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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 28, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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the new health secretary makes his first statement in the job and says england are still on course to lift restrictions onjuly 19th. after visiting a hospital this morning, sajid javid said he wants to see life going back to normal as quickly as possible. the restrictions on our freedoms, they must come to an end. we owe it to the british people, who have sacrificed so much, to restore their freedoms as quickly as we possibly can. i hope his confidence today about the 19th — i hope his confidence today about the 19th ofjuly does not prove somewhat premature. meanwhile, the controversy surrounding the former health secretary continues. the prime minister is forced to defend why he didn't sack him. also tonight... in a further blow to holiday plans,
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portugal brings in a two week quarantine for uk visitors if they're not fully vaccinated. nissan is to create 2000 newjobs in sunderland, expanding production of electric car batteries.— electric car batteries. serving, two set points- — and at wimbledon, i9—year—old britjack draper takes a set off reigning champion djokovic, but eventually experience wins over youth. and coming up on sportsday on the bbc news channel, i'll be live at wembley, with less than 2a hours to go before england's crucial last 16 tie with germany here at wembley. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six.
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in his first commons statement since becoming _ in his first commons statement since becoming the new health secretary, said saiid _ becoming the new health secretary, said sajid javid says he sees no reason — said sajid javid says he sees no reason for— said sajid javid says he sees no reason fo— reason for restrictions to last be ond reason for restrictions to last beyond the _ reason for restrictions to last beyond the 19th _ reason for restrictions to last beyond the 19th of _ reason for restrictions to last beyond the 19th ofjuly. - reason for restrictions to last beyond the 19th ofjuly. he l reason for restrictions to last i beyond the 19th ofjuly. he said people should not have to put up with restrictions a moment longer than necessary. that despite more than necessary. that despite more than 22,000 new cases across the uk being reported today, the highest since january but only three new deaths. meanwhile, questions that surround the former health secretary matt hancock with labour demanding an investigation he used private e—mails but government business and the prime minister has been forced to defend his decision not to sack mr hancock. here is our political editor laura kuenssberg. the hard hat and hive ears are the same but it's not really been business as usual. 0ne really been business as usual. one of boris johnson's really been business as usual. one of borisjohnson's most senior colleagues had to quit when he was caught out breaking the covid rules. and at the start, the prime minister had wanted to keep him on. well. and at the start, the prime minister had wanted to keep him on.- had wanted to keep him on. well, i read the story _
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had wanted to keep him on. well, i read the story on _ had wanted to keep him on. well, i read the story on friday _ had wanted to keep him on. well, i read the story on friday and - had wanted to keep him on. well, i read the story on friday and we'vel read the story on friday and we've got a new health secretary in post on saturday and i think that's about the right pace to proceed in a pandemic. we are very likely to be in a position onjuly the 19th to say that that really is the terminus and we can go back to life as it was before covid as far as possible. cases continue to rise, though, and switching health secretary is in a pandemic is far from switching health secretary is in a pandemic is farfrom ideal, even if it is a return to government for a familiarface. mr; it is a return to government for a familiar face.— familiar face. my first visit to hos - ital familiar face. my first visit to hospital on — familiar face. my first visit to hospital on the _ familiar face. my first visit to hospital on the job. - familiar face. my first visit to hospital on the job. sajid - familiar face. my first visit to l hospital on the job. sajid javid familiar face. my first visit to - hospital on the job. sajid javid has hospital on the 'ob. sa'id javid has already been _ hospital on the job. sa'id javid has already been the h hospital on the job. sajid javid has already been the home _ hospital on the job. sajid javid has already been the home secretaryl hospital on the job. sajid javid has i already been the home secretary and the chancellor. now as health secretary, he is also giving heavy hints ministers are on course to lift the remaining restrictions in england in three weeks. congratulations, nice to meet you. we see _ congratulations, nice to meet you. we see no— congratulations, nice to meet you. we see no reason to go beyond the 19th of— we see no reason to go beyond the 19th ofjuly. because, in truth, no
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date _ 19th ofjuly. because, in truth, no date we _ 19th ofjuly. because, in truth, no date we choose comes with zero risk for covid, _ date we choose comes with zero risk for covid, for — date we choose comes with zero risk for covid, for me, a 19th ofjuly is not only— for covid, for me, a 19th ofjuly is not only the — for covid, for me, a 19th ofjuly is not only the end of the line but the start of— not only the end of the line but the start of an — not only the end of the line but the start of an exciting newjourney. but a _ start of an exciting newjourney. but a new — start of an exciting newjourney. but a new face doesn't mean everything about mr hancock's departure is ancient history. how was it gina coladangelo appointed to the board of health? when did their relationship start and did he sometimes dude government work on a private e—mail account? the opposition is pushing to know. i opposition is pushing to know. i have right here the minutes of a departmental meeting in which senior civil servants report government contracts being approved from the minister's private e—mail address. can the minister now say from this dispatch box categorically and on the record that no minister or prime minister has used or does use private e—mailfor minister has used or does use private e—mail for government business? private e-mail for government business?— private e-mail for government business? ., business? today, the government has been emphasising _ business? today, the government has been emphasising its _ business? today, the government has been emphasising its optimism - business? today, the government has been emphasising its optimism about| been emphasising its optimism about being able to get rid of the
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remaining covid rules in england on its planned date ofjuly the 19th. but it is still grappling with the fallout of the behaviour of the man who argued for those rules here in the commons. matt hancock might be gone from government but his exit was messy and a reminder also the downing street, they can't and don't control all events. and the new health secretary won't either. with what is hoped to be the tail end of a pandemic and a growing list of other tasks... a pandemic and a growing list of other tasks. . ._ a pandemic and a growing list of other tasks. .. that is what it's all about. other tasks. .. that is what it's all about- the _ other tasks. .. that is what it's all about. the first _ other tasks. .. that is what it's all about. the first photocall- other tasks. .. that is what it's all about. the first photocall may . other tasks. .. that is what it's all. about. the first photocall may well be the easiest _ about. the first photocall may well be the easiest day _ about. the first photocall may well be the easiest day in _ about. the first photocall may well be the easiest day in the _ about. the first photocall may well be the easiest day in the office - about. the first photocall may well be the easiest day in the office he | be the easiest day in the office he ever has. so, the new health secretary sajid javid sounding very confident in the commons restrictions will be lifted in england onjuly restrictions will be lifted in england on july the 19th restrictions will be lifted in england onjuly the 19th but how sure can he be of that? i england on july the 19th but how sure can he be of that?— sure can he be of that? i think it is a tricky _ sure can he be of that? i think it is a tricky one. _ sure can he be of that? i think it is a tricky one. both _ sure can he be of that? i think it is a tricky one. both sajid - sure can he be of that? i think it is a tricky one. both sajid javid i sure can he be of that? i think it| is a tricky one. both sajid javid in his first outing in the job and the prime minister today were noticeably very cheerful about the possibility
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of lifting restrictions on three weeks' time. and more than the possibility, they made it sound as if it was actually something of a dead cert. but when it comes to the pandemic, when it comes to the government's handling of covid and how cases shift up and down and the spread of the disease, i think our viewers would be forgiven for wondering whether or not they should be quite so sure. we have learned, haven't we, on so many occasions over the last year—and—a—half that the government have had to change their plans at the last minute, whatever consequences that has then for people trying to plan their lives, trying to plan seeing relatives and holidays. trying to cope with the disruption that covid has had for everybody. but the big difference now of course is the vaccination programme. in downing street, they are hoping that in the next couple of weeks before that date, there will be another 5 millionjobs also going date, there will be another 5 million jobs also going into the arms, trying as each day goes past to build this very solid defence but you are right, after a very choppy
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few days the government i think today had made a deliberate decision today had made a deliberate decision to get out there and pump out a hopeful message. but when i think when it comes to covid, never quite put something in ink, that date is not a cast—iron guarantee. it is something that is very much still pencilled in, however optimistic ministers want to some, just as f boris, johnson was not in complete control of what happened to matt hancock, downing street is not in complete control of this pandemic either. . . complete control of this pandemic either. ., ., , , , ., ~ complete control of this pandemic either. ., ., , , , ., ,, , ., the latest government figures show that in the past 2a hours three deaths were reported and 22,868 new infections were recorded, but technical problems over the weekend means approximately 2,0000 infections that should have been reported yesterday are reflected in today's total. scotland has reported 3,258 cases, the highest since the pandemic began. there has been an average of 16,612 new cases per day in the uk last week.
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over 139,000 people received a first dose of the vaccine in the latest 2a hour period, meaning nearly 44.5 million people have now had theirfirstjab — that's 84.4% of uk adults. just over 123,000 people have had their second dose of the vaccine in the latest 2a hour period. with more than 32.5 million people having now had both doses, that's 61.9% of uk adults. as we've just seen, the number of infections is continuing to rise rapidly, but hospitalisations are rising at a much slower rate. 0ur medical editor fergus walsh looks at the role the vaccine programme is playing in reducing levels of serious illness from coronavirus. every day, with every vaccination, the link between covid cases and severe illness is getting weaker. the more people who are protected, the less damage the virus can do.
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during september and october last year, coronavirus cases rose sharply to more than 20,000 cases per day over the same period before vaccines, the number of patients being admitted to hospital every day followed a similar upward trend, rising to nearly 1500 patients a day. but if we look at the period from may this year, although cases have risen sharply to around 15,000 per day, hospital admissions have not followed that same upward trend, rising to just over 200 patients a day. the chances of dying from covid have fallen dramatically. at the peak injanuary, it estimated that one in every 60 infections caused a death. now, it's fewerthan one in every 60 infections caused a death. now, it's fewer than one in every 1000. and it is the huge success of covid vaccines which has
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prompted some scientists to back the lifting of restrictions in three weeks. , , ., , weeks. the july date is good because schools will be _ weeks. the july date is good because schools will be closing _ weeks. the july date is good because schools will be closing for _ weeks. the july date is good because schools will be closing for the - schools will be closing for the summer, we will be going into the summer, we will be going into the summer holidays and transmission potential will be somewhat less than it would be in the autumn will be winter. and also, we are pretty close to getting the vast majority of our population, adult population, immunised. abs, of our population, adult population, immunised-— of our population, adult population, immunised. a new study shows that mixin: immunised. a new study shows that mixing between _ immunised. a new study shows that mixing between astrazeneca - immunised. a new study shows that mixing between astrazeneca and . mixing between astrazeneca and pfizer vaccines gives strong protection against coronavirus. initial results show getting a different brand as the second dose can actually boost immunity levels. i think when it comes to giving the first two doses, better to stick to standard schedules because we know they are effective and work. when it comes to giving later dozes like a booster dose, then these mix and match schedules of a good response.
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scotland has recorded more than 3000 daily coronavirus cases, the highest number over 2a hours since the start of the pandemic. vaccines don't give complete protection but the more people who are immunised, the more covid hospital admissions will be keptin covid hospital admissions will be kept in check. fergus walsh, bbc news. hugh pym joined us. according to their new health secretary it seems all systems go in england for lifting restrictions onjuly all systems go in england for lifting restrictions on july the 19th but given that report, could the data yet go the wrong way? this rare the data yet go the wrong way? as we have heard. — the data yet go the wrong way? as we have heard, experts _ the data yet go the wrong way? as we have heard, experts are _ the data yet go the wrong way? as we have heard, experts are pretty - the data yet go the wrong way? is "he: have heard, experts are pretty clear that although case numbers are rising quite rapidly, the number of hospital admissions is rising a lot less fast and that the vaccines are having an impact. in fact, public health england today published new figures, quoted by the secretary of state, suggesting 27,000 lives have been saved by the vaccines and that 7 million infections have been
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prevented. so, that is the sort of database behind which the government are now saying, actually, they are pretty confident about going ahead onjuly the 19th. but, as you just said, 22,000 is the latest figure the daily reported cases. the underlying averages obviously less than that over the last week but 22,000 is double what the daily reported cases were a week ago. so it begs the question, what happens if it doubles again? and we get nearer to the point when they have to confirm whetherjuly the 19th in england is going ahead? hospital admissions will have risen a little bit more. so it does suggest quite a few imponderables to stop sajid javid also said the government because my aim was to have two thirds of adults having two doses by july the 19th. well, one expert this morning on one of the government advisory committee said he would be advisory committee said he would be a bit more comfortable if it was near 80% who had had two doses. so it is looking pretty positive at the
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moment but i think there is certainly scope for things to change. data often does change and as laboursaid, change. data often does change and as labour said, there were promises about opening up at christmas which did not take place, then schools were set to reopen injanuary and that only happened for one day and even during the 21st, the changes which were told were looking pretty good for monday we did not happen and were postponed.— good for monday we did not happen and were postponed. thank you very much. another _ and were postponed. thank you very much. another blow _ and were postponed. thank you very much. another blow to _ and were postponed. thank you very much. another blow to holiday - and were postponed. thank you very | much. another blow to holiday plans. from today, uk visitors to portugal must quarantine for two weeks unless fully vaccinated. the new rule imposed by portugal reflects continuing concern over the spread of the delta variant. hong kong has banned all passenger flights from the uk from thursday. here is caroline davies. another cloud in the sky for international travel. 0vernight, portugal announced international arrivals must be fully vaccinated or quarantined for 1h days. it has meant last—minute changes for victoria and simon, due to go their
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own honeymoon this morning. mr; own honeymoon this morning. iji parents were own honeymoon this morning. m1: parents were banging own honeymoon this morning. m1 parents were banging on own honeymoon this morning. m1: parents were banging on the own honeymoon this morning. m1 parents were banging on the front door to get us out of bed to tell us we couldn't go any more. so, a few hours cancelling everything and calling up ryanair and now we're going to ib ferry instead. iterate going to ie ferry instead. we literall going to ib ferry instead. we literally found out this morning we coutdnt— literally found out this morning we couldn't fly today, having left everything to book until the very last minute, literally the night before — last minute, literally the night before so we were not surprised for anything. _ before so we were not surprised for anything, finding out this morning was annoying. anything, finding out this morning was annoying-— anything, finding out this morning was annoying. anything, finding out this morning was anno inc. :, :, :, :, was annoying. portugal was moved to the amber list — was annoying. portugal was moved to the amber list in _ was annoying. portugal was moved to the amber list in early _ was annoying. portugal was moved to the amber list in early june, - the amber list in earlyjune, meaning when arrivals come back to the uk, they already need to quarantine here for ten days at home. the number of uk travellers is already low and affecting business. the british tourists are everything for our business. at the end of the day, we have everybody coming from europe but the brits are the biggest spenders and we are now entering the season of holidays.— season of holidays. portugal is not the only country — season of holidays. portugal is not the only country to _ season of holidays. portugal is not the only country to tighten - season of holidays. portugal is not the only country to tighten its - the only country to tighten its travel policies. malta will be added to the green list on wednesday but it has now said it will require all
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travellers aged 12 and over to be fully vaccinated or to quarantine for 1h days. spain hasn't gone as far but now requires all arrivals to be double jabbed or have a negative covid test. iterate be double 'abbed or have a negative covid test. ~ :, , ., covid test. we all started getting sliehtl covid test. we all started getting slightly worried... _ covid test. we all started getting slightly worried... ben _ covid test. we all started getting slightly worried... ben had - covid test. we all started getting i slightly worried... ben had booked to no to slightly worried... ben had booked to go to malta _ slightly worried... ben had booked to go to malta with _ slightly worried... ben had booked to go to malta with his _ slightly worried... ben had booked to go to malta with his family - slightly worried... ben had booked to go to malta with his family but i to go to malta with his family but will not have had the second jab in time. will not have had the second 'ab in time. :, :, , will not have had the second 'ab in time. :, ., , , will not have had the second 'ab in time. :, ., , time. fortunately both my parents are fully jabbed — time. fortunately both my parents are fully jabbed so _ time. fortunately both my parents are fully jabbed so they _ time. fortunately both my parents are fully jabbed so they can - are fullyjabbed so they can potentially go out but for me and my sisters, because we are in our 30s, we have only had a single dose, we realise it is an iron likely we would be able to fly. it is what it is and i appreciate we need to be safe but i do think our government should have liaised better with the maltese government.— maltese government. there are worries about _ maltese government. there are worries about the _ maltese government. there are worries about the knock-on - maltese government. there are i worries about the knock-on impact maltese government. there are - worries about the knock-on impact as worries about the knock—on impact as rules change. this worries about the knock-on impact as rules change-— rules change. this industry needs ura ent rules change. this industry needs urgent help- _ rules change. this industry needs urgent help- we _ rules change. this industry needs urgent help. we are _ rules change. this industry needs urgent help. we are a _ rules change. this industry needs urgent help. we are a long - rules change. this industry needs urgent help. we are a long way . rules change. this industry needs i urgent help. we are a long way from having _ urgent help. we are a long way from having the _ urgent help. we are a long way from having the uk summer as we know it was that— having the uk summer as we know it was that we — having the uk summer as we know it was that we have last may and june are now— was that we have last may and june are now well lose a big chunk of july and — are now well lose a big chunk of july and it— are now well lose a big chunk of july and it does not look like the summer— july and it does not look like the summer we know july and it does not look like the summerwe know and july and it does not look like the summer we know and love when we are able to— summer we know and love when we are able to travel— summer we know and love when we are able to travel where we want to. it looks _
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able to travel where we want to. it looks like — able to travel where we want to. it looks like that as many weeks. the uk looks like that as many weeks. t“ie: uk government has previously said tailored and wider economic support is available to the sector, including the furlough scheme. as countries chop and change their border policies, international travel is left on shaky ground. caroline davies, bbc news. the japanese carmaker nissan is set to create up to 2,000 newjobs in sunderland, by expanding its production of batteries for electric vehicles. industry sources suggest the company could also announce the launch of a brand new electric crossover model later this week. our business editor simonjack is here. how significant is this for nissan and for the how significant is this for nissan and forthe uk? how significant is this for nissan and for the uk? it is how significant is this for nissan and for the uk?— and for the uk? it is a ma'or announcement i and for the uk? it is a ma'or announcement we �* and for the uk? it is a ma'or announcement we are i and for the uk? it is a major - announcement we are expecting when the top brass come from japan to sunderland and they already make electric cars and batteries in sunderland. the leaf model, they make 50,000. but i understand the plant will be on a different scale and enough over time to create enough batteries for 500,000 cars. and that kind of scale has made
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industry sources speculate that maybe a new model is coming. now, this is a big moment for the government of course, because nissan were one of loudest voices warning of a no—deal brexit and the government are making a contribution to the cost, 2,000 directjobs and maybe 4 thousand in the supply chain. it comes at an important moment. in the trade deal with the eu, there are no tariffs, but thor or the components that have to come from the uk has to start going up. you can't get your batteries from china or the us. the industry have been warning we need this to secure production and they will hope it is a down payment on the factories it will need to secure production in the future. will need to secure production in the future-— our top story this evening:
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the new health secretary sajid javid says he wants to see life going back to normal as quickly as possible. here at wimbledon we notice the changes and we recognise all that remains the same. the main thing is we are back. and, coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel, wimbledon is back and under way, although rain has delayed play on the outside courts. 0n the eve of their clash with germany in the knockout stages of the euro 2020 championship, england manager gareth southgate hopes his team can make history. it's 25 years since southgate missed a crucial penalty against germany at euro �*96, ending the team's hopes of reaching the final. he's now keen to write a new chapter in the football rivalry between england and germany, as our sports editor dan roan reports.
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the last time england met germany at wembley in a majr. the last time england met germany at wembley in a ma jr. jor tour mament, the fanned believed. but the defeat another painful chapter in the team's history. 25 years on, gareth southgate is now manager as the two meet again, but says his team shouldn't be weighed down by the past. iterate shouldn't be weighed down by the ast. ~ :, shouldn't be weighed down by the ast, . ., ., , shouldn't be weighed down by the ast. . :, ., , ., shouldn't be weighed down by the ast, . ., ., , ., 4' :, past. we are ready and we know it is a difficult challenge. _ past. we are ready and we know it is a difficult challenge. it _ past. we are ready and we know it is a difficult challenge. it is _ past. we are ready and we know it is a difficult challenge. it is a _ past. we are ready and we know it is a difficult challenge. it is a great - a difficult challenge. it is a great opportunity for this team to make history and give people memories of england/germany y fixtures. england know the euros _ england/germany y fixtures. england know the euros have _ england/germany y fixtures. england know the euros have reached - england/germany y fixtures. england know the euros have reached a - know the euros have reached a decisive stage. chris waddle was another to experience the anguish of
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failure from the spot, in the semifinal of the 1990 world cup and urged the team to ensure a shoot—out is not needed. it urged the team to ensure a shoot-out is not needed-— is not needed. it will prey on op them we are — is not needed. it will prey on op them we are good _ is not needed. it will prey on op them we are good enough - is not needed. it will prey on op them we are good enough not l is not needed. it will prey on op| them we are good enough not to is not needed. it will prey on op - them we are good enough not to go to some _ them we are good enough not to go to some of— them we are good enough not to go to some of that. if somebody missing, hopefully— some of that. if somebody missing, hopefully they're don't, it will drag — hopefully they're don't, it will drag on — hopefully they're don't, it will drag on for years.— hopefully they're don't, it will drag on for years. hopefully they're don't, it will dra: on for ears. , :, , :, drag on for years. germany needed a late coal drag on for years. germany needed a late goal against _ drag on for years. germany needed a late goal against hungary _ drag on for years. germany needed a late goal against hungary to - drag on for years. germany needed a late goal against hungary to qualify l late goal against hungary to qualify and some sense vulnerability. it has and some sense vulnerability. it has a secial and some sense vulnerability. it has a special meaning _ and some sense vulnerability. it has a special meaning to _ and some sense vulnerability. it has a special meaning to germans - and some sense vulnerability. it has a special meaning to germans as . a special meaning to germans as welt _ a special meaning to germans as welt so— a special meaning to germans as welt so everyone _ a special meaning to germans as well. so everyone is _ a special meaning to germans as well. so everyone is looking - a special meaning to germans as i well. so everyone is looking forward to it and _ well. so everyone is looking forward to it and no — well. so everyone is looking forward to it and no german— well. so everyone is looking forward to it and no german says _ well. so everyone is looking forward to it and no german says that - well. so everyone is looking forward to it and no german says that we . well. so everyone is looking forwardl to it and no german says that we are going _ to it and no german says that we are going to _ to it and no german says that we are going to win— to it and no german says that we are going to win this _ to it and no german says that we are going to win this game _ to it and no german says that we are going to win this game easily - to it and no german says that we are going to win this game easily and - going to win this game easily and for me _ going to win this game easily and for me permiy_ going to win this game easily and for me permiy it— going to win this game easily and for me permly it can _ going to win this game easily and for me permly it can go _ going to win this game easily and for me permly it can go either- going to win this game easily and i for me permly it can go either way. england _ for me permly it can go either way. england have — for me permly it can go either way. england have beaten _ for me permly it can go either way. england have beaten germany, - for me permly it can go either way. england have beaten germany, the 1966 world cup final win securing the team's only major trophy. win tomorrow and the hosts may believe they're on course for another. and
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spain had had croatia the lead with a bizarre own goal against the run of play a simple back pass to the spanish keeper was scliped into his own net. replays showed how a momentary lapse led to the error. the game is in the second half with the score 2—1 to spain. last month a two—year—old girl called harper—lee fanthorpe died in hospital after swallowing a button battery from a remote control. those kind of batteries are found in lots of products — from watches, to toys, and kitchen scales. now, five weeks after harper—lee's death, her mum and sister are calling for more awareness about the dangers the batteries pose to children. they've been speaking to phil mackie. toddler sings. harper—lee fanthorpe
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was a typical bright, curious, effervescent, happy two—year—old. she loved to dance, didn't she? she really loved to dance. the best thing she'd listened to is, she loved rave music, rave and dance music! anything else, she wouldn't dance to, would she? she'd always give a little fist pump. she laughs. five weeks ago, her older sister was looking after her and she suddenly became ill. her head just went backwards. and then she sat back up and just blood came out. so i rang an ambulance straight away. it must have been very frightening for you? yeah. she just... she wasn't responding and they told me to put her on her side. so she could still breathe and she just went very wheezy. her eyesjust closed and she couldn't talk back to me. it was like she wasn't there. no—one knew that she'd swallowed
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a tiny button battery, and the acid was burning through a major artery. she had to have two litres blood transfusion. she left surgery. she'd still got my phone, she was still talking. the last thing she ever said to me was, "mummy, i need you." i told her i loved her. that's the last time i saw her. halfway through her surgery, a surgeon came out and asked if she'd swallowed anything. i said, "not that i know." that's when they told me they thought she'd swallowed a button battery. so, we actually went up then to children's intensive care where we were waiting for more news. and hejust said, "i'm sorry." that's what i can remember. i can rememberjust letting a loud scream out, shouting, "no." and i had tojust go and tell my girls, because they were only letting
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two of us in a room, and i had to tell my girls that their baby sister had passed away. she's left a very big hole. very. when you realised what had happened, what did you then think about those batteries, and particularly about the remote control in this instance, but the way that they are relatively easily accessible, i guess, for little children? and we actually found the remote without the button battery in. so i turned it around, and itjust came out. it wasn't even secure. there was no lock on it. there was no lock. there was no little thing you had to push to get it out. itjust slid out. harper—lee's granddad's built a memorial at the bottom of the garden. the family really hopes that by talking about her, other lives will be saved. phil mackie, bbc news,
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stoke—0n—trent. harper lee's mother and sister there. rain delayed the return of wimbledon tennis today. britain's jack draper took a set off novak djokovic and andy murray is on court against nikoloz basilashvili. joe wilson is there. early moments for andy murray. i will bring you a score. through the sunshine and showers, the significance was unmistakable after wimbledon was cancelled last year. you know, sometimes this place can appear to exist in its own bubble. it is part of the appeal. but wimbledon returns very much part of the world and all its challenges. two years to prepare, no one gets in unchecked. show a negative result or proof of
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vaccination and here is the evidence of gratitude. in the royal box, sarah gilbert, the scientist who designed the vaccine. players were transported in a bubble. 19 years old, versus 19 titles. that is jack draper breaking novak djokovic's serve. 6—4, he won the first set. centre court fully engaged. the seats taken centre court fully engaged. the seats ta ken closest to centre court fully engaged. the seats taken closest to the action. and then, well, novak djokovic won the match. £31 and then, well, novak d'okovic won the match. _, , :, , and then, well, novak d'okovic won | the matchfi three the match. of course he does. three sets in succession _ the match. of course he does. three sets in succession with _ the match. of course he does. three sets in succession with assurance. i sets in succession with assurance. the champion on the court he called sacred. novak djokovic is a favourite, and the women's single is open to wide speculation. the belarus player has the power. seeded
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second and through in straight sets. how about american's sloan stevens. back to her best to beat kvitova, twice champion here. nothing beat it is wimbledon winning feeling. and a after all the pain, andy murray completed his preparations for his wimbledon singles return. well after defeat for no 3 seeds it has been an early test for our wimbledon. a big test for murray, at the moment, it is going with serve and murray is 2-1 is going with serve and murray is 2—1 up. we will see countless victories and defeat. johanna konta
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had to pull out after being a close contact of a covid test. perhaps it is difficult to say with confidence that there will be british participation as we look ahead to the second week. andy murray is inspired by roger federer. roger federer in sight of his 40th birthday and now murray says he is playing for the love of it, for the minute and perhaps we should all share that philosophy, atz we see him back in the singles at wimbledon. thank you. we love watching him play. time for a look at the weather, here's stav danaos. a contrast in conditions across the uk from north to south. behind this scene in the highlands of blue sky and sunshine and warm in scotland
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parts of scotland. compare that to the grey skies in much of england and wales with further showers breaking out. it is tied in with this low pressure that is across northern france and is affecting the south of the country. further north, high pressure dominates. we have some rain in the midlands and northern england and north wales. this rain moved across the south—east earlier. a line of thunder storms have developed across the south from cornwall to sussex and kent. they will rumble on for a while with some local flooding. further down pours are likely in central and southern areas tonight. further north, clearer skies. central and southern areas tonight. further north, clearerskies. nine orten further north, clearerskies. nine or ten degrees here. another muggy night in england and wales. tuesday, a repeat performance. we have the best of the sunshine in scotland and
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northern ireland and northern england. that is away from the north coast. largely cloudy for england and wales. further rain in the south—east and some could be heavy. high teens celsius there. the mid 20s in central scotland. grey with further rain for wimbledon for tuesday and wednesday. not until we reach thursday and friday that high pressure builds in and we should see improving conditions with sunshine and high temperatures. the low pressure clears from the south—east and high pressure builds in on thursday and friday. but the low pressure will make its way across the country into the weekend. improving picture in the south for thursday and friday. warmerfor london. plenty of sunshine in the north and heading into weekend, it starts to turn more unsettled as low pressure starts to take over.

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