard from gap earlier this year that they were undergoing strategic review of all of their retail operations in europe and that it could mean the closure of all the stores in the uk. whilst it's a massive gap on the high street, because it's another brand gone, i think it's understandable because the organisation have not only had to endure the same on and off lockdowns that the rest of retail have, and they were dependent on those numbers, but it's also a brand that's going through a big change. they were having challenging times before the pandemic hit. gap's announcement comes as the latest blow to uk high streets, already reeling from the collapse of debenhams and retail group arcadia during the pandemic. and with online retail sales continuing to rise, and footfall remaining sluggish, it's unlikely gap will be the last of the big clothing chain to move permanently to cyberspace.
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you might well think that here on oxford street they will have no problem finding someone to take on the store when gap moves out. on the way here i walked past debenhams and their old flagship store which shut a few months ago, it still boarded up a few months ago, it still boarded up and empty, no one in there. and take a look over the road from where we are, another store with an tolet sign on the front. the loss of a major retailer will be a worry not just here in london but on high streets up and down the country. the japanese car—maker nissan is due to confirm a major expansion of its sunderland plant this morning, creating thousands of jobs locally. it's expected that a new factory will be built, capable of producing more than 100,000 batteries for electric vehicles every year by 20211. nina is there for us. tell us some more details. good morning, there is definitely a growing buzz here this morning because this is set to be a big day
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for sunderland. a big day for the uk car industry, and for our move towards going electric. let me give you a bit of context about this site in sunderland, this is nissan's biggest site in europe, it has been here since 1986, around 6000 employees and here they make the electric leaf, and within that, the battery. but they want more electric cars and more batteries with more power. to make that happen, what is needed is something called a gigafactory, making batteries around three times the power on a massive scale. we are expecting to hear an announcement on that and possibly on announcement on that and possibly on a new electric model. how involved will the government be? they need for this to happen, they have set their own ambitious pledges of phasing out diesel and petrol cars by 2030, and carbon neutrality by 2050. critics say they have over promised and are currently under delivering. where are the millions
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of charging points for example, that have been promised for electric cars? why are we so far behind the eu and the us when it comes to a gigafactory like this and when the site comes into fruition, where will we stand in the global race? we expect the details of the announcement in the next ten minutes. the number of migrants crossing the channel by boat in the first half of this year has more than doubled compared with the same period last year. almost 6,000 people have made the journey since january. last month saw a record numberfor a single month, with more than 2,000 people making the crossing. the government says its new plan for immigration paper will tackle the criminal gangs behind the crossings. princes william and harry will today unveil a statue of their mother, diana princess of wales, at kensington palace on what would have been her 60th birthday. it will be the first time
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the brothers have seen each other since the funeral of their grandfather the duke of edinburgh in april. let's speak now to our royal correspondent sarah campbell. there are many elements to today, one of them is intensely personal for the two brothers.— for the two brothers. yes, good morning- _ for the two brothers. yes, good morning- it _ for the two brothers. yes, good morning. it was _ for the two brothers. yes, good morning. it was four _ for the two brothers. yes, good morning. it was four and - for the two brothers. yes, good morning. it was four and a - for the two brothers. yes, good morning. it was four and a half| morning. it was four and a half years ago that the brothers announced the plans for this permanent statue, they said the time was right to commemorate their mother, her positive impact around the world. as you say, so much has changed since then. not least in a sunken garden where the statue will be located, just behind the hedges that you can see behind me, it has been redesigned and replanted over the last couple of years with thousands of new plants, many of them diana's favourites. it was one of her favourite places to be. them diana's favourites. it was one of herfavourite places to be. much has changed between william and harry, once the closest of brothers but now living on different continents. their relationship truly fractured. today will be the first time they have met since their grand
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father's funeral. what we know about today? very little, a brief unveiling, a small private affair, covid has made that numbers will have had to be limited. the princess will be there along with members of diana's close family. —— the princes will be there, we expect diana's siblings and the garden design designer will be there. a big personal day for the princes, and we know that they know the people will be watching the interactions, hoping it will be a bridge to get their relationship back to what it was. a covid certificate which aims to ease travelling between eu countries has been launched today. the document has a qr code which shows whether someone has been vaccinated, recovered from the virus, or has had a recent negative test result. ourforeign our foreign correspondent is ourforeign correspondent is in vienna. how do these certificates
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work, first of all, but will people in the uk be able to use them? hts in the uk be able to use them? 113 really hoped in the uk be able to use them? 1113 really hoped that these certificates will make things much easier because up will make things much easier because up to now, if you tried to to travel, you have needed tests and vaccination certificates, often in lots of different languages. airline staff and border control people could not possibly read them. what this qr code does is shows whether your test status, your vaccination status, and you show it, it is scanned in and everybody can read it across the eu. yes, the eu commission says they are talking to the uk at the moment, having technical talks about that, but they did not give a timescale as to when the uk might be able tojoin did not give a timescale as to when the uk might be able to join this. thank you very much, bethany. a man has apologised for his part in the footage that shows england's chief medical officer,
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professor chris whitty, being harrassed in a park. 24—year—old lewis hughes has said he is sorry for any upset caused, and that he has "paid the price" after losing hisjob because of the incident. police say it's been recorded as a common assault. his pet dog has been the scourge of posties for decades but the royal mail is still honouring dennis the menace with a set of stamps. the stamps, which are released today, show some of dennis' key moments during his 70 years in the beano. they include his first ever appearance in the comic in 1951, the moment he adopted his famously ferocious dog, gnasher, in 1968, and the arrival of baby sister bea in 1998. that's a 1998, his sister. i didn't... iwas that's a 1998, his sister. i didn't... i was unfamiliar with almost all of those events. i feel like i should have known. we will talk to the _
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like i should have known. we will talk to the man _ like i should have known. we will talk to the man who _ like i should have known. we will talk to the man who illustrates i like i should have known. we will. talk to the man who illustrates him before atm. every person who illustrated dennis the menace was called david for years, until roger came along. a little—known fact. —— until nigel came along. i didn't know that. let's have a look at the weather now with carol. it's a mixed picture this morning, this picture was sent in from one of our weather watchers in dundee, and for the next few days it is a mixture of sunshine and showers. by the time we get to the weekend, the weather will turn much more unsettled. we have some mist and fog across the channel islands this morning, some could lap onto the coastline of south—east england. the irish sea will have some mist as well, but inland, dry weather, the cloud will break and we will see some sunshine coming through. the exception is part of eastern england were today once again we will see a bit more cloud and thick enough for
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some drizzle here and there. brighter across essex and kent than yesterday. as temperatures rise to the day, a few showers knocking around, many of us will get away with a dry day. feeling nice in the sunshine, 22 degrees, unless you have an allergen to pollen because the pollen levels are very high or high across much of the uk. this evening and overnight, most of the showers will fade, misty and murky conditions returning, but not a particularly cold night for most of us with temperatures widely in double figures, apart from some sheltered glens where temperatures will be seven or eight. a longer weather forecast in half an hour. thank you very much, carol. the nhs has been given the green light to roll out a booster vaccine programme this autumn.
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not everyone is eligible, but to the over—50s and anyone eligible for a flu jab will be offered one. professor adam fenn joins us from thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. take us through the basics on this one. the proposal and the planning is in place, or it isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie. isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie- the _ isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie. the point _ isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie. the point of _ isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie. the point of all _ isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie. the point of all of - isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie. the point of all of this i isjust beginning? just beginning, charlie. the point of all of this is| charlie. the point of all of this is to enable us to get things in place, if this proves to be necessary, and in particularfor if this proves to be necessary, and in particular for people who are at the highest risk of getting seriously ill with covid, the elderly and people who are immunosuppressed. we need to think about the health care staff, doctors and nurses who will be manning the health service through the coming winter. in particular, every autumn in september, we start a flu vaccine
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programme. that's very important this year because we are very concerned that there will be a large epidemic through the winter of flu, having had no flu last year. we need to be able to coordinate those things together and enable people to receive both vaccines in the same visit. 1 receive both vaccines in the same visit. ~' , ., , , receive both vaccines in the same visit. ~ , ., , , ., visit. i think the phrase he used to have, professor, _ visit. i think the phrase he used to have, professor, is, _ visit. i think the phrase he used to have, professor, is, we _ visit. i think the phrase he used to have, professor, is, we need - visit. i think the phrase he used to have, professor, is, we need to i visit. i think the phrase he used to| have, professor, is, we need to be ready, if it proves to be necessary. what are the markers, that you are waiting for, to make that decision? the two key things are, looking at the immune responses and how well they persist in people who have already received the vaccines, and that has been very closely followed. looking at antibody levels over time, if you like. the other thing we will be observing over the next few weeks closely is how well the immunity is persisting, and how well people are being protected against this new wave of covid we are seeing coming through. of course, there are
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people in hospital already who have been fully vaccinated, the vaccines are not perfect. but at the moment the signs are very good that the protection is strong. but we will need to see if there are any signs, particularly in the very old and the people who receive the vaccine early in the programme that they are less well protected, which will encourage us to give them boosters. so well protected, which will encourage us to give them boosters.— us to give them boosters. so the timeline on _ us to give them boosters. so the timeline on this, _ us to give them boosters. so the timeline on this, can _ us to give them boosters. so the timeline on this, can you - us to give them boosters. so the timeline on this, can you give i us to give them boosters. so the timeline on this, can you give us| us to give them boosters. so the l timeline on this, can you give us a sense? the talk is around september, if it is going to be brought into place, around september. so will always be on that period late in the summer, which isn't far away now, —— so, we'll all eyes he on that period, to see if people are testing positive if they are double jab, and more importantly, hospitalisations of people who have been double jab? is that the timeline? of people who have been double 'ab? is that the timeline?fi is that the timeline? absolutely, we are literally watching _ is that the timeline? absolutely, we are literally watching this _ is that the timeline? absolutely, we are literally watching this one - is that the timeline? absolutely, we are literally watching this one week|
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are literally watching this one week after the next to see what the trends are, and getting more information now about the immune responses to boosters that are given. we are doing studies that are looking at boosting with different vaccines. there will be new vaccines coming through to add to the ones we have already, so we will be in a position to work out which vaccines to use if it proves necessary. and then getting things lined up so that when the flu vaccines come through, we are ready to move with this when it's necessary or if it is necessary. it's necessary or if it is necessary-— it's necessary or if it is necessa . ., ., necessary. cast your mind forward, those of us — necessary. cast your mind forward, those of us who _ necessary. cast your mind forward, those of us who are _ necessary. cast your mind forward, those of us who are not _ necessary. cast your mind forward, those of us who are not expert - necessary. cast your mind forward, those of us who are not expert in l those of us who are not expert in this area, if this does happen, the booster starts in september, people will be thinking that maybe this is basically the future. if you do it after six months, eight months, ten months after you have had your two jabs, basically, that will be the beginning of a new way of living in the same way that you have a flu
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vaccine, every year after a certain period of time, you will get a booster vaccine in relation to covid. is that a realistic assumption of where we are going? ht assumption of where we are going? 11 is, but possibly not for everybody. and the uncertainty will reduce as time goes by, and we will really see how much of an ongoing problem we have with this virus, and how it behaves and evolves. i think it's highly likely that we will see, go on seeing people getting infected with this virus in the future, and the need to particularly immunise people who are vulnerable to getting seriously ill with it, yes.— seriously ill with it, yes. finally, on a practical — seriously ill with it, yes. finally, on a practical note, _ seriously ill with it, yes. finally, on a practical note, the - seriously ill with it, yes. finally, on a practical note, the very - seriously ill with it, yes. finally, i on a practical note, the very visual picture, someone having a flu vaccine here and it covid vaccine here, this could be vulnerable people, what do we know about people's ability to withstand two vaccinations at the same time? giving several vaccines at once is fairly common, mostly in children.
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adults getting vaccine forjarrell will be familiar with getting several shots on the same day stop —— getting vaccines for travel. we have been leading a study, my colleague has been leading a study in bristol looking at exactly this, the covid vaccine is being given with flu vaccines, over the last few months. the results arejust with flu vaccines, over the last few months. the results are just coming through of that study, and they seem to suggest that it is a perfectly tolerable thing to do. professor adam finn. _ tolerable thing to do. professor adam finn, always _ tolerable thing to do. professor adam finn, always good - tolerable thing to do. professor adam finn, always good to - tolerable thing to do. professor l adam finn, always good to speak tolerable thing to do. professor - adam finn, always good to speak to you, thank you for your time this morning. all eyes will be on princes william and harry later today, as they come together later to unveil a statue of their mother princess diana, on what would have been her 60th birthday. the brothers may put on a united front for the event, but their once close relationship is likely to have been damaged by the revelations prince harry made in his interview with talk show host oprah winfrey. so might this moment today signal
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an end to the conflict? we can speak now to royal author and historian robert lacey. good morning. first of all, this statue, if we can talk about it, we know very little about it. have you had any insight? 1110. know very little about it. have you had any insight?— had any insight? no, i have 'ust been over there i had any insight? no, i have 'ust been over there to i had any insight? no, i have 'ust been over there to try �* had any insight? no, i have 'ust been over there to try and i had any insight? no, i havejust been over there to try and look| had any insight? no, i havejust i been over there to try and look at it, and there is nothing visible. apparently, after today, it will be possible for members of the public when the gardens are open, 10am to 6pm also, you will be able to go and look through a gap in the hedge. apparently the sculptor designed it to be seen with hedges on either side. and if you care to pay money, you can go into the palace, and get a closer look at it. but there is a box in there, a big black box, presumably that will be removed and whatever is on top of it will come off. apparently, it will notjust be
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diana just standing there, she's going to be doing something, that symbolises what she stood for her life. ht symbolises what she stood for her life. , ., , . ., symbolises what she stood for her life. , ., ,. ., ., , life. it will be fascinating to see what it looks — life. it will be fascinating to see what it looks like. _ life. it will be fascinating to see what it looks like. and - life. it will be fascinating to see what it looks like. and clearly, | life. it will be fascinating to see | what it looks like. and clearly, i think the brothers would prefer today to be all about her and her legacy, but all eyes will be on the two of them. do we have any indication whether there has been much contact, or any warming of relationship between the two since the apparently deepening rift between them, or harry and the family members? 1110. between them, or harry and the family members?— between them, or harry and the famil members? ., ., , , family members? no, there has been. -- there has— family members? no, there has been. -- there has rrot _ family members? no, there has been. -- there has not been. _ family members? no, there has been. -- there has not been. you _ family members? no, there has been. -- there has not been. you mention i —— there has not been. you mention to the revelations on oprah, those did not go down well with william. worst is what happens afterwards, when conversations between the two of them were reported via oprah and other friends of meghan and harry. which, a, didn't cause goodwill, and b, rather undermines future
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conversations or reconciliation. we have no inside information from either side, we know that both brothers will make a speech and the emphasis will be on the tribute to diana. they have been working on this for years. it's not the only tribute to diana ran here, there is a playground, fountain, a walkway, this was meant to be the final piece of the tribute. and of course, it was devised in happier days. apparently, it was even over the style of the statue that the disagreements started to show themselves. although the disagreements are not about the statue itself. and let's hope that this will be a family occasion. of course, it is the spencers, their uncle, charles spencer, who will be presiding over it. they will not be any other members of the royal family present, no prince charles, no queen. it will be in a way a
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reminder of how the spencers, the new spencer generation is taking over the family and diana is right at the heart of that.— at the heart of that. prince harry himself has _ at the heart of that. prince harry himself has been _ at the heart of that. prince harry himself has been in _ at the heart of that. prince harry himself has been in quarantine l at the heart of that. prince harry i himself has been in quarantine since he arrived, but he was at an event for a children's charity last night. will he be meeting any other embers of the royal family while he's will he be meeting any other embers of the royalfamily while he's here? —— members of the royalfamily? we haven't been told that. last time he was here, staying in frogmore, he would meet the queen when she was walking her dogs. to date they will only meet briefly before they go out and make the speeches —— today they'll only meet briefly. a lot of people have said to me, what would diana have made this? would her presence had made any this difference? but he will be there
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today in presence, a physical presence, and she will be in the hearts and minds of her two sons as they designed this tribute to her. what they do about their relationship is surely part of their tribute to her. the relationship is surely part of their tribute to her.— tribute to her. the new growth of the relationship. _ thousands and thousands of different plants have been planted in this garden, and attended to by the gardens there, have you been able to take a peek at that? 1 gardens there, have you been able to take a peek at that?— take a peek at that? i have seen some pictures — take a peek at that? i have seen some pictures of _ take a peek at that? i have seen some pictures of it, _ take a peek at that? i have seen some pictures of it, yes, - take a peek at that? i have seen some pictures of it, yes, it's- some pictures of it, yes, it's wonderful. they have actually changed the name of the garden, from the sunken garden, slightly depressing name, to the white garden. apparently that is the theme of the planting. wonderful white plants everywhere, and meadow plants, cow parsley in a kind of thing. i think it will be a wonderful thing for people to look at and visit. this is now a new
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centre of royal pilgrimage in london. even if you weren't discussing today the relationships between the two brothers, we would between the two brothers, we would be discussing the way in which diana is now centrestage in what the royal family means and stands for. you might not have thought that 25 years ago when she was a royal rebel, but it shows how the monarchy has changed. sadly, the brothers have gone on a different direction for the time being. but one can't imagine that will be the case forever. ., ~ , ., imagine that will be the case forever. ., ~' , ., imagine that will be the case forever. ., ~ , ., . imagine that will be the case forever. ., ~ . ., imagine that will be the case forever. ., . ., forever. thank you so much for your time this morning, _ forever. thank you so much for your time this morning, robert _ forever. thank you so much for your time this morning, robert lacey, i time this morning, robert lacey, royal biographer. tpm is the official unveiling. —— 2pm is the official unveiling. —— 2pm is the official unveiling. —— 2pm is the official unveiling so we will bring you that on the bbc news channel. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. a parliamentary inquiry into policing at the sarah everard vigil in march, has found there were multiple failings by officers. the met was criticised for being heavy handed during the vigil on clapham common,
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but cleared of any wrongdoing by inspectors. but the all parliamentary group said the right to peaceful protest must be supported, not suppressed by the law. her majesty s inspectorate of constabulary has rejected the findings of the parliamentary group, saying its own review found officers acted proportionately. chelsea and westminster hospital has opened a new state—of—the—art expansion to its intensive care unit. the ribbon was cut by three and a half year—old theo hutton, who was born prematurely atjust 23 weeks and looked after by doctors and nurses at the hospital. the new neonatal intensive care unit will allow the hospital to treat 150 more sick babies every year. intensive care is a very technical care process, lots of machines, lots of noise, lots of beeps, lots of staff, lots of very skilled interventions. but actually, what makes a big difference to recovery and a big difference to family is that kind of comfort level, the human issues around light, the space,
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the feeling that this is a home from home environment. parliament is to re—open its doors to the public once again for tours of the house of commons. tickets will be on sale from the end ofjuly, for a 90—minute covid secure tour that includes the house of commons and house of lords chambers. households in london have experienced an increase in calorie consumption over the course of the pandemic, according to the institute for fiscal studies. largely down to more working from home, calorie intake was up 10% more than usual unto the end of last year, the end of last year. it isa it is a further challenge in the fight against obesity loss. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a bright start this morning, and we should see a little bit more in the way of sunshine compared to yesterday. perhaps a little bit of mistiness first thing, but that should start to lift to these decent spells of sunshine. we are at risk of maybe
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one or two showers. towards end of the afternoon many places staying dry and temperatures 22 celsius, so feeling a little bit more warmth in that sunshine. that shower risk will peter out overnight. dry with some clear spells to start with, but we'll see low cloud and potentially some mist and fog coming up from the south through the night, minimum temperature between 11 and 111 celsius. so it is going to be quite a murky start tomorrow morning. we should still see some sunshine, but we start to notice the influence of this low—pressure system coming in from the atlantic. so the risk of one or two showers. looking to wimbledon for today, we should get a full day's play. a 10% chance of a shower. uv levels are high and the pollen count very high as well, temperatures around 22 celsius as a maximum. so as we head towards the weekend, that low—pressure system, some showers potentially for friday. but then saturday, spells of rain. and more showers on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. many of us have been longing for a holiday abroad, but travel restrictions have brought uncertainty to our summer plans. from today, travel between eu countries will be made easier with the introduction of a covid certificate to prove a negative test, or vaccine status. but what does that mean for us here in the uk? breakfast�*s graham satchell has been finding out. the border between croatia and slovenia. at the checkpoint people are showing covid certificates. those who can prove they have been double jabbed, or have had a recent negative test, allowed through. from today, the eu covid certificate goes live across the whole of the european union. it means travel for millions on the continent will start to open up. the certificate doesn't
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apply to britain. we are no longer part of the eu. but talks have started with brussels to allow it is people who have had both vaccinations to travel more easily. vaccine tears —— where certificates will make a big difference. they should enable easy access into other countries, especially in europe. the challenge is that governments are constantly changing the rules. they are literally changing day by day at the moment. so consumers need to be a detective, they need to be a sleuth, to travel this summer, to follow the right rules and be up—to—date. i hope the vaccine certificates go some way to helping that riddle. 50 certificates go some way to helping that riddle. ._ certificates go some way to helping that riddle. , ., , ., that riddle. so we may need to show covid certificates _ that riddle. so we may need to show covid certificates in _ that riddle. so we may need to show covid certificates in the _ that riddle. so we may need to show covid certificates in the future - that riddle. so we may need to show covid certificates in the future to - covid certificates in the future to go on holiday. what about use in the uk? a concert in liverpool, one of the government's so called test events. should you have to show a covid certificate to get into a
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concert, cinema? the government have been thinking about it for months. latest reports suggest that they won't be required. industry experts say uncertainty is damaging. haste won't be required. industry experts say uncertainty is damaging. we need the government _ say uncertainty is damaging. we need the government to _ say uncertainty is damaging. we need the government to say _ say uncertainty is damaging. we need the government to say one _ say uncertainty is damaging. we need the government to say one way - say uncertainty is damaging. we need the government to say one way or i the government to say one way or another, _ the government to say one way or another, is _ the government to say one way or another, is this going to be an entry— another, is this going to be an entry requirement or not? and i will say that— entry requirement or not? and i will say that even if it isn't mandatory, i do think— say that even if it isn't mandatory, i do think some events may still want _ i do think some events may still want to— i do think some events may still want to introduce a covid certification system as part of the duty of— certification system as part of the duty of care to audiences. your covid status, _ duty of care to audiences. your covid status, how _ duty of care to audiences. your covid status, how many - duty of care to audiences. your covid status, how many jabs i duty of care to audiences. 111,5- covid status, how manyjabs you have had, is automatically uploaded to your nhs app. it looks like you may have to show this to travel in the future. but there is still a? over whether we will have to use it to access large events here. so, let's take a look at what the latest rules are for some popular holiday destinations. in malta, which is now on the uk government's green list, travellers from the uk aged 12
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and over can only enter the country if they have had both doses of the vaccine, which effectively stops families with teenagers going there. portugal was on the green list, but is now on the amber list. the portugese authorities have said tourists from the uk must quarantine for 111 days on arrival, unless you can prove you're fully vaccinated. but, unlike malta, portugal will allow under—18s into the country without isolating, if they're with parents who have had both jabs. and in italy, uk tourists need to iisolate for five days and then take a covid test before they can go out and enjoy their holiday. but that rule is only in place until the 30th july. i hope you got your heads around that. for more on the travel and leisure situation, we're joined now by simon calder, the travel editor of the independent, and by stephanie sirr, who's the chief executive of nottingham playhouse.
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stephanie we were talking about potential covid passport any moment. simon, how is any traveller supposed to make a decision about where to 90, to make a decision about where to go, how to get there? 1 to make a decision about where to go, how to get there?— to make a decision about where to go, how to get there? i have never known things _ go, how to get there? i have never known things so _ go, how to get there? i have never known things so complicated. - go, how to get there? i have never known things so complicated. here go, how to get there? i have never i known things so complicated. here we are in— known things so complicated. here we are injuly. _ known things so complicated. here we are injuly, one of the two peak months — are injuly, one of the two peak months along with august. all the airports _ months along with august. all the airports would be incredibly busy. they are — airports would be incredibly busy. they are getting busier than they were _ they are getting busier than they were but— they are getting busier than they were but we are still seeing just a trickle _ were but we are still seeing just a trickle of— were but we are still seeing just a trickle of passengers. those poor passengers are getting incredibly confused. you mentioned malta. yes you can _ confused. you mentioned malta. yes you can go _ confused. you mentioned malta. yes you can go if— confused. you mentioned malta. yes you can go if you are lucky enough to he _ you can go if you are lucky enough to be jabbed. but you have to produce — to be jabbed. but you have to produce an nhs covid past letter, which _ produce an nhs covid past letter, which you — produce an nhs covid past letter, which you can order online or get by phone _ which you can order online or get by phone in— which you can order online or get by phone in england and scotland. you can order— phone in england and scotland. you can order iry— phone in england and scotland. you can order by phone in wales. in northern— can order by phone in wales. in northern ireland they are saying, hang _ northern ireland they are saying, hang on. — northern ireland they are saying, hang on, we have not quite got them ready _ hang on, we have not quite got them ready my— hang on, we have not quite got them ready. my dear, the only part of portugal— ready. my dear, the only part of portugal on the green list, you can io portugal on the green list, you can go to— portugal on the green list, you can go to if— portugal on the green list, you can go to if you — portugal on the green list, you can go to if you are a british person. you _ go to if you are a british person. you have — go to if you are a british person. you have to _ go to if you are a british person. you have to have a pcr test in
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advance — you have to have a pcr test in advance. but they will give you one when _ advance. but they will give you one when you _ advance. but they will give you one when you get there. and spain, we saw all— when you get there. and spain, we saw all kinds of scenes yesterday. we can _ saw all kinds of scenes yesterday. we can go — saw all kinds of scenes yesterday. we can go there. there is confusion about— we can go there. there is confusion about whether, if you haven't been vaccinated. — about whether, if you haven't been vaccinated, you can get by with a iaterai— vaccinated, you can get by with a lateral flow test. as of 5pm last night _ lateral flow test. as of 5pm last night the — lateral flow test. as of 5pm last night the foreign office say you can't _ night the foreign office say you can't i— night the foreign office say you can't i ani _ night the foreign office say you can't. i am trying to get the spanish _ can't. i am trying to get the spanish authorities to tell me. it gives— spanish authorities to tell me. it gives you — spanish authorities to tell me. it gives you an idea of the incredible confusion — gives you an idea of the incredible confusion out there. that is for the green _ confusion out there. that is for the green countries from which we are allowed _ green countries from which we are allowed to— green countries from which we are allowed to come back without quarantine, but with a test before and after— quarantine, but with a test before and after you get there.— quarantine, but with a test before and after you get there. given what ou have and after you get there. given what you have described, _ and after you get there. given what you have described, and _ and after you get there. given what you have described, and some - and after you get there. given what i you have described, and some people may have made the decision to leave it, if people are thinking about going somewhere, the checklist is, i guess you look at whether you are allowed to go from here, the green, amber, red system, but then you have to check as to what the other country is saying about what happens
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when you get there, even if you can go? when you get there, even if you can 10? , ., ., , ., go? yes, and that is getting more complicated _ go? yes, and that is getting more complicated as — go? yes, and that is getting more complicated as infections - go? yes, and that is getting more complicated as infections right i complicated as infections right here — complicated as infections right here. yesterday, 26,000 new infections _ here. yesterday, 26,000 new infections in the uk. that is more than _ infections in the uk. that is more than ten — infections in the uk. that is more than ten times as many as they were in france, _ than ten times as many as they were in france, which has an identical population _ in france, which has an identical population. some people say we test more here, _ population. some people say we test more here, so you would get higher numbers _ more here, so you would get higher numbers. we are looking likely sick man of— numbers. we are looking likely sick man of europe at the moment. while people _ man of europe at the moment. while people desperately wants to go on holidays _ people desperately wants to go on holidays and rescue their economies, they are _ holidays and rescue their economies, they are trying to guard their public— they are trying to guard their public health.— public health. let's talk to stephanie. _ public health. let's talk to stephanie, the _ public health. let's talk to stephanie, the chief - public health. let's talk to - stephanie, the chief executive of the nottingham playhouse. what can you tell us about how all of these is affecting you trying to get your business back together, passports, what do people have to prove to come to your theatre? that what do people have to prove to come to your theatre?— to your theatre? at the moment we are following _ to your theatre? at the moment we are following safely. _ to your theatre? at the moment we are following safely. we _ to your theatre? at the moment we are following safely. we are - to your theatre? at the moment we are following safely. we are doing l are following safely. we are doing temperature — are following safely. we are doing temperature checks _ are following safely. we are doing temperature checks on _ are following safely. we are doing temperature checks on the - are following safely. we are doing temperature checks on the door. are following safely. we are doing i temperature checks on the door and hand sanitisers. _ temperature checks on the door and hand sanitisers. people _ temperature checks on the door and hand sanitisers. people wear- temperature checks on the door and hand sanitisers. people wear masks| hand sanitisers. people wear masks during _ hand sanitisers. people wear masks during the _ hand sanitisers. people wear masks during the show— hand sanitisers. people wear masks during the show itself. _ hand sanitisers. people wear masks during the show itself. we - hand sanitisers. people wear masks during the show itself. we are - hand sanitisers. people wear masks during the show itself. we are not i during the show itself. we are not expecting — during the show itself. we are not expecting people _ during the show itself. we are not expecting people to _
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during the show itself. we are not expecting people to show - during the show itself. we are not expecting people to show it - during the show itself. we are not. expecting people to show it vaccine passport _ expecting people to show it vaccine passport we — expecting people to show it vaccine passport. we are _ expecting people to show it vaccine passport. we are not— expecting people to show it vaccine passport. we are not sure - expecting people to show it vaccine passport. we are not sure how- expecting people to show it vaccine passport. we are not sure how we. passport. we are not sure how we would — passport. we are not sure how we would implement— passport. we are not sure how we would implement that. _ passport. we are not sure how we would implement that. we - passport. we are not sure how we would implement that. we are - passport. we are not sure how we| would implement that. we are not asking _ would implement that. we are not asking the — would implement that. we are not asking the audience _ would implement that. we are not asking the audience to _ would implement that. we are not asking the audience to do- would implement that. we are not asking the audience to do lateral. asking the audience to do lateral flow tests — asking the audience to do lateral flow tests. the _ asking the audience to do lateral flow tests. the staff _ asking the audience to do lateral flow tests. the staff do - asking the audience to do lateral flow tests. the staff do it - asking the audience to do lateral flow tests. the staff do it twice i asking the audience to do lateralj flow tests. the staff do it twice a week _ flow tests. the staff do it twice a week the — flow tests. the staff do it twice a week. the acting _ flow tests. the staff do it twice a week. the acting company- flow tests. the staff do it twice a - week. the acting company rehearsing at the _ week. the acting company rehearsing at the moment— week. the acting company rehearsing at the moment are _ week. the acting company rehearsing at the moment are testing _ week. the acting company rehearsing at the moment are testing every- at the moment are testing every single _ at the moment are testing every single day — at the moment are testing every single day it _ at the moment are testing every single day it is _ at the moment are testing every single day. it is a _ at the moment are testing every single day. it is a different- at the moment are testing every. single day. it is a different system for different — single day. it is a different system for different people. _ single day. it is a different system for different people. we _ single day. it is a different system for different people. we need - single day. it is a different system i for different people. we need people to understand — for different people. we need people to understand theatre _ for different people. we need people to understand theatre is _ for different people. we need people to understand theatre is a _ for different people. we need people to understand theatre is a safe - to understand theatre is a safe thing _ to understand theatre is a safe thing to— to understand theatre is a safe thing to do _ to understand theatre is a safe thing to do. you _ to understand theatre is a safe thing to do. you referenced i to understand theatre is a safe | thing to do. you referenced the recent— thing to do. you referenced the recent pilots _ thing to do. you referenced the recent pilots. there _ thing to do. you referenced the recent pilots. there are - thing to do. you referenced the| recent pilots. there are 58,000 tickets— recent pilots. there are 58,000 tickets sold _ recent pilots. there are 58,000 tickets sold. only _ recent pilots. there are 58,000 tickets sold. only 28 _ recent pilots. there are 58,000 tickets sold. only 28 cases - recent pilots. there are 58,000 tickets sold. only 28 cases of. tickets sold. only 28 cases of covid — tickets sold. only 28 cases of covid i— tickets sold. only 28 cases of covid. i imagine _ tickets sold. only 28 cases of covid. i imagine it— tickets sold. only 28 cases of covid. i imagine it is- tickets sold. only 28 cases of covid. i imagine it is not- covid. i imagine it is not dissimilar— covid. i imagine it is not dissimilarto_ covid. i imagine it is not dissimilar to popping i covid. i imagine it is not| dissimilar to popping into covid. i imagine it is not- dissimilar to popping into your local— dissimilar to popping into your local supermarket. _ dissimilar to popping into your local supermarket. theatre i dissimilar to popping into your local supermarket. theatre isi dissimilar to popping into youri local supermarket. theatre is a dissimilar to popping into your- local supermarket. theatre is a safe thing _ local supermarket. theatre is a safe thing we _ local supermarket. theatre is a safe thing we need _ local supermarket. theatre is a safe thing we need a _ local supermarket. theatre is a safe thing. we need a certainty. - local supermarket. theatre is a safe thing. we need a certainty. we - local supermarket. theatre is a safe| thing. we need a certainty. we have to know— thing. we need a certainty. we have to know when — thing. we need a certainty. we have to know when we _ thing. we need a certainty. we have to know when we can _ thing. we need a certainty. we have to know when we can open - thing. we need a certainty. we have to know when we can open fully. - to know when we can open fully. theatre — to know when we can open fully. theatre is — to know when we can open fully. theatre is expensive. _ to know when we can open fully. theatre is expensive. it - to know when we can open fully. theatre is expensive. it takes i theatre is expensive. it takes months — theatre is expensive. it takes months to— theatre is expensive. it takes months to organise. - theatre is expensive. it takes months to organise. at - theatre is expensive. it takes months to organise. at the i theatre is expensive. it takes - months to organise. at the moment we have a _ months to organise. at the moment we have a show_ months to organise. at the moment we have a show on— months to organise. at the moment we have a show on where _ months to organise. at the moment we have a show on where we _ months to organise. at the moment we have a show on where we would - have a show on where we would normally— have a show on where we would normally have _ have a show on where we would normally have a _ have a show on where we would normally have a capacity- have a show on where we would normally have a capacity of- have a show on where we would normally have a capacity of 700 i have a show on where we would i normally have a capacity of 700 to 800 people~ — normally have a capacity of 700 to 800 people. we _ normally have a capacity of 700 to 800 people. we actually- normally have a capacity of 700 to 800 people. we actually have - normally have a capacity of 700 to 800 people. we actually have a i 800 people. we actually have a capacity— 800 people. we actually have a capacity of— 800 people. we actually have a capacity of 250~ _ 800 people. we actually have a capacity of 250. had _ 800 people. we actually have a capacity of 250. had we - 800 people. we actually have a capacity of 250. had we not - 800 people. we actually have a - capacity of 250. had we not accessed the cultural— capacity of 250. had we not accessed the cultural funding, _ capacity of 250. had we not accessed the cultural funding, we _ capacity of 250. had we not accessed the cultural funding, we wouldn't- capacity of 250. had we not accessed the cultural funding, we wouldn't bel the cultural funding, we wouldn't be opening _ the cultural funding, we wouldn't be opening tomorrow— the cultural funding, we wouldn't be opening tomorrow night. _ the cultural funding, we wouldn't be opening tomorrow night. people - the cultural funding, we wouldn't be i opening tomorrow night. people need to understand — opening tomorrow night. people need to understand theatre _ opening tomorrow night. people need to understand theatre is _ opening tomorrow night. people need to understand theatre is safe, -
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opening tomorrow night. people need to understand theatre is safe, we - to understand theatre is safe, we are diligent, _ to understand theatre is safe, we are diligent, very— to understand theatre is safe, we are diligent, very welcoming, - to understand theatre is safe, we | are diligent, very welcoming, and you can't— are diligent, very welcoming, and you can'tjust _ are diligent, very welcoming, and you can't just turn _ are diligent, very welcoming, and you can't just turn it _ are diligent, very welcoming, and you can'tjust turn it on— are diligent, very welcoming, and you can't just turn it on and - are diligent, very welcoming, and you can'tjust turn it on and off. you can'tjust turn it on and off like a — you can'tjust turn it on and off like a tap _ you can'tjust turn it on and off like a tap it— you can'tjust turn it on and off like a tap. it takes _ you can'tjust turn it on and off like a tap. it takes a _ you can'tjust turn it on and off like a tap. it takes a long - you can'tjust turn it on and off like a tap. it takes a long time| you can'tjust turn it on and off. like a tap. it takes a long time for these _ like a tap. it takes a long time for these shows— like a tap. it takes a long time for these shows to _ like a tap. it takes a long time for these shows to reach _ like a tap. it takes a long time for these shows to reach these - like a tap. it takes a long time for these shows to reach these days. | like a tap. it takes a long time for- these shows to reach these days. you need some these shows to reach these days. need some indication before july 19 need some indication beforejuly 19 if you are going to have to operate at full capacity. how frustrating is it for people in your sector watching the scenes at wembley and wimbledon this week, admittedly outdoor events, but seeing thousands of people congregating together? to be honest, the result was fantastic, the football — be honest, the result was fantastic, the football is — be honest, the result was fantastic, the football is amazing _ be honest, the result was fantastic, the football is amazing for- the football is amazing for everybody. _ the football is amazing for everybody, but _ the football is amazing for everybody, but it- the football is amazing for everybody, but it is- the football is amazing for- everybody, but it is frustrating. you can't — everybody, but it is frustrating. you can'tjust— everybody, but it is frustrating. you can'tjust rebuild _ everybody, but it is frustrating. you can'tjust rebuild this- everybody, but it is frustrating. you can'tjust rebuild this from| you can'tjust rebuild this from scratch — you can'tjust rebuild this from scratch overnight. _ you can'tjust rebuild this from scratch overnight. it _ you can'tjust rebuild this from scratch overnight. it is - you can't just rebuild this from i scratch overnight. it is frustrating when _ scratch overnight. it is frustrating when you — scratch overnight. it is frustrating when you see _ scratch overnight. it is frustrating when you see people _ scratch overnight. it is frustrating when you see people admittedlyi when you see people admittedly outdoors, — when you see people admittedly outdoors, but _ when you see people admittedly outdoors, but sometimes - when you see people admittedly outdoors, but sometimes under| when you see people admittedly - outdoors, but sometimes under some covei’, _ outdoors, but sometimes under some cover, absolutely— outdoors, but sometimes under some cover, absolutely cheika _ outdoors, but sometimes under some cover, absolutely cheika by _ outdoors, but sometimes under some cover, absolutely cheika by gel. - cover, absolutely cheika by gel. whereas — cover, absolutely cheika by gel. whereas we _ cover, absolutely cheika by gel. whereas we are _ cover, absolutely cheika by gel. whereas we are also _ cover, absolutely cheika by gel. whereas we are also silly- cover, absolutely cheika by gel. i whereas we are also silly distance. -- socially— whereas we are also silly distance. —— socially distanced. _ whereas we are also silly distance. —— socially distanced. our- whereas we are also silly distance. —— socially distanced. our show- —— socially distanced. our show opens— —— socially distanced. our show opens tomorrow. _ —— socially distanced. our show opens tomorrow. it _ —— socially distanced. our show opens tomorrow. it finishes - —— socially distanced. our show opens tomorrow. it finishes on| —— socially distanced. our show. opens tomorrow. it finishes on the 17th of— opens tomorrow. it finishes on the 17th ofjuly— opens tomorrow. it finishes on the 17th ofjuly and _ opens tomorrow. it finishes on the 17th ofjuly and then _ opens tomorrow. it finishes on the 17th ofjuly and then goes - opens tomorrow. it finishes on the 17th ofjuly and then goes to - opens tomorrow. it finishes on the i 17th ofjuly and then goes to leeds. it 17th ofjuly and then goes to leeds. it means— 17th ofjuly and then goes to leeds. it means we — 17th ofjuly and then goes to leeds. it means we miss _ 17th ofjuly and then goes to leeds. it means we miss the _ 17th ofjuly and then goes to leeds. it means we miss the reopening - 17th ofjuly and then goes to leeds. i it means we miss the reopening date
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completely— it means we miss the reopening date completely for — it means we miss the reopening date completely for this _ it means we miss the reopening date completely for this production. - it means we miss the reopening date completely for this production. i- completely for this production. i have _ completely for this production. i have to — completely for this production. i have to be — completely for this production. i have to be honest, _ completely for this production. i have to be honest, it _ completely for this production. i have to be honest, it is - have to be honest, it is frustrating. _ have to be honest, it is frustrating. we - have to be honest, it is frustrating. we are - have to be honest, it is - frustrating. we are pleased other people _ frustrating. we are pleased other people can — frustrating. we are pleased other people can reopen— frustrating. we are pleased other people can reopen but— frustrating. we are pleased other people can reopen but we - frustrating. we are pleased other people can reopen but we want. frustrating. we are pleased other. people can reopen but we want the same _ people can reopen but we want the same extended _ people can reopen but we want the same extended to _ people can reopen but we want the same extended to theatre. - people can reopen but we want the same extended to theatre.- people can reopen but we want the same extended to theatre. simon, do ou want same extended to theatre. simon, do you want to — same extended to theatre. simon, do you want to take _ same extended to theatre. simon, do you want to take up _ same extended to theatre. simon, do you want to take up the _ same extended to theatre. simon, do you want to take up the eu _ you want to take up the eu certificate? there is a sort of european wide certificate that is in place today. the european wide certificate that is in place today-— european wide certificate that is in lace toda . . , , place today. the digital green pass. it will, if you _ place today. the digital green pass. it will, if you are _ place today. the digital green pass. it will, if you are in _ place today. the digital green pass. it will, if you are in the _ place today. the digital green pass. it will, if you are in the eu - place today. the digital green pass. it will, if you are in the eu and - it will, if you are in the eu and you have — it will, if you are in the eu and you have been vaccinated or can prove _ you have been vaccinated or can prove you — you have been vaccinated or can prove you have recovered from covid, or you _ prove you have recovered from covid, or you have _ prove you have recovered from covid, or you have had a recent test, you .et or you have had a recent test, you get three — or you have had a recent test, you get three europe very easily. it is absolutely— get three europe very easily. it is absolutely common right across the country _ absolutely common right across the count . . , ., . country. can we be part of that? well, there _ country. can we be part of that? well, there are _ country. can we be part of that? well, there are most _ country. can we be part of that? well, there are most definitely i well, there are most definitely technical— well, there are most definitely technical talks going on to see if that can — technical talks going on to see if that can happen. but i willjust cause — that can happen. but i willjust cause in— that can happen. but i willjust cause in people who think there might— cause in people who think there might be — cause in people who think there might be one ready by the time the schools— might be one ready by the time the schools break up in england and wales— schools break up in england and wales in— schools break up in england and wales in a — schools break up in england and wales in a couple of weeks. i don't think— wales in a couple of weeks. i don't think they're well. at the moment we can't get any thing worked out across— can't get any thing worked out across the uk, let alone engage with europe _
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across the uk, let alone engage with europe. but in time it will be a very— europe. but in time it will be a very valuable resource. it is also the case that — very valuable resource. it is also the case that individual- very valuable resource. it is also| the case that individual countries within europe are making decisions about us, is it not? one country will say, you can, and another will say you can't. it may be tricky. angela merkel last week was saying we don't _ angela merkel last week was saying we don't have a common policy against — we don't have a common policy against the uk, but every country is suffering _ against the uk, but every country is suffering and it is every country for themselves. they are doing all they can _ for themselves. they are doing all they can to— for themselves. they are doing all they can to get their national wealth— they can to get their national wealth balanced against their public health _ wealth balanced against their public health it _ wealth balanced against their public health. it is a real mess for the holiday— maker, health. it is a real mess for the holiday—maker, which is why, if you rely on _ holiday—maker, which is why, if you rely on the — holiday—maker, which is why, if you rely on the travel agent, book a package — rely on the travel agent, book a package holiday, that is the best advice _ package holiday, that is the best advice it— package holiday, that is the best advice. it still looks as if travel is going — advice. it still looks as if travel is going to _ advice. it still looks as if travel is going to be for the bold and desperate at the moment. it is not 'ust desperate at the moment. it is not just about — desperate at the moment. it is not just about holidays. it is all the people — just about holidays. it is all the people separated from loved ones. they are _ people separated from loved ones. they are the ones along with millions— they are the ones along with millions in the travel industry whose —
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millions in the travel industry whose jobs are on the line, who are most _ whose jobs are on the line, who are most in _ whose jobs are on the line, who are most in my— whose jobs are on the line, who are most in my thoughts.— whose jobs are on the line, who are most in my thoughts. stephanie will be hoinu most in my thoughts. stephanie will be hoping that _ most in my thoughts. stephanie will be hoping that theatre-goers - most in my thoughts. stephanie will be hoping that theatre-goers are i be hoping that theatre—goers are bold and desperate to get back into theatre. i wonder about any lingering restrictions and social distancing that might be required, evenif distancing that might be required, even if you can open to capacity. you would probably like to see the end of masks, if possible, you think that would be safe?— end of masks, if possible, you think that would be safe? yeah, i do think it would be so. _ that would be safe? yeah, i do think it would be so. we _ that would be safe? yeah, i do think it would be so. we saw _ that would be safe? yeah, i do think it would be so. we saw what - that would be safe? yeah, i do think. it would be so. we saw what happened before _ it would be so. we saw what happened before actually, — it would be so. we saw what happened before. actually, it _ it would be so. we saw what happened before. actually, it is _ it would be so. we saw what happened before. actually, it is very— it would be so. we saw what happened before. actually, it is very safe. - before. actually, it is very safe. theatre-goers _ before. actually, it is very safe. theatre—goers tend _ before. actually, it is very safe. theatre—goers tend to - before. actually, it is very safe. theatre—goers tend to be - before. actually, it is very safe. j theatre—goers tend to be facing before. actually, it is very safe. . theatre—goers tend to be facing in the same — theatre—goers tend to be facing in the same direction. _ theatre—goers tend to be facing in the same direction. actually, - theatre—goers tend to be facing in the same direction. actually, that| the same direction. actually, that flow of— the same direction. actually, that flow of air— the same direction. actually, that flow ofair is— the same direction. actually, that flow of air is quite _ the same direction. actually, that flow of air is quite reduced. - the same direction. actually, that flow of air is quite reduced. also, | flow of air is quite reduced. also, theatres — flow of air is quite reduced. also, theatres are _ flow of air is quite reduced. also, theatres are well— flow of air is quite reduced. also, theatres are well ventilated, - flow of air is quite reduced. also, theatres are well ventilated, so l theatres are well ventilated, so that would _ theatres are well ventilated, so that would be _ theatres are well ventilated, so that would be ideal. _ theatres are well ventilated, so that would be ideal. we - theatres are well ventilated, so that would be ideal. we will- theatres are well ventilated, so that would be ideal. we will do| theatres are well ventilated, so - that would be ideal. we will do what we do _ that would be ideal. we will do what we do we _ that would be ideal. we will do what we do we had — that would be ideal. we will do what we do we had a _ that would be ideal. we will do what we do. we had a show— that would be ideal. we will do what we do. we had a show opening - that would be ideal. we will do what we do. we had a show opening a - we do. we had a show opening a couple _ we do. we had a show opening a couple weeks _ we do. we had a show opening a couple weeks ago _ we do. we had a show opening a couple weeks ago and _ we do. we had a show opening a couple weeks ago and everybody watched — couple weeks ago and everybody watched it — couple weeks ago and everybody watched it wearing _ couple weeks ago and everybody watched it wearing a _ couple weeks ago and everybody watched it wearing a mask. - couple weeks ago and everybody watched it wearing a mask. theyj couple weeks ago and everybody - watched it wearing a mask. they were comfortable — watched it wearing a mask. they were comfortable we — watched it wearing a mask. they were comfortable. we know— watched it wearing a mask. they were comfortable. we know we _ watched it wearing a mask. they were comfortable. we know we will- watched it wearing a mask. they were comfortable. we know we will have i comfortable. we know we will have some _ comfortable. we know we will have some social — comfortable. we know we will have some social distance _ comfortable. we know we will have some social distance in— comfortable. we know we will have some social distance in the - comfortable. we know we will have some social distance in the future. | some social distance in the future. people _ some social distance in the future. people are — some social distance in the future. people are nervous _ some social distance in the future. people are nervous and _ some social distance in the future. people are nervous and anxious. . some social distance in the future. i people are nervous and anxious. that is absolutely — people are nervous and anxious. that is absolutely fine. _ people are nervous and anxious. that is absolutely fine. we _ people are nervous and anxious. that is absolutely fine. we will— people are nervous and anxious. that is absolutely fine. we will do - people are nervous and anxious. that is absolutely fine. we will do that. . is absolutely fine. we will do that. but we _ is absolutely fine. we will do that. but we really _ is absolutely fine. we will do that. but we really need _ is absolutely fine. we will do that. but we really need a _ is absolutely fine. we will do that. but we really need a firm - is absolutely fine. we will do that. but we really need a firm opening| but we really need a firm opening date _ but we really need a firm opening date that — but we really need a firm opening date that is _ but we really need a firm opening date. that is what _ but we really need a firm opening date. that is what we _ but we really need a firm opening date. that is what we desperately
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need, _ date. that is what we desperately need. with— date. that is what we desperately need, with full— date. that is what we desperately need, with full capacity. - date. that is what we desperately need, with full capacity. we - date. that is what we desperately need, with full capacity. we will. date. that is what we desperately. need, with full capacity. we will be accommodating _ need, with full capacity. we will be accommodating in _ need, with full capacity. we will be accommodating in terms _ need, with full capacity. we will be accommodating in terms of - need, with full capacity. we will be accommodating in terms of safety. j accommodating in terms of safety. safety _ accommodating in terms of safety. safety is _ accommodating in terms of safety. safety is paramount. _ accommodating in terms of safety. safety is paramount.— safety is paramount. thank you so much. safety is paramount. thank you so much- best _ safety is paramount. thank you so much. best of _ safety is paramount. thank you so much. best of luck. _ safety is paramount. thank you so much. best of luck. break- safety is paramount. thank you so much. best of luck. break a - safety is paramount. thank you so much. best of luck. break a leg. i much. best of luck. break a leg. simon, thank you. nice to see you. let's turn our attention to events in wimbledon last night. a small number of people can make a lot of noise. yes, 7500 roaring on this guy, andy murray. he tweeted at midnight last night, life of the old dog yet after reaching the third round. he was maybe in an ice bath after this marathon. two matches, over seven hours on court. if you wanted match practice, he is getting at. he came from two sets to one down to defeat the german qualifier oscar otte, the centre court roof was closed and roared on by the crowd, he took the match with a wonderful lob.
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this is the andy murray of old. he'll face 10th seed denis shapovalov next. what an atmosphere to play in at the end. the whole crowd is amazing but there were a few guys who were... they were getting me fired up. yeah, i needed everyone pass 's help tonight. they did a greatjob. and yeah, i hit some great shots to finish it. but it was a tough match. british number one dan evans is also through to round three after another impressive performance — he beat dusan lajovic in straight sets. good news too for cameron norrie. he's into round two for only the second time in his career — after winning his delayed match against lucas pouille. and on her main draw debut, 18—year—old emma raducanu beat russia's vitalia diatchenko in straight sets in the first round.
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she is the only british woman left in the singles. she was sitting her a—levels a few weeks ago. mark cavendish will get the chance to race for another stage victory at the tour de france in chateauroux today, the scene of his first tour win in 2008. defending champion tadej pogacar was nine years old at the time geraint thomas wasn't making excuses about his injured shoulder on yesterday's time trial. but he did fall further behind his main rivals, particularly pogacar, who won stage 5 to move within 8 seconds of race leader mathieu van der pool. tottenham have appointed a new manager at last — 72 days afterjose mourinho left. and it's the former wolves boss nuno espirito santo. he left wolves in may after four successful seasons, taking them into the premier league and to a europa league quarter—final. he said there was no time to lose at spurs, with pre—season starting in a few days.
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everton have confirmed the appointment of the former liverpool manager rafael ben tez. it is seen as the most contentious and controversial managerial appointment in the history of the club. he will be the first to cross the merseyside managerial divide since the 18905. let's get the view of former everton player pat nevin. morning, pat. how are you feeling? is he the right man?— is he the right man? well, if you listen to a _ is he the right man? well, if you listen to a lot _ is he the right man? well, if you listen to a lot of _ is he the right man? well, if you listen to a lot of evertonians, - is he the right man? well, if you | listen to a lot of evertonians, they are absolutely furious. i understand that _ are absolutely furious. i understand that. liverpoolare are absolutely furious. i understand that. liverpool are their great rivals~ — that. liverpool are their great rivals. that is what he is most famous — rivals. that is what he is most famous for _ rivals. that is what he is most famous for. i have been here before with other— famous for. i have been here before with other clubs. when he joined chelsea — with other clubs. when he joined chelsea there was fury there as well _ chelsea there was fury there as well a — chelsea there was fury there as well a lot— chelsea there was fury there as well. a lot of the chelsea fans despised _ well. a lot of the chelsea fans despised rafa. however, in the end he won— despised rafa. however, in the end he won them over. he won them over by simply— he won them over. he won them over by simply being incredibly dignified about— by simply being incredibly dignified about how he went about his business. _ about how he went about his business, and also, more importantly, he got chelsea into the top three _ importantly, he got chelsea into the top three and eventually got them a europa _ top three and eventually got them a europa league win. they won that
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trophy~ _ europa league win. they won that trophy. when he left the club i don't _ trophy. when he left the club i don't think they carried him shoulder— don't think they carried him shoulder high, but they certainly showed — shoulder high, but they certainly showed him respect. this shoulder high, but they certainly showed him respect.— shoulder high, but they certainly showed him respect. this is going to be much harder. _ showed him respect. this is going to be much harder. how— showed him respect. this is going to be much harder. how hard _ showed him respect. this is going to be much harder. how hard will- showed him respect. this is going to be much harder. how hard will it - showed him respect. this is going to be much harder. how hard will it be| be much harder. how hard will it be to win over the die—hard everton fans? i'm not talking about the ones who left an offensive flag outside what they thought was his home, but the ones who say that in 2007 he described everton as a small club when he managed liverpool? he said he didn't mean _ when he managed liverpool? he said he didn't mean it _ when he managed liverpool? he said he didn't mean it the _ when he managed liverpool? he said he didn't mean it the way _ when he managed liverpool? he said he didn't mean it the way it _ when he managed liverpool? he said he didn't mean it the way it was - he didn't mean it the way it was taken — he didn't mean it the way it was taken yes. _ he didn't mean it the way it was taken. yes, it is going to be very hard _ taken. yes, it is going to be very hard to— taken. yes, it is going to be very hard to get— taken. yes, it is going to be very hard to get over that. certainly a lot of— hard to get over that. certainly a lot of everton fans that i have spoken — lot of everton fans that i have spoken to, they say it is not about the liverpool thing. they don't really— the liverpool thing. they don't really lift — the liverpool thing. they don't really lift his style. that's what might — really lift his style. that's what might like your style. it doesn't matter— might like your style. it doesn't matter in— might like your style. it doesn't matter in the end. the last piece we did there _ matter in the end. the last piece we did there was about andy murray. throw— did there was about andy murray. throw your— did there was about andy murray. throw your mind back. there are a lot of— throw your mind back. there are a lot of people who didn't like andy murray _ lot of people who didn't like andy murray. eventually he won people over because he kept on doing the i’ili'it over because he kept on doing the right thing, he showed he was professional, he had the love for
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the sport— professional, he had the love for the sport and the people and eventually he won a whole nation around, — eventually he won a whole nation around, just about. rafa just on —— only— around, just about. rafa just on —— only needs — around, just about. rafa just on —— only needs to — around, just about. rafa just on —— only needs to win a club around. how im ortant only needs to win a club around. how important is — only needs to win a club around. how important is that _ only needs to win a club around. hmnr important is that he lives in the area, he is still connected to merseyside?— area, he is still connected to merseyside? area, he is still connected to merse side? ~ . , merseyside? well, that might be important. _ merseyside? well, that might be important. but — merseyside? well, that might be important, but i'm _ merseyside? well, that might be important, but i'm sure - merseyside? well, that might be important, but i'm sure the - merseyside? well, that might bej important, but i'm sure the most hardline — important, but i'm sure the most hardline everton fans won't care about _ hardline everton fans won't care about that — hardline everton fans won't care about that one way or the other. he has a _ about that one way or the other. he has a foothold in the area. he loves it. has a foothold in the area. he loves it he _ has a foothold in the area. he loves it he has— has a foothold in the area. he loves it. he has come back regularly. however. — it. he has come back regularly. however, he has been here before and 'ust however, he has been here before and just with _ however, he has been here before and just with chelsea. he went to other clubs _ just with chelsea. he went to other clubs he _ just with chelsea. he went to other clubs. he went to real madrid. he welcome _ clubs. he went to real madrid. he welcome there very much. fans wanted a bigger— welcome there very much. fans wanted a bigger name. it is a hard job. welcome there very much. fans wanted a bigger name. it is a hardjob. it is hard _ a bigger name. it is a hardjob. it is hard for— a bigger name. it is a hardjob. it is hard for everyone. in the end you have _ is hard for everyone. in the end you have good _ is hard for everyone. in the end you have good times and bad times. he is a good _ have good times and bad times. he is a good manager. look at the managers everton— a good manager. look at the managers everton have _ a good manager. look at the managers everton have lost over the years. david _ everton have lost over the years. david moyes is not a bad manager 'ust david moyes is not a bad manager just now — david moyes is not a bad manager just now. roberto martinez is not doing _ just now. roberto martinez is not doing too— just now. roberto martinez is not doing too badly. it is all about the success _ doing too badly. it is all about the success. ~ . ., , , ., doing too badly. it is all about the success. ~ . ., , .
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success. what does he give you as a -la er? success. what does he give you as a player? put — success. what does he give you as a player? put yourself _ success. what does he give you as a player? put yourself in _ success. what does he give you as a player? put yourself in the - success. what does he give you as a player? put yourself in the dressing| player? put yourself in the dressing room, what does he give a player? interest, i think. room, what does he give a player? interest, ithink. he is room, what does he give a player? interest, i think. he is a very interesting manager, ithink. unlike a lot of— interesting manager, ithink. unlike a lot of others he does move people around _ a lot of others he does move people around he — a lot of others he does move people around. he had steven gerrard playing — around. he had steven gerrard playing as _ around. he had steven gerrard playing as a right winger years ago. he will— playing as a right winger years ago. he will look at what is needed for a specific— he will look at what is needed for a specific game and adapt. players like being adapted every now and again _ like being adapted every now and again it — like being adapted every now and again. it gives them interest. they will be _ again. it gives them interest. they will be on — again. it gives them interest. they will be on their toes. because of what _ will be on their toes. because of what he — will be on their toes. because of what he has done in the game, he will be _ what he has done in the game, he will be respected by the players, if not all— will be respected by the players, if not all the — will be respected by the players, if not all the fans.— not all the fans. pat, thank you for our not all the fans. pat, thank you for your time- — not all the fans. pat, thank you for your time. loving _ not all the fans. pat, thank you for your time. loving those _ not all the fans. pat, thank you for your time. loving those album - not all the fans. pat, thank you for. your time. loving those album covers on your back wall. a flaming lips, i spotted. on your back wall. a flaming lips, i sotted. ~ . , on your back wall. a flaming lips, i sotted. ~ ., . on your back wall. a flaming lips, i sotted. ~ . . on your back wall. a flaming lips, i sotted. . ., ., ., ., spotted. was it a heart? no, not aha. spotted. was it a heart? no, not aha- woody _ spotted. was it a heart? no, not aha- woody got _ spotted. was it a heart? no, not aha. woody got the _ spotted. was it a heart? no, not aha. woody got the flaming - spotted. was it a heart? no, not aha. woody got the flaming lips. spotted. was it a heart? no, not- aha. woody got the flaming lips. see ou aaain aha. woody got the flaming lips. see you again at — aha. woody got the flaming lips. see you again at half _ aha. woody got the flaming lips. see you again at half past _ aha. woody got the flaming lips. see you again at half past eight. - you again at half past eight. talking of music, i think, charlie and rachel. talking of music, i think, charlie and rachel-— talking of music, i think, charlie and rachel. , , and rachel. our next guest might be riflin: and rachel. our next guest might be rifting through _ and rachel. our next guest might be rifling through pat _ and rachel. our next guest might be rifling through pat nevin's _ and rachel. our next guest might be rifling through pat nevin's record - rifling through pat nevin's record collection. it's all change on the
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bbc radio one airwaves. yesterday, dj nick grimshaw announced he is leaving the station after ill years. and so a new presenting duo are taking over the drivetime slot. jordan north and vick hope will be stepping into the studio from september. and jordan joins us now. congratulations. from someone who started out answering the phones on five live, look at where you are now. it is a fantastic move for you? thank you so much. good morning. it has not _ thank you so much. good morning. it has not sunk— thank you so much. good morning. it has not sunk in, if i'm honest. everybody_ has not sunk in, if i'm honest. everybody is asking me how i am feeling — everybody is asking me how i am feeling. my phone has been going off since last— feeling. my phone has been going off since last night. it doesn't seem real _ since last night. it doesn't seem real it— since last night. it doesn't seem real. ., , , since last night. it doesn't seem real. . , ,~ . since last night. it doesn't seem real. ., , , . ., ., real. it all probably changed for ou with real. it all probably changed for you with m — real. it all probably changed for you with m a _ real. it all probably changed for you with i'm a celebrity, - real. it all probably changed for you with i'm a celebrity, which l real. it all probably changed for i you with i'm a celebrity, which you yourself have said, you may be the least recognisable person on, but it suddenly took off. the public absolutely love you. how much is your life changed? that absolutely love you. how much is your life changed?— absolutely love you. how much is your life changed? that show is the best thing i— your life changed? that show is the best thing i have _ your life changed? that show is the best thing i have ever _ your life changed? that show is the best thing i have ever done. - your life changed? that show is the best thing i have ever done. i - best thing i have ever done. i nearly— best thing i have ever done. i nearly didn't do it because i was going _ nearly didn't do it because i was going to — nearly didn't do it because i was going to talk myself out of it. just
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before _ going to talk myself out of it. just before i— going to talk myself out of it. just before i went in my mum told me i had to— before i went in my mum told me i had to do— before i went in my mum told me i had to do it — before i went in my mum told me i had to do it. since then it has been great _ had to do it. since then it has been great i— had to do it. since then it has been great i have — had to do it. since then it has been great. i have been doing things that are fun _ great. i have been doing things that are fun and — great. i have been doing things that are fun and enjoyable. there is nothing — are fun and enjoyable. there is nothing i— are fun and enjoyable. there is nothing i have not wanted to do. i have _ nothing i have not wanted to do. i have always said this and i will repeat— have always said this and i will repeat it — have always said this and i will repeat it until my dying day. as long _ repeat it until my dying day. as long as — repeat it until my dying day. as long as i — repeat it until my dying day. as long as i have got my radio, whatever— long as i have got my radio, whatever else comes along, doing all these _ whatever else comes along, doing all these tv— whatever else comes along, doing all these tv shows and stuff, that's great, _ these tv shows and stuff, that's great, but — these tv shows and stuff, that's great, but radio is my bread and butter — great, but radio is my bread and butter. ~ ., ., great, but radio is my bread and butter. a, ., , ., butter. morning to you, congratulations. - butter. morning to you, congratulations. charlie butter. morning to you, - congratulations. charlie here. butter. morning to you, _ congratulations. charlie here. well done. we were talking to pat nevin about aha. will they get a look in on the new show ever?— about aha. will they get a look in on the new show ever? charlie, if i'm on the new show ever? charlie, if m honest _ on the new show ever? charlie, if i'm honest with _ on the new show ever? charlie, if i'm honest with you, _ on the new show ever? charlie, if i'm honest with you, not - on the new show ever? charlie, if i'm honest with you, not a - on the new show ever? charlie, if| i'm honest with you, not a chance, no! , ., ., i i'm honest with you, not a chance, no!_ i don't - i'm honest with you, not a chance, no!_ i don't think- i'm honest with you, not a chance, no!_ i don't think we | no! there you go. i don't think we will be playing _ no! there you go. i don't think we will be playing that. _ no! there you go. i don't think we will be playing that. radio - no! there you go. i don't think we will be playing that. radio 2 - no! there you go. i don't think we| will be playing that. radio 2 might .ive will be playing that. radio 2 might give it— will be playing that. radio 2 might give it a _ will be playing that. radio 2 might give it a spin but not us. it is aood to give it a spin but not us. it is good to be — give it a spin but not us. it is good to be definitive - give it a spin but not us. it 3 good to be definitive about things. it is ruled out. if you describe the vibe, and i know you are probably just thinking about it now, how do
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you think, what will the vibe be around your programme? what will be the atmosphere? me around your programme? what will be the atmosphere?— around your programme? what will be the atmosphere? me and they have got massive shoes — the atmosphere? me and they have got massive shoes to _ the atmosphere? me and they have got massive shoes to fill. _ the atmosphere? me and they have got massive shoes to fill. nick _ the atmosphere? me and they have got massive shoes to fill. nick grimshaw i massive shoes to fill. nick grimshaw is a radio _ massive shoes to fill. nick grimshaw is a radio 1 _ massive shoes to fill. nick grimshaw is a radio 1 legend. he has done the breakfast _ is a radio 1 legend. he has done the breakfast show, the drivetime show. we have _ breakfast show, the drivetime show. we have said because there are two of us, _ we have said because there are two of us, we _ we have said because there are two of us, we are — we have said because there are two of us, we are going to bring a different— of us, we are going to bring a different energy to it, but we have still got _ different energy to it, but we have still got to — different energy to it, but we have still got to make sure that every afternoon — still got to make sure that every afternoon we are sounding as good as he did _ afternoon we are sounding as good as he did he _ afternoon we are sounding as good as he did. he has got a lot of followers and a lot of fans. we have to make _ followers and a lot of fans. we have to make sure we send just as good. i said this _ to make sure we send just as good. i said this yesterday, he is the funniest— said this yesterday, he is the funniest guy on the radio. if we are half as— funniest guy on the radio. if we are half as funny as him, we will be pretty— half as funny as him, we will be pretty happy. half as funny as him, we will be pretty happy-— half as funny as him, we will be pretty happy-d pretty happy. let's talk a bit of a co - , our pretty happy. let's talk a bit of a cop, your co-presenter. - pretty happy. let's talk a bit of a cop, your co-presenter. she i pretty happy. let's talk a bit of a cop, your co-presenter. she was pretty happy. let's talk a bit of a i cop, your co-presenter. she was on cop, your co—presenter. she was on strictly. you have both been through that crazy television experience. do you two know each other well? what is the chemistry like between you? yes, we have known each other since she came _ yes, we have known each other since she came over to radio 1. we have
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met a _ she came over to radio 1. we have met a few— she came over to radio 1. we have met a few times. we did a couple of pilots. _ met a few times. we did a couple of pilots. test — met a few times. we did a couple of pilots, test pilots, that is how these — pilots, test pilots, that is how these things are done, and we just hit it— these things are done, and we just hit it off— these things are done, and we just hit it off straightaway. it's hard to explain _ hit it off straightaway. it's hard to explain because as soon as we got in the _ to explain because as soon as we got in the studio— to explain because as soon as we got in the studio it was like, yeah, this— in the studio it was like, yeah, this is— in the studio it was like, yeah, this is it — in the studio it was like, yeah, this is it. we have got a lot of mutual— this is it. we have got a lot of mutual friends. we have known each other— mutual friends. we have known each other for— mutual friends. we have known each other for a _ mutual friends. we have known each other for a couple of years. we are really. _ other for a couple of years. we are really, really excited about starting _ really, really excited about starting his new show in september. what is _ starting his new show in september. what is it— starting his new show in september. what is it like in the morning at your place? have you got music gone? what happens in thejordan house in the morning? have you got loud music on to i have literallyjust turned it off now. i on to i have literally 'ust turned it off newt on to i have literally 'ust turned it off now. i try to listen to greg on the breakfast _ it off now. i try to listen to greg on the breakfast show. - it off now. i try to listen to greg on the breakfast show. i - it off now. i try to listen to greg on the breakfast show. i wouldl it off now. i try to listen to greg i on the breakfast show. i would think if you _ on the breakfast show. i would think if you are _ on the breakfast show. i would think if you are on — on the breakfast show. i would think if you are on a radio station you try to _ if you are on a radio station you try to listen _ if you are on a radio station you try to listen to the breakfast show. i put try to listen to the breakfast show. i put some — try to listen to the breakfast show. i put some tv on later. usually it's pretty— i put some tv on later. usually it's pretty much— i put some tv on later. usually it's pretty much music on all the time, because _ pretty much music on all the time, because we — pretty much music on all the time, because we have got to be playing the best— because we have got to be playing the best new music or a young audience — the best new music or a young audience want to hear. you are constantly— audience want to hear. you are constantly listening to new albums, new tracks —
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constantly listening to new albums, new tracks. you are not wrong. the bit ou new tracks. you are not wrong. the bit you missed _ new tracks. you are not wrong. tie: bit you missed is new tracks. you are not wrong. tte: bit you missed is the new tracks. you are not wrong. tt9: bit you missed is the slot new tracks. you are not wrong. tt9 bit you missed is the slot between eight and have passed out when you watch bbc breakfast every morning. yes? yes. that is when i have a cup of tea _ yes? yes. that is when i have a cup of tea and _ yes? yes. that is when i have a cup of tea and sit— yes? yes. that is when i have a cup of tea and sit down and watch the telly _ of tea and sit down and watch the tell . g :, . of tea and sit down and watch the tell ._, . , :, of tea and sit down and watch the tell ._, . ,:, a of tea and sit down and watch the tell . ,:, , telly. jordan, loads of luck. it is a very sociable _ telly. jordan, loads of luck. it is a very sociable time _ telly. jordan, loads of luck. it is a very sociable time of - telly. jordan, loads of luck. it is a very sociable time of the i telly. jordan, loads of luck. it is a very sociable time of the day l telly. jordan, loads of luck. it is. a very sociable time of the day to be working as well. you have picked yourself some nice hours.— be working as well. you have picked yourself some nice hours. thank you. a- arentl yourself some nice hours. thank you. apparently it's _ yourself some nice hours. thank you. apparently it's good _ yourself some nice hours. thank you. apparently it's good if _ yourself some nice hours. thank you. apparently it's good if you _ yourself some nice hours. thank you. apparently it's good if you are - apparently it's good if you are going — apparently it's good if you are going out the night before, doing the drivetime show is the best one to do _ the drivetime show is the best one to do it _ the drivetime show is the best one to do. it works well.— to do. it works well. cheers, jordan. thanks _ to do. it works well. cheers, jordan. thanks very - to do. it works well. cheers, jordan. thanks very much, l to do. it works well. cheers, i jordan. thanks very much, guys. reau jordan. thanks very much, guys. really looking — jordan. thanks very much, guys. really looking forward _ jordan. thanks very much, guys. really looking forward to - jordan. thanks very much, guys. | really looking forward to hearing it. dennis the menace is turning 70 this year, and, as befits a national icon, the occasion is being marked with a set of stamps. they show some key images from his seven decades of mischief and pranks in the beano. let's take a look.
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# you ain't nothing but a trouble maker, girl. # you had me up from the minute you set down. as mike you have my head spinning around. #i around. # i don't know if i have a chance to stand. # 0h, stand. # oh, trouble, trouble... # oh, trouble, trouble... #i # oh, trouble, trouble... # i know you are no good... absolutely iconic, that black and red stripey top. just four artists have had the honour of illustrating dennis' adventures in the beano. the current one is nigel parkinson, who joins us from liverpool. appropriately striped up.
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0h, oh, yes. it is a responsible job. the weight— oh, yes. it is a responsible job. the weight of responsibility is on your shoulders. thousands of people waiting _ your shoulders. thousands of people waiting to _ your shoulders. thousands of people waiting to see what you are going to do. waiting to see what you are going to do you _ waiting to see what you are going to do. you have to continually brand. you have — do. you have to continually brand. you have to — do. you have to continually brand. you have to make sure that you have .ot you have to make sure that you have got something good to pass on. here he is _ got something good to pass on. here he is can _ got something good to pass on. here he is can i _ got something good to pass on. here he is. can ijust point out, it is not _ he is. can ijust point out, it is not black— he is. can ijust point out, it is not black and red, it is black —— red and — not black and red, it is black —— red and black. 50 not black and red, it is black -- red and black.— not black and red, it is black -- red and black. , , red and black. so sorry. understood! a true illustrator _ red and black. so sorry. understood! a true illustrator and _ red and black. so sorry. understood! a true illustrator and speaking. i red and black. so sorry. understood! a true illustrator and speaking. can l a true illustrator and speaking. can i ask you how, if at all, the illustrations have changed over the years? 70 years is a very long time. technology obviously has changed a lot in that time. at about a character wise? lot in that time. at about a characterwise? do lot in that time. at about a character wise? do you feel you have any freedom to do something with dennis and nasser? how does that
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work? �* . :, , . . dennis and nasser? how does that work? �* ., :, , ., ., , work? the beano is a team. there is the editorial— work? the beano is a team. there is the editorial board. _ work? the beano is a team. there is the editorial board. there _ work? the beano is a team. there is the editorial board. there is - work? the beano is a team. there is the editorial board. there is the i the editorial board. there is the printers — the editorial board. there is the printers. and in between there is the writer. — printers. and in between there is the writer, me and my colourist, and we do _ the writer, me and my colourist, and we do the _ the writer, me and my colourist, and we do the stuff that you see. but there _ we do the stuff that you see. but there are — we do the stuff that you see. but there are a — we do the stuff that you see. but there are a lot of people involved. we can't _ there are a lot of people involved. we can'tjust decide to have him in green _ we can'tjust decide to have him in green and — we can'tjust decide to have him in green and blue one week or have his hair blonde~ — green and blue one week or have his hair blonde. there has to be a reason — hair blonde. there has to be a reason for— hair blonde. there has to be a reason for everything. it sounds like a _ reason for everything. it sounds like a restricted thing. what we get a lot of— like a restricted thing. what we get a lot of pleasure out of doing tennis— a lot of pleasure out of doing tennis every week. the main change really— tennis every week. the main change really is _ tennis every week. the main change really is very— tennis every week. the main change really is very subtle. the most recent — really is very subtle. the most recent change was in 2016, when we went from _ recent change was in 2016, when we went from this sort of design into a slightly— went from this sort of design into a slightly older looking guy, which works _ slightly older looking guy, which works well. we slightly older looking guy, which works well-— slightly older looking guy, which works well. ~ ,, :, . , works well. we know there have been so many products _ works well. we know there have been so many products that _ works well. we know there have been so many products that have _ works well. we know there have been so many products that have been i so many products that have been spawned through dennis the menace, not least the cartoon. how involved
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were you in creating that?— not least the cartoon. how involved were you in creating that? well, the final thing that _ were you in creating that? well, the final thing that came _ were you in creating that? well, the final thing that came on _ were you in creating that? well, the final thing that came on the - were you in creating that? well, the final thing that came on the screen, | final thing that came on the screen, i final thing that came on the screen, i wasn't _ final thing that came on the screen, i wasn't really involved at all, but the process was about two years. at the process was about two years. at the beginning we were all involved in it _ the beginning we were all involved in it we _ the beginning we were all involved in it. we all had our input. it evolved _ in it. we all had our input. it evolved into something which was different— evolved into something which was different again. we fed back from the tv— different again. we fed back from the tv show back into the comic. it is a kind _ the tv show back into the comic. it is a kind of— the tv show back into the comic. it is a kind of a — the tv show back into the comic. it is a kind of a loop with the beano at the _ is a kind of a loop with the beano at the heart — is a kind of a loop with the beano at the heart of everything. dennis is the _ at the heart of everything. dennis is the most — at the heart of everything. dennis is the most recognisable character in comics — is the most recognisable character in comics. so everyone has a sort of shared _ in comics. so everyone has a sort of shared responsibility to make sure that he _ shared responsibility to make sure that he is— shared responsibility to make sure that he is good this week and he is good _ that he is good this week and he is good next — that he is good this week and he is good next week on tv, and he will always— good next week on tv, and he will always be — good next week on tv, and he will always be -- — good next week on tv, and he will always be —— be good. not every sense _ always be —— be good. not every sense of— always be —— be good. not every sense of a — always be —— be good. not every sense of a good boy, but good in the sense _ sense of a good boy, but good in the sense of— sense of a good boy, but good in the sense of good stories, good action. he is— sense of good stories, good action. he is a _ sense of good stories, good action. he is a very— sense of good stories, good action. he is a very bad boy, really. it is heart _ he is a very bad boy, really. it is heart is — he is a very bad boy, really. it is heart is in — he is a very bad boy, really. it is heart is in the right place. you doesn't — heart is in the right place. you doesn't mean to be bad. nigel,
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rachel mentioned _ doesn't mean to be bad. nigel, rachel mentioned this - doesn't mean to be bad. nigel, rachel mentioned this earlier, | doesn't mean to be bad. nigel, i rachel mentioned this earlier, you are the first nigel to do this illustration. everybody else has been called david, you have broken the mould? t been called david, you have broken the mould?— been called david, you have broken the mould? . , . , the mould? i have broken it anyway. first there was _ the mould? i have broken it anyway. first there was david _ the mould? i have broken it anyway. first there was david lowe, - the mould? i have broken it anyway. first there was david lowe, david i first there was david lowe, david sutherland, david parkins. there is a link _ sutherland, david parkins. there is alink. :, , :, sutherland, david parkins. there is alink. :, , . :, sutherland, david parkins. there is alink. :, , . . ,, a link. lovely to chat to you. thank ou for a link. lovely to chat to you. thank you for charting — a link. lovely to chat to you. thank you for charting us _ a link. lovely to chat to you. thank you for charting us through - a link. lovely to chat to you. thank you for charting us through the i you for charting us through the nuances of change on the way. filth. nuances of change on the way. 0h, es. nuances of change on the way. oh, yes- always- _ nuances of change on the way. oh, yes. always. dennis _ nuances of change on the way. oh, yes. always. dennis will keep going. he will— yes. always. dennis will keep going. he will always be the same and he will always be different. that is one of— will always be different. that is one of the greatjoys of will always be different. that is one of the great joys of a will always be different. that is one of the greatjoys of a character you bring _ one of the greatjoys of a character you bring to — one of the greatjoys of a character you bring to life. one of the great 'oys of a character you bring to life.— you bring to life. thank you very much. you bring to life. thank you very much- nigel— you bring to life. thank you very much. nigel parkinson. - you bring to life. thank you very much. nigel parkinson. dennis i you bring to life. thank you very i much. nigel parkinson. dennis the menace illustrator. 70 years this year. menace illustrator. 70 years this ear. : menace illustrator. 70 years this ear. . . stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today. the uk's biggest car—maker, nissan, announces a major expansion of its battery production facilities in sunderland, creating 1,600 newjobs. thousands more in the supply chain, £1 billion of investment in batteries and in a new model but is it enough to secure the uk's place in the global race to electric? but it's not such good news on the high street.
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the fashion chain gap confirms plans to close all its 81 stores in the uk and ireland. almost three years after he was sent to prison for sexual assault, the american entertainer bill cosby is released after his conviction was overturned. it's another murray marathon at wimbledon. the two time wimbledon champion came through a late night five set classic to make it into the third round on centre court. on the day princess diana would have turned 60, her sons william and harry unveil a statue in her honour. good morning. for many of us it is a cloudy and murky start to the day, but for most, that cloud will break up but for most, that cloud will break up allowing some stanchion to develop, some showers but some drizzle across some eastern areas of england. one of the details later in the programme. —— all of the details. it's thursday, july the ist. our top story. there's been news of a jobs boost for the automotive industry this morning, with the japanese car—maker nissan, confirming a major expansion
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of its north east of england plant. a new electric model factory will be built, capable of producing more than 100,000 batteries for the vehicles every year by 2024, creating 1,600 jobs in sunderland. nina is there for us. just tell us what more we know about this huge plan. just tell us what more we know about this huge plan-— this huge plan. good morning. there is a ulobal this huge plan. good morning. there is a global race _ this huge plan. good morning. there is a global race towards _ this huge plan. good morning. there is a global race towards meeting i is a global race towards meeting these electric vehicle targets, by 2030, 40% of all new cars will be electric, by 2040, it's 2030, 40% of all new cars will be electric, by 2040, its estimated that almost 100% of all new cars made will be electric. this is why it's so important that the uk is part of this race. today, first of all this early pounds investment secures written 's but nissan's place in the future of electric vehicles. overall —— it secures britain's place and nissan's place. jobs will be created in this new
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gigafactory and making a new model, here is what the boss of nissan had to say a few moments ago. sometimes when i no to say a few moments ago. sometimes when i go to — to say a few moments ago. sometimes when i go to the _ to say a few moments ago. sometimes when i go to the shop _ to say a few moments ago. sometimes when i go to the shop floor, _ to say a few moments ago. sometimes when i go to the shop floor, i - to say a few moments ago. sometimes when i go to the shop floor, i meet i when i go to the shop floor, i meet some _ when i go to the shop floor, i meet some employees, there father worked, their son _ some employees, there father worked, their son works, they are so proud of working — their son works, they are so proud of working here. so why not have generation — of working here. so why not have generation after generation in sunderland as part of the family? that's— sunderland as part of the family? that's what we're going to do. in total. _ that's what we're going to do. in total. we — that's what we're going to do. in total, we are going to create 6200 'obs total, we are going to create 6200 jobs in _ total, we are going to create 6200 jobs in the — total, we are going to create 6200 jobs in the full ecosystem.- jobs in the full ecosystem. there's been lots of _ jobs in the full ecosystem. there's been lots of questions _ jobs in the full ecosystem. there's been lots of questions around i jobs in the full ecosystem. there's been lots of questions around howj been lots of questions around how much investment the uk government would make towards this, because of course they have pledged to phase out petrol and diesel cars by 2030, for the uk to be carbon neutral by 2050. i asked the secretary of state for business, energy and industrial strategy about how much the treasury was putting into this, he would not be drawn about it and said it was a significant part of the 500 million that has been set aside by the uk
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government. t that has been set aside by the uk government-— government. i think the uk is not fallin: government. i think the uk is not falling behind. — government. i think the uk is not falling behind, the _ government. i think the uk is not falling behind, the nissan - falling behind, the nissan investment today is a really positive _ investment today is a really positive story. the jobs that they provide, — positive story. the jobs that they provide, 1600 jobs, positive story. the jobs that they provide, 1600jobs, it's positive story. the jobs that they provide, 1600 jobs, it's notjust nissan, — provide, 1600 jobs, it's notjust nissan, it — provide, 1600 jobs, it's notjust nissan, it is the vision of doing a great _ nissan, it is the vision of doing a greatjob— nissan, it is the vision of doing a greatiob of— nissan, it is the vision of doing a greatjob of landing the great job of landing the gigafactory, greatjob of landing the gigafactory, they make the batteries for electric vehicles. the two companies together have brought 1600 new companies together have brought 1600 newiobs, _ companies together have brought 1600 newjobs, great investment, very good _ newjobs, great investment, very good salaries. and it's a positive story, _ good salaries. and it's a positive story, really positive story for the uk. story, really positive story for the uk it— story, really positive story for the uk. , ., ,:,, story, really positive story for the uk. , story, really positive story for the uk. it is a positive story, but is it positive _ uk. it is a positive story, but is it positive enough? _ uk. it is a positive story, but is it positive enough? one - uk. it is a positive story, but is it positive enough? one of- uk. it is a positive story, but is it positive enough? one of the| uk. it is a positive story, but is i it positive enough? one of the big criticisms of this government is that they have over promised when it comes to meeting these targets, but they are under delivering when it comes to investment. even with this, the society of motor manufacturers and trading say this is a vote of confidence, but they need a lot more than that. with that in mind, a government source has told me this morning, i ask him about the
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vauxhall site 200 miles away in ellesmere port, they said we can expect an announcement on that in the coming weeks, on a new electric model. good news but questions this morning about whether it goes far enough. morning about whether it goes far enou:h. ~' , :, , morning about whether it goes far enou:h. ~ , . morning about whether it goes far enou:h. ~ ,, , : . it's not all good news for the economy this morning though. the clothing retailer, gap, has announced its closing all 81 of its stores in the uk and ireland and will trade only online. ben boulos is outside the company's flagship store on london's oxford street and can tell us more. we know a lost about the problems on the high street, physical stores, and gap the latest to an ounce problems related to that. indeed, a familiar story. _ problems related to that. indeed, a familiar story, shops _ problems related to that. indeed, a familiar story, shops having - problems related to that. indeed, a familiar story, shops having to i familiar story, shops having to discount heavily and repeatedly to get people in their stores and spending money. gap was relying on that even before the pandemic it.
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when nocount came in and stores had to shut, it was already in a weak position —— when lockdown came in. it's flagship store and all of its 81 stores will be closing in the uk and ireland by the end of september, and ireland by the end of september, and it will become an online retailer only. reflecting a definite trend in the way that we are now all shopping. once a common sight on the british high street. but by the end of september this year, all 81 gap clothes shops in the uk and ireland will have shut their doors for the final time. the warning signs were already there. last month, the company announced the closure of 19 stores as their leases were expiring. in a statement, gap said it planned to stay trading online but hasn't yet made clear how many of its staff will be affected by the plans. the consultation with workers is under way. we heard from gap earlier this year that they were undergoing strategic review of all of their retail operations in europe and that it could mean the closure of all the stores in the uk.
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whilst it's a massive gap on the high street, because it's another brand gone, i think it's understandable because the organisation have not only had to endure the same on and off lockdowns that the rest of retail have, and they were dependent on those numbers, but it's also a brand that's going through a big change. they were having challenging times before the pandemic hit. gap's announcement comes as the latest blow to uk high streets, already reeling from the collapse of debenhams and retail group arcadia during the pandemic. and with online retail sales continuing to rise, and footfall remaining sluggish, it's unlikely gap will be the last of the big clothing chains to move permanently to cyberspace. just down the road from here is debenham's old flagship store which is still boarded up and empty. the loss of another big name on the high street will be a concern notjust on a prime shopping street like this,
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oxford street, but on high streets, retail parks and shopping centres across the country. the american actor and comedian, bill cosby, has been released from prison after more than two years behind bars. judges at the highest court in pennsylvania overturned his conviction for sexual assault, ruling the 83—year—old should be freed because the correct legal processes hadn't been followed. michelle fleury has this report. this is the moment bill cosby left prison, a free man. he had served two years of a three to ten year sentence. his fall from grace was sealed in 2018 after he was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault, for drugging and molesting andrea constand in 200a. but in a stunning reversal, pennsylvania's highest court said the entertainer should never have been charged. in the split ruling, the judges wrote the trial shouldn't have gone ahead because of an immunity deal mr cosby had struck with the previous prosecutor. he can't be retried.
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earlier, supporters drove by mr cosby's home shouting, "hey, hey, hey". a reference to fat albert, the cartoon character he once played. the comedian, who is back with his family, didn't comment to the media but said in a statement, "i have always maintained my innocence". for his accuser, andrea constand, it was a bitter blow. reacting to the decision, she called it... bill cosby became known as america's dad for his role as cliff huxtable in the 19805 hit sitcom the cosby show. his conviction was seen as proof that even when the accused is one of the most famous people in the world, the voices of the victims of sexual assault could be heard in the us justice system. now, he has a chance to restore his reputation. michelle fleury, bbc news, pensylvania.
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dozens of people have died in western canada during an unprecedented heatwave that's lasted almost a week. more than a hundred regional and national records have been broken by what's been described as a heat dome of high pressure. cities across the north west of the us are also experiencing the high temperatures which president biden has blamed on climate change. the number of migrants crossing the channel by boat in the first half of this year has more than doubled compared with the same period last year. almost 6,000 people have made the journey since january. meanwhile this last month ofjune saw a record numberfor a single month, with more than 2,000 people making the crossing. simonjones reports. crossing the busiest shipping lane in the world. for the people on board this boat, the destination is dover. the government has repeatedly pledged to make this route unviable, but the numbers have continued to grow. the boats are getting bigger, and the smugglers organising thejourneys are packing more
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and more people onto them. injune, more than 2000 people made the crossing from france to the uk, a record figure for a single month. it brings the total so far this year to just under 6000 migrants. that's an increase on the first half of last year when almost 2500 made the journey. it's a highly visible route. though last year asylum applications in the uk actually fell by a quarter. the un refugee agency has previously described numbers arriving as manageable. a familiar sight in dover, people being brought to shore by the border force after being picked up in the channel. next week the nationality and borders bill comes before parliament. the government says its new plan for immigration will tackle the criminal gangs behind the crossings who are putting profits before people's lives. but charities supporting refugees say what's needed is more safe and legal ways for migrants to be able to claim asylum in the uk from abroad,
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without having to risk their lives on the water. simon jones, bbc news. the nhs has been given the green light to roll out a booster vaccine programme this autumn. the extra dose will be given to the over—sos and anyone eligible for a flu jab. flu numbers are expected to be higher than normal this year, meaning extra protection against covid is likely to be needed to prevent too many hospital admisisons. changes to the government's furlough scheme take effect today, as the treasury starts to wind down economic support for companies hit by the pandemic. employers will now be able to claim back only 70% of their workers' wages rather than 80% and will need to cover the 10% shortfall themselves. business groups, trade unions and labour have urged the government not to press ahead with the changes. princes william and harry will today unveil a statue of their mother, diana, princess of wales, at kensington palace, on what would have been her 60th birthday. it will be the first time the brothers have seen each other since the funeral
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of their grandfather, the duke of edinburgh, in april. let's speak now to our royal correspondent, sarah campbell. give us the details of what will be happening today. give us the details of what will be happening today-— give us the details of what will be happening today. good morning. it was four and _ happening today. good morning. it was four and a _ happening today. good morning. it was four and a half— happening today. good morning. it was four and a half years _ happening today. good morning. it was four and a half years ago i happening today. good morning. it was four and a half years ago that. was four and a half years ago that princes william and harry announced the idea of this permanent statue, they said they wanted to reflect the positive impact their mother had had on the uk and the world. much has changed since then, physically in a sunken garden, one of diana's favourite places, it isjust sunken garden, one of diana's favourite places, it is just behind the head you can see there. it has been replanted with some of diana's favourite flowers. so much has changed in the relationship between william and harry, now living a continent apart and we know their relationship has fractured. what we know about today? not much, it will be a smaller private family affair, covid will have impacted the numbers that would have been here where they're not a pandemic going on. we know they will be there, diana's
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close family will be there, her siblings, the sculptor will be there, and also the garden designer. that's happening later on today. i should say that the public will not be able to see the statue today. it will only be able to be visible when kensington palace is open to the public and it has been closed today for that event. it will be open from tomorrow. no doubt it will bring a lot of visitors. today would have been diana's 60th birthday. thank ou ve been diana's 60th birthday. thank you very much. — been diana's 60th birthday. thank you very much, sarah. _ let's have a look at the weather. looking at those pictures about the events in london, looking may be ok for them. yes, there is less of a risk today of a shower than yesterday, more sunshine around across much of the uk. you can already see some sunshine in the highlands, this is a weather watch is picture. but the forecast will change especially towards the weekend. you can see
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what is coming our way, an area of low pressure with its various fronts, today we are starting with some cloud and murky conditions, particularly around the irish sea coastline, just the can —— across the channel islands. in eastern england to the cloud will be thick enough for some drizzle. in between, dry weather, the odd shower across the trossachs in scotland. not all of us catching one. a bit more cloud in northern ireland but i will break up in northern ireland but i will break up as well. for the east of england, damages will be lower, thicker clad with some drizzle. —— temperatures will be lower. take a cloud with some drizzle. this evening and overnight, the showers will fade and we will see some low cloud, mist and fog, and under clear skies it will be a cold night in sheltered glens in scotland, and in the shelter, in the north—east of england. tomorrow
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we start with low cloud, mist and murk, that will break with some sunshine coming through. tomorrow the showers will be more widespread than today. not all of us will catch on but they could be heavy or thundery across northern england and south to scotland in particular. highs of up to 23. thank you, carol. a continuous cough, a fever, and a loss of taste and smell. these are the covid symptoms that we're probably familiar with, and we should book a test if we develop them. but scientists now say more should be added to that official list. headaches, a cough and fatigue are some of the most common symptoms people have experienced, according to a uk survey by the office of national statistics. in the us, a runny nose, muscle ache or a sore throat are also listed as some of the signs that you could have the virus. and the world health organization
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says people can also suffer with conjunctivitis or a skin rash. we're joined now in the studio by professor calum semple, who is a professor of child health and outbreak medicine at the university of liverpool. we know those obvious ones, loss of taste and smell, temperature continuous and cough, but the symptoms of this virus have grown and varied so much over the last 18 months, how do you keep on top of it all? �* , : months, how do you keep on top of it all? �*, . . all? it's tricky, you are right, at the start it _ all? it's tricky, you are right, at the start it was _ all? it's tricky, you are right, at the start it was good _ all? it's tricky, you are right, at the start it was good enough i all? it's tricky, you are right, at the start it was good enough to| all? it's tricky, you are right, at- the start it was good enough to use the start it was good enough to use the simple three symptoms. but as older people are vaccinated, proportionally younger people have the disease and they have a different group of symptoms. by extending the symptomless, we think we will pick up a third more cases but more importantly, we will pick them up a day earlier and that of his great opportunity to break
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transmission chains and stop the further spread of the virus. 50 transmission chains and stop the further spread of the virus. so what shau further spread of the virus. so what shall we add _ further spread of the virus. so what shall we add to _ further spread of the virus. so what shall we add to the _ further spread of the virus. so what shall we add to the list _ further spread of the virus. so what shall we add to the list as - further spread of the virus. so what shall we add to the list as far- further spread of the virus. so what shall we add to the list as far as i shall we add to the list as far as you are concerned? t shall we add to the list as far as you are concerned?— shall we add to the list as far as you are concerned? i really could survey from _ you are concerned? i really could survey from the _ you are concerned? i really could survey from the university - you are concerned? i really could. survey from the university college london shows that adding in —— a really good survey shows that adding in fatigue, sore throat, headache and diarrhoea would increase the catch. this will increase the amount of people getting tested but we have a lot of testing capacity now, and we also have an app which could triage people between lateral flow testing and pcr testing depending on the combination of symptoms. the bottom line is, if you are not feeling right, headache and an upset tummy, feeling washed out or tired, that could be covid particularly if you are in your 205 or 305, so get a test. tt you are in your 20s or 30s, so get a test. ., , , ., , :, you are in your 20s or 30s, so get a test. . , , . , ., . ., test. it appears it to a degree to be at odds _ test. it appears it to a degree to be at odds with _ test. it appears it to a degree to be at odds with what _ test. it appears it to a degree to be at odds with what the - test. it appears it to a degree to be at odds with what the official| be at odds with what the official government advice is, what you are saying this morning. the advice is
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officially, high temperature, continuous cough, loss of smell and taste. so are you telling us this morning this should replace the official advice? morning this should replace the officialadvice? how morning this should replace the official advice? how did these things sit together? hat official advice? how did these things sit together?— official advice? how did these things sit together? not at all but there is enough _ things sit together? not at all but there is enough scientific - things sit together? not at all but there is enough scientific advice l things sit together? not at all but | there is enough scientific advice in there is enough scientific advice in the mix now, and scientific evidence, and the government are taking this on board so my understanding is the direction of travel is towards a wider symptom list. the challenge for the government and the nhs is how they take these symptoms and use them effectively and technology can help with that, to direct people to the right kind of testing system. we don't want to overwhelm pcr testing, we want to probably encourage more people to do lateral flow testing in the community and get pcr tests to confirm it. :, , the community and get pcr tests to confirm it. . , , confirm it. even as we sit here in midsummer. _ confirm it. even as we sit here in midsummer, looking _ confirm it. even as we sit here in midsummer, looking ahead i confirm it. even as we sit here in midsummer, looking ahead to i confirm it. even as we sit here in l midsummer, looking ahead to the autumn, we think about the number of people watching the programme who think, i have got a bit of a sniffle, my kids have got a bit of a sniffle, my kids have got a bit of a sniffle, they are going back to school. that idea of some of the
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things you have mentioned, they could apply on so many days of the week to so many people. so if you are in that circumstance, you have a bit of a sniff, you feel that way, are you now saying, get the tests? is it that cut and dry? for are you now saying, get the tests? is it that cut and dry?— is it that cut and dry? for sure it could be another— is it that cut and dry? for sure it could be another respiratory i is it that cut and dry? for sure it| could be another respiratory virus that are becoming more common now, and is process now needs to be taken in the round, thinking about how it will effect the bubble, how we will have to change how we manage children in school, there will be more people to for testing because of the viruses are out there. the only real way around that is to increase testing, so we can be sure that what is a common cold and what is covid. that person with covid symptoms without realising it could take it home to grandparents or parents, orto take it home to grandparents or parents, or to the workplace. i'm afraid it is vaccination and testing which is going to be the way out of
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this. , :, ,. :, :, , . this. funnily enough, schools are sa inc, if this. funnily enough, schools are saying. if you _ this. funnily enough, schools are saying, if you have _ this. funnily enough, schools are saying, if you have any _ this. funnily enough, schools are saying, if you have any kind i this. funnily enough, schools are saying, if you have any kind of i saying, if you have any kind of unwell symptoms, get a pcr tests, sets and it children go to, which runs counter to the official nhs advice. —— at least the schools that my children go to. which runs counter to the nhs advice. they are so keen to not have people having it at school. i have had it, another one of my children is now at home again, it is a nonstop process of in and out, which is particularly problematic for low income families, and we know it is having a detrimental impact on children particularly in deprived areas. absolutely right, and that is part of the wider debate of how we go back to normal particularly as seasons change and we get other coughs and colds. so we are going to have to end up sending more home. we cannot go on like this. we _ have to end up sending more home. we cannot go on like this. we can't, - have to end up sending more home. we cannot go on like this. we can't, so -
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cannot go on like this. we can't, so first of all. — cannot go on like this. we can't, so first of all, vaccinate _ cannot go on like this. we can't, so first of all, vaccinate those - cannot go on like this. we can't, so first of all, vaccinate those who - first of all, vaccinate those who can be, which is adults, an increase testing in schools. it could be that we could use the test and release process developed in liverpool where rather than isolating people who are contacts, they instead do daily testing to prove that they don't have infectious levels of the virus. that's one particular solution for this problem. that's one particular solution for this problem-— that's one particular solution for this roblem. �* , , ., ,, this problem. bring us up to speed of where we _ this problem. bring us up to speed of where we are _ this problem. bring us up to speed of where we are we _ this problem. bring us up to speed of where we are we vaccinating - of where we are we vaccinating children, that is your area of expertise. we are talking about the booster programme being suggested to come on in septemberfor those booster programme being suggested to come on in september for those who are more vulnerable. in your head, how do you balance the idea of a booster programme for the vulnerable, and not yet vaccinating children? up to the age of 18? we have children? up to the age of 18? , have looked really carefully at the disease coinfection in children in the second and first wave now, we have rock—solid data. the risk of severe disease and even the risk of a long covid and multi—inflammatory
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syndrome are very low. children with these conditions are recovering. so these conditions are recovering. so the risk of severe harm to children is incredibly low. vaccines are safe, but not entirely risk—free. we are aware perhaps in the adults about clots, there is some safety data from america showing rare heart problems associated with some vaccines. untilthat problems associated with some vaccines. until that data is very complete for children, i'm not persuaded that the risk benefit for children has been clarified. can i aet ou children has been clarified. can i get you to _ children has been clarified. can i get you to clarify _ children has been clarified. can i get you to clarify what _ children has been clarified. can i get you to clarify what you - children has been clarified. can i get you to clarify what you just said there? if i understand you correctly, your position, you are speaking in a private capacity on this morning, your position is that there is not enough evidence that would suggest that vaccinating children is the right thing to do. that's right. from the position of personal health harm, the balance i
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think has not swayed positively one way or the other. so i'm not convinced that the evidence base there is strong enough to support vaccination of children, because we don't have complete safety data for the vaccines that we would want to use. the harm to education is a different issue. that has to be thought of on societal terms, but that's not a harm to health. if you are the rare child that suffers the side effect, that could be a side—effect for quite time. missing some school could also affect your life chances, but what you put first, health or education? it becomes a very difficult and you debate. i don't think there is enough evidence at the moment to support vaccinating children. trier? support vaccinating children. very - leased support vaccinating children. very leased to support vaccinating children. very pleased to see — support vaccinating children. very pleased to see you _ support vaccinating children. very pleased to see you here with us, professor, we are very welcoming. i feel like putting you in a box because _ feel like putting you in a box because i'm used to seeing you on
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zoom _ because i'm used to seeing you on zoom. �* , , . ., because i'm used to seeing you on zoom. �*, , . .,, zoom. it's very nice to be getting back to normal. _ zoom. it's very nice to be getting back to normal. thank _ zoom. it's very nice to be getting back to normal. thank you - zoom. it's very nice to be getting back to normal. thank you for . back to normal. thank you for comini. your washing machine, fridge or tv could last another ten years or so, thanks to a new law which comes into force today. it's all about manufacturers being forced to make spare parts available so that appliances can be fixed instead of heading straight to the tip. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith is at a waste recycling centre on merseyside to tell us more. you can also get in touch with us about your repairs, successful or unsuccessful, you think that you have never repaired and successfully? i have never repaired and successfully?— have never repaired and successfull ? ., , , ., �* ~ successfully? i honestly don't think i have. successfully? i honestly don't think i have- let's _ successfully? i honestly don't think i have- let's go _ successfully? i honestly don't think i have. let's go and _ successfully? i honestly don't think i have. let's go and talk _ successfully? i honestly don't think i have. let's go and talk to - i have. let's go and talk to colette- — good morning, everyone. these are the kind of thing is that these new rules are trying to clamp down on. we make 1.5 million tonnes of
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electrical waste every single year in the uk, and the government are trying to clamp down by forcing manufacturers to make parts available. small parts, different components to be available for ten years, so anything on sale from today will then have parts available for the following ten years so you can make small repairs. you can do the fixupjob or get can make small repairs. you can do the fixup job or get someone professional to do it for you, safely, especially if it involves electrical or gas. so rather than throw things away, we make sure we repair more of the goods for use in our household. he's only six, is willie, but he's got a mechanical mind, and he's taken over part of his father's yard as a repair shop for kiddies' bikes, trikes and so on. repairing things might have gone out of fashion for a while. bringing history back to life is what makes the repair shop so special. but it's all the rage again now. it's not a two minute job doing this, so patience is definitely the key. but even if you're wanting to get things repaired at the moment,
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whether to save money or save the planet, it's pretty hard to get hold of the right parts that you need to replace things. but from today, things will hopefully start to get a little bit easier. manufacturers of white goods and tvs now have to stock and sell replacement parts of each product for ten years. so would it tempt you to try and repair something? my dishwasher and oven was 15 years old, and ijust replaced both of them. maybe if it's a smaller repair, something that's just £60 or £70, like a small part, like an element in an oven, but over and above that, i wouldn't have thought so. a toaster, kettle, you know, i might even potentially have a look at a hoover. just a very basic repair, yeah, but certainly not on a washer or a cooker, ora tumble dryer. they're so cheap to replace, so ijust probably get - a new one, really. door seals can go, and that's an easy thing that a homeowner can replace themselves. similar with shelves. rob's company has 400 engineers. washing machines are a huge part of our business.
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it's what we see day in and day out. making more complex repairs in domestic appliances. these can sometimes come off the runners, quite easily fixable, you just click them back in. but he thinks there's plenty we can try ourselves. it gives customers a choice. we really want consumers to take that opportunity to look at what they need as a repair, whether they can repair it themselves via a small component, or if they need to call somebody out like ourselves. a yougov survey suggests we feel most confident with the hoover. 42% feel comfortable repairing vacuum cleaners. 20% would try patching up a broken toaster. and only ll% would try to fix a gas cooker. in all the statistics, men consistently reported feeling more confident in trying to repair household items than women. but does that mean they do a betterjob? no, not when you've got a partner like me, no. he attempts it but for me, if you've had something for six years, off you pop.
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and get a new one. it's removable, you can separate it. it's cheaper to make it in one piece. but we make it like that. the uk's only white goods manufacturer say they knew the legislation was coming, and have already made their machines simpler to mend. the secret of products that are easy to repair and last longer is in the design. you've got to start off by saying, the objective here is to make a product that's going to be reliable, easy to maintain or whatever. you've got to design a product that's difficult to make wrong and easy to repair if it needs to be repaired. even though we now have the right to repair, it's a big cultural shift to convince people to fix things rather than fling them. there was a queue at the gates this morning at 8am when things opened, and already somebody has delivered a
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dishwasher which is unwarranted, maybe not able to be repaired or maybe not able to be repaired or maybe just too expensive to repair. tim is the man in charge of what happens to all these products in terms of recycling. a lot of this does not end up in landfill. everything the general public brings to this site gets recycled or repaired. there will be new incentives from the government, part of a wider plan to encourage people to come, with the website, recycle your electricals, to make it easy for people to find a site and bring material here. idols? for people to find a site and bring material here.— for people to find a site and bring material here. ., �* , , ., material here. now there's parts are iioin to material here. now there's parts are going to be — material here. now there's parts are going to be more — material here. now there's parts are going to be more accessible - material here. now there's parts are going to be more accessible for - material here. now there's parts are going to be more accessible for the l going to be more accessible for the general public, they will be more accessible for you as well, some of these things will be repaired? yes. these things will be repaired? yes, we work with _ these things will be repaired? yes, we work with charities, _ these things will be repaired? use: we work with charities, they try to fix them but it's not easy to find parts. it will be easier with the right to repair. there will be a new labelling system from march this year which will make it easier for
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people to understand energy efficiency and make savings on their electricity bills so it's all going in the right direction. we are trying to promote eco design from the brands and get more recycling in this country. the brands and get more recycling in this country-— the brands and get more recycling in this country. some of these tvs look better than the _ this country. some of these tvs look better than the ones _ this country. some of these tvs look better than the ones i _ this country. some of these tvs look better than the ones i have - this country. some of these tvs look better than the ones i have in - this country. some of these tvs look better than the ones i have in my - better than the ones i have in my house. now we will have a right to get hold of parts but if it is still expensive to buy the part or get it put in by a professional, it might still mean that people send things to things like this rather than repair them. thank you so much. one quick e—mail from a viewer this morning, this one was on twitter, my ex—wife had a fridge door with a door handle from a mark one ford cortina to lock it because the seal had broken. i think that would look _ because the seal had broken. i think that would look quite _ because the seal had broken. i think that would look quite good. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. a parliamentary inquiry into policing at the sarah everard vigil in march has found there were multiple failings by officers. the met was criticised for being heavy handed during the vigil on clapham common but cleared of any wrongdoing by inspectors. but the all parliamentary group said the right to peaceful protest must be supported, not suppressed by the law. her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary has rejected the findings of the parliamentary group saying its own review found officers acted proportionately. chelsea and westminster hospital has opened a new state—of—the—art expansion to its intensive care unit. the ribbon was cut by three—year—old theo hutton, who was born prematurely at just 23 weeks. the new neonatal intensive care unit will enable the hospital to treat 150 more sick babies every year. some commuters face paying—out over £50 a day more for train travel if they use the new flexible tickets, according to analysis by the labour party.
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they found that some would pay more per day if they used the flexible tickets three days a week rather than a traditional annual season ticket. a government spokesperson said most part—time commuters would benefit and that passengers should consider which product best suits their travel pattern. a man from east london, who three years ago achieved the record for oldest climber of the 02 arena at age 97, has beaten his own record by climbing it again on his 100th birthday. harry white scaled the up at the 02 attraction in his wheelchair. i was born in silvertown and i have lived mostly round and about this area all the time. so it was quite nice. the last time i came up, i turned round and said, i'd like to do it if i reach 100. to do it again. and i've done it. let's take a look at the travel situation on the tube now... a good service just minor delays on the circle line.
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now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a bright start this morning, and we should see a little bit more in the way of sunshine compared to yesterday. perhaps a little bit of mistiness first thing, but that should start to lift to these decent spells of sunshine. we are at risk of maybe one or two showers. towards end of the afternoon many places staying dry and temperatures 22 celsius, so feeling a little bit more warmth in that sunshine. that shower risk will peter out overnight. dry with some clear spells to start with, but we'll see low cloud and potentially some mist and fog coming up from the south through the night, minimum temperature between 11 and 1a celsius. so it is going to be quite a murky start tomorrow morning. we should still see some sunshine, but we start to notice the influence of this low—pressure system coming in from the atlantic. so the risk of one or two showers. looking to wimbledon for today, we should get a full day's play. a 10% chance of a shower. uv levels are high and the pollen count very high as well, temperatures around 22 celsius as a maximum.
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so as we head towards the weekend, that low—pressure system, some showers potentially for friday. but then saturday, spells of rain. and more showers on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. gethin and janette can tell us what's in store. morning. good morning. coming up on morning live — 94% of uk adults now own a mobile phone, but new research has found nearly two thirds of us are convinced our phones are listening in on our private conversations. so what's the truth? we've been to code—breaking hq, bletchley park to find out. plus, someone we love listening to — dr xand's here. _ today, with news that the nhs have been given the green light - for a covid boosterjab for the over—50s, -
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he'll have the latest. from health to wealth — it's all change for the furlough scheme from today. if you're one of the 3.4 million people this affects, alex depledge will be here to explain exactly what this means for yourjob and the impact it could have on your wages. also on the show, it's the first day ofjuly, l and anna haugh's here to tell us- about two of this month's in—season vegetables and the tasty dishes you can make with them. - they're packed full of nutrients that could improve cholesteroll levels and your skin. she is out of the chef whites. she is looking — she is out of the chef whites. she is looking beautiful today. and, from summer veg to summer plants — mark lane shares his clever tips on how you can make your garden feel bigger, whatever its size, including how a shower curtain can help. plus, i've got an upper body workout that will release the tension - from your shoulders for today's strictly fitness — _ so get warmed up ready. and, loads of us have hinged on box—sets through lockdown. and despite not filming a new episode for six years. this summer's surprise hit is none other than bbc drama waterloo road.
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we're speaking to one of its stars — laurie brett — about why she thinks it's become so many people's guilty pleasure. we'll see you at 9.15! thank you both very much. see you later on. princes william and harry will come together today to unveil a statue of their mother, princess diana, on what would have been her 60th birthday. it will be the first time the brothers have seen each other since the funeral of their grandfather, the duke of edinburgh, amid reports of family rift. our royal correspondent daniela relph reports. in place, but hidden from view until its unveiling this afternoon. the statue of diana princess of wales will stand here in the sunken garden of kensington palace. it was a favourite location of diana's. over the past two years, the layout of the garden has been redesigned and replanted to create a calmer and more reflective setting for the statue. it was commissioned by princes william and harry to mark the positive impact their mother had
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during her life. they've been involved at every stage, to ensure the statue captures their mother in the way they remember her. yesterday, harry, fresh out of self isolation, afterflying in from california, was a surprise guest at a charity event with seriously ill children. another reminder of the kind of work his mother did. today will be filled with emotion for her sons. i think the statue is another form of legacy. it's celebrating everything that she stood for, for the 36 years that she lived. it will capture the thoughts of her sons around her. i think that will be hugely, that will be so meaningful. the statue has been created by sculptor ian rank—broadley. his work, a major part of the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. he already has a royal connection as well, having designed the image of the queen that appears
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on all our coins. oh, my god. get this on camera. you forgot your boots! the days of banter and teasing between william and harry are gone for now, amid family conflict. their relationship remained strained. the tension lingers between them. our british royal family is not supposed to be a perfect family. if somehow out of this split comes some kind of reconciliation, that will presumably hold a lesson for all of us. many around them hope that under the gaze of their mother today, there is a chance of some reconciliation. daniela relph, bbc news. let's now speak to omid scobie, who is the biographer of the duke and duchess of sussex. good morning to you. ijust wonder first of all, it is worth realising for at the moment this is for those
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two young men a very personal moment, isn't it?— two young men a very personal moment, isn't it? yeah, morning. this is obviously _ moment, isn't it? yeah, morning. this is obviously something - moment, isn't it? yeah, morning. | this is obviously something deeply personal— this is obviously something deeply personal to both william and harry. they started this journey in 2017. they— they started this journey in 2017. they had — they started this journey in 2017. they had always wanted to create something that would remember their life -- _ something that would remember their life -- her_ something that would remember their life —— her life in the way they wanted~ — life —— her life in the way they wanted. they have been deeply involved — wanted. they have been deeply involved in this from the start, having — involved in this from the start, having a — involved in this from the start, having a say, working alongside the sculpton _ having a say, working alongside the sculptor. despite the distances between the brothers today, it was a project _ between the brothers today, it was a project that started with the two of them _ project that started with the two of them very— project that started with the two of them very much in communication with each other, _ them very much in communication with each other, working side by side. today— each other, working side by side. today wiii— each other, working side by side. today will be a reminder of that moment— today will be a reminder of that moment as they finally unveil the statue _ moment as they finally unveil the statue to — moment as they finally unveil the statue to the world. the moment as they finally unveil the statue to the world.— moment as they finally unveil the statue to the world. the reality of course though _ statue to the world. the reality of course though is _ statue to the world. the reality of course though is that _ statue to the world. the reality of course though is that today - statue to the world. the reality of course though is that today there | course though is that today there will be cameras. it is a very private event to a degree, but there will be cameras. inevitably, given what people think they know about the relationship between the two of them, a lot of questions will be asked. there will be a great deal of
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scrutiny? asked. there will be a great deal of scrutin ? ., , ., scrutiny? yeah, it is a private event, scrutiny? yeah, it is a private event. we — scrutiny? yeah, it is a private event, we call _ scrutiny? yeah, it is a private event, we call it. _ scrutiny? yeah, it is a private event, we call it. there - scrutiny? yeah, it is a private event, we call it. there are l scrutiny? yeah, it is a private - event, we call it. there are cameras that wiii— event, we call it. there are cameras that will he — event, we call it. there are cameras that will be there. they will be feeding — that will be there. they will be feeding out to every news outlet across _ feeding out to every news outlet across the world. that footage will be analysed for every single body language — be analysed for every single body language context that you can imagine _ language context that you can imagine. we have seen very little of the two _ imagine. we have seen very little of the two brothers together. people will he _ the two brothers together. people will be what you love to see how they are — will be what you love to see how they are around each other. but i think— they are around each other. but i think what— they are around each other. but i think what we will see two brothers extremely— think what we will see two brothers extremely professional moment that is not _ extremely professional moment that is not about them, but about remembering the life of their mum. they are _ remembering the life of their mum. they are of— remembering the life of their mum. they are of course a other family members. — they are of course a other family members, diana's sisters, her brother, — members, diana's sisters, her brother, and those who run the statue — brother, and those who run the statue committee, including some of diana's_ statue committee, including some of diana's closest friends. this is a moment— diana's closest friends. this is a moment they will put everything to one side _ moment they will put everything to one side may be for us watching it will he _ one side may be for us watching it will be curious to see how they are with each— will be curious to see how they are with each other, but i think we will 'ust with each other, but i think we will just see _ with each other, but i think we will just see professionalism and nothing else. . ., , ., , just see professionalism and nothing else. . ., , ., else. prince harry has travelled from the us —
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else. prince harry has travelled from the us to _ else. prince harry has travelled from the us to be _ else. prince harry has travelled from the us to be involved. - else. prince harry has travelled | from the us to be involved. like everybody else, he was subject to quarantine. but he was able to attend an event yesterday evening? yeah, absolutely. one of his favourite _ yeah, absolutely. one of his favourite events is the well—child awards — favourite events is the well—child awards it — favourite events is the well—child awards. it acknowledges and celebrates these special projects carried _ celebrates these special projects carried out by seriously ill chiidren— carried out by seriously ill children and their carers and families _ children and their carers and families. a lot of work went into actually— families. a lot of work went into actually making that moment happened. the awards usually take place _ happened. the awards usually take place later— happened. the awards usually take place later in the year. there was a very small— place later in the year. there was a very small window they could use to have the _ very small window they could use to have the event. they managed to pull it off _ have the event. they managed to pull it off for _ have the event. they managed to pull it off. for harry, i have been alongside _ it off. for harry, i have been alongside him.— it off. for harry, i have been alongside him. it off. for harry, i have been aloniside him. �* ., , , it off. for harry, i have been aloniside him. ~ ., , , ., alongside him. apologies, we seem to have some problems _ alongside him. apologies, we seem to have some problems with _ alongside him. apologies, we seem to have some problems with the - alongside him. apologies, we seem to have some problems with the link - alongside him. apologies, we seem to have some problems with the link to i have some problems with the link to kensington gardens. the actual unveiling itself taking place around 2pm this afternoon. it is essentially a private event but there will be cameras there, so we will get a sense of those who are at
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there. but i think carol is on standby with the weather. i am seeing that the sun appears to be shining in and around kensington palace this morning? that is right. it is indeed. good morning. for many of us today it is going to be a pleasant day if you like the sunshine. just a few isolated showers. tomorrow the risk of showers increases. we have an area of low pressure coming our way for the weekend. this morning there is some low cloud, mist and fog around the coasts. inland look at the distinct lack of isobars. not much wind. if you do catch a shower and later it will be slow moving. close to the irish sea coastline we have got some mist and fog. the same across the channel islands. some of this could lap on shore around the coast of england later. a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine. showers in parts of scotland this afternoon.
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the exception rather than the rule. a fine and a dry and a warm day. i want to focus on the north—east of england heading towards the wash. we will have more cloud around and here too it will be thick enough for the odd shower or some drizzle. further west a lot of dry weather. you could catch some showers in wales, south—west england, heading over towards hampshire. some of them could be sharp, again, the exception rather than the rule. temperatures 14 to 21 or 22. a 10% chance of a shower today at wimbledon. this evening and overnight many of the showers will tend to fade. they will be some clear skies. we will also have some mist and fog, particularly around the coastlines. where you do have some breaks in the cloud part of the highlands, across parts of north—east england, temperatures could dip to between seven and 9 degrees. mostly we are staying in double figures. tomorrow, after that
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cloudy and murky start, the cloud will break, giving sunshine, that would spark off some showers. they will be more of them around tomorrow than today. some of them in north—east england and south east scotland could be heavy and thundery. 20% risk of a shower in wimbledon tomorrow. highs of 23 degrees. and notice it is not as cloudy along the north sea coastline as today. heading through friday night and into the weekend, you can see the low pressure starting to approach from the south—west. that means first thing on saturday morning it is going to be quite a cloudy and showery picture. some of those showers merging to give longer spells of rain. look out if they spread through the day. moving north eastwards. temperatures 14 to 21 degrees. as for the outlook, well, still a bit of uncertainty around this, but it looks like the low pressure may well stay with us and we could see a new one coming our
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way. the early part of the week is looking unsettled. that is a long way off. this forecast could change. back to you. it always does, doesn't it carol? yes, when you look that far in advance, absolutely it can change. now we know. it is going to change. it could change. nothing is written in stone. there's been another major blow for the high street, after clothing retailer gap announced plans to close all 81 of its stores in the uk and ireland. the company will continue to trade online, and hasn't said how many of its staff will be affected by the plans. let's speak now to retail analyst natalie berg, who joins us from outside gap's flagship store on london's oxford street. good morning. a huge name giving up on the high street, yet another one. did you see this one coming? itrefoil.
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did you see this one coming? well, unfortunately _ did you see this one coming? well, unfortunately l _ did you see this one coming? well, unfortunately i don't _ did you see this one coming? well, unfortunately i don't think- did you see this one coming? well, unfortunately i don't think the - did you see this one coming? well, unfortunately i don't think the news has come _ unfortunately i don't think the news has come as much of a shock to any of us _ has come as much of a shock to any of us the _ has come as much of a shock to any of us. the writing has been on the wall for— of us. the writing has been on the wall for many years. what we are seeing _ wall for many years. what we are seeing now— wall for many years. what we are seeing now is that the pandemic has simply— seeing now is that the pandemic has simply accelerated the demise of mediocre — simply accelerated the demise of mediocre retail. it has accelerated the demise of those retailers that have struggled to stay relevant to shoppers. — have struggled to stay relevant to shoppers, they have struggled to adapt. _ shoppers, they have struggled to adapt, they have struggled to differentiate from rivals both online — differentiate from rivals both online and also on the high street. and the _ online and also on the high street. and the uncomfortable truth is that we simply— and the uncomfortable truth is that we simply have too many stores. we have an _ we simply have too many stores. we have an oversupply of retail space. we have _ have an oversupply of retail space. we have retail space that isjust no longer— we have retail space that isjust no longer fit _ we have retail space that isjust no longer fit for purpose. and unfortunately, it has left retailers like gap _ unfortunately, it has left retailers like gap looking vulnerable. the uk and ireland not _ like gap looking vulnerable. the uk and ireland not the _ like gap looking vulnerable. the uk and ireland not the only _ like gap looking vulnerable. the uk and ireland not the only places - like gap looking vulnerable. the uk and ireland not the only places to i and ireland not the only places to lose gap stores. they are looking to do the same in france and italy. can they continue to online only? it is a really good _ they continue to online only? it is a really good question. but it is not the — a really good question. but it is not the first retailer to ditch the
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hi-h not the first retailer to ditch the high street in favour of an online only strategy. we have also seen the likes of— only strategy. we have also seen the likes of arcadia, debenhams, all shut stores in favour of operating purely— shut stores in favour of operating purely online. that comes with challenges too though. it will be hard for— challenges too though. it will be hard for gap to stand out online. it is a competitive market. there are a lot of— is a competitive market. there are a lot of challenges in selling goods purely— lot of challenges in selling goods purely online when it comes to the cost of— purely online when it comes to the cost of shipping, acquiring new customers and making sure that you are reaching — customers and making sure that you are reaching shoppers in, on their terms _ are reaching shoppers in, on their terms. ., ., ,, terms. even there on oxford street, one of the country's _ terms. even there on oxford street, one of the country's biggest - terms. even there on oxford street, one of the country's biggest and - one of the country's biggest and best—known shopping centres, we are beginning to see empty premises not opening up, shutting down, effectively stop how rapidly do you think high streets can adapt to that changing retail environment and become something slightly different? what will it look like in five years? i what will it look like in five ears? ., �* ~'
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what will it look like in five ears? ., �* ~ ,, years? i don't think the high street is d in: years? i don't think the high street is dying but— years? i don't think the high street is dying but it _ years? i don't think the high street is dying but it is — years? i don't think the high street is dying but it is certainly _ is dying but it is certainly evolving. there has to be some serious — evolving. there has to be some serious reinvention of retailers want _ serious reinvention of retailers want to— serious reinvention of retailers want to continue trading on the high street _ want to continue trading on the high street i_ want to continue trading on the high street. i think in the future high street— street. i think in the future high street will— street. i think in the future high street will become more digitally led. clearly we want to continue shopping — led. clearly we want to continue shopping online. we have spent the past 18_ shopping online. we have spent the past 18 months shopping on our phones. — past 18 months shopping on our phones, shopping online. we have all gotten _ phones, shopping online. we have all gotten used for the convenience. and also try— gotten used for the convenience. and also try shopping for other categories online like groceries and fashion _ categories online like groceries and fashion. those behaviours will outlast— fashion. those behaviours will outlast the pandemic. high street retailers _ outlast the pandemic. high street retailers need to give customers something more than product. there needs— something more than product. there needs to _ something more than product. there needs to he — something more than product. there needs to be product, they need to be experienced. oxford street will look different _ experienced. oxford street will look different in the next few months. we are to _ different in the next few months. we are to see _ different in the next few months. we are to see more pedestrianisation, more _ are to see more pedestrianisation, more green — are to see more pedestrianisation, more green spaces, more entertainment. and ironically, less retail _ entertainment. and ironically, less retail. ln _ entertainment. and ironically, less retail. ., , ., entertainment. and ironically, less retail. ., , retail. in many ways that is excitini retail. in many ways that is exciting to _ retail. in many ways that is exciting to see, _ retail. in many ways that is exciting to see, what - retail. in many ways that is exciting to see, what will. retail. in many ways that is - exciting to see, what will happen next. a very tough for the staff affected by resort lodges. thank you very much. 8:49am. mike, if you are
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wonderin: very much. 8:49am. mike, if you are wondering around _ very much. 8:49am. mike, if you are wondering around the _ very much. 8:49am. mike, if you are wondering around the south - wondering around the south west london around 10pm last night, you might�*ve heard a distant roar. it rolled back the years.. certainly going through those hip operations. refusing to refusing to listen to those that doubt he would be back. he is into the third round at wimbledon. there were four british winners to celebrate asjoe wilson reports. we may look at him and wonder how much more. we only know how much he's given. there were times on centre court when andy murray looked like a champion, but times when he didn't. oh, no! germany's oscar 0tte could see his big opportunity, of course he could.
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he took a two sets to one lead. now, hang on, what about the grass? bottom of the screen, murray. oh, no. now, wimbledon spent the day explaining the courts are normal, just need to firm up. was that the end? no. murray played on... ..for worse, or better. roof on, fourth set renaissance. yeah, right there. he does it this time. suddenly, only a power cut would stop him. gentle touch, and then the noise. cheering. was that metal hip now fitted with some kind ofjet engine? oh, that is brilliant! and that is vintage murray again. 6—2 in the fifth, it felt like a win to match any of murray's here. but was that court really only half full? i needed, i needed everyone's help tonight. and, yeah, they did a greatjob. and, yeah, i've hit some great shots at the end to finish it,
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but it was a tough match. well, he said it. the hill was first henman's. and if you're here to cheer british players, well, you must remember there are others. there are seeds. a dominant performance from dan evans against dusan lajovic. he's seeded 22 for a reason. life on track, straight sets win. evans into the third round. and that's it. keep waving. the 29th seed, cameron norrie, won today, and he's enjoying an outstanding year. well, we could glimpse court 18 for emma raducanu, not 19 until november. great potential for british tennis. joe wilson, bbc news, wimbledon. 18—year—old emma is another fantastic story. more in a moment with annabel croft. jadon sancho is on england duty at the euros. and it looks as though he's heading for manchester united, who've agreed a deal in principle to sign him from borussia dortmund. it's understood united will pay around £73 million for the winger,
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who's still only 21, and who joined the german side from manchester city in 2017. he's been given the go—ahead to discuss personal terms. a controversial managerial appointment, has been confirmed. rafa benitez, the former liverpool boss, has taken over at everton. benitez replaces carlo ancelotti, who left last early last month, and he'll need to win over fans, who took offence when he described everton as a "small club" when he was in charge at liverpool. and tottenham's 72—day search for a new manager is finally over — they've appointed former wolves boss nuno espirito santo. he replaces his portuguese compatriotjose mourinho, who was sacked in april. next to the cricket, and kate cross took five wickets, as england's women beat india by 5 wickets in the second one—day international in taunton. they were chasing 222, and were looking shaky at 133—5. but a composed innings from sophia dunkley saw them home —
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she made an unbeaten 73. katherine brunt hit the winning runs. england are now 6—2 up in the multi—format series. final word, because we are talking to annabel croft shortly, i know he has got denis shapovalov on friday, the tenth seed, but as andy murray tweeted last night, just after midnight, there is still life in the old dog yet. midnight, there is still life in the old dog yet-— midnight, there is still life in the old dog yet. isn't there 'ust? the adrenaline — old dog yet. isn't there 'ust? the adrenaline must have _ old dog yet. isn't there just? the adrenaline must have been - old dog yet. isn't there just? the i adrenaline must have been coursing through his veinsjust adrenaline must have been coursing through his veins just after midnight last night. probably in pain as well. we are going to pick up with annabel croft. good morning. going to pick up with annabel croft. good morning-— going to pick up with annabel croft. good morning._ can l going to pick up with annabel croft. i good morning._ can you good morning. good morning. can you aint a good morning. good morning. can you paint a picture? _ good morning. good morning. can you paint a picture? l _ good morning. good morning. can you paint a picture? i think _ good morning. good morning. can you paint a picture? i think you _ good morning. good morning. can you paint a picture? i think you are - paint a picture? i think you are watching at home like lots of people were, i know you are involved in the commentaries normally, but can you give us a sense for those people have not been there,, can't it, the
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player, the crowd seemed to be it was absolutely an electric atmosphere.— it was absolutely an electric atmosphere. it was absolutely an electric atmoshere. ., , .,. ., atmosphere. clearly the fact we have even not atmosphere. clearly the fact we have even got crowds _ atmosphere. clearly the fact we have even got crowds back _ atmosphere. clearly the fact we have even got crowds back at _ atmosphere. clearly the fact we have even got crowds back at a _ atmosphere. clearly the fact we have even got crowds back at a sporting i even got crowds back at a sporting event _ even got crowds back at a sporting event and — even got crowds back at a sporting event and back at wimbledon, everybody was ready to release all their energy. but the connection between — their energy. but the connection between andy murray and bad credit, theyjust _ between andy murray and bad credit, they just absolutely love between andy murray and bad credit, theyjust absolutely love him. he is such a _ theyjust absolutely love him. he is such a brave heart out there. he is such a warrior on the tennis court _ he is such a warrior on the tennis court he — he is such a warrior on the tennis court he has _ he is such a warrior on the tennis court. he has won the championship a couple _ court. he has won the championship a couple of— court. he has won the championship a couple of times. we hadn't seen him in action— couple of times. we hadn't seen him in action since 2017, and the fact he is _ in action since 2017, and the fact he is playing with a metal hip and he is playing with a metal hip and he gives— he is playing with a metal hip and he gives so— he is playing with a metal hip and he gives so much, he was feeding off the energy— he gives so much, he was feeding off the energy of the crowd. i was watching — the energy of the crowd. i was watching at home behind a pillow. it was writing — watching at home behind a pillow. it was writing this roller—coaster ride of emotion — was writing this roller—coaster ride of emotion. that is what tennis brings — of emotion. that is what tennis brings it — of emotion. that is what tennis brings it is— of emotion. that is what tennis brings. it is some of the greatest
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entertainment you can ever watch because _ entertainment you can ever watch because you are never quite sure what _ because you are never quite sure what is _ because you are never quite sure what is going to happen next. why did we _ what is going to happen next. why did we ever doubt him? it what is going to happen next. why did we ever doubt him?— what is going to happen next. why did we ever doubt him? it was always iioin to be did we ever doubt him? it was always going to be like _ did we ever doubt him? it was always going to be like that _ did we ever doubt him? it was always going to be like that for— did we ever doubt him? it was always going to be like that for andy - going to be like that for andy murray. i am trying to work out whether for him murray. i am trying to work out whetherfor him it murray. i am trying to work out whether for him it is just enough to be back competing, or whether he seriously wants to be looking ahead and getting to the final stages of the competition, maybe that is what is in his mind. what do you think you would be happy with? number one, he is so thrilled _ you would be happy with? number one, he is so thrilled to _ you would be happy with? number one, he is so thrilled to be _ you would be happy with? number one, he is so thrilled to be back _ you would be happy with? number one, he is so thrilled to be back here. - he is so thrilled to be back here. none _ he is so thrilled to be back here. none of— he is so thrilled to be back here. none of us — he is so thrilled to be back here. none of us can imagine what he has put himself— none of us can imagine what he has put himself through to even get back out on _ put himself through to even get back out on court. there were some very dark moments when he thought he would _ dark moments when he thought he would never play professional sport again _ would never play professional sport again. having hip surgery a couple of times — again. having hip surgery a couple of times. there aren't too many players — of times. there aren't too many players on — of times. there aren't too many players on the professional circuit playing _ players on the professional circuit playing with a metal hip. that's the mentality— playing with a metal hip. that's the mentality of a champion. you never, ever underestimate that. when they walk on— ever underestimate that. when they walk on court, it is a bit like roger— walk on court, it is a bit like roger federer, they believe they can beat anybody. i believe that is the
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way with _ beat anybody. i believe that is the way with andy murray. i feel he will continue _ way with andy murray. i feel he will continue going, play one point at a time _ continue going, play one point at a time he _ continue going, play one point at a time. he has such a perfectionist attitude. — time. he has such a perfectionist attitude, he expects so much of himself. — attitude, he expects so much of himself, he will expect himself, i believe. — himself, he will expect himself, i believe. to— himself, he will expect himself, i believe, to be denis shapovalov. he has been _ believe, to be denis shapovalov. he has been improving dramatically in recent— has been improving dramatically in recent years. as dangerous as shapovalov is, a big server with a bil shapovalov is, a big server with a big strike — shapovalov is, a big server with a big strike of the forehand, i believe _ big strike of the forehand, i believe andy murray thinks he can beat him — believe andy murray thinks he can beat him. he has a game that is very unusual _ beat him. he has a game that is very unusual cat — beat him. he has a game that is very unusual. cat and mouse tactics,. a lot of— unusual. cat and mouse tactics,. a lot of tactics — unusual. cat and mouse tactics,. a lot of tactics. he pulls players into awkward positions and makes them _ into awkward positions and makes them feel— into awkward positions and makes them feel uncomfortable and get into their heads psychologically. it will be interesting to see how that pans out. be interesting to see how that pans out all _ be interesting to see how that pans out all of — be interesting to see how that pans out. all of us can't wait. what entertainment it was last night. as ou entertainment it was last night. as you are entertainment it was last night. 33 you are talking entertainment it was last night. is you are talking we were seeing some pictures of shapovalov. he plays with a lot of passion. he put it all out there. just in terms of those
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two personalities shown that space, there is going to be a lot going on? oh, definitely. denis shapovalov. as 0h, definitely. denis shapovalov. as a oh, definitely. denis shapovalov. as a bl- oh, definitely. denis shapovalov. as a big star— oh, definitely. denis shapovalov. as a big star of— 0h, definitely. denis shapovalov. as a big star of the men's tour. he rose _ a big star of the men's tour. he rose through as a young lad that started — rose through as a young lad that started to — rose through as a young lad that started to make progress against the top players in the world. he has got a huge _ top players in the world. he has got a huge game. he is left—handed, which _ a huge game. he is left—handed, which always helps on a grass court, but he _ which always helps on a grass court, but he has _ which always helps on a grass court, but he has got a huge serve and a bil but he has got a huge serve and a big lefty— but he has got a huge serve and a big lefty forehand strike. his game can bring _ big lefty forehand strike. his game can bring the crowd alive because of his beautiful shot making. if i can remember— his beautiful shot making. if i can remember rightly, i am pretty sure he lost _ remember rightly, i am pretty sure he lost to— remember rightly, i am pretty sure he lost to cameron norrie at queens and he _ he lost to cameron norrie at queens and he does — he lost to cameron norrie at queens and he does get a little bit nervous _ and he does get a little bit nervous. he has admitted that he .ets nervous. he has admitted that he gets nervous under immense pressure. you can— gets nervous under immense pressure. you can only— gets nervous under immense pressure. you can only imagine what it is like for an— you can only imagine what it is like for an opponent to face somebody like a _ for an opponent to face somebody like a tim — for an opponent to face somebody like a tim henman or andy murray out on centre _ like a tim henman or andy murray out on centre court when you have an electric— on centre court when you have an electric crowd behind a british player~ — electric crowd behind a british player. that player has to take on not only— player. that player has to take on not only the opponent, but the crowd
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as well _ not only the opponent, but the crowd as well. that is something that psychologically it is very tough for a lot of _ psychologically it is very tough for a lot of players to do. we have heard — a lot of players to do. we have heard novak djokovic talking on the part about — heard novak djokovic talking on the part about trying to block out the crowd _ part about trying to block out the crowd and — part about trying to block out the crowd and mentally pretend that crowds _ crowd and mentally pretend that crowds are for him, even if they are against _ crowds are for him, even if they are against it _ crowds are for him, even if they are against it he— crowds are for him, even if they are against it. he has certain techniques he tries to use. denis shapovalov will have to use all of that because after what we witnessed last night, _ that because after what we witnessed last night, that crowd is going to be overwhelmingly in favour of andy murray _ be overwhelmingly in favour of andy murray a _ be overwhelmingly in favour of andy murra . �* ., be overwhelmingly in favour of andy murra . . ., , ., ., , murray. a great competition. lovely to seak murray. a great competition. lovely to speak to — murray. a great competition. lovely to speak to you- _ you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. nissan announces a major expansion of electric vehicle production in sunderland, bringing thousands of newjobs to the region. i meet some of the employees, their father worked here, they retired from here, their son is working here, they are so proud of working here. so why not to prepare generation after generation in sunderland as a part of the family? and this is what we are going to do. employers will have to bear more of the costs of furlough from today as the government starts to wind down its job support scheme. whether you're an employer or employee — as furlough, or thejobs retention scheme as its officially known — begins to wind down, how will this effect you? let me know on twitter — @annita?mcveigh with the #bbcyourquestions.

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