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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  June 10, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm sally bundock with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. on his first foreign trip as us presidentjoe biden is in the uk for the g7 summit, ahead of talks with nate and the russian president. heading to the g7, then the nato ministerial events, to meet with mr putin, to let him know what i want him to know. political organisations linked to the jailed kremlin critic alexei navalny are banned by the russian government. curfew stops play — the quarter—finals of the french tennis open are disrupted by coronavirus restrictions as 5,000 fans are forced to leave the court. and skygazers delight — amateur astronomers across the northern hemisphere await a partial eclipse
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of the sun. hello and welcome to the programme. president biden will hold talks with the british prime minister, borisjohnson in cornwall, in a few hours at the start of his first foreign tour since taking office. mr biden flew into the uk with his wife, jill, on air force one last night, before going on to cornwall for the meeting, and the g7 summit which begins on friday. the two leaders will agree a new atlantic charter, modelled on the statement setting out american and british goals at the end of the second world war. 0ur diplomtaic correspondent, paul adams reports.
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it's not every day the american president comes calling. joe biden, accompanied by his wife, touching down late last night. a warm welcome at the start of a complex, challenging week of diplomacy. earlierat a complex, challenging week of diplomacy. earlier at raf mildenhall, a chance to mingle with american troops, and set out his stall.— out his stall. i'm heading to the g7 and _ out his stall. i'm heading to the g7 and then _ out his stall. i'm heading to the g7 and then the - out his stall. i'm heading to the g7 and then the nato i the g7 and then the nato ministerial, and then to meet with mr putin, to let him know what i want him to know. america, he said, was back, ready to work with allies to tackle coronavirus and climate change, improve the democracy still works in the of 21st—century challenges. mr biden sits down with boris johnson later today. the president says america's relationship with britain is still special, the prime minister says this is a big moment. minister says this is a big moment-— minister says this is a big moment. �* ., , , moment. don't forget this is the first time _ moment. don't forget this is the first time in _ moment. don't forget this is the first time in six - moment. don't forget this is the first time in six months.
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moment. don't forget this is| the first time in six months in office almost thatjoe biden, the us president, has been able to come overseas for a major trip, it is first time on the european continent, is the first time any of us have been able to see each other face—to—face since the pandemic began, and the pandemic, let's face it, was a pretty scratchy period for the world. downing street is talking _ period for the world. downing street is talking of _ period for the world. downing street is talking of a - period for the world. downing street is talking of a new - street is talking of a new atlantic charter, modelled in the i941 atlantic charter, modelled in the 1941 joint statement in which winston churchill and franklin roosevelt set out their vision of a post—war world. it sounds lovely but includes more immediate objectives, like opening up travel between the us and uk as soon as possible. borisjohnson will also seek to reassure his guests that arouse over sausages and the northern ireland protocol does not threaten the good friday agreement. american officials say their concern runs very
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deep. pauladams, bbc news. we will have a lot more on this story later in the programme in around 25 minutes in a business coverage because the brexit trade tensions do threaten to overshadow this g7 summit, so we will get an expert view on how that could be sorted out, the northern ireland protocol and the various details, that's coming later. let's get some of the day's other news. more charges have been brought against the former leader, aung san suu kyi, whose government in myanmar was toppled by the military in february. state—run media said she now faced corruption charges linked to a charity set up in memory of her mother. a controversial oil pipeline project between canada and the united states has been officially abandoned, more than a decade after it began. the keystone xl pipeline had been opposed by environmentalists and indigenous groups. reports in the us media say the world's biggest meat processing company, jbs, has admitted that it paid an $11 million ransom to resolve a major cyber
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attack. hackers caused several of the firm's plants to shut down. the fbi blamed a cyber criminal group based in russia. the united nations is warning that, after decades president biden is to revoke executive orders introduced by donald trump designed to block us downloads using the popular online apps wechat and tiktok. but the white house said mr biden has instructed the commerce department to conduct a security review of the chinese—owned apps. a separate investigation by the us security services is also continuing. a russian court has outlawed groups linked to jailed kremlin critic alexei navalny after declaring them extremist. it's a move that bans his allies from elections due to take place in september. and it will further strain us—russia ties before a closely watched summit between president biden and president putin. aruna iyengar has the latest.
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rachel denber is the deputy director of europe and central asia at human rights watch. she says the ruling doesn't come as a surprise but sets a dangerous precedent. sadly it is utterly unsurprising that the court has ruled in this way. this is exactly what we can expect from russia's justice system is unfortunately. the secondary message is it is completely a scandalous ruling, the lawsuit itself was completely unfounded and baseless. it's a very dangerous precedent that has been set. there are already organisations that have been branded xm is, such as jehovah's witness, and since that time in 2017, there are
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now almost 500 people in russia who are jehovah's witnesses who are under criminal prosecution, 55 an hour behind bars, either having been convicted and serving sentences of four, five, six, seven years injail or are awaiting trial — 55 are now behind bars. this sunday, thousands of spaniards are expected to protest in madrid against plans by the government of pedro sanchez to grant pardons to nine catalan independence leaders. the prisoners were jailed for their role in a failed attempt to break away from spain, after they defied the courts by holding an independence referendum in 2017. the government believes the pardons will help calm tensions with catalonia. but many in spain oppose the move. guy hedgecoe reports. this in her home in catalonia, laura takes a call from her father who is in prison,
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serving a 12 year sentence. nearly two years ago, the spanish supreme court convicted him, a politician, of sedition, along with eight others for attempting to create an independent catalan republic in 2017. he independent catalan republic in 2017. , ., , ., independent catalan republic in 2017. , ., , 2017. he promised to the people that we would _ 2017. he promised to the people that we would celebrate - 2017. he promised to the people that we would celebrate a - that we would celebrate a referendum, and that's what he did. if doing that as a crime, i think we have a problem, and celebrating freedom in spain is not a crime, so that's why it's turn to the senate to explain why all of them are in prison, and of course he is not a criminal. and of course he is not a criminal-— and of course he is not a criminal. , , , , criminal. this is the present where most _ criminal. this is the present where most of _ criminal. this is the present where most of the - criminal. this is the present where most of the jails - criminal. this is the present i where most of the jails catalan leaders are serving out their sentences, which range from nine to 13 years. there imprisonment has been a major cause of grievance for the independence movement, which says that there are political
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prisoners. however, in the next few weeks, the government of socialist pedro sanchez is expected to issue pardons to the nine jailed politicians, ensuring their release. mr sanchez himself has spoken of the need for understanding, rather than revenge when dealing with the catalan issue. catalonia remains virtually split down the middle on the issue of independence. mr sanchez�*s allies in the region see this as an opportunity to calm tensions, with a view to resolving the territorial crisis. , ., , resolving the territorial crisis. , . , . , crisis. they are very necessary in catalonia. _ crisis. they are very necessary in catalonia. the _ crisis. they are very necessary | in catalonia. the independence process, it has been very negative for the economy, and painful, it is very important, these pardons, to return to dialogue. these pardons, to return to dialogue-— these pardons, to return to dialouue. , , ,, ., ., dialogue. there is substantial resistance — dialogue. there is substantial resistance to _ dialogue. there is substantial resistance to the _ dialogue. there is substantial resistance to the pardons, . resistance to the pardons, particularly on the right. the
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prime minister's political opponents point out that in 2019, he said the jail sentences should be served in full. ., ., ., , ., sentences should be served in full. . . ., , ., , full. catalans who obeyed the law, respected _ full. catalans who obeyed the law, respected the _ full. catalans who obeyed the law, respected the law - full. catalans who obeyed the law, respected the law will i full. catalans who obeyed the | law, respected the law will be humiliated the pardon, and pro—independence politicians who broke the law, divided society in catalonia, and who caused an immense damage in our economy will be rewarded. it makes no sense.— economy will be rewarded. it makes no sense. polls suggest most spaniards _ makes no sense. polls suggest most spaniards oppose - makes no sense. polls suggest| most spaniards oppose pardons for the jails catalan leaders, as do some in mr sanchez�*s own socialist party. this gesture, aimed at calming tensions, could end up creating a fierce backlash. guy had to go, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: all the sports news, including novak djokovic winning his
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french open quarter—final. the day the british liberated the falklands. and by tonight, british troops had begun the task of disarming the enemy. in the heart of the west german capital, this was gorby—mania at its height. the crowd packed to see the man who, for them, has raised great hopes for an end to the division of europe. it happened as the queen moved towards horse guards parade for the start of trooping the colour. gunshots the queen looks worried but recovers quickly. as long as they'll - pay to go and see me, i'll get out there and kick 'em down the hills. - what does it feel like to be the first man to cross the channel by your own power?
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it feels pretty neat. it feel marvellous, really. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: president biden will hold talks with the british prime minister in cornwall, at the start of his first foreign tour since taking office. mr biden is in the uk, for the g7 summit, where the agenda will include, covid recovery, climate change and trade. let's stay with that story, presiden biden is expected to announce later today that he will buy 500 million doses of the pfizer vaccine and distribute it to the rest of the world. 's it is also reported the g7 will match that total, but will it be enough? professor anne rimoin is an epidemiologist at the ucla fielding school of public health. she's in los angeles.
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good to talk to you again. give us your reaction to this pledge by the us president and also the report that g7 will match that. to what extent will it make a difference to this global pandemic? it make a difference to this global pandemic?- make a difference to this global pandemic? it will be very important. _ global pandemic? it will be very important. we - global pandemic? it will be very important. we need . global pandemic? it will be | very important. we need to global pandemic? it will be - very important. we need to get as many vaccines out, globally, to where they are needed most as soon as possible we can. right now, here in the united states we have almost 50% of the population vaccinated, fully vaccinated, but in the rest of the world, we have as little as 1% of populations vaccinated. places throughout africa, for example, have less than 1% of the population vaccinated, places like the democratic republic of congo, where i work, only several thousands of vaccines have been distributed in a country of 80 million. we cannot control the
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pandemic if we cannot get vaccines in arms globally. what is very important _ vaccines in arms globally. what is very important is _ vaccines in arms globally. what is very important is the - is very important is the process, you have worked extensively in africa dealing with the bowler, that kind of thing, and we heard from some developing countries that their concern is that they will get stockpiles of vaccines that and they have not got the people and the manpower to administer those vaccines. you and the manpower to administer those vaccines.— those vaccines. you are absolutely _ those vaccines. you are absolutely right. - those vaccines. you are absolutely right. the i those vaccines. you are - absolutely right. the vaccines themselves is issue number one. the next issue is getting those vaccines into arms. we had this discussion very early on in the united states and in europe, and we were talking about the great news that we have vaccines, know—how will be getting to the population? this is a big issue and in particular in low resource settings where we don't necessarily have the cold chain available, we don't have logistics, supply chains in place, these are things we stumbled here the united states and in europe, and elsewhere in the world, where we had very
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sophisticated systems, so this will have to be a multi— pronged approach to be able to get vaccines to every corner of the world. in get vaccines to every corner of the world-— get vaccines to every corner of the world. in terms of how that is tackled, _ the world. in terms of how that is tackled, do _ the world. in terms of how that is tackled, do developing - is tackled, do developing countries, the us, europe, wealthy countries need to do more than just give the money for the vaccines and supply the vaccines? what about manpower and people who can administer the vaccines as well? absolutely. this is a global pandemic, we're not going to be free of virus until we can get vaccines into people's arms, notjust into vaccines into people's arms, not just into freezers. vaccines into people's arms, notjust into freezers. so every step is a step in the right direction. getting those vaccines ordered, getting those vaccines ordered, getting those vaccines and countries but then we have to be working on the manpower. i get talks about preventing pandemics before they start all the time and you have to invest in the global health infrastructure, local health infrastructure, local health infrastructure, local health infrastructure because thatis health infrastructure because that is where it is happening, it is happening on the ground and i think that we are finally coming to grips with this fact
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and this reality that in order to stop endemics, in order to stop outbreaks, we have to invest in local infrastructure and that includes the infrastructure to get vaccines out quickly and efficiently. and there is also the problem of vaccine hesitancy and those who don't want to have the vaccine at all. there cultural issues as well depending on the country. issues as well depending on the count . ~ , ,., , issues as well depending on the count , . country. absolutely, you are correct. country. absolutely, you are correct- we _ country. absolutely, you are correct. we know _ country. absolutely, you are correct. we know that - country. absolutely, you are l correct. we know that vaccine hesitancy has been an issue globally, notjust with this particular vaccine but with many vaccines, with all vaccines and so we really need to be tackling this issue straight on and really understanding what the root of the hesitant he is, speaking to communities and that also requires local health workers on the ground, community discussions, so this is going to be a multi pronged approach globally that is going to take a lot of effort and a lot of co—ordination. a lot of effort and a lot of co-ordination._ a lot of effort and a lot of
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co-ordination. �* co-ordination. and given where we are at _ co-ordination. and given where we are at the — co-ordination. and given where we are at the moment, - co-ordination. and given where i we are at the moment, obviously in the united states you are seeing a huge step forward with many taking up the vaccine, we are seeing that in the uk but there's concerns about a third wave in the uk and elsewhere, where are we at with your respective in terms of the global fight against this? this is the same — global fight against this? ti 3 is the same discussion we've been having over and over again, which is that we are in again, which is that we are in a race with these variants and the more that this virus has an opportunity to circulate them opportunity to circulate them opportunity we have for these variant to rise which is what you are seeing now in the uk with the delta variant spreading, it is extremely contagious, so we need to be getting vaccines and arms faster and notjust in these high resource settings but globally because unless we can stop this virus from circulating globally, we are never going to get in front of it, we are going to be constantly chasing behind it. professor, good to talk to you again, thank you for your time. tennis now, novak djokovic will face rafael nadal
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in the french open semi finals, after battling past matteo berrettini in a match that saw spectators ejected from roland garros midway through. tennis fans were allowed into a night session for the first time, following a relaxation of paris's curfew from 9pm to 11pm. aruna iyengar has the details. celebrating new freedoms. tennis fans toasting the chance to watch the tennis greats at new night sessions at roland—garros. 5,000 fans were allowed in to court philippe—chatrier for the quarterfinal. an electric atmosphere as top—ranked djokovic was ahead in the first set. but the cheers turned to jeers as the quarterfinal was stopped at a critical point in the fourth set, officials stopped play at 11pm in line with the new coronavirus cu rfew. are we going to go out or stay? unhappy fans were forced to leave the court. a cathedral—like silence
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for the rest of the match. the world number one perhaps making up for the lack of noise from the crowd by making some of his own. yes! novak djokovic will now face 13—time champion rafael nadal for a place in the final but questions remain about whether the quarterfinal could have started earlier. aruna iyengar, bbc news. now let's get more on the tennis, and the rest of the sport. hello i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news where we start with tennis and rafael nadal�*s bid for a record extending 14th french open title has moved a step closer. the third seeded spaniard beat argentina's diego schwarzmann over four sets at roland garros and will now face world number one and top seed novak djokovic for a place in the final. may have been in a tricky situation, for him in the first
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set and then was the moment to call myself, to think about the things that i was doing well and just to try to make it happen. in the women's draw defending champion iga swiatek of poland was beaten in straight sets by greece's maria sakkari. the 17th seed was a 6—4, 6—4 winner and it means greece will have two players in the semi—finals this year after stefanos tsitsipas made it to the last four in the men's draw. i'm enjoying, as i said on court, make tennis and myself and, you know, i have people around me telling me that it was gonna come and they were right. may be i was the one who was telling them and i was the impatient one telling them when and where and when, so it actually came this week so i am happy about it. the 25—year—old will now play the czech republic's barbora strycov who won out
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against coco gauff while anastasia pavlyuchenkova goes up against tamara zidansek in the other last four tie. for the first time in the open era, the french open semi—finals will feature four women who have never previously got this far at the slams. a bruno fernandes double helped portugal to a 4—0 win over israel in theirfinal warm up game ahead of their european championship defence. cristiano ronaldo and joao cancelo scored the other two with their first match of the delayed euro 2020 against hungary in budapest next tuesday. new zealand captain kane williamson will rest an elbow injury for the second test against england getting underway in the coming hours, sitting out the game in order to be fit for the world test championship final next week. it's been mainly off the field problems that england have had to deal with this week, with 0llie robinson suspended and a number of players investigated for historical offensive tweets. we have right now very much committed to moving the game
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forward and to making it more inclusive and to educate ourselves further, and we are going to have to front up to what has happened and accepted but ultimately we want to move forward in a really positive way and keep going on this journey that we have started of trying to better our sport and we will continue to do that. in the nba, brooklyn nets will be without james harden for game 3 of their eastern conference semi—final series with the milwaukee bucks later on thursday. the nine time all star played just 43 seconds of the second game before leaving with a hamstring injury, the nets lead the best of seven series 2—0. you can get all the latest sports news at our website, that's bbc.com/sport. but from me tulsen tollett and the rest of the team that's your sports news for now. stargazers in some parts of the world will be treated to a solar eclipse today. the full spectacle will be visible from northern canada, greenland and some
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parts of russia. and weather permitting, a partial eclipse will be seen in northern asia, europe and the united states. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle has more. it is one of nature's most dazzling sights — the moon casting its shadow across the sun. the northernmost parts of the world will be treated to the best view, where the total eclipse will begin in canada, travelling across a narrow band of the earth before ending in siberia. and it is a special solar event known as an annular eclipse. an annular eclipse happens when the moon is a little bit further away from the earth, so it looks smaller in the sky. and what you'll be able to see is a sort of ring around the moon, and that is why the annular solar eclipses are sometimes known as the 'ring of fire'. they're incredibly beautiful eclipses to spot as well. so, how can you safely watch the eclipse? well, you should never look at the sun directly or through sunglasses, because you can seriously damage your eyes.
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use two pieces of card, one with a hole in it, to make a projection of the sun. or if you can get a pair of certified eclipse viewers, you can use these to watch the spectacle instead. across other parts of the globe, the united states, northern europe and northern asia, a partial eclipse will be visible. scientists are urging people to take a look. i think it gives us an opportunity to connect with the sun. normally, the sign is so dazzlingly bright we kind of do not pay much attention to it, but during an eclipse of one form or another, we are able to remind ourselves, if we look safely and with special filters and projection techniques, we can look at the sun and see the moon gliding in front of it and remind ourselves this sort of clockwork solar system that we live in. eclipse watches everywhere will be hoping for good weather. if not, there will be another annular eclipse at the end of the year, one that will sweep across antarctica. rebecca morelle, bbc news.
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0n the east coast of the united states, the car to have been flying off the trees. and a chocolate shop just a few miles from washington, dc they are also flying off the shelves. if you are prone to getting a little bit queasy you might want to look away now, but in maryland they are dipping these insect into chocolate to turn them into crunchy treats. the owner says they now have a five—day backlog, apparently, of orders for chocolate dipped cicadas. customers appear to love the delicacy. i'm a chocoholic and i'm sorry, i don't think i can go there. but that's only me, i'm a little bit rubbish when it comes to things like that. let's look at what is coming next, we got all the top business stories, we are going to look at that g7 summit that kicks off officially on friday but as we can see online, and north
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american editorjohn sobel has written about today's meeting, the us open uk special relationship, how it goes under biden and johnson. i will be backin biden and johnson. i will be back in a moment. hello. two main points to take from our forecast for the next five days. number one, there is very little rain on the way for the uk as a whole, and number two — temperatures will be sitting above average for the majority of us in the days ahead. the reason for this weather, this ridge of high pressure which extends up from the azores. we will see various weather fronts trying to push their way in to the north—west. there'll be some rain for the northern isles on thursday. more cloud around in general and some patchy, light rain possible around western coasts and hills, often quite mucky and murky here with mist and fog as well. best of the sunshine on thursday will be for central and eastern england. quite windy to the north. that could break the cloud up quite nicely across eastern scotland, seeing temperatures up to 23 around the moray firth. further south, 24—25 across central and eastern england. 0vernight thursday into friday,
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we do start to see a weather front having a bit more success working its way south across the uk, but not bearing anything significant in the way of rain. it basicallyjust introduces some slightly lower humidity here, so slightly less muggy across the northern half of the uk first thing on friday. to the south, still a warm and humid start, and a cold weather front works its way south through the day, but you can barely make it out. it's essentially a few showers drifting their way south across england and wales. the odd one may be sharper, but certainly, the majority of places will stay dry. ahead of the front, still looking at temperatures in the mid—20s, a little down on thursday thanks to more cloud. to the north, it will feel fresher, but temperatures still into the high teens, even the low 20s. and then, through the weekend, the high pressure plumbs us into a more southerly airstream once again. it keeps things fine and it also bumps those temperatures back up after that brief dip behind the cold front on friday. there's what's left of the cold front heading off into the continent. here is saturday.
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aside from a bit of cloud across western scotland and perhaps northern ireland, wall—to—wall sunshine and temperatures above average across the uk. for sunday, just the chance of a little more in the way of rain getting pushed in on the front to western scotland. elsewhere, though, again, a lot of dry weather. sunday, if anything, the warmest of the two days. eastern scotland up to 24, perhaps close to 30 in the south—east.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. trading threats — post—brexit tensions threaten to overshadow the g7 summit, as the eu warns its patience is "wearing very thin" with the uk. price pressure — as the cost of living surges, inflation poses a growing dilemma for policymakers. the dilemma for policymakers. way our economy works is the way our economy works today is very much like a drug addict, so if we take the drug away, it's going to be a bad withdrawal. turning back the clock on tiktok — biden revokes trump's us ban on the chinese owned app. plus, fuming! the legal battle dividing europe over diesel emissions.

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