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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 27, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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sifting through them, tony grew and caroline frost. welcome back to both of you. the metro leads with a political story of the weekend, as is the former health secretary has been reported to the police are flouting the social distancing rules. the i leaves with concerns about how the footage was obtained, and whitehall is calling for a review. the mirror quotes the opposition as the labour party accuses matt hancock of being a hypocrite. he still has questions to answer about his decision on friday to accept his resignation on saturday. mr hancock's replacement sajid javid features widely on the front pages. the ft says he's promising a return to normality. the
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times is reporting that priti patel has a plan that with the asylum—seekers being held offshore from the uk waltzed their applications are processed. caroline, do you want to kick off this time with the daily mirror's take? not usually surprising it is hostile to matt hancock, because it's hostile towards the conservative government. it's really laying it on with the trial tomorrow morning. laying it on with the trial tomorrow morninu. , ~ f morning. yes, i think they've given u . morning. yes, i think they've given u- the morning. yes, i think they've given up the ponds— morning. yes, i think they've given up the ponds and — morning. yes, i think they've given up the ponds and funny _ morning. yes, i think they've given up the ponds and funny memes. i i up the ponds and funny memes. i think the story has slightly moved on from the horrors of friday both. the payoff is the latest problem matt hancock will be given a £16,000 payoff after quitting his role. 0bviously, payoff after quitting his role. obviously, this is not gone down well with the editors of the mirror, who say that's obviously deeply
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inappropriate, considering the circumstances in which he has left. he is equally facing a probe over his conduct in terms of giving his aid thejob, how his conduct in terms of giving his aid the job, how that came his conduct in terms of giving his aid thejob, how that came up his conduct in terms of giving his aid the job, how that came up about. more questions about his general conduct, plus the sense of hypocrisy and anger about having one rule for himself while dishing out guidelines for other people across the country. it shows no sign of abating, for about 36 hours there was an attempt to spin from his camp. there was talk about the love match, the strain he'd been under. all these usual things we remember from tory party stories, but that seems to be going limp. i think if he's got any sense, he's keeping his head down and hoping this blows over.- sense, he's keeping his head down and hoping this blows over. yeah, a eriod of and hoping this blows over. yeah, a period of silence _ and hoping this blows over. yeah, a period of silence on _ and hoping this blows over. yeah, a period of silence on your— and hoping this blows over. yeah, a period of silence on your part - and hoping this blows over. yeah, a period of silence on your part would be welcome for him. he wrote rather
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short letters, and you feel matt hancock is in that position. even if he doesn't say anything, a lot of other people are saying things about him, not least the daily mail. as a parliamentary reporter, can you to try to give us some sense? there will be picked pull thinking he's gone, his private life, he's separated from his wife. it's a terrible thing for both families. why are they banging on about it when it has their scout, but if there is a reason for that? {131 there is a reason for that? of course it _ there is a reason for that? of course it is. this isn't a private matten — course it is. this isn't a private matter. met hancock has been lecturing — matter. met hancock has been lecturing the public for over a year how many— lecturing the public for over a year how many people they can meet inside or outside _ how many people they can meet inside or outside. this isn'tjust a story about_ or outside. this isn'tjust a story about a — or outside. this isn'tjust a story about a politician having an affair. by about a politician having an affair. by the _ about a politician having an affair. by the way, i don't understand why the by the way, idon't understand why the daily— by the way, i don't understand why the daily mail thinks it's appropriate to put his wife on the
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front— appropriate to put his wife on the front page. she's entirely blameless in the _ front page. she's entirely blameless in the saga. but this is notjust a normal_ in the saga. but this is notjust a normal story about a minister having an attain _ normal story about a minister having an attain the — normal story about a minister having an affair. the entire morals of the government has been based on him given— government has been based on him given these orders. the vast majority— given these orders. the vast majority of people in britain have followed — majority of people in britain have followed those instructions, even though— followed those instructions, even though they didn't particularly want to, and _ though they didn't particularly want to, and the fact that he has been quite _ to, and the fact that he has been quite patently breaking those rules —— blatantly, is a matter of concern _ —— blatantly, is a matter of concern. i've never understood why ministers _ concern. i've never understood why ministers get paid back, because he is only— ministers get paid back, because he is only lost— ministers get paid back, because he is only lost one of hisjobs. he still— is only lost one of hisjobs. he still get — is only lost one of hisjobs. he still get paid £82,000 a year. i don't _ still get paid £82,000 a year. i don't understand.— don't understand. you're right because it _ don't understand. you're right because it would _ don't understand. you're right because it would be _ don't understand. you're right because it would be a - don't understand. you're right because it would be a bit - don't understand. you're right| because it would be a bit more understandable with ministers in the house of lords because they don't get paid to be members, but mps are
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still full—time salaries. it is a curious thing. perhaps we had to explain that in the course of tomorrow. tony, the times picks up on something arguably, trying to move the story, talking about sajid javid. it says he's confident covid restrictions will end onjuly javid. it says he's confident covid restrictions will end on july the 19th. he's the man who will tell us on monday what's happening next, but do you think tory mps will be pleased that he is matt hancock's successor, if for no other reason than that one? i successor, if for no other reason than that one?— successor, if for no other reason than that one? i mean, there are several reasons _ than that one? i mean, there are several reasons why _ than that one? i mean, there are several reasons why sajid - than that one? i mean, there are several reasons why sajid javid i than that one? i mean, there are several reasons why sajid javid is j than that one? i mean, there are i several reasons why sajid javid is a good _ several reasons why sajid javid is a good choice. but, one of the things from _ good choice. but, one of the things from hancock was the volume of conservative mps. he has to go, this is a ridiculous— conservative mps. he has to go, this is a ridiculous situation, and why
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hasn't _ is a ridiculous situation, and why hasn't he — is a ridiculous situation, and why hasn't he resigned yet? in terms of the sajid _ hasn't he resigned yet? in terms of the sajid javid stuff, it would be appropriate for him to say... when we promising new under lockdown a month— we promising new under lockdown a month ago— we promising new under lockdown a month ago and then we promise you this with _ month ago and then we promise you this with absolutely going to be the last time _ this with absolutely going to be the last time. of course i'm confident. of last time. of course i'm confident. of course — last time. of course i'm confident. of course he — last time. of course i'm confident. of course he wants to lift of course he wants to lift restrictions. what same person does not? having — restrictions. what same person does not? having said that, he is a player— not? having said that, he is a player -- _ not? having said that, he is a player —— what 21 person. he's a big beast. _ player —— what 21 person. he's a big beast. and — player —— what 21 person. he's a big beast, and that would change the tone of— beast, and that would change the tone of the cabinet —— what sane person — tone of the cabinet -- what sane erson. ., , ., tone of the cabinet -- what sane erson. .,, ., ., ., person. people might have forgotten the details, but _ person. people might have forgotten the details, but he _ person. people might have forgotten the details, but he refuse _ person. people might have forgotten the details, but he refuse pressure i the details, but he refuse pressure for number ten to basically have these advisers answer to them rather to him, and as a result, he resigned. the fact the prime minister is having him back is quite
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an interesting relationship. completely. he was exact in what was effectively _ completely. he was exact in what was effectively a fight between him and dominic— effectively a fight between him and dominic cummings. he has to sack all of his— dominic cummings. he has to sack all of his advisers and except advisers have been— of his advisers and except advisers have been appointed by number ten. that's_ have been appointed by number ten. that's why— have been appointed by number ten. that's why rishi sunak became chancellor. 0ne that's why rishi sunak became chancellor. one of the problems of this government is the cabinet appear— this government is the cabinet appear to _ this government is the cabinet appearto be... to this government is the cabinet appear to be... to have a this government is the cabinet appearto be... to have a —— can only— appearto be... to have a —— can only he— appearto be... to have a —— can only be good— appearto be... to have a —— can only be good for the government around _ only be good for the government around it — only be good for the government around it. ., ., �* , ., ., around it. caroline, let's move on from the saga _ around it. caroline, let's move on from the saga of _ around it. caroline, let's move on from the saga of all _ around it. caroline, let's move on from the saga of all of _ around it. caroline, let's move on from the saga of all of that - around it. caroline, let's move on from the saga of all of that to - from the saga of all of that to other stories. the big splash for the times is very interesting. this is not an unusual plan. i heard a labour cabinet minister they will house asylum—seekers off the course of dorset, but now priti patel seems to be playing one further. i
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of dorset, but now priti patel seems to be playing one further.— to be playing one further. i think this story is _ to be playing one further. i think this story is a — to be playing one further. i think this story is a reminder- to be playing one further. i think this story is a reminder that - to be playing one further. i think this story is a reminder that this| this story is a reminder that this government faces significant challenges other than covid and brexit. we had those on our front pages for over two years now, and here we are. the reminder that priti patel is hard at work trying to work out, come up with a solution for the ongoing challenge of refugees and migrants to this country. her latest plan is to team up with denmark, who doesn't have a bad record on these matters at all, but the idea is to put this centre as far away from africa —— as africa. this raises more questions than answers how human rights can be enforced for in such a distance. but this is currently the idea. the big plan is to somehow dissuade migrants making these illegal and often dangerous and tragicjourneys across these ending up on british shores, so anything but that. borisjohnson and priti patel have been scratching their heads, and this is the latest
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plan they come up with. so, very early in the telling and obviously, lots more to be discussed. many questions raised about that idea. i questions raised about that idea. i suppose the president is what australia has been doing for some years now. those who apply for asylum off the coast of australia on an island, some distance from the mainland. lots of concerns over there how you ensure the standards, there how you ensure the standards, the health and these people are given safe and suitable accommodation. ., ~ given safe and suitable accommodation. ., ,, , accommodation. yeah, i think these are insensitive _ accommodation. yeah, i think these are insensitive and _ accommodation. yeah, i think these are insensitive and impractical. - are insensitive and impractical. people — are insensitive and impractical. people have arrived in kent from france _ people have arrived in kent from france this— people have arrived in kent from france this year alone. the home office _ france this year alone. the home office already takes years to process _ office already takes years to process asylum applications, so i think. _ process asylum applications, so i think. i_ process asylum applications, so i think, i understand why they look for solutions, but i do think they need _ for solutions, but i do think they need to— for solutions, but i do think they need to speed up the system that we have here _ need to speed up the system that we have here in the uk. but this is an
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ongoing _ have here in the uk. but this is an ongoing problem. ialso have here in the uk. but this is an ongoing problem. i also don't think it would _ ongoing problem. i also don't think it would do— ongoing problem. i also don't think it would do priti patel any harm to elect _ it would do priti patel any harm to elect a _ it would do priti patel any harm to elect a new— it would do priti patel any harm to elect a new leader, because this is seen _ elect a new leader, because this is seen as— elect a new leader, because this is seen as an — elect a new leader, because this is seen as an approach to what some of these _ seen as an approach to what some of these issues — seen as an approach to what some of these issues that have dogs conservative governments for decades _ conservative governments for decades. ~ �* ., ., decades. we're in the realm of unintended _ decades. we're in the realm of unintended consequences. - decades. we're in the realm of| unintended consequences. one decades. we're in the realm of. unintended consequences. one of decades. we're in the realm of- unintended consequences. one of the consequences of having quite a complicated process for applying and appealing decisions on asylum is that you get delays, and the system isn't really resourceful. consequently, some applications can take notjust months, but years. perfect english, would be ideal to go and teach in a school in london, but she couldn't because she was applying for asylum. she was not allowed to have a job. therefore,
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she was living off the state even though she didn't want to, because she could work. there are all sorts of paradoxes, and they also become sources for resentment as a consequence. sources for resentment as a consequence-— sources for resentment as a consequence. two of the great tracedies consequence. two of the great tragedies of — consequence. two of the great tragedies of the _ consequence. two of the great tragedies of the situation - consequence. two of the great tragedies of the situation is . consequence. two of the great l tragedies of the situation is one, the lack of dignity afforded to people who have probably done well in their native land and hoping to continue that in some way and two, the absolute waste of potential opportunity, notjust for themselves opportunity, not just for themselves but opportunity, notjust for themselves but for the people they can help. yes, there is no short, swift solution to any of this. i think that this will be talked about for a long time before we see it happening. in the day of the iraq war, it was called rendition when it was about containment of criminals. they have very sinister undertones, and i think a solution can be reached that won't involve this sort
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of some contract with —— subcontract. of some contract with -- subcontract.— of some contract with -- subcontract. �* , ., , ., subcontract. i'm still not sure what happened- — subcontract. i'm still not sure what happened- people _ subcontract. i'm still not sure what happened. people who _ subcontract. i'm still not sure what happened. people who may - subcontract. i'm still not sure what happened. people who may have i subcontract. i'm still not sure what. happened. people who may have been on board. we'll leave that one for the stories. the guardian revealed abuse faced by english footballer. this is appalling but unsurprising. just the _ this is appalling but unsurprising. just the sheer scale they face on social— just the sheer scale they face on social media. this is obviously a relatively— social media. this is obviously a relatively new phenomenon and football, — relatively new phenomenon and football, people face abuse online, but it _ football, people face abuse online, but it is— football, people face abuse online, but it is difficult to see what the solution — but it is difficult to see what the solution is. obviously, i feel social— solution is. obviously, i feel social media companies are doing enough _ social media companies are doing enough to — social media companies are doing enough. to interfere sometimes feel they go— enough. to interfere sometimes feel they go too— enough. to interfere sometimes feel they go too far, i guess the solution _ they go too far, i guess the solution is for people to stop acting — solution is for people to stop acting like idiots on the internet and realise they're not anonymous and realise they're not anonymous and the _ and realise they're not anonymous and the messages they send to cause offence _ and the messages they send to cause offence it— and the messages they send to cause offence. it is a difficult problem
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and there — offence. it is a difficult problem and there is no solution. a related sto on and there is no solution. a related story on the _ and there is no solution. a related story on the telegraph, _ and there is no solution. a related | story on the telegraph, underlying the risk associating with the online world. a warning from the attorney general about... the acting attorney general, michael ellis, about the danger of contempt in criminal charge. basically kind of destroying potential of getting convictions of. yes, journalists are given this training in what you can and can't say about civil trials in newspapers and now online. of course, that training isn't meant to social media users who are moving in with both guns blazing on their keyboards and off they go. drawing attention to the chances of that interfering with probably what they are hoping is an outcome of that trial. so, i think it's timely warning. it's perhaps
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not getting the attention it deserves because we've had electoral problems and disruptions on social media, and horrendous racist abuse of high—profile figures. but this is yet another liability of social media. ., ., .,, yet another liability of social media. ., ., ., ., , , media. caroline frost and tony grew, thank ou media. caroline frost and tony grew, thank you very _ media. caroline frost and tony grew, thank you very much. _ media. caroline frost and tony grew, thank you very much. i'm _ media. caroline frost and tony grew, thank you very much. i'm sure - media. caroline frost and tony grew, thank you very much. i'm sure you're| thank you very much. i'm sure you're both very careful on your social media feeds. you've both been professionally trained. thank you very much for being professional with us this evening. thank you for bringing yourselves to the papers this evening. the film review is coming up next and then the weather, and then the midnight news. goodbye.
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hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode, rounding up the best new movies available in cinemas and in the home. back in 2001, director rob cohen's street racing actioner the fast and the furious proved that nuts and bolts exploitation pics still had a place in the modern movie market. inspired by a magazine article and shot in and around la, it made a healthy profit on its modest mid—range budget. two decades later, the fast and furious franchise has become one of the highest grossing film series of all—time, mutating into a globe—trotting mission impossible style spies and heists behemoth, spawning sequels, feature spin offs and an animated tv series, and raking in more than $6 billion.
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with money like that, it's no surprise we now

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