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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 17, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the official report into the manchester arena attack highlights missed opportunities to prevent deaths. the bomber salman abedi should have been identified as a threat the report blames police and security and the operators of the arena. everybody concerned with security at the arena should have been doing theirjob in the knowledge a terrorist attack might occur on that night. they were not. we terrorist attack might occur on that night. they were not.— terrorist attack might occur on that night. they were not. we will bring ou the night. they were not. we will bring you the findings — night. they were not. we will bring you the findings of— night. they were not. we will bring you the findings of that _ night. they were not. we will bring you the findings of that report - night. they were not. we will bring you the findings of that report in i you the findings of that report in the area which killed 22 people. also across the air with talk about the olympics. japan lifting the state of emergency for covid—19 with
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one month ago before the lip again. tributes paid to one of the pioneers of the africa struggle for independence. he was the first president of zambia and has died at the age of 97. and the chinese after not submit it to their space station making china a major power in the space race. —— chinese astronauts. a damning report into the 2017 manchester arena bombing has found that the suicide bomber responsible should have been identified as a threat on the night of the atrocity. 22 people died in the explosion which was at the end of an ariana grande concert on the 22nd of may, 2017. hundreds were injured. the attacker was this man, salman abedi. he died in the explosion. his brother, hashem, has admitted to helping plan the attack and is now serving life sentences. the inquiry�*s chairman is sirjohn saunders.
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he says there were missed opportunities to prevent the "devastating impact". here's more of his conclusions. there were serious shortcomings in the security provided by those organisations which had responsibility for it and also failings and mistakes by some individuals. the public inquiry began last year. this is the first of three reports it will deliver. the inquiry has heard how the attacker waited in the foyer before he detonated his explosives as fans were leaving. and much of the criticism has been directed at the british transport police. the inquiry heard how one officer wasn't present in the foyer while two on—duty officers took a break of more than two hours, including a 16—km round trip to buy kebabs. paul price survived the attack, but his partner, elaine mciver, who was a police officer, didn't. here's how he views the actions of british transport police that night. after the explosion, there was heroics and they stepped
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up, but their failings before the explosion was unforgivable as far as i'm concerned. also facing criticism are the arena operators, smg, and their contracted security providers, showsec. the inquiry found two teenage stewards from showsec ignored concerns raised from a member of the public over abedi's behaviour. showsec has previously admitted falling short, but said its errors didn't contribute to the bombing. here's the inquiry chairman again. an important part of the report deals with what are called "missed opportunities". there were a number of opportunities to identify salman abedi's activities as being suspicious on the night before he detonated his bomb. what i cannot say with any certainty is what would have happened if those opportunities had not been missed. then this is a statement from arena operator, smg. it says that that while it believes
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the standards that it adopted were in line with published industry guidance at the time, they will look at... we've also heard from from the british transport police. the chief constable said... and here's the former deputy assistant commissioner at the metropolitan police in london on the lessons that have been learned. at the end of the day, _ you rely on people, and those people need to be well—trained, . well—briefed and, probably above all, well—managed and led i so that when they have been given decent instructions, _ there is somebody there to ensure those instructions are actually. carried out, so that they don't go missing from where they should be and they don't leave the public - vulnerable. the manchester attack took place two years after the attack on a rock concert at the bataclan theatre in paris, killing 90 people.
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here's the inquiry chairman on the context. everybody concerned with security at the arena should have been doing theirjob in the knowledge that a terrorist attack might occur on that night. they weren't. no—one believed it could happen to them. the threat level had been at severe for a period in excess of two and a half years, and it is difficult to maintain a level of preparedness over a long period. that is not a criticism of the threat level. while the threat was high, the level needed to be at severe. the report also makes a number of recommendations, the chief of which is for the introduction of new protect duty legislation. this would place a duty on venue operators to consider and cater for the risk of terrorist attack. this has been named martyn�*s law after martyn hett, who was killed in the bombing. here's his mother, who has been
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championing the cause. now the recommendations have to be acted upon by the government so that all venues have basic security and so that no other families have to go through what we have. while the report focuses on venue security, martyn's law goes beyond this to make the safety of all public venues a priority. we should not have to live in fear, and i'm determined to make this law a reality. this has been the government's response. she went on to say... this is what the lawyer representing some of the bereaved families had to say. there are a lot of ocassions here.
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throughout the life of this tragedy where things that should have been done were not done, and one - of the important things looking i for the future is that those private enterprises responsible, - particularly the big corporate enterprises, actually do theirjob and make sure to a degree - of diligence required that people who attend these big _ venues, they expect to be kept safe land simply have an enjoyable night| out watching their favourite artists, are safe. _ this report is part of an ongoing inquiry. here's danny savage again to explain what will happen next. this has been going on for many months. it will go on for many months more yet. so, they'll be looking at the emergency response from the services that night. that will be the next stage. that may come out later this year or early next year.
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then there will be a further look at what was known about security, etc, beforehand, in intelligence and that kind of thing. so, there are more stages in this. i think a lot of people thought that perhaps the end of this inquiry there would be one big volume of findings, but it's not, it's going to come in stages. so, we will be standing here in future months talking about the next stages in this inquiry, which is very thorough, talking to so many different witnesses, to try to get to the truth of what exactly happened that night. full update on the pandemic. first, japan. it's just over a month til the olympics in tokyo, and the state of emergency there and in several other regions of japan will be lifted. here's the japanese prime minister. translation: the total number of infections - in the country has been declining since the middle of may. the number of people in critical condition is also decreasing, and the situation of insufficient hospital beds has improved. on the other hand, in some areas, infection numbers are plateauing, and there are possibilities for a rebound of covid—19 cases. here's the latest data on covid injapan. this goes back to
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the start of the year. the daily number of cases peaked in april. they've been going down since. and the numbers right now are low. in the past week, there have been 90 confirmed cases. so, this end to the state of emergency is not controversial. here's the asia editor of the times. it's what many people expected. going ahead with the olympics, that's controversial. and the timing of this announcement, i think no—one could deny is very closely tied up with that decision. and what this does is in some ways encapsulates the dilemma facing the japanese government as it presses on with the olympics because it would look very bad to go ahead with the olympics, the world's biggest sporting event in the world's most popular city, tokyo, if that city was under an official state of emergency.
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but on the other hand, once they remove the state of emergency, i think everyone expects that the number of daily infections will start to go up again. and five weeks from now, when the olympics kick off, who knows what level they will be at? now, going into the olympics, all of the athletes and journalists attending have to be double vaccinated, but they are still coming and there are tens of thousands of them. but vaccine rates injapan are low compared with many other wealthy countries. that's one of several reasons the games are so unpopular. here's michael bristow. it's about 6% of the population, l so that's just over about 8 million people who have been vaccinated so far. - a very small percentage of the population. - that indeed was why so many people | in japan were worried about hostingl these games. as you alluded to before, public opinion is largely l against it, although that has- shifted slightly over recent days. but people are concerned i
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that the population weren't vaccinated, there infections i were rising and that it wasjust unsafe to hold the games. the games continue to be extremely unpopular with the public. over 80% of the population wanting them either to be cancelled or postponed. japan won't allow international spectators, but the government has said it would allow up to 10,000 domestic spectators. the final decision for that on that lies with the olympic organisers. that's right. the ioc decides, notjapan. translation: i would like to show | the world that japan can overcome| a difficult time through people's efforts and wisdom. for that, i think it is important to hold a safe and secure tokyo tokyo games, curb infection injapan during the period of the games and prevent infection after the games. i would like to ask everyone
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to support the athletes at home by watching the games on tv. so, what about those competing? heading to the olympics is karen bennett. she'll be rowing for great britain. she's training in italy. are all the debates about how the games are going to work distracting you? i games are going to work distracting ou? ., �* ~' games are going to work distracting ou? ., �*
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experienced without covid-19? yeah, it's auoin experienced without covid-19? yeah, it's going to — experienced without covid-19? yeah, it's going to be _ experienced without covid-19? yeah, it's going to be very. _ experienced without covid-19? yeah, it's going to be very, very _ it's going to be very, very different. i actually went to the olympics— different. i actually went to the olympics in rio, and i've experienced a whole shebang there. and for— experienced a whole shebang there. and for my— experienced a whole shebang there. and for my understanding, it's going to he _ and for my understanding, it's going to he very. _ and for my understanding, it's going to be very, very different. there are not— to be very, very different. there are not going to be any spectators. we are _ are not going to be any spectators. we are going to have to be tested daily, _ we are going to have to be tested daily, which is obviously fine, we are very— daily, which is obviously fine, we are very willing to do that in order for the _ are very willing to do that in order for the games to go ahead. he will be for the games to go ahead. he will he very— for the games to go ahead. he will be very watered down. as soon as we finish _ be very watered down. as soon as we finish our— be very watered down. as soon as we finish our competition, we leave. i think— finish our competition, we leave. i think we _ finish our competition, we leave. i think we have got 48 our to get out of the _ think we have got 48 our to get out of the country. so it'sjust a case of the country. so it'sjust a case of we _ of the country. so it'sjust a case of we are — of the country. so it'sjust a case of we are going to be in the olympic village _ of we are going to be in the olympic village and — of we are going to be in the olympic village and we are going to be transported to our olympic venue and back again _ transported to our olympic venue and back again. there is not going to be any wandering around the town looking — any wandering around the town looking at different sites or anything. it's actually there to do business — anything. it's actually there to do business and then they to leave. and it is a of that — business and then they to leave. and it is a of that in _ business and then they to leave. fific it is a of that in any way undermining your experience of the
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sport, of the pleasure of doing your best at the olympics? i sport, of the pleasure of doing your best at the olympics?— best at the olympics? i think all the thins best at the olympics? i think all the things around _ best at the olympics? i think all the things around it _ best at the olympics? i think all the things around it are... - best at the olympics? i think all the things around it are... they| best at the olympics? i think all. the things around it are... they are 'ust the things around it are... they are just pluses — the things around it are... they are just pluses. they make things may be a little _ just pluses. they make things may be a little more — just pluses. they make things may be a little more exciting and everything, but you take it all away and we _ everything, but you take it all away and we have been training for the past, _ and we have been training for the past, like. — and we have been training for the past, like, for many years but in iockdown — past, like, for many years but in lockdown we have in training behind closed _ lockdown we have in training behind closed doors. and it isjust what we have _ closed doors. and it isjust what we have been— closed doors. and it isjust what we have been doing and it is what we are use _ have been doing and it is what we are use to— have been doing and it is what we are use to as well. so, you know, we are use to as well. so, you know, we are going _ are use to as well. so, you know, we are going out — are use to as well. so, you know, we are going out there to row and to represent — are going out there to row and to represent our country and to do the best that _ represent our country and to do the best that we can. and i think that's fine and _ best that we can. and i think that's fine and it— best that we can. and i think that's fine and it does not affect us and as i fine and it does not affect us and as i said — fine and it does not affect us and as i said everything else around it is a plus — as i said everything else around it is a plus 50 — as i said everything else around it is a plus. so we are going out there to do— is a plus. so we are going out there to do what— is a plus. so we are going out there to do what we are training to do. | to do what we are training to do. i have to do what we are training to do. have to ask to do what we are training to do. i have to ask you about the sport as well. how is the training going? are you feeling in line for a metal? is
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reform good?— you feeling in line for a metal? is reform aood? . h ., , reform good? yeah, it's really good. we all have — reform good? yeah, it's really good. we all have our— reform good? yeah, it's really good. we all have our highs _ reform good? yeah, it's really good. we all have our highs and _ reform good? yeah, it's really good. we all have our highs and lows - reform good? yeah, it's really good. we all have our highs and lows and l we all have our highs and lows and other— we all have our highs and lows and other things that have been going on, other things that have been going on. but _ other things that have been going on. but at — other things that have been going on, but at that moment we are out in italy on, but at that moment we are out in italy and _ on, but at that moment we are out in italy and its _ on, but at that moment we are out in italy and its actually very hot and our air—conditioning is not working. so it— our air—conditioning is not working. so it is— our air—conditioning is not working. so it is setting up a good steam for tokyo _ so it is setting up a good steam for tokyo. yes. — so it is setting up a good steam for tokyo. yes, so it's going well. we tokyo. yes, so it's going well. appreciate tokyo. yes, so it's going well. - appreciate you joining us. thank you very much indeed and the best of luck with your training in the best of luck in tokyo when you get there. thank you. now, let's turn to africa. cases are rising across the continent, and many countries are now struggling with a third wave. cases of covid have surged by over 20% week—on—week. the democratic republic of the congo, namibia and uganda reported their highest number of new weekly cases since the pandemic began. and there are concerns about how the slow vaccination roll—out on the continent. less than i% of the population has been vaccinated.
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23 countries have administered less than half of their doses. dr mary stephen is from the world health organization. she is live from congo. thank you forjoining us. what are the reasons forjoining us. what are the reasons for the slow vaccine roll—out at the moment? for the slow vaccine roll-out at the moment? . ~ for the slow vaccine roll-out at the moment? ., ,, , ., ., ., moment? thank you for having me. so we can trace — moment? thank you for having me. so we can trace in — moment? thank you for having me. so we can trace in terms _ moment? thank you for having me. so we can trace in terms of _ moment? thank you for having me. so we can trace in terms of the _ we can trace in terms of the roll—out, countries that are so slow but other countries, several countries have used 100% of their vaccination already. we have additional seven countries that have used up 80% of their vaccines. so before, they are still those lagging behind and the number of people they are prioritising, may be the health forecast and the issue people with comorbidities, the elderly. so what countries have done is to expand the coverage. like in c te d'ivoire, it
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was one of the countries that was lagging behind and they went to ghana to understand how ghana managed to increase the rate of vaccine and now they have expanded the coverage to the people above 18 as well as reaching out to facilities beyond the capital city. and we have a number of countries that are doing that as well. a like we said, the rate of vaccine is still a challenge for us on the continent. still a challenge for us on the continent-— still a challenge for us on the continent. �* ., , . ., continent. but to be clear, in some circumstances. _ continent. but to be clear, in some circumstances, there _ continent. but to be clear, in some circumstances, there are _ continent. but to be clear, in some circumstances, there are vaccines i continent. but to be clear, in some | circumstances, there are vaccines in countries with the countries don't have the means to use them to distribute them. is that correct? we have countries where the roll—out is a bit slow. — have countries where the roll—out is a bit slow, not that they don't have the means— a bit slow, not that they don't have the means to distribute them. and this is a the means to distribute them. jifuc this is a number of the means to distribute them. fific this is a number of factors. the means to distribute them. e"ic this is a number of factors. they were earlier highlighted. but like i said, the coverage is increasing slowly because from the previous
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three weeks, we were seeing about 3.5 million doses and those were administered every weekend in the last five days, we saw about 5 million doses administered. so some countries are also dealing with some form of hesitancy, but they are trying to address this using community mobilisation and communication.— community mobilisation and communication. �* ., , communication. and finally can i ask ou wh communication. and finally can i ask you why some _ communication. and finally can i ask you why some countries _ communication. and finally can i ask you why some countries like - communication. and finally can i ask you why some countries like the - communication. and finally can i askj you why some countries like the drc are seeing such high numbers at the moment this far into the pandemic? yes, so the drc is seeing a high number of cases including uganda and namibia, this is automatically a number of things. first of all, poor vaccination coverage. secondly, the measures. and now the prevalence of the variance of concern in all these countries contributing to this high number of cases that we are seeing across the continent.—
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across the continent. doctor, thank ou for across the continent. doctor, thank you forjoining _ across the continent. doctor, thank you forjoining us. _ across the continent. doctor, thank you forjoining us. thank— across the continent. doctor, thank you forjoining us. thank you - across the continent. doctor, thank you forjoining us. thank you for i you for “oining us. thank you for havin: you forjoining us. thank you for having me- _ let's turn to hong kong. the news outlet apple daily is promising to continue publishing despite the arrest of its most seniorjournalists. they were detained during police raids this morning, and live footage of it was broadcast on its facebook. here's some of it. over 500 police officers entered the building at around 7:30am. they confiscated boxes of reporting material. other photos published online by apple daily show police going through reporters' computers. police accuse apple daily of breaking a national security law they've linking their investigation to 30 apply daily articles which called on countries to impose sanctions on hong kong and china. it's confirmed five arrests. one of them is editor—in—chief ryan law. all five arrested are accused of collusion with a foreign country or with external elements
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to endanger national security. hong kong has also ordered the freezing of more than $2 million worth of assets owned by three companies linked to apple daily. this is its security secretary. we are talking about a conspiracy in which the suspects tried to make use of journalistic work to collude with a foreign country or external elements to impose sanctions or take hostile activities against hong kong and the prc. pro—democracy activists don't agree with that statement. here's one living in exile in the uk. this is the same jargon or wording that would be used by the beijing government in mainland china. so, we can see that in the past or in the last few months, bbcjournalists have been needed to relocate to taiwan
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because of the threat to journalism. the same has happened to australian journalists in mainland china. so, the same is happening again in hong kong. apple daily is owned by prominant pro—democracy supporterjimmy lai. you might remember these pictures of his arrest in december. here is mr lai paraded through the newsroom in handcuffs. he's a staunch critic of china and is in prison on a string of charges relating to the 2019 protest movement. he's also facing charges for violating the national security law. the law was introduced last year in response to massive pro—democracy protests in hong kong. it essentially reduces hong kong's judicial autonomy and made it easier to punish demonstrators from the pro—democracy movement. it criminalises any act of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces. critics say it undermines freedom of assembly and speech and some democratic rights. however, beijing argues the law will bring stability. this is thought to be first time thatjournalists have been arrested on suspicion of violating the law. here's the bbc�*s danny
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vincent in hong kong. the journalists that i i've been speaking to, they feel that this is not just - an attack on the pro—democracy movement, but there seems to be, in their words, a shift here. - it seems that the media itself are also being under attack. l apple daily has issued an open letter to its readers calling it the "worst of times in hong kong", warning that press freedom is hanging by a thread. and here's mark simon, an advisertojimmy lai, on the future of apple daily. let me be very clear, apple daily hong kong is cash flow positive. this is not a money—losing operation. we have tremendous support from the people of hong kong, we have an incredibly large subscription base. we're doing fine. the market wants us. it's the communist party that doesn't.
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to the euro 2020 tournament now. denmark have beaten belgium in their latest euros game. the match was played just five days after denmark's star player christian eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest on the pitch. he is now recovering in hospital in copenhagen and is to be fitted with a heart—starting device. earlier, both denmark and belgium's players paused the game earlier to applaud him. and these fans were watching the match in copenhagen. they also got to their feet and clapped. john bennett is in one of the host cities for these euros, budapest. i guess this means denmark will be heading out of the tournament. thea;r heading out of the tournament. they are still in with _ heading out of the tournament. they are still in with a _ heading out of the tournament. t"ia: are still in with a chance because the tournament is a bit different, a bit strange. third place teams have a chance. for third place teams will be able to go through to the next
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round. there is even a chance that if results go their way in the final round of group games, denmark could still finish second. they would have to beat russia by two goals and belgium would have to be finland, so they still have hope that they can progress into the last 16. but it was such an emotional occasion as expected. it was incredible really when denmark took the lead after just two minutes. the fans could not believe it. it was a release of emotion, and then as you say on ten minutes, that standing ovation. the ball was kicked out of place and everyone stood and applauded in the ground in copenhagen for christian eriksen. it completely changed in the second half with a cave bruno coming on as a substitute. came into the tournament with injury and that is why he did not start again. he set up the first goal for eden hazard and then score the second. denmark not out but they have to win their final game and denmark not out but they have to win theirfinal game and hope denmark not out but they have to win their final game and hope the results go their way. find their final game and hope the results go their way. and what about the netherlands _ results go their way. and what about the netherlands against _ results go their way. and what about the netherlands against austria - the netherlands against austria please. the netherlands against austria lease. ., , , ., .,
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please. yeah, this is the one to watch if you _ please. yeah, this is the one to watch if you want _ please. yeah, this is the one to l watch if you want entertainment. please. yeah, this is the one to - watch if you want entertainment. the netherlands i really entertainment team to watch was that they went up to heaven zero against ukraine and then ukraine fought back to level and then with five minutes left the dutch won the game 3—2. so they are entertaining. you never know what they are going to get for them. the had coats criticised by some fans back home in the netherlands came as a coverfor ronald koeman back home in the netherlands came as a cover for ronald koeman who was very popular in the qualification campaign. they have a very strong attack but at the back, a few problems because they are missing virgil van dijk, one of the best defenders in the world. he is out injured. good news is i have another defender back tonight. eight juventus defender is fit and starts. this should be a really good game. we watch out for that one. thank you very much come into his life for me to pass. if you don't have to be pcs want to follow the tournament, indeed follow sport more generally, download that onto your smartphone whether you have an apple or an android. back in a couple of minutes looking in depth at the decisions
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made in april here in the uk and how that impacted on the delta variant. good evening. central and eastern areas have been sitting under the shower cloud today, but the humidity has stayed, so it's felt quite oppressive out and about, but to the west of the weather front, the humidity has cleared away and it has felt much fresher with some sunshine. but southern and eastern areas are going to stick with that humid air as we go through the rest of this evening and overnight into tomorrow. with further pulses of heavy showers developing and moving northwards, heavy thundery rains, and with all of that cloud, it's going to be another very close night. uncomfortable for sleeping, but for the vast majority across scotland, northern ireland, western parts of england and wales, too, temperatures will be lower and that humidity has gotten more comfortable for sleeping.
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in fact, low single figures in some of the glens of scotland. but we are concerned about those thunderstorms giving further torrential rain. we saw that last night and into the morning, we had a couple of inches of rain in a few places. so that's certainly a possibility as we go through friday, because look how widespread we are expecting this thundery rain to be. pushing gradually northwards, possibly a little further westwards as we go through the day. behind it, some more intense thunderstorms developing because we've got that heat and humidity. but very few showers in contrast across scotland and northern ireland. across wales and western england, still in that slightly fresher air. and pollen levels, because we have got all that rain slightly down on those today, but still pretty high further north. still uncomfortable grass pollen season at the moment, and still strong sunshine. then as we go through the evening and overnight, we've got the football at wembley, so it could well be quite a wet affair before that finally clears out of the way tomorrow night. that will be one to watch. it looks like saturday will be our drier day of the weekend. still a few showers, but a lot of dry and settled
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rather, some sunshine as well. feeling warm, so we may well have lost the intense humidity, but temperatures at this time of year given the sunshine will still get into the low 20s. and the high teens and low 20s in the north. pleasantly warm in that strong sunshine. saturday night into sunday, we are watching for another area of heavy, possibly thundery rain to move its way northwards. pushing this time into scotland and northern ireland, northern england as we get into sunday itself and followed behind by sunny spells. but those will trigger some intense showers and thunderstorms as well. and it's still warm air. so, when the sun comes out, still into the low 20s. as ever, there is more on the website including the warnings.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the official reports into the manchester arena attack has highlighted missed opportunities prevent deaths. the bomber should have been identified as a threat, the report blames police and others responsible at the concert. everybody concerned with security at the arena should have been doing theirjob in the knowledge that a terrorist attack might occur on that night. terrorist attack might occur on that ni . ht. , ., ., night. they were not. the next hour we will turn — night. they were not. the next hour we will turn to _ night. they were not. the next hour we will turn to zambia, _ night. they were not. the next hour we will turn to zambia, when - night. they were not. the next hour we will turn to zambia, when the i night. they were not. the next hour we will turn to zambia, when the of| we will turn to zambia, when the of africa's struggle for independence, zambia public first president has died aged 97. we will look in detail
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about how they dealt variant of covid has delayed the end of restrictions in the uk. let's look at the coronavirus pandemic in england. the biggest case numberjump in nearly four months. on average that is over 8400 new cases per day in the last week. according to this new data much of the rights of infections is being driven by younger people who are not yet vaccinated. every week every week on outside source we produce an in depth look at one of the week's main stories for the bbc website — and for iplayer in the uk.
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this week we turn once again to the covid pandemic and how the delta variant took hold in the uk. this is the story of the delta variant. of how it came to the uk and how it delayed borisjohnson's plans. and how it delayed boris johnson's lans. . . and how it delayed boris johnson's lans. ,, . ., ., and how it delayed boris johnson's lans, ,, . ., ., and how it delayed boris johnson's plans. since today i cannot say that we have met _ plans. since today i cannot say that we have met all _ plans. since today i cannot say that we have met all our _ plans. since today i cannot say that we have met all our tests _ plans. since today i cannot say that we have met all our tests for i we have met all our tests for proceeding onjune 21. i think it is sensible to waitjust a little longer. sensible to wait 'ust a little [on . er. ~ ., �* , sensible to wait 'ust a little loner. ~ ., �*, ., ., longer. while that's go back to the start. in october, _ longer. while that's go back to the start. in october, a _ longer. while that's go back to the start. in october, a new— longer. while that's go back to the start. in october, a new variant. longer. while that's go back to the | start. in october, a new variant was detected in india. six months on, in april, india's cases were searching. in several mutations of the variance or causing concern. one was this. this was delta. it was getting international attention. the world health organization designated a variant of interest on the 4th of april, on the 9th of april boris johnson's government expanded the red list of countries, the ones facing the strictest travel
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restrictions also appear as the press release. the delta variant was not mentioned. nor was india. the delta variant was not mentioned. norwas india. it the delta variant was not mentioned. nor was india. it was not on the list. which begs the question why. one possible explanation was politics. a portion trip to india in late april that he did not want to cancel. weeks later, the sunday times reported its alleged that borisjohnson times reported its alleged that boris johnson wanted times reported its alleged that borisjohnson wanted to keep relations with india smooth before keep us brexit trade talks. the theory goes that the trip would have helped. the government will never accept that, what is beyond spew —— has never accepted that. when leading public health academic was that it's frankly insane. the government held the line, the
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telegraph lasted about india puppet absence from the list. and number ten spokesperson said only we keep it under constant review and will not hesitate to add countries if we think it's necessary. we got more detail on the government thinking when health secretary matt hancock said this in may. when we put pakistan on the red list and indeed bangladesh the positivity of those arriving was three times higher than from india. that's why we talk of those decisions. but publicly available data does not back that up. these the for late march and early april. india above bangladesh and to pakistan. and then injune mr hancock argued that back in april the government did not have the full picture. we the government did not have the full icture. ~ ., ., ., ., picture. we did not have the data because there _ picture. we did not have the data because there was _ picture. we did not have the data because there was a _ picture. we did not have the data because there was a long - picture. we did not have the data because there was a long lag i picture. we did not have the data | because there was a long lag from the cases, the data in which the case occurs to the date when the
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result comes back. you have to act on the data you have. his argument is about sequencing _ on the data you have. his argument is about sequencing of _ on the data you have. his argument is about sequencing of the - on the data you have. his argument is about sequencing of the process. is about sequencing of the process when individual variants are identified but even without that information the headline data from india did not need much interpretation. by mid april even after factoring interpretation. by mid april even afterfactoring in population size india was recording former cases a day than bangladesh or pakistan. for the uk government say higher testing rate was a factor. they had outbreaks of the kent, south africa and brazil variants and number one was a huge a rapidly escalating crisis. this press release on the 19th of april announced india was being added to the red list from the 23rd. it noted there is a high volume of travel between india and the uk. suddenly there was a high volume in april. the sunday times
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estimates 20,000 people arrived from india in the first three weeks of the month. but again this week boris johnson has defended his government. we put india on the red list on april 23. and the delta variant was not so identified until april the 28th. and only identified as a variant of concern on may the 7th. this is also true. it's also true that— this is also true. it's also true that the — this is also true. it's also true that the role of the crisis was known — that the role of the crisis was known earlier in april and other people — known earlier in april and other people were urging the prime minister— people were urging the prime minister to act. and whatever the rights _ minister to act. and whatever the rights and — minister to act. and whatever the rights and wrongs of the government decision. _ rights and wrongs of the government decision, borisjohnson was following a pattern. at decision, boris johnson was following a pattern.- decision, boris johnson was following a pattern. at the start of the pandemic— following a pattern. at the start of the pandemic he _ following a pattern. at the start of the pandemic he locks _ following a pattern. at the start of the pandemic he locks down i following a pattern. at the start of. the pandemic he locks down england later than many european countries. in the autumn he locked down later than his scientific adviser suggested. in december he resisted calls from more restrictions at christmas, then changed his mind. and again here he acted later that
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he might have it. the question is what was the impact of doing that? by what was the impact of doing that? by mid—may the opposition was making these. by mid-may the opposition was making these. , . ., by mid-may the opposition was making these. , , ., ., , ., these. they should have put on the red list of the _ these. they should have put on the red list of the same _ these. they should have put on the red list of the same time _ these. they should have put on the red list of the same time as - red list of the same time as bangladesh. since then because the three year period —— three week period where thousands of people had returned from india and that includes hundreds of the new variant covid cases. it is includes hundreds of the new variant covid cases-— covid cases. it is the case numbers increased so _ covid cases. it is the case numbers increased so did _ covid cases. it is the case numbers increased so did the _ covid cases. it is the case numbers increased so did the criticism i covid cases. it is the case numbers increased so did the criticism of. increased so did the criticism of what happened in april. injune does this add up? can we connect this going on the red list but what is happening now? delta is the problem right now. it accounts for more than 90% of new cases and one former government adviser describes what's happening this way stop you that we are in the grip of the early stages of a third wave of the virus.
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and it is this delta variant. 7000 cases on average a day and a double in time which is somewhere around a week. but was the red list of responsible for this? this is one current uk government adviser. in other words the timing didn't matter because if delta had been delayed more people would have been vaccinated and we know the vaccine reduces the chance of getting delta and of getting seriously ill because of it. but timing is not the whole story. look at this. the ua brought to restrictions on the 22nd of
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april, france was the 24th and the us the 4th of may. the uk with the 23rd of april, it was not out of sync. and here is an american official telling us the delta variant is doubling every two weeks. more broadly, the who says delta is in over 60 countries. so what is the uk affected particularly? maybe the volume of people who came in. he also points out that mark had individual cases of delta at the same time as the uk but not a huge volume of them and thought upon the impact is much smaller. all of which
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features the ongoing argument for the timing of the red this decision. arguments that have an urgency because delta is becoming more and more of an issue. the because delta is becoming more and more of an issue.— because delta is becoming more and more of an issue. the problem at the moment is that _ more of an issue. the problem at the moment is that the _ more of an issue. the problem at the moment is that the projections i more of an issue. the problem at the moment is that the projections that l moment is that the projections that include _ moment is that the projections that include a _ moment is that the projections that include a significant third wave which — include a significant third wave which is — include a significant third wave which is the delay today is designed to try. _ which is the delay today is designed to try. also — which is the delay today is designed to try, also say that in one month's time _ to try, also say that in one month's time situation is very unlikely to look— time situation is very unlikely to look any— time situation is very unlikely to look any better. and time situation is very unlikely to look any better.— time situation is very unlikely to look any better. and a longer-term oint as look any better. and a longer-term point as well- _ look any better. and a longer-term point as well. no _ look any better. and a longer-term point as well. no question - look any better. and a longer-term point as well. no question that i look any better. and a longer-term. point as well. no question that when we have this — point as well. no question that when we have this conversation _ point as well. no question that when we have this conversation in - point as well. no question that when we have this conversation in six i we have this conversation in six months' — we have this conversation in six months' time we will be talking about— months' time we will be talking about different variance. his point bein: that about different variance. his point being that the _ about different variance. his point being that the long-term - about different variance. his point. being that the long-term challenge being that the long—term challenge and how governments manage them will have a huge bearing on how much this disrupts our lives. both of those points are borne out by the last three months. because it's true that the delta variant would have reached the delta variant would have reached the uk anyway. but it's also true that decisions in april directly connected to the fact that england's
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restrictions will not be eased on june the 21st. you can find more analysis from outside source elsewhere on the bbc. each week we tackle a different subject. you can see our videos on the bbc news website. previous editions are on bbc sounds app too if you prefer to listen. there's lots of ways to find them across the bbc — just search for my name. one of the giants of africa s liberation struggles — the former zambian president kenneth kaunda has died at the age of 97. he had been admitted to hospital in lusaka earlier this week suffering from pneumonia. in the 1950s, mr kaunda was a key figure in what was then northern rhodesia s independence movement from britain — and became zambia s first president in 1964 — stepping down in 1991. caroline hawley looks back at his life. singing.
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he was the father of independent zambia, seen as a moral force in africa. but when kenneth kaunda left office, his country faced economic ruin. at independence in 1964, kenneth kaunda became president of zambia as leader of the independence party. a devout christian, he always advocated non—violent change. but he did still let guerrillas operate from his country into what was then rhodesia, into mozambique, and particularly into south africa. in 1979, kenneth kaunda danced with prime minister margaret thatcher, but he found her completely out of step with his demands for sanctions
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against south africa and its system of apartheid. visiting zambia in the 1980s, her foreign secretary geoffrey howe was given this stinging rebuke. as a fellow human being, sir geoffrey, you're most welcome. but as the messenger of what you have come to do in south africa, you're not welcome at all. but zambia was too weak and too dependent on goods imported from south africa to comply with the sanctions that kenneth kaunda supported. a collapse in world copper prices, the oil crisis of the 1970s, plus corruption and mismanagement, crippled zambia's economy. president kaunda dealt with early opposition by instituting a one—party state, which became increasingly oppressive. as new winds of change
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blew through africa, kenneth kaunda was becoming out of tune with his people. protests against his government were sparked by rocketing food prices and shortages of essentials. it forced him to agree to democratic change. he was eventually ousted by frederick chiluba in elections in 1991, but the influence he continued to exert led to his arrest for alleged treason in 1997. the new regime dropped the charges under pressure from the international community. at nelson mandela's funeral, kenneth kaunda made a last global appearance... president kaunda, please come forward. ..casting away his stick, bounding onto the stage. god almighty, bless him and others like him who have come to know the importance of... he spoke forfar longer than he was allowed. fare thee well, amen.
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it was vintage kenneth kaunda. despite his many mistakes, history will credit him with preventing the break—up of his country and fulfilling his party's slogan: one zambia, one nation. mr kaunda was also leading backer of liberation movements in mozambique and what is now zimbabwe — the bbc�*s shingai nyoka is in harare. help me understand how he is viewed in neighbouring zimbabwe. it help me understand how he is viewed in neighbouring zimbabwe.— in neighbouring zimbabwe. it would be impossible _ in neighbouring zimbabwe. it would be impossible to _ in neighbouring zimbabwe. it would be impossible to write _ in neighbouring zimbabwe. it would be impossible to write about - in neighbouring zimbabwe. it would be impossible to write about the i be impossible to write about the history of zimbabwe without referring to him. he was a central figure notjust in the fight against colonialism in zambia but also zimbabwe and south africa, namibia, mozambique, angola, and so many
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freedoms that black southern africans a joy today as a result of the decisions that he made and the sacrifices that zambia made. during those days in the 70s. kaunda offered his country as a base for liberation movements from which they launched their military offences. including zimbabwe, one of the wings of the armed, of the forces was headquartered in zambia. the country suffered immense casualties because of attacks as a result of that. and zambia suffered economic collapse. many people would say natural because of the collapse in the copper prices as well as the economic policies, but the support he gave to countries like zimbabwe, south africa and namibia. does he gave to countries like zimbabwe, south africa and namibia.— south africa and namibia. does that pan african spirit _ south africa and namibia. does that pan african spirit that _ south africa and namibia. does that pan african spirit that we _ south africa and namibia. does that pan african spirit that we saw i south africa and namibia. does that pan african spirit that we saw from |
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pan african spirit that we saw from the liberation movement live on in southern africa today? it the liberation movement live on in southern africa today?— the liberation movement live on in southern africa today? it does. and i think southern africa today? it does. and i think what — southern africa today? it does. and i think what we _ southern africa today? it does. and i think what we are _ southern africa today? it does. and i think what we are seeing - southern africa today? it does. and i think what we are seeing now- southern africa today? it does. and i think what we are seeing now as l i think what we are seeing now as result of his death, the outpouring of morning notjust in zambia but the consonant as a whole is a reminder of how important he was and the immense recognition that he continues to have it. there has been some debate about whether he is remembered enough outside of zambia. butjust as an example well zambia has declared 21 days of morning, botswana has also declared days of morning. that's a recognition of the contribution that he made. he was not a saint and many people would recognise that. they say they forgive him a long time ago and they all had to be remembered notjust as all had to be remembered notjust as a unifier in zambia but a unifier of the continent of africa.— the continent of africa. thank you
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very much — the continent of africa. thank you very much indeed. _ the continent of africa. thank you very much indeed. live _ the continent of africa. thank you very much indeed. live up - the continent of africa. thank you very much indeed. live up with i the continent of africa. thank you j very much indeed. live up with us from harare. we will return to the chinese space station. we will find out all about it. the number of children in care in england has risen by a quarter in the last decade to more than 80,000 but an independent review has found that social services are too often focused on investigating struggling families, when they should be providing them with support. our social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. what can you see? but the independent review says spending by councils in england on general advice and support for families has been cut by a third this is a flat for one of our young people. abs. this is a flat for one of our young --eole. " ~ , this is a flat for one of our young ..eole, " ~' , ., ., this is a flat for one of our young --eole. " ~ , ., ., ., people. a key area that the review sa s people. a key area that the review says needs — people. a key area that the review says needs to _ people. a key area that the review says needs to change _ people. a key area that the review says needs to change is _ people. a key area that the review says needs to change is what i people. a key area that the review says needs to change is what it i says needs to change is what it calls the broken market in
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children's homes. irate calls the broken market in children's homes. ~ ., , , children's homes. we have bedrooms in the bathroom _ children's homes. we have bedrooms in the bathroom further _ children's homes. we have bedrooms in the bathroom further down. - children's homes. we have bedrooms in the bathroom further down. he's i in the bathroom further down. he's been said by harvester county counsel because it was so tough to find suitable places. it's been difficult to place young people to keep them within heart for sure. they may struggle and have struggled in the past living within a group environment. where is here they don't have that pressure. for this 15-year-old _ don't have that pressure. for this 15-year-old it's — don't have that pressure. for this 15-year-old it's made _ don't have that pressure. for this 15-year-old it's made a _ don't have that pressure. for this 15-year-old it's made a huge i 15—year—old it's made a huge difference. 15-year-old it's made a huge difference.— 15-year-old it's made a huge difference. it's really nice, it's my favourite _ difference. it's really nice, it's my favourite colours. - difference. it's really nice, it's my favourite colours. pink - difference. it's really nice, it's| my favourite colours. pink pink difference. it's really nice, it's - my favourite colours. pink pink wall in the _ my favourite colours. pink pink wall in the kitchen. did my favourite colours. pink pink wall in the kitchen.— in the kitchen. did you get to choose those _ in the kitchen. did you get to choose those colours - in the kitchen. did you get to choose those colours casillal in the kitchen. did you get to - choose those colours casilla yes, it makes me feel at home. but prices have decreased by more than 40% in a decade and the shortage of places means that children and up miles from home. we could go may be up to 200 providers to find a replacement. but it did make us think is that
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we've got to something different ourselves because the complexity of need is not going away. with so much spent on crisis services too often early support for families has been cut. this is where money needs to be invested, surly health can head off later problems. the official reporting to the manchester arena attack has highlighted missed opportunities to prevent deaths. 22 people died in the attack in 2017. now, three chinese astronauts are spinning theirfirst night in orbit chinese astronauts are spinning their first night in orbit on chinese astronauts are spinning theirfirst night in orbit on board a new space station, and when i say space astronauts it's a huge step
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forward for the space programme. this is when their rocket docked after a seven hour flight from earth, that was cause for celebration back in mission control as you can imagine this is in the gobi desert. 0n as you can imagine this is in the gobi desert. on board this is celebrations as well. first manned space mission in five years and there was a lot riding on this. when they arrived they had this to say. translation: 12 they arrived they had this to say. translation:— they arrived they had this to say. tuna/mom— they arrived they had this to say. translation: 12 crew reporting to the ground. — translation: 12 crew reporting to the ground. we _ translation: 12 crew reporting to the ground, we have _ translation: 12 crew reporting to the ground, we have entered - translation: 12 crew reporting to the ground, we have entered our. translation: 12 crew reporting to - the ground, we have entered our home in space. we thank all chinese people for their support. and thank the sites and technology workers for their hard work. we salute you. those three will be on board for at least three months. they have scientific experiment to get on with but their main task will be to finish building the space station. there is of course another space station up there, the international space station around five times bigger and the us will be following
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the progress of the chinese closely. keith is a former nasa scientist. the space station that's up there now — built by the us, russia, europe and japan — was designed and built in the 1990s. i worked on it. and by the time most of it was launched, it was based on technology that was already 10—15 years old. so, it's doing just fine up there now and it's state—of—the—art, but china's space station has some of the benefit of experience they've seen from us in our space station, but was wholly designed the 21st century. and so, they've got a bit of an edge there, and it may well be operating after the international space station is taken off—line. jennifer is a presenter of the awesome astronomy podcast, given the name of the international space station, it's a justice for all countries to get involved, why the chinese are having to do their own thing? chinese are having to do their own thin ? f , chinese are having to do their own thin ? j , . .,
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thing? they've been excluded from the international _ thing? they've been excluded from the international space _ thing? they've been excluded from the international space initiative i the international space initiative because of sanctions held by the american government, so this is why they commissioned their own statistician. but they are going to be opening it up when it is fully commissioned to other astronauts from other countries, and it's a great step forward in terms of collaborations with china. they have traditionally been a secretive state in the past. it traditionally been a secretive state in the ast. , , ., traditionally been a secretive state in the ast. , , . ., in the past. it is smaller than the iss in the past. it is smaller than the 155 but in the past. it is smaller than the iss but with _ in the past. it is smaller than the 55 but with the _ in the past. it is smaller than the 155 but with the other _ in the past. it is smaller than the 155 but with the other ways - in the past. it is smaller than the 155 but with the other ways does| in the past. it is smaller than the i 155 but with the other ways does it iss but with the other ways does it differ? it iss but with the other ways does it differ? , , . �* , iss but with the other ways does it differ? , , ., �*, ., iss but with the other ways does it differ? , , ., �* , ., ., differ? it is smaller, it's going to have a great _ differ? it is smaller, it's going to have a great big _ differ? it is smaller, it's going to have a great big telescope - differ? it is smaller, it's going to i have a great big telescope attached to it which i think is one of the great differences with the international space station. at the minute as well it's looking at short—term missions, so three months and things like that. and possibly smaller crews as well. thea;r and things like that. and possibly smaller crews as well.— and things like that. and possibly smaller crews as well. they will be lookin: to smaller crews as well. they will be looking to collaborate _ smaller crews as well. they will be looking to collaborate with - smaller crews as well. they will be looking to collaborate with other . looking to collaborate with other countries, do we know who those might be? fit countries, do we know who those miaht be? �* ,, ., countries, do we know who those mirhtbe?�* might be? at the minute russia has shown interest, _ might be? at the minute russia has shown interest, they _ might be? at the minute russia has shown interest, they have _ might be? at the minute russia has| shown interest, they have expressed that they would like to send some of their astronauts up to the station.
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but we also know that they will be working with other countries in terms of experiments, so norway have gotten experiment of their about cancer cells, we know the end you have got one which is ultraviolet spectrogram and will be investigating the light from exploding stars. [30 investigating the light from exploding stars.— investigating the light from exploding stars. investigating the light from exlodin: stars. ~ , exploding stars. do you think this kind of competition _ exploding stars. do you think this kind of competition might - exploding stars. do you think this kind of competition might be - exploding stars. do you think this| kind of competition might be good exploding stars. do you think this i kind of competition might be good if the speedy development of space technology? we the speedy development of space technology?— technology? we always say that conflict drives _ technology? we always say that conflict drives innovation, - technology? we always say that conflict drives innovation, but . technology? we always say that i conflict drives innovation, but i'm more excited about the collaboration side of its and the fact that china are willing to work with nations that they have not worked with before. if we do want to achieve things like going to mars i think this is what it's going to take. it's going to have to be a global effort and so it's great to see china which is a superpower when it comes to space starting to work with us. �* ., , ., ., , comes to space starting to work with us. �* ., ., , ., us. before i let you go up that i was mentioning _ us. before i let you go up that i was mentioning they _ us. before i let you go up that i was mentioning they were - us. before i let you go up that i l was mentioning they were going us. before i let you go up that i - was mentioning they were going to be there for three months, if that long enough to finish it? it there for three months, if that long enough to finish it?— enough to finish it? it should be. as lona enough to finish it? it should be. as long as _ enough to finish it? it should be. as long as they _ enough to finish it? it should be. as long as they work _ enough to finish it? it should be. as long as they work hard - enough to finish it? it should be. as long as they work hard and i enough to finish it? it should be. l as long as they work hard and they have got an awful lot to do, but i'm
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confident they will get there. thank ou ve confident they will get there. thank you very much _ confident they will get there. thank you very much indeed, _ confident they will get there. thank you very much indeed, jennifer - you very much indeed, jennifer they're an awful lot to do. thank you jennifer, she hopes that podcast as well if you want to follow it. but they've got an awful her to do but also worth pointing out they have nothing else to do because they are up there of course. we will see how they get on. much more about their efforts in the efforts of mesa and everyone else involved through the text section of the bbc news website. just go to the front page and click on the science tab. before we wrap up this edition i should mention that as you know since covid came along outside sources not been in the normal home looking down on that balcony over the bbc news room, from next week we will be going back there which we are very excited about. having a brand—new way of telling you stories, having a brand—new look. that will be on air from monday, both on the bbc news channel and on bbc world news. we hope you'll enjoy what we've got to
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show you and we will see you then. bye—bye. good evening. central and eastern areas have been sitting under the shower cloud today, but the humidity has stayed, so it's quite oppressive out and about, but to the west of the weather front the humidity has cleared away and it has felt much fresher with some sunshine. but southern and eastern areas are going to stick with that humid air as we go through the rest of this evening and overnight into tomorrow. with further pulses of heavy showers developing and moving northwards, heavy thundery rains and with all of that cloud it's going to be another very close night. uncomfortable for sleeping, but for the vast majority across scotland, northern ireland, western arts of england and wales as well temperatures will be lower and that humidity has gotten more comfortable for sleeping. in fact, low single figures in some of the glens of scotland.
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but we are concerned about those thunderstorms giving further torrential rain. we saw that last night and into the morning when we had a couple of inches of rain in a few places. so that's certainly a possibility as we go through friday, because look how widespread we are expecting this thundery rain to be. pushing gradually northwards, possibly a little further westwards as we go through the day. behind it some more intense thunderstorms developing because we have got that heat and humidity. but very few showers in contrast across scotland and northern ireland across wales and western england still in that slightly fresher air. and pollen levels, because we have got all that rain slightly down on those today, but still pretty high for the north. still grass pollen season at the moment, and still strong sunshine. then as we go through the evening and overnight we've got the football at wembley, so it could well be quite a wet affair before that finally clears out of the way tomorrow night. that will be one to watch. it looks like saturday will be our
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dryer day of the weekend. still a few showers but a lot of dry and settled rather, some sunshine as well. feeling warm so we may well have lost the intense humidity but temperatures at this time of year given the sunshine will still get into the low 20s. and the high teens and low 20s in the north. pleasantly warm in that strong sunshine. saturday night into sunday we are watching for another area of heavy, possibly thundery rain to move its way northwards. pushing this time into scotland and northern ireland, northern england as we get into sunday itself and followed behind by sunny spells. but those will trigger some intense showers and thunderstorms as well. and it is still warm air. so when the sun comes out still into the low 20s. as ever, there is more on the website including the warnings.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8 o'clock... the public inquiry into the manchester arena bombing has concluded that there were serious shortcomings in security at the venue on the night of the attack. everybody concerned with security at the arena should have been doing theirjob that a terrorist the arena should have been doing their job that a terrorist attack might occur on that night. they were not. ,., , ., might occur on that night. they were not. , ., ~ , might occur on that night. they were not. , ., a , ., not. the bomber salman abedi should have been identified _ not. the bomber salman abedi should have been identified as _ not. the bomber salman abedi should have been identified as a _ not. the bomber salman abedi should have been identified as a threat, - have been identified as a threat, the report blames british transport police, the operators of the arena and a security firm.— and a security firm. today, our heartbreak _ and a security firm. today, our heartbreak turns _ and a security firm. today, our heartbreak turns to _ and a security firm. today, our heartbreak turns to anger. - and a security firm. today, our| heartbreak turns to anger. this inquiry has rightly found that we were failed on every level. the uk
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