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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 19, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news, i'm lewis vaughan—jones. our top stories: voting ends in iran's presidential election to choose a successor to hassan rouhani — but how much choice do iranians really have? catholic bishops in the us face clashing withjoe biden after moving to deny holy communion to politicians, like the us president, who support abortion rights. the woman who punched a crocodile on the nose to save her twin sister tells us how she fought off the deadly reptile. more trouble at the golden globes as two members of the body that organise the awards quit, calling the organisation toxic. one of the most anticipated
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matches of euro 2020 so far ends in a goalless draw as england face scotland at wembley stadium. hello and welcome to the programme full. polls have closed in iran's presidental election after voting was extended to midnight local time. the winner will succeed hassan rouhani, who's not allowed to serve for a third term. but, with candidates hand—picked by iran's powerful guardian council, many would—be voters have become disenchanted, especially the young. the vote also comes at a sensitive time for the country with us sanctions still battering the economy, and the future of the iran nuclear deal hanging in the balance. our middle east editor jeremy bowen reports.
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elections in iran are not free or fair, but they're a window into an opaque country with a repressive regime. any resemblance to democracy is coincidental — candidates are vetted in advance. millions of frustrated iranians have stopped hoping that voting will improve their lives. in the city of shiraz, he was pulling down every election poster he could find. man yells. "well done!" shouts the man in the car. this man posted a plea to boycott the election next to portraits of his son, amir hussain, who was killed next to portraits of his son, amir hussain, who was killed with hundreds of others in protests in 2019. "my vote," he says, "is for the downfall of the dictator and the criminals who sold out the country". a hardliner, ebrahim raisi, the head of thejudiciary, seems to have a clear path to the presidency. his strongest rivals
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were not allowed to stand. get set... gunshot. a viral video compared raisi to the murderous middle eastern tyrant in the sacha baron cohen film the dictator, partly because of the way that voters were denied a real choice. and it's because of the executions of thousands of regime opponents in the late 1980s. raisi was one of their prosecutors. his past sends a bleak message to iranian reformists who want more freedom. this man, not the president, is at the pinnacle of power in iran.
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he is ayatollah ali khamenei, the 82—year—old supreme leader who seems determined to deliver a victory for conservative hardliners. the only candidate left who might appeal to reformists is abdolnaser hemmati, the former central bank governor. elections in iran can produce surprises, but he needs a miracle. iran's nuclear future remains the big issue for any president. ebrahim raisi says he supports reviving the international deal that restricts iran's capabilities. iran's price would be an end to the sanctions that have caused real hardship. this was a queue for a chicken in a country with huge reserves of oil. whoever�*s president, the iranian people need some relief. jeremy bowen, bbc news. let's get more from bbc persian correspondent behrang tajdin. let's start with the results. when we going to expect some inclination about what is
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happening? element the previous rounds of residential elections, usually, we would have had some results by now. that make it is 635 in the morning. 4.5 hours after the polls closed. this time it seems that they are taking their time and there are reports that we may get some results in the next half—an—hour. results in the next half-an-hour.- results in the next half-an-hour. , , half-an-hour. so, pretty soon for some _ half-an-hour. so, pretty soon for some initial— half-an-hour. so, pretty soon for some initial results - half-an-hour. so, pretty soon| for some initial results coming in. it seems to be people are pretty confident they know who has won already.— pretty confident they know who has won already. yes, it seems so. and there _ has won already. yes, it seems so. and there are _ has won already. yes, it seems so. and there are some - so. and there are some unofficial reports in some uranian news agencies that apparently ebrahim raisi has taken two—thirds of the vote and also the number of people that have cursed about it around 50% which is higher than what many anticipated in the days and weeks before the election. days and weeks before the election-—
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days and weeks before the election. the voter turnout hi . h election. the voter turnout hiuh for election. the voter turnout high for the _ election. the voter turnout high for the legitimacy - election. the voter turnout l high for the legitimacy fears. we wait to see what the turnout figures are. let's say that he does win. what kind of difference does that make to the country? we difference does that make to the country?— difference does that make to the country? we need to wait and see- _ the country? we need to wait and see- we _ the country? we need to wait and see. we know— the country? we need to wait and see. we know that - the country? we need to wait and see. we know that it - the country? we need to wait and see. we know that it is l the country? we need to wait i and see. we know that it is not —— he is not a moderate. we know that he is coming from the hardline part of the irani and establishment. —— iranian. he will try to renew or revitalise the nuclear deal that was signed quite a few years ago, and former us at donald —— former us president donald trump tried to pull out of and that had serious effects and damage the iranian economy. it shrank by more than 10% in two years after the us withdrawal from the nuclear deal. so he
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may try to get the us to join at the nuclear deal again so that i run can export its crude oil and revitalise its own economy which is in dire straits —— iran. i will give you one number. the latest figure for inflation in iran is 41%, and you can imagine what a difficult situation that makes for most people.— for most people. that is clearly the _ for most people. that is clearly the priority - for most people. that is clearly the priority and l for most people. that is| clearly the priority and if for most people. that is . clearly the priority and if he does win coming in, that will be his international objective. what about at home, what kind of character is he, what and how would life change at all for many iranians. he how would life change at all for many iranians.— how would life change at all for many iranians. he is coming from the kind _ for many iranians. he is coming from the kind of— for many iranians. he is coming from the kind of part _ for many iranians. he is coming from the kind of part of - for many iranians. he is coming from the kind of part of the - from the kind of part of the iranian establishment that is going to maybe curtail social freedoms, maybe he is going to
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make iran more islamic, if you will, and also, we may see parts of the state, for example, the old powerful revolution regards, they may get even more powerful and you may see less space for political activism in iran. just one quick question, just very, very quickly, because we are out of time. as important as thisjob in are out of time. as important as this job in this role are out of time. as important as thisjob in this role is, it is not the ultimate source of power in iran.— power in iran. no, it is not, it is the _ power in iran. no, it is not, it is the supreme _ power in iran. no, it is not, it is the supreme leader - power in iran. no, it is not,| it is the supreme leader and those who are directly responsible to him who have most of the power, including the guardian council which is in charge of choosing who people can vote for, for example in this election. thank ou for example in this election. thank you for clearing _ example in this election. thank you for clearing that _ example in this election. thank you for clearing that up, - you for clearing that up, behrang. let's get some of the day's other news.
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the un special envoy for myanmar says the country is at real risk of a large—scale civil war. christine schraner burgener warned the un general assembly that the opportunity to reverse february's military coup was narrowing. earlier, a resolution was passed calling for member states to stop providing arms to myanmar. the palestinian authority has cancelled a deal under which israel was to give it at least a million coronavirus vaccines. the palestinians said the jabs were too close to their expiry date. there's been international criticism of israel's failure to fully extend its world—beating vaccination programme to the occupied territories. dangerously hot temperatures across the us south—west continue to climb this week. an excessive heat warning is now in place for much of arizona and california, and southern areas of nevada and utah. people are being told to stay in air—conditioned areas and out of the sun. many areas have seen temperatures topped 43 celsius for much of this week.
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people living in new orleans and along parts of the us gulf coast are preparing for the arrival of a tropical storm. it's the third storm of the 2021 season and is expected to strengthen over the weekend. some oil companies have already evacuated their offshore platforms off the coast of louisiana. the newest version of boeing's 737 max aircraft has made its first test flight over washington state. the max ten successfully completed a 2.5 hour flight before landing in seattle. the 737 max was grounded worldwide in march 2019 after two fatal crashes in indonesia and ethiopia. it was cleared to start flying again at the end of last year. he roman catholic bishops in the us have voted overwhelmingly to draft a teaching document addressing whether catholic politicians
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who support abortion rights — including presidentjoe biden — should be barred from communion. the decision is seen as a direct rebuke to mr biden, and exposes the deep political and cultural divisions within the american church. jamie manson is the president of the advocacy group catholics for choice. she says this was a political action against president biden. i think the timing is very obvious. joe biden is one of the most faithful and religious presidents we have had in a long time. he is a very devout catholic and he supports abortion rights. and the bishops have decided that is the pre—eminent issue and they use it really as a political rallying cry. but won't they say "it is very important to us, it is what we believe and everyone must believe the same thing?" well, that would be true if they were consistent. and the reality is they had
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nothing to say to president trump, who supported capital punishment, who treated migrants at the border in a subhuman manner, who daily defiled the earth with his practices and his policies. if they were consistent, sure. but they are not consistent on life issues. ok, let's get into slight technicalities — not too much — but what kind of document are they drawing up and what kind of weight does it have? it's a teaching document, it's not official norms, but it is something that they can draw upon to back up their demands, that politicians who support abortion rights refrain from communion. and just remind people who are not catholic, what is communion and why is it important? absolutely, so this is the central sacrament of the church. you can receive it daily when you are a catholic. you're supposed to receive it at least once a week. it is the body and blood of christ for catholics. it is the real presence of god in our midst. it truly brings us into communion, into one with each other. and so to see this disunity happening is profoundly painful
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for the church. so what kind of impact would have if this does go ahead and joe biden is formally, according to this document, not allowed to take part in that? well, it would notjust be joe biden, it would be house speaker nancy pelosi and early 100 other congresspeople who are catholic and pro—choice. they would be forced to refrain from communion. it is very sad because they are using this to bully the president with something that is profoundly sacred to him, and many of our elected officials. so it would be, i think, a cause of great embarrassment for the church, and a cause of great pain for elected officials. in florida, closing arguments will be heard on monday in the ronnie o'neal double murder trial. o'neal faces the death penalty if convicted. he's accused of shooting dead his partner, murdering their daughter with an axe and stabbing and setting their son alight in 2018. the accused was allowed to confront the boy in court. aruna iyengar has this report.
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it is unusual for the accused to represent themselves in their own murder trial that thatis their own murder trial that that is what ronnie o'neal is doing. this week, in a florida court, he has tried to portray himself as a victim of a conspiracy. this is how he greeted his son, now aged 11. how you doing?— greeted his son, now aged 11. how you doing?- it - greeted his son, now aged 11. how you doing?- it is i greeted his son, now aged 11. i how you doing?- it is good how you doing? good. it is good to see you. _ how you doing? good. it is good to see you, man. _ how you doing? good. it is good to see you, man. good - how you doing? good. it is good to see you, man. good to - how you doing? good. it is good to see you, man. good to see i to see you, man. good to see ou to see you, man. good to see you too- — to see you, man. good to see you too- his _ to see you, man. good to see you too. his son _ to see you, man. good to see you too. his son who - to see you, man. good to see you too. his son who testified via video _ you too. his son who testified via video link _ you too. his son who testified via video link from _ you too. his son who testified via video link from a - you too. his son who testified via video link from a different| via video link from a different location, told the jury how his father had killed his mother, kenyatta barron, and struck his sister ron'niveya with an axe in march 2018. then this extraordinary exchange. did i hurt ou extraordinary exchange. did i hurt you that _ extraordinary exchange. did i hurt you that night? - extraordinary exchange. did i hurt you that night? of - extraordinary exchange. d c i hurt you that night? of this incident?— hurt you that night? of this incident?- i _ hurt you that night? of this incident?- i did? - hurt you that night? of this incident? yes. i did? and how did i incident? yes. i did? and how did i hurt _ incident? yes. i did? and how did i hurt you? _ incident? yes. i did? and how did i hurt you? you _ incident? yes. i did? and how did i hurt you? you stabbed i incident? yes. i did? and how.
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did i hurt you? you stabbed me. this is the _ did i hurt you? you stabbed me. this is the harrowing _ did i hurt you? you stabbed me. this is the harrowing testimonyl this is the harrowing testimony about the boy's sister. film this is the harrowing testimony about the boy's sister.- about the boy's sister. oh yes, he hit her _ about the boy's sister. oh yes, he hit her with _ about the boy's sister. oh yes, he hit her with an _ about the boy's sister. oh yes, he hit her with an axe - about the boy's sister. oh yes, he hit her with an axe in - about the boy's sister. oh yes, he hit her with an axe in the i he hit her with an axe in the head and, in the back and then the head, and then i saw her eyes roll. in the head, and then i saw her eyes roil-— eyes roll. in the united states. _ eyes roll. in the united states, defendants - eyes roll. in the united states, defendants are j eyes roll. in the united - states, defendants are allowed to represent themselves and question witnesses, even if those in the stand are victims. on friday, the lead detective was questioned by o'neill about whether the killings could be in self defence. he has refused to testify in his own defence. he could face the death penalty if can be had. aruna iyengar, bbc news. this is bbc news — the headlines: polls have closed in iran's presidental election after voting was extended to midnight local time. the winner will succeed hassan rouhani, who's not allowed to serve for a third term. roman catholic bishops in the us have made a first
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move towards denying holy communion to politicians — like president biden — who support abortion rights. the bishops voted in defiance of the vatican's advice. a british woman who was attacked repeatedly by a crocodile in mexico has been discharged from hospital. 28—year—old melissa laurie suffered a perforated intestine and several other injuries when she was attacked by the animal in a lagoon. her twin georgia had to fend off the creature, while trying to pull her sibling to safety. she's been speaking to will grant. a bandage hiding the teeth marks in her wrist. the only outward sign of georgia laurie's fight with the crocodile. i actually heard her scream, and i saw her being taken underneath by the crocodile, and then i realised she was really in trouble when i was calling out her name, and there was no response from her. it grabbed her on the leg and her behind, and tried
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to death roll her and drag her away. so i was beating it on its snout, and it grabbed my wrist and my arm, so i had to beat it off with my other arm. their nightmare began here, at the manialtepec lagoon. an unlicensed german guide told their tour group it was safe to swim in these waters, despite it being hatching season for crocodiles. it's just one of those things where, you know, mistakes happen, and so i don't want him to feel any worse, because we all make mistakes. yes, pretty big one. georgia's bravery undoubtedly saved melissa, who still has months of recovery ahead. i helped save my sister's life, but also she fought for her own life as well. she really fought and clung on. many people in america have
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been enjoying the day off in celebration of the nation's newest federal holiday. juneteenth commemorates the emancipation of the last enslaved african americans over 150 years ago, and yesterday, presidentjoe biden signed the bill making the day official. koralie barrau reports. all right! applause. for the first time — all right! applause. for the first time in _ all right! applause. for the first time in nearly _ all right! applause. for the first time in nearly 40 - all right! applause. for the j first time in nearly 40 years, first time in nearly a0 years, america officially has a new federal holiday. at an event at the white house on thursday, president biden signed into law a national commemoration of juneteenth, which memorialises when the last enslaved people in texas were freed. shy, when the last enslaved people in texas were freed.— in texas were freed. a day in which we _ in texas were freed. a day in which we remember - in texas were freed. a day in which we remember the - in texas were freed. a day in l which we remember the moral stain and the terrible toll that slavery took on the country, and continues to take. what i have long called america's original sin. among those at the _ america's original sin. among those at the signing _ america's original sin. among those at the signing with - america's original sin. among those at the signing with the l those at the signing with the
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president was 9a—year—old opal lee, who has been referred to as the grandmother of juneteenth for her efforts to urge legislators to make today a federal holiday. the urge legislators to make today a federal holiday.— a federal holiday. the bill is assed! a federal holiday. the bill is passed! how _ a federal holiday. the bill is passed! how am _ a federal holiday. the bill is passed! how am i _ a federal holiday. the bill is j passed! how am i supposed a federal holiday. the bill is i passed! how am i supposed to ex - ress passed! how am i supposed to exoress the — passed! how am i supposed to exoress the joy. _ passed! how am i supposed to express the joy, how - passed! how am i supposed to express the joy, how am - passed! how am i supposed to express the joy, how am i - express the joy, how am i supposed to express all the years— supposed to express all the years that we have worked, and for it _ years that we have worked, and for it to — years that we have worked, and for it to come to fruition, on the — for it to come to fruition, on the hacks _ for it to come to fruition, on the backs of so many people. juneteenth is a commemoration of when slavery ended in the united states. on 19june, 1865 among the last enslaved people living in galveston, texas, received the news they were free. it was nearly 2.5 years after abraham lincoln signed the emancipation proclamation. so today is the first time many americans have the day off work in honour of the holiday, and in honour of the holiday, and in galveston, celebrations are already under way.— in galveston, celebrations are already under way. people are aware, already under way. people are aware. it _ already under way. people are aware, it has _ already under way. people are aware, it has been _ already under way. people are| aware, it has been recognised, and actually i think they will
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be able to see a lot of change, a lot of things. things are going to improve, ijust believe in matter. going to improve, i 'ust believe in matter. america continues _ believe in matter. america continues to _ believe in matter. america continues to face - believe in matter. america continues to face a - believe in matter. america continues to face a racial. continues to face a racial reckoning and a national conversation about systemic racism, police brutality and voting rights issues. the recognition ofjuneteenth as a holiday is a reminder of how far the country has come, but many americans are also taking the day to highlight the work thatis the day to highlight the work that is left to do. two members have resigned from the hollywood foreign press association, the body that organises the golden globes, denouncing the organisation as "toxic". the hfpa has been battered by recent criticism — back in may, the us broadcaster nbc announced that it would not air the golden globes in 2022. among the reasons given, the hfpa had not had any black members in more than 20 years. diederik van hoogstraten and wenting xu wrote a letter, here is some of what they had
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to say: they also said: in a statement, the hfpa said: here's our la correspondent, david willis. this has been a terrible year for the hollywood foreign press association, no question about that. it has long been the butt ofjokes, portrayed as a group of about 85 starstruck journalists, many of whom work for obscure overseas publications. even then, part time rather than full—time in many cases. but those jokes became a lot more serious this year, following the publication of an expose in the los angeles
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times, which talked about corruption in the organisation, and basically made it seem more like a sort of country club at best, or a sort of cabal at worst. that was followed by the news that some of the big powerful companies in hollywood, like amazon and warner brothers, were boycotting the hollywood foreign press association until reforms had taken place, and nbc, which airs the annual golden globe ceremony also announced it was stepping back. now we have this very damning criticism from insiders who are basically saying that the...any motion towards reform that the organisation says it is taking, is really no more than window dressing. football now, and one of the most anticipated matches of euro 2020 so far, the clash between england and scotland, has ended in a goalless draw. our sports editor, dan roan reports from wembley.
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no older rivalry and no greater stage. a quarter of a century had passed since wembley hosted the only previous meeting between these two teams at a major tournament — one of england's most memorable victories, but the visitors have enjoyed success of their own here. a night of history and hope lay ahead. we've got a really good chance here, we've got a good squad, good line—up. anything can happen. england always underestimate us. we have nothing to lose here. so let's do it. i'm nervous. i can see scotland getting a goal, and it's making me a bit nervy, but i think we will come through. we will get what we need. these fixtures almost always have an edge, and with the rain failing to dampen the atmosphere, it was clear this would be no exception. in a lively opening period, john stones' towering header coming agonisingly close to putting england ahead. so much for predictions — this could be cagey. jordan pickford forced
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into a great save by stephen o'donnell. hard to believe a0 places separate these teams in the world rankings. despite an injury time goal mouth scramble, england had been kept at bay in a performance that raises more questions than answers. a goalless draw the final result, but a point scotland will be proud of. we defended well, we had a game plan and we drew 0—0, and we are going to qualify, so thank you. i was expecting a 12—0 victory. here we are going against croatia, _ we should win that one. this is typical england, really, this is what we do. we are a bit average and then i don't know. we'll still win it. and finally, a european art collector has just paid a whopping $3.a million for a copy of leonardo da vinci's mona lisa. take a look at this — known as the hekking mona
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lisa, after its owner who unsuccessfully argued that a copy he had bought in the 1950s was the real thing. it's one of many reproductions of the original, which hangs in the paris louvre museum. a spokesperson from christie's in paris said "this is madness, an absolute record for a mona lisa reproduction." a quick reminder of our top story before i go now. people in iran have been voting in a presidential election and the winner will succeed hassan rouhani who is not allowed to serve a third term. in highly controlled contest most reformist candidates were barred from standing. almost all allowed to run were regarded as hardliners. that's it from me, plenty more online as always. do download the bbc news app, and if you are on
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social media, get me there. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @lvaughanjones. hello there. friday brought us two very different days of weather depending on where you were across the uk. for some, beautiful sunshine — that was the scene for a weather watcher in orkney, compare that with this picture from oxford, where the rain was teeming down. some parts of southern england saw over a month's worth of rain injust 2a hours. you can see that wet weather on the earlier radar picture. but it did begin to clear off to the east through the latter part of the day, the area of low pressure responsible sliding away eastwards, and that leaves us between weather systems for saturday. he so the contrasts in the weather system will be less dramatic. some places will be a little cloudier than others. some will see some showers, but generally speaking, there's quite a lot of dry weather on the way. we will see some spells of sunshine developing, some showers breaking out
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particularly across parts of scotland through the day, some of those could be heavy and some creeping up across the channel islands and into southern counties of england later on. temperatures perhaps at their highest around parts of wales and north—west england getting up to 21 or 22 degrees. as we head through saturday night, we are going to see some of those showers pushing up from the south. some longer spells of rain in places. northern ireland and scotland staying largely dry through the night with some clear spells and temperatures generally between 8 and 1a degrees. so for sunday, it is quite a complicated weather setup. low pressure to the south—west, this frontal system will bring some early rain across some eastern and north—eastern parts and a few showers elsewhere. so, the detailfor sunday probably will change between now and then. but we are going to see quite a lot of cloud spilling up from the south with some showers or longer spells of rain. some sunny spells too across parts of northern ireland, southern scotland, perhaps the north of england. but even here, we could see some showers breaking out. and temperatures will depend on how much sunshine you get, but generally between 13 and 20 degrees.
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let's have a look at the start of next week. because as we head into monday, this weather front here is likely to become quite slow moving across southern parts of the uk. so that means there will be some outbreaks of rain here. with the wind starting to come down from the north, we are going to tap into some rather cool air for the time of year. monday is the summer solstice. it is not going to feel much like summer — cool for all, wet down towards the south. stays unsettled and quite cool into tuesday.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: polls have closed in iran's presidental election, to choose a leader to succeed hassan rouhani — who's not allowed to serve for a third term. in a highly controlled contest — almost all those allowed to run were regarded as hardliners. the conservative cleric, ebrahim raisi is expected to win. roman catholic bishops in the us are on a potential collision course withjoe biden after voting overwhelmingly to draft a teaching document addressing whether catholic politicians , who support abortion rights , should be barred from communion. the vatican has already indicated its opposition to the bishops' move. england and scotland have played to a 0—0 draw at wembley in their eagerly anticipated group game at euro 2020. it was the first contest between football's oldest rivals at a major tournament since euro 96. the stalemate still leaves both sides still able to qualify for the next round.
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