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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 21, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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lam shaun i am shaun ley. the headlines this hour: the bbc has uncovered new claims that children from china's uyghur minority have been separated from their parents by chinese officials. voting has been taking place in ethiopia's general election. president abiy told the bbc there was no hunger in the war—torn tigray province, but admitted there were problems and said the government was capable of fixing them. the un's expert on truth and justice has called on the vatican to do more to protect children from sexual exploitation in institutions run by the roman catholic church. fabian salvioli said there was systematic obstruction tojustice in many countries. the us, the uk, the european union and canada have imposed joint sanctions on belarus, after it forced a commercial flight carrying a dissident to land in minsk last month. individuals and some industries will be affected.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are author and journalist shyama perera and iain anderson, executive chairman of cicero. tomorrow's front pages, let's bring you up—to—date with them. the i leads on the warning from the prime minister that britons won't be able to expect restriction—free holidays abroad until next year. it quotes borisjohnson saying that it will be a "difficult year" for travel. the metro focuses on the isolating football players on the scotland and england teams, with two more england players having to isolate away from the rest of the team today. the telegraph has an interview with the lord chiefjustice, saying that the covid pandemic has led to "deeply damaging" delays in the justice system and suggesting juries should be made smaller to help clear the backlog in cases. the mail focuses on the social care sector, with campaigners accusing the prime minister of cowardice
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after he cancelled a meeting with the chancellor and the health secretary to fix the funding crisis. and the guardian's front page features a photo of a reveller enjoying the summer solstice at stonehenge, where hundreds of people defied covid restrictions to visit the monument. right, let's kick off, shyama and iain. thank you very much for being with us on the programme this evening. good to have you both. shyama, do you want to kick off on the euros? i know you have been itching to. i the euros? i know you have been itching ta— the euros? i know you have been itching im— the euros? i know you have been itching t0-— the euros? i know you have been itchinu to. . ~' ., . . , itching to. i asked know that a bit about football, _ itching to. i asked know that a bit about football, i _ itching to. i asked know that a bit about football, i did _ itching to. i asked know that a bit about football, i did have - itching to. i asked know that a bit about football, i did have three . about football, i did have three young men in kilts staying in my garden on thursday night ready for the game on friday, that's a story for another time. the game on friday, that's a story foranothertime. i the game on friday, that's a story for another time.— for another time. i was going to sa , we for another time. i was going to say. we are _ for another time. i was going to say, we are well— for another time. i was going to say, we are well after— for another time. i was going to say, we are well after the - say, we are well after the watershed, shyama! indie say, we are well after the watershed, shyama! say, we are well after the watershed, sh ama! ~ . , , ., watershed, shyama! we are, but you still want to — watershed, shyama! we are, but you still want to be _ watershed, shyama! we are, but you still want to be careful. _ watershed, shyama! we are, but you still want to be careful. this - watershed, shyama! we are, but you still want to be careful. this is - still want to be careful. this is the story which has kept everybody going all day, which is that we have
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had billy gilmourfrom scotland, who was man of the match on friday night, he has kakovin, i am of the book confused by this. i don't quite understand, i thought everybody is tested before the games, so it's a bit confusion, but he was embraced by mason mount and ben chilwell, it says here, and as a result, both of them have had to go into isolation, which means they will not play in england's game against croatia. i am not sure i can keep this going much beyond that!— beyond that! iain, do you want to hel out? beyond that! iain, do you want to help out? as _ beyond that! iain, do you want to help out? as a — beyond that! iain, do you want to help out? as a scott, _ beyond that! iain, do you want to help out? as a scott, i'm - beyond that! iain, do you want to i help out? as a scott, i'm delighted to help out — help out? as a scott, i'm delighted to help out on _ help out? as a scott, i'm delighted to help out on the _ help out? as a scott, i'm delighted to help out on the story _ help out? as a scott, i'm delighted to help out on the story -- - help out? as a scott, i'm delighted to help out on the story -- as - help out? as a scott, i'm delighted to help out on the story -- as a - to help out on the story —— as a person— to help out on the story —— as a person from _ to help out on the story —— as a person from scotland. already, it would _ person from scotland. already, it would appear england mathematically, in a way, _ would appear england mathematically, in a way, this front—page story is almost _ in a way, this front—page story is almost irrelevant now terms of england's— almost irrelevant now terms of england's aspects given the matches this evening. england already qualify— this evening. england already qualify to the next stages on the basis _ qualify to the next stages on the basis of— qualify to the next stages on the basis of the points that they have
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gained _ basis of the points that they have gained so— basis of the points that they have gained so far. usually disappointing -- usually— gained so far. usually disappointing —— usually disappointed that, by all accounts, _ —— usually disappointed that, by all accounts, billy gilmour was scotland's standout player, in the match _ scotland's standout player, in the match on — scotland's standout player, in the match on friday night. all eyes no one scotland to be able to qualify cub but _ one scotland to be able to qualify cub but what this story really is throwing — cub but what this story really is throwing up is perhaps the differences, again cub between the rules in_ differences, again cub between the rules in scotland in the rules in england — rules in scotland in the rules in england on covid.— england on covid. yeah, and i noticed the — england on covid. yeah, and i noticed the sun _ england on covid. yeah, and i noticed the sun was _ england on covid. yeah, and i noticed the sun was having i england on covid. yeah, and i noticed the sun was having a| england on covid. yeah, and i l noticed the sun was having a bit england on covid. yeah, and i - noticed the sun was having a bit of a go on the steam as well on friday, i seem to remember, and it is turning into a bit of a theme, this cub the england— scotland thing. whether it is politics or football. i am just interested, shyama, what do you think of this? you said it yourself, they are being tested, we know there bubbling with their teams, officials are separate. of course there is contact on the field, it is unavoidable but you would've thought meeting after the game, you would've thought that would've been something out of
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bounds, he would not have thought they would've been allowed to do this. i know you to this normally, but not in a pandemic. i this. i know you to this normally, but not in a pandemic.— this. i know you to this normally, but not in a pandemic. i know this. i found but not in a pandemic. i know this. i found myself— but not in a pandemic. i know this. i found myself quite _ but not in a pandemic. i know this. i found myself quite difficult - but not in a pandemic. i know this. i found myself quite difficult when | i found myself quite difficult when i found myself quite difficult when i meet people now to not hug them, even though i'm double vaccinated, and i know in a strange way while playing sports, your adrenaline is just coursing through you cub you are fantastically excited, your honour hi, i imagine is a bit like being drunk at the end of a match. you just want to hug everybody who was there because you've just screwed get rid of all this energy, dissipate the excitement cub and i think players do forget. look at those scotland fans, who were naked on the two, naked on this streets, embracing each other in huge numbers on leicester square. the fact is, once they were on the spirit, in that moment, look at stonehenge today, when he ist that moment, look at stonehenge today, when he 1st of that moment, look at stonehenge today, when he ist ofjune, 21st
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week of the 21stjune of this 21st century, it is people forgetting in the heat of the moment. yes. century, it is people forgetting in the heat of the moment. yes, they do. the heat of the moment. yes, they do- sorry. — the heat of the moment. yes, they do- sorry. i — the heat of the moment. yes, they do- sorry. i was — the heat of the moment. yes, they do. sorry, iwasjust_ the heat of the moment. yes, they do. sorry, i wasjust conjuring - the heat of the moment. yes, they do. sorry, i wasjust conjuring that| do. sorry, i was just conjuring that image of them around leicester square, it sounds like euphemism for on the horn or something! it square, it sounds like euphemism for on the horn or something!— on the horn or something! it would make your — on the horn or something! it would make your eyes — on the horn or something! it would make your eyes water! _ on the horn or something! it would make your eyes water! i _ on the horn or something! it would make your eyes water! i hope - on the horn or something! it would j make your eyes water! i hope none on the horn or something! it would i make your eyes water! i hope none of that was happening _ make your eyes water! i hope none of that was happening in _ make your eyes water! i hope none of that was happening in your _ make your eyes water! i hope none of that was happening in your garden, i that was happening in your garden, the man with skills. —— the men with kilts. yes, 0k. the man with skills. —— the men with kilts. yes, ok. you have put it in your own words. that was shyama speaking, not the bbc! iain, should remove him very swiftly, we have a duty to build homes, says robert jenrick? as you learn nothing from the by election last week? this jenrick? as you learn nothing from the by election last week?- the by election last week? this is the by election last week? this is the front page — the by election last week? this is the front page of _ the by election last week? this is the front page of the _ the by election last week? this is the front page of the telegraph, | the by election last week? this is i the front page of the telegraph, the rifle of— the front page of the telegraph, the rifle of the _ the front page of the telegraph, the rifle of the tory party, if you like cub housing minister saying we owe
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it to young — cub housing minister saying we owe it to young people to build more homes, — it to young people to build more homes, absolutely doubling down on the government's stated commitment so far— the government's stated commitment so far to _ the government's stated commitment so far tojust build, build, the government's stated commitment so fartojust build, build, build, but as— so fartojust build, build, build, but as you — so fartojust build, build, build, but as you say, by election last week, — but as you say, by election last week, it — but as you say, by election last week, it would appear, that parts of suburban _ week, it would appear, that parts of suburban middle england in the south very concerned about building more. theres— very concerned about building more. there's a _ very concerned about building more. there's a wonderful quote from a tory— there's a wonderful quote from a tory mp— there's a wonderful quote from a tory mp that does not describe himself— tory mp that does not describe himself as a nimby cub it is comes of as— himself as a nimby cub it is comes of as a _ himself as a nimby cub it is comes of as a banana, and that's —— he describes— of as a banana, and that's —— he describes as _ of as a banana, and that's —— he describes as of as a banana. that is building _ describes as of as a banana. that is building absolutely nowhere near anybody — building absolutely nowhere near anybody. you sought here first! what do ou anybody. you sought here first! what do you make — anybody. you sought here first! what do you make of _ anybody. you sought here first! what do you make of this? _ anybody. you sought here first! what do you make of this? it _ anybody. you sought here first! wisgt do you make of this? it is every political dilemma here, isn't it? the issue is where you build, where you —— what you build, and is it affordable for rent? -- what you build, and is it
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affordable for rent?- affordable for rent? this is something _ affordable for rent? this is something that _ affordable for rent? this is something that has - affordable for rent? this is something that has been l affordable for rent? this is - something that has been going on in cities as well as outside london for decades now, this argument about building on any space that is available. the buildings of whom not suitable for the architecture of the area of the infrastructures of the area, it is happening is the government is looking to bring in its new planning bill and they are obviously going to go ahead with this figure of three under thousand homes a year, but it is a true dairy how it doesn't matter how any homes are built, there are never enough that are affordable for the people who need them, and these are the homes that you buy. what about the people who need to rent? i speak in an area of central london zone two, in a centre area, where we are all old victorian houses, cottages and some counsel blocks, and suddenly you've got developers coming in and putting up a 25 story block with a hold of element around it, not also the five stories, people have been complaining and complaining and
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complaining, nobody is listening. they all got targets and they are determined to go where they can. i think this willjust burn out. i suspect it is not possible to be a banana or in a london or in the leeds or a plymouth or wherever you are, because it there is somebody everywhere! we must...- everywhere! we must... against ermitted everywhere! we must... against permitted planning _ everywhere! we must... against permitted planning in _ everywhere! we must... against permitted planning in london . everywhere! we must... against| permitted planning in london and everywhere, apples.— permitted planning in london and everywhere, apples. there you go. you are going _ everywhere, apples. there you go. you are going to — everywhere, apples. there you go. you are going to get _ everywhere, apples. there you go. you are going to get your - everywhere, apples. there you go. you are going to get your five - everywhere, apples. there you go. you are going to get your five a - everywhere, apples. there you go. | you are going to get your five a day one way or another by the end of this paper review, i can tell you. let's move on shyama. lord chief justice calls for slimmed—down juries. we all rely on these 12 good men or women in troop, being judged by your peers, although we know juries and up not being the full 12, it is interesting solution to the problem of delayed justice, but is it entirely satisfactory one? i am
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not sure. what _ it entirely satisfactory one? i am not sure. what the _ it entirely satisfactory one? i am not sure. what the lord - it entirely satisfactory one? i —n not sure. what the lord chief justice is saying is that we should whittle down the size of the juries just to try and get through all these crown court cases that have been sitting there waiting during the pandemic to be heard. i am not sure how that works. presumably he is suggesting we take up school halls, council buildings, because we only have a finite number of... quite a lot were closed.- only have a finite number of... quite a lot were closed. quite a lot were closed! _ quite a lot were closed. quite a lot were closed! you _ quite a lot were closed. quite a lot were closed! you would _ quite a lot were closed. quite a lot were closed! you would need - were closed! you would need security, you would need all sorts of structures to be built to enable it but very interestingly cub it says that during the war, which i did not know, they had jurors of seven people because ofjust the shortage of people and the need... interesting. shortage of people and the need... interesting-— interesting. obviously that works. it would interesting. obviously that works. it would be _ interesting. obviously that works. it would be great _ interesting. obviously that works. it would be great to _ interesting. obviously that works. it would be great to have - interesting. obviously that works. it would be great to have some i it would be great to have some figures to know how many appeals were brought of what was seen as wrong judgements or wrong verdicts.
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but, why do there have to be 12? there are not 12 on a bafta jury? i know it is different because i know it is about our freedom or fines or whatever, but nonetheless, why do you need 12 people to reach an informed decision?— informed decision? iain, your thou~hts informed decision? iain, your thoughts on _ informed decision? iain, your thoughts on that? _ informed decision? iain, your thoughts on that? i _ informed decision? iain, your thoughts on that? i just i informed decision? iain, your thoughts on that? i just sat i informed decision? iain, your| thoughts on that? i just sat on informed decision? iain, your. thoughts on that? ijust sat on a thoughts on that? i 'ust sat on a 'u . thoughts on that? i 'ust sat on a 'u , the thoughts on that? i 'ust sat on a jury. the first _ thoughts on that? i 'ust sat on a jury, the first time i thoughts on that? ijust sat on a jury, the first time come - thoughts on that? ijust sat on a jury, the first time come in i thoughts on that? ijust sat on a| jury, the first time come in april, i jury, the first time come in april, i set _ jury, the first time come in april, i set as— jury, the first time come in april, i set as a — jury, the first time come in april, i set as a juror. i sat in one of the _ i set as a juror. i sat in one of the knightdale courts. it was nodding _ the knightdale courts. it was nodding ordinary building, it was a crown— nodding ordinary building, it was a crown court— nodding ordinary building, it was a crown court put in a conference so the space — crown court put in a conference so the space can be found and actually hats off— the space can be found and actually hats off to — the space can be found and actually hats off to the team committed incredibly good job of making the system, — incredibly good job of making the system, the wheels ofjustice, continuing to work, but... —— nightingale _ continuing to work, but... —— nightingale court. it was complicated, but the numbers of cases. _ complicated, but the numbers of cases. but— complicated, but the numbers of cases, but the lord chiefjustice is
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pointing _ cases, but the lord chiefjustice is pointing to — cases, but the lord chiefjustice is pointing to cub really racking up. the cases— pointing to cub really racking up. the cases of rape, which the justice secretary— the cases of rape, which the justice secretary was talking about just on last week— secretary was talking about just on last week cub over a thousand days from _ last week cub over a thousand days from case _ last week cub over a thousand days from case to taking it into court, and that's— from case to taking it into court, and that's three years. cases are taking _ and that's three years. cases are taking six— and that's three years. cases are taking six years to get cub i was judging — taking six years to get cub i was judging a — taking six years to get cub i was judging a case myself in a jury that the event — judging a case myself in a jury that the event had taken place back in 2018~ _ the event had taken place back in 2018. ., , , 2018. yeah, it is interesting. shyama. _ 2018. yeah, it is interesting. shyama. i— 2018. yeah, it is interesting. shyama. ijust _ 2018. yeah, it is interesting. shyama, ijust wondered, i 2018. yeah, it is interesting. l shyama, ijust wondered, one 2018. yeah, it is interesting. - shyama, ijust wondered, one other alternative, perhaps you could have had a word with thejustice secretary, why do you not have a word with the chancellor of the f checker? why not have these people furloughed onjuries? they are checker? why not have these people furloughed on juries? they are stuck not doing anything, and perhaps some of them would find it quite useful to have something to do with the time while they are waiting for their businesses to reopen again. more to the point cub when half of them lose theirjobs, as they did
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some of them when furlough is over, what we are to doing social distancing, it is difficult, whether they on furlough or available using they on furlough or available using the normal system of picking people randomly, there might be the space for us to have numerous courts set “p for us to have numerous courts set up afterwards cub but certainly afterwards i think it is a very good idea. we have masses of volunteers. i do a lot of work with our local regal aid association. we have loads of volunteers. all of these are people willing to give up their time, let them be onjuries! if back in the 70s you lived in manchester, walking down the street cub you had a good chance of ending up on a jury. a good chance of ending up on a 'u . , a good chance of ending up on a jury. does anyone remember crown court? that — jury. does anyone remember crown court? that is _ jury. does anyone remember crown court? that is one _ jury. does anyone remember crown court? that is one worth _ jury. does anyone remember crown court? that is one worth digging i jury. does anyone remember crown | court? that is one worth digging out on breadbox. gary is saying i am showing my age! yes, iam! social
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care — that is not care, it is cowardice, the mailfunders. what is going on here? am i miss remember this? the prime minister, was there in oven ready social care plan? forests really learn the lesson of what _ forests really learn the lesson of what happened to theresa may in the 2017 general election —— boris really— 2017 general election —— boris really learned. she made social care reform _ really learned. she made social care reform the _ really learned. she made social care reform the centrepiece of the tory party— reform the centrepiece of the tory party manifesto and before she even launched _ party manifesto and before she even launched the manifesto in 2017, the ideas _ launched the manifesto in 2017, the ideas were — launched the manifesto in 2017, the ideas were being roundly attacked by not least _ ideas were being roundly attacked by not least andrew delmont, who a decade _ not least andrew delmont, who a decade ago did something for the government to try to get across party— government to try to get across party consensus on long—term care, in the _ party consensus on long—term care, in the mail, _ party consensus on long—term care, in the mail, you're right, it is
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thundering away. it is saying there was a _ thundering away. it is saying there was a planned meeting between the pm and rishi _ was a planned meeting between the pm and rishi sunak that was you to be taking _ and rishi sunak that was you to be taking place tomorrow, is apparently cancelled. _ taking place tomorrow, is apparently cancelled, and this broader sense that the _ cancelled, and this broader sense that the issue of long—term care 'ust that the issue of long—term care just keeps— that the issue of long—term care just keeps on being kicked down the road _ just keeps on being kicked down the road the _ just keeps on being kicked down the road. the daily mail knows its readership, its consent —— its constituency very well. thinking _ —— its constituency very well. thinking of _ —— its constituency very well. thinking of my own parents will people — thinking of my own parents will people really concerned about getting — people really concerned about getting a long—term solution to social— getting a long—term solution to social care here, but no government seems _ social care here, but no government seems to— social care here, but no government seems to want to grip it. iain, social care here, but no government seems to want to grip it.— seems to want to grip it. iain, are our seems to want to grip it. iain, are your parents _ seems to want to grip it. iain, are your parents is — seems to want to grip it. iain, are your parents is coming _ seems to want to grip it. iain, are your parents is coming or - seems to want to grip it. iain, are your parents is coming or in i your parents is coming or in england?— your parents is coming or in encland? , ., ., ., m england? they are in scotland. so otentiall england? they are in scotland. so potentially under _ england? they are in scotland. so potentially under the _ england? they are in scotland. so potentially under the scottish i potentially under the scottish system of the regimen is different. —— their arrangement is different for there are different customs in different parts of the uk. this problem has been hanging over us for, as iain says, more than a decade. the parties cannot come up
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with a consensus now, are

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