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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 9, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm — the us presidentjoe biden has just [ended in the uk, making just [ended in the uk, his making just landed in the uk, his first overseas trip since his making his first overseas trip since his inauguration injanuary. i am paul adams live at raf mildenhall. the president arrived just half an hour ago at the start of a busy week of global diplomacy. the european union warns its relationship with the uk is at a crossroads over the implementation of post—brexit trade rules in northern ireland. the cornish village that's used to welcoming tourists — now it's host to the world's top leaders, and thousands of police officers. the high court rules the government acted unlawfully, when michael gove awarded a covid contract, worth half a million pounds, to a firm run by friends
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of dominic cummings. the latest official figures show eight out of ten people have covid antibodies — so what does that mean for a final lifting of restrictions? a row between the sussexes and a buckingham palace source over the naming of their new baby daughter — now a warning from harry and meghan�*s lawyers. welcome if you have just welcome if you havejustjoined us. in the past few minutes, the us presidentjoe biden has arrived in the uk, ahead of a major summit of world leaders taking place in cornwall this weekend. joined by first ladyjill biden, this was the scene as air force one arrived at
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raf mildenhall in suffolk, whether bitins i met —— i due to meet and greet —— where the bidens. the bidens are due to meet and greet us troops and families there, before making some remarks to the troops. president biden will then head on to cornwall, where the g7 summit will be held later this week. us presidentjoe biden departed washington early wednesday, for his first foreign trip since taking office. the president arrived half an hour ago. he is in a hangar on the base talking to us troops. my understanding is that the white house was very keen that there should be a visit to us troops somewhere in the course of this very busy week long trip of his and it seemed logistically sensible to do it right here, so that is going on now. he is not going to be here for very long at all and pretty soon we will see air force one taking off again for the very short flight down to newquay, where the real business of this week gets under way. find
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of this week gets under way. and what is his _ of this week gets under way. and what is his schedule looking like over the coming days, because presumably before the formalities of the g7 opening, there will be lots of behind—the—scenes contacts, behind—the—scenes meetings, one issue of which could of course be northern ireland?— issue of which could of course be northern ireland? yes, that is going to come up — northern ireland? yes, that is going to come up tomorrow, _ northern ireland? yes, that is going to come up tomorrow, because - northern ireland? yes, that is going to come up tomorrow, because i - northern ireland? yes, that is going i to come up tomorrow, because i think the first bilateral meetings between joe biden and borisjohnson, and it comes in the middle of this unresolved row about the northern ireland protocol. us officials, including jake sullivan, the national security adviser, saying to the bbc thatjoe biden is absolutely determined that nothing should be done to disturb the peace in northern ireland, a piece which the united states and joe biden feels personally invested in. so oversea thatis personally invested in. so oversea that is a bit of a wrinkle, but downing street would have preferred not to have had it on the agenda this week, but it is there, and will be part of the discussion, when the two men get together tomorrow.
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beyond that of course, we go into the wider g7 business, and a very, very ambitious agenda. some would argue almost too ambitious, starting off of course with the global pandemic and efforts to make sure that vaccines are available to as many people around the world as possible. joe biden, before he got on air force one for his trip, said he was going to unveil an ambitious plan to tackle vaccine inequality. we will see the details of that in the coming days. then of course there is the ceremonial, a visit with the queen, and then on to europe for a meeting of nato leaders, and then the big one, right at the end, the most challenging perhaps of all his meetings this coming week, when he sits down... i'm sorry, we've lost the signal to paul adams, so we will try and get it back as soon as we can. sometimes these things happen with satellite
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feeds. the interesting thing about raf mildenhall is at one point the americans were going to pull out altogether. they only decided last year, afterfive altogether. they only decided last year, after five years of uncertainty, that they would in fact keep their presence at raf mildenhall in suffolk. worth remembering that it is an raf base, it is a british air force base, not a us airforce base. most of it is a british air force base, not a us air force base. most of those bases over time have disappeared, as the american military commitment in europe has reduced over the last decade or so, but this base remains principally a place where british air force supply support to the refuelling wing, the only refuelling place that the us has in the european theatre. from the pictures, that we are going to see, we are hoping to hearfrom that we are going to see, we are hoping to hear from the that we are going to see, we are hoping to hearfrom the president in just a few moments time, that of course the military is going to be the important part of the topic when he goes on to brussels, after the g7 summit, for a nato summit. the eu
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the eu has doubled down on its threat to take action against the uk, after talks about the implementation of post—brexit trading arrangements in northern ireland ended without a breakthrough today. something joe biden will be talking about with borisjohnson tomorrow in face—to—face talks. at the heart of the row is the brexit agreement�*s northern ireland protocol, which allows for border checks on goods going into the province from the rest of the uk. ministers want an end to those checks, arguing they are leading to food shortages. our deputy political editor vicki young reports. a short, powerful slogan, but getting brexit done is not as easy as it sounds. after years of painstaking negotiations, we left the eu with a deal. now the whole thing could be unravelling over those new rules on trade in northern ireland. the eu's chief negotiator was back in london for more talks with the uk's brexit minister, and it didn't go well. we are at a crossroads in our relationship with the uk. the eu will not be shy in reacting swiftly,
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firmly and resolutely to ensure that the uk abides by the international law obligations. there were not any breakthroughs, there are not any breakdowns either, and we will carry on talking. what we really now need to do is very urgently find some solutions. the most severe brexit disruption is being felt in northern ireland, which still follows eu rules. england, scotland and wales don't, so the way goods move within the uk has changed. for example, the eu does not accept chilled meats from other countries, so british sausages will not be allowed in belfast supermarkets from the end of this month. certain things, like milk, eggs, medicine and parcels need to be monitored when they arrive in northern ireland from great britain to make sure they meet eu standards. that is because northern ireland shares an open land border with an eu member, ireland, and the eu does not want unchecked products finding their way into its single market area.
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this row has been brewing since the uk decided, without agreement, to delay some of these checks. you have already launched legal action, how soon would you consider starting the next step? i was coming here with hope for a breakthrough. of course now we have to consider our future steps. it is not too late, that is correct. let's focus on what unites us. there were plenty of people warning borisjohnson at the time that the deal he was signing up to would mean exactly this, more checks and restrictions on goods crossing the irish border. but ministers now sound irritated and surprised that the eu expects the uk to stick to the rules that it agreed to. if that does not happen, there will notjust be legal action, the eu could retaliate with taxes on british exports. borisjohnson is in cornwall, preparing for the g7 summit of world leaders.
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he says the brexit deal is about the careful balance of relationships. what we want to do is make sure |that we can have a solution that| guarantees the peace process, i and protects the peace process, but also guarantees the economic and territorial integrity _ of the whole united kingdom. the prime minister faces some uncomfortable chats beside the sea, as the practical realities of brexit become clearer. the small seaside village of carbis bay has never seen anything like it. as global leaders and their teams of diplomats fly into cornwall, thousands of police officers have been drafted in to ensure security. what's the reaction from residents? jon kay has been talking to them. cornwall — you know, that laid—back corner of the country where nothing much happens? st ives doesn't have a police
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station, but there are now 6,000 officers here from across the uk. they look like they are well prepared, and we are putting our lives in their hands. from tomorrow, there will be less of a holiday vibe here. the two hotels, where global leaders will discuss things like the pandemic and the environment, are sealed off. some consider it a waste of money when we have got children going hungry. charles now looks out on a ring of steel. unbelievable, unbelievable. i mean, this is a quiet, residential area. we have a school at the top, you know. a little bit unusual. what do you make of all this? well, it'sjust going to be so different, isn't it? - we are moving away for the weekend. cornwall�*s airborne predators now have some serious competition.
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there is a radar unit in the national trust car park. and the fishing boats have company. they told me i could not go inside a certain area. when this fisherman tried to reach his lobster pots this morning, he was turned back by a warship. were you not given a warning about this? not at all, no warning, nothing. we presumed the navy would be coming for a bit of protection and i understand they need to do that, but they should have given us a heads up. but some are benefiting. these sisters are providing hampers of cornish products for the vips. for us, the prospect of one of our items ending up- in the white house, we cannot quite get our heads around it. _ we are only a small shop in st ives, l so this is kind of the biggest thing i that could happen for us. spencerjust wants to know how he will get his car out. he has turned up from scotland on holiday, expecting a sea view, not a summit. we didn't know until we arrived. you did not know it was happening? no. what do you make of it?
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some do worry about covid, and protests. but next door to the summit, there is pride, that cornwall�*s big moment is here. jon kay, bbc news, capiz bay. jon kay, bbc news, carbis bay. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight are lizzy burden, economics reporter for bloomberg and faiza shaheen, political commentator and nonresident fellow, new york university. the headlines on bbc news... it is just approaching 13 minutes past eight. the us presidentjoe biden arrived in the uk in the last hour on the eve of the g7 summit, his first overseas trip since he was inaugurated as president injanuary. the european union has warned its
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relationship with the uk is at a crossroads over the implementation of the post—brexit trade rules for northern ireland. the cornish village that is used to welcoming tourists. now it is host to the world's top leaders, and also thousands of police officers. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's tulsen. round—up from the bbc good evening. round—up from the bbc rafa nadal�*s quest for a record—extending 14th title at the french open is still on track. the undisputed king of clay is through to another semi—final at roland garros, but it's far more open in the women's draw. all four semi—finalists will make their first appearance in the last four at a grand slam, including greece's maria sakkari, who beat defending champion iga swiatek. adam wild watched the action. with restrictions on easing in paris, there comes the tightening of the pressure. all fans now allowed in roland garros, but this is a crucial moment for that stage to
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shift. the player's reaction? first up, coco gauff, the youngest grand final —— quarterfinalist. she has never gone this far before. —— grand slam quarterfinalist. pressure enough. but racing into a three game lead showed just why so much as expected. but that can weigh heavy. narrowly losing the first set on a tie—break, her game collapsed. a stark reminder of how much remains in the mind. her opponent would not wait for her to regain her composure. she goes through to the semifinals for the first time. coco gauff gone, at least for now. to be honest, it gauff gone, at least for now. to be honest. it is _ gauff gone, at least for now. to be honest, it is in _ gauff gone, at least for now. to be honest, it is in the _ gauff gone, at least for now. to be honest, it is in the past, _ gauff gone, at least for now. to be honest, it is in the past, it- gauff gone, at least for now. to be honest, it is in the past, it would i honest, it is in the past, it would happen, and after the match my hitting partner told me that this match will probably make me a champion in the future, so i really do believe that. find champion in the future, so i really do believe that.— do believe that. and from one for the future — do believe that. and from one for the future to _ do believe that. and from one for the future to one _ do believe that. and from one for the future to one trying _ do believe that. and from one for the future to one trying to - do believe that. and from one for. the future to one trying to recreate her recent past. iga swiatek, only just out of teenage years herself, but carries with her an air of
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confidence born of this formidable run in paris. to repeat the feet, she would need to get past maria sakkari, and that today rarely looked likely. perfectly powerful and precise, a combination eager swiatek could not match. the defending champion out, her opponent like many in the scarcely able to believe it. �* like many in the scarcely able to believe it— like many in the scarcely able to believe it. �* , , . ,, ~ ., believe it. i'm speechless. a dream cominu believe it. i'm speechless. a dream coming true- _ believe it. i'm speechless. a dream coming true. you _ believe it. i'm speechless. a dream coming true. you know _ believe it. i'm speechless. a dream coming true. you know how- believe it. i'm speechless. a dream| coming true. you know how it feels. don't _ coming true. you know how it feels. don't know. — coming true. you know how it feels. don't know, it is a very nice feeling _ don't know, it is a very nice feeling i_ don't know, it is a very nice feeling. i couldn't have done it without — feeling. i couldn't have done it without my team and their support. still. _ without my team and their support. still, nothing stirs the crowd in paris quite like perhaps the finest player anyone there has ever seen. rafa nadal, 13 times a winner come up rafa nadal, 13 times a winner come up against diego schwartzman, this was a true contest, taking a set each before nadal finally was a true contest, taking a set each before nadalfinally took control. nadalwinning, roared on each before nadalfinally took control. nadal winning, roared on by thousands of fans in the sunshine. this, finally, beginning to feel like a french open should. adam
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wilde, bbc news. snow nadal chasing that record 14th grand slam title will face the winner of the last of the men's quarterfinals. world number one and topsy novak djokovic playing italy's matteo berrettini. he has won the opening set 6—3 and is currently 3—2 up in the second. european football's governing body uefa has announced it's suspended legal proceedings against real madrid, barcelona and juventus, the three clubs involved in the european super league, that didn't pull out of the failed project. it means they'll not face sanctions, until further notice. meanwhile, the six english clubs involved have been fined a total of £22 million, and threatened with further financial and sporting penalties by the premier league. it's understood the money will go to grassroots and community projects. arsenal, totttenham, liverpool and manchester united have already said their owners will be covering the costs. new zealand captain kane williamson will miss the second test against england, which starts tomorrow at edgbaston, as he's resting his injured elbow.
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england have been practising today, amid controversy over a number of offensive social media posts made in the past by members of the squad. tweets by eoin morgan, james anderson and jos buttler have been highlighted. the ecb have said they're looking at each case individually, after suspending bowler ollie robinson on sunday. we have right now very much committed to moving the game forward and making ita committed to moving the game forward and making it a better place, making it more inclusive, and educating ourselves further, and we will have to front up to what happened. i accept it, but ultimately we want to move forward in a really positive way, and keep going on thisjourney that we started, of trying to better our sport. and we will continue to do that. two—time olympic gold medallist helen glover has been named in the team gb rowing squad for tokyo 2020. she won back—to—back gold medals in london and rio, but then took four years away from the sport. she's since had a boy, and a set of twins, and decided
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to make her comeback last year. she's been named in the team gb pair, alongside olympic silver medallist polly swann. 37 of the 45—strong british team will make their debut at the games. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. thank you very much. the latest official figures on the pandemic show that, in the past 2a hours, six deaths were reported, and there have been 7,540 new infections, which means an average of 5,984 new cases per day in the last week. nearly 137,000 people received a first dose of the vaccine in the latest 24—hour period, meaning more than 40.7 million people have now had theirfirstjab — that's over 77% of uk adults. the number of people who've had their second dose of the vaccine in the latest 24—hour period, is over 313,000. more than 28.5 million have had both doses, meaning over 54% of uk adults are fully vaccinated.
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new official figures show that eight in ten adults in the uk now have antibodies for the coronavirus, meaning they have some level of immunity to the virus. but experts are still concerned, pointing to rising case numbers, especially in northwest england, with the delta variant that was first identified in india. our health correspondent, dominic hughes reports from manchester. this is what we are likely to see in hotspot areas of greater manchester and lancashire in the coming weeks. in bolton, a big push on testing and also vaccinations has succeeded in cutting the infection rate by around a quarter injust ten days. the plan is to replicate that success across the region. here in stockport, in the south of greater manchester, the infection rate has grown by 150% in a week. that has meant some schoolchildren have been sent home and some businesses have had to close, as staff have to isolate. but the really serious impact
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will be if those infections translate into hospitalisations, if people fall ill and they end up in hospital. so far, health leaders in greater manchester say the vaccines are keeping the most vulnerable out of hospital. it is now predominantly younger people who have not had access to vaccines, they are not getting seriously ill, and they are not in general ending up in intensive care. because it is generally un—vaccinated, younger people falling ill with the virus, there have been calls for surge vaccinations in areas seeing a spike in infections, but the supply of pfizer and moderna, which are approved for the younger population, is limited, so surging in one region may not be possible without causing shortages in another. the good news is that around eight in ten adults in the uk now have coronavirus antibodies through vaccination or past infection. the figure is 83% in wales and 80%
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in both england and northern ireland and 73% in scotland. there are still many unknowns, with fresh warnings the delta variant, now dominant in the uk, could be 60% more transmissible than the alpha or kent variant. we are not out of the woods yet. we really _ we are not out of the woods yet. we really need _ we are not out of the woods yet. we really need to prioritise getting more _ really need to prioritise getting more vaccines into more people, so that we _ more vaccines into more people, so that we can — more vaccines into more people, so that we can deal not only with this variant, _ that we can deal not only with this variant, hut— that we can deal not only with this variant, but with the risk of opening _ variant, but with the risk of opening up and continuing to move forward _ opening up and continuing to move forward and not take a step back. and all of this will play into the government's decision whether we open up onjune 21st. that will have a real impact on lives and livelihoods, for those like doug almond, who wants to see his chain of pubs in stockport running at full capacity. it is the first thing you think. about when you are waking up, are we going back to full strength or not? - it really is. if they have to put the decision back, we understand, - but we don't want the ambiguity of stopping and starting. - getting life back to normal while keeping us all safe, a decision in the balance. dominic hughes, bbc news, stockport.
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the high court has ruled that the government acted unlawfully at the start of the pandemic last year, when it awarded a market research contract to a firm run by former colleagues of dominic cummings, the prime minister's chief adviser at the time. the judge said that the government's failure to consider other companies would lead other observers to think that bias had played a part in the decision. ministers deny any favouritism. our special correspondent, lucy manning told us more. well, is this a case of contracts for mates, as labour claims, orjust as cabinet sources suggest, paperwork not being done during a covid crisis? what is clear is the high court has decided the government acted unlawfully when it gave this half £1 million contract to public first. it does marketing research. it was run by friends of dominic cummings, people who had also worked with michael gove. the
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cabinet office says michael gove wasn't involved in the decision, but his name was on the legal papers, and thejudge deciding his name was on the legal papers, and the judge deciding there was apparent bias, because they didn't consider other firms, and that is embarrassing for the government. the case brought by the campaign group, good law project. but dominic cummings has been tweeting about this today, and he seems to suggest that thisjudgment means this today, and he seems to suggest that this judgment means that he should been concentrating on paperwork, ratherthan should been concentrating on paperwork, rather than the covid crisis. public first says it's proud of its work that it did, and the cabinet office says there was no actual bias, and procedures have been tightened up. but a loss in court for the government today. the trial of the teenager accused of murdering two sisters in a london park has begun. 19—year—old danyal hussein is accused of stabbing nicole smallman and bibaa henry injune last year. the court heard how hussein had made a pact with the devil, promising to sacrifice" women in exchange for winning the lottery. he denies the murder charges. june kelly has more.
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last weekend, mina smallman and her family had to face the first anniversary of the deaths of her two daughters. today they came to the old bailey to see a teenager go on trial accused of killing them both. bibaa henry, on the left, died within hours of celebrating her 46th birthday outside in a park during lockdown. her younger sister, nicole smallman, who was 27, was murdered beside her. their bodies were discovered with their limbs intertwined at fryant country park in wembley in north london. in the dock is 19—year—old danyal hussein. he denies the double murder. prosecutor oliver glasgow qc told the jury he had made a written pact with the devil, signed in his own blood. it said he would perform a minimum
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of six sacrifices every six months. "sacrifice only women, build a temple for you to do everything that i have promised. "for me, win the mega millions superjackpot. the court heard that danyal hussein's dna was found on both women's bodies and on a bloodstained knife close by. bibaa henry had been stabbed eight times, nicole smallman had suffered 28 stab wounds, and it appeared she had tried to fight off the attacker. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. back to raf mildenhall in suffolk where in the next few minutes we are hoping to hear from where in the next few minutes we are hoping to hearfrom us presidentjoe biden who landed about an hour ago at the base. this is the principal sort of home of the american 100th air refuelling wing of the us air force, and that basically provides logistical support to obviously
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operation is conducted in european airspace, by doing what it says on the title, refuelling. we can hear a little bit of the sound, as they present arms. music: god save the queen. the national anthem of course, because it is a british air base. we hope to hearfrom president biden in the next 15 minutes. stay with us. now, there is a different version of events tonight between a buckingham palace source in the duke and duchess of sussex over the naming of their new daughter, lilibet. it comes after a palace source told the bbc that the queen was never asked by harry and meghan to use her childhood nickname, and in a latest
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development, the sussexes have issued a legal warning to reporters covering the story. our correspondent says there were two versions of events. bath correspondent says there were two versions of events.— versions of events. both of them centrin: versions of events. both of them centring around _ versions of events. both of them centring around this _ versions of events. both of them centring around this issue - versions of events. both of them centring around this issue of- versions of events. both of them centring around this issue of the| centring around this issue of the naming of the newborn lilibet. that is a nickname given to the queen by her grandfather george v, used rarely by her closest relative so it is a very personal name. after harry and meghan made the announcement they were going to call their little girl lilibet, stories started to be published, sourced prince harry's friends, that the couple had been given permission to use the name by the queen. a palace source said no, she didn't, she was never asked. harry said he had raised the issue of lilibet and the queen had not been supportive, the couple would not have used the name. meanwhile, as you say, harry and megan's lawyers have written to various different national news outlets,
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saying that what the palace source told the bbc was defamatory and false, and that those outlets should not repeat the allegations at all. jonny dymond, our royal correspondent. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. good evening. it's been very warm again in the sunshine, but it hasn't been sunny for all. we've got weather fronts out to the west, the odd sharp shower to come in the southern and western areas this evening. patchy rain and drizzle elsewhere, and this cloud will continue to migrate its way eastwards. so, misty, low cloud and hill and coastal fog around. but what that will do is prevent the temperatures from falling much overnight. it'll be warm and muggy by the time we get towards tomorrow morning. and, by that stage, there'll be more cloud, generally speaking. it'll tend to break up quite readily across the bulk of england, parts of wales, northern and eastern scotland, more so into the afternoon across northern ireland that we've seen today. than we've seen today. but ever present in the northwest, quite a brisk wind and and
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with an increasingly active weather front. but with some sunshine again and that breeze coming again from the south or southwest, it'll be another very warm day — warmer than today for some areas in the north and west, particularly where we've had the persistent cloud. a little bit fresher with more cloud on friday, but temperatures will start to rise again over the weekend.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the us presidentjoe biden has just landed in the uk, making his first overseas trip since his inauguration injanuary. this is the scene in suffolk where the president has been welcomed by officers representing the us air force's 100 officers representing the us air force's100 air refuelling wing which is based at the base. the cornish village which is youth to welcome tourists is now hosted a
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world leaders and thousands of police officers. the high court rules that the government acted unlawfully with michael gove the cabinet minister awarded a contract to fence run by this man, dominic cummings. the latest official figures show eight out of ten people have covid antibodies, so what does that mean for a final lifting of restrictions? and a row between the suffixes and buckingham palace source over the naming of the new baby daughter, now a warning from harry and meghan�*s lawyers. the prime minister is in cornwall he's been speaking to the media from newquay about the g7 meeting he addressed a number of issues with concerns but the northern ireland protocol to the summit itself but he began by discussing coronavirus and the next stage of easing restrictions in england which is
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scheduled forjune the 21st. boris johnson said he recognised the number of infections were rising in some cases hospital admissions as well and they are going up and that he would look again at the situation in england this monday. the reason we do, we have been doing the steps on the road map with five week intervals is really to give us time to look at all of the data as it comes in, and to assess the state of the pandemic. before we go forward to the next step. so on monday, that four—week period will be up and will have a look at where we are. i think what everybody can see very clearly is that cases are going up and in some places hospitalisations are going up, and i think what we need to assess is the extent to which the vaccine roll—out, which has been phenomenal, has built up enough protection in the population. in order for us to go ahead to the next stage. nhs providers think that it's... and so that's what we will be looking at. and there are arguments
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being made one way or another, but we will be driven by the data. we will be looking at that and as i said we will be sending it out on monday. how worried are you that the g7 could be overshadowed by a trade work with the european union? i'm not worried about that, i think that this is an amazing opportunity for the world. it's a big moment. don't forget, this is the first time in six months in office, almost, thatjoe biden, the us president has been able to come overseas for a major trip. it's his first time on the european continent... if the first time any of us have really been able to see each other face—to—face since the pandemic began, and the pandemic, let's face it, was a pretty scratchy period for the world. it was a pretty miserable period. there are more issues than the pandemic, this could become a trade war. competition and squabbling over ppe and all sorts of things. so here at the g7,
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what we are looking at is making sure that we have a new treaty on pandemics, working to that, building back greener, building back better which is why we are looking at what is going on here in cornwall with all the green technology. but also talking about the values that we have in common, everything that we want to do together. it is a huge agenda. on the northern ireland protocol, you signed a deal saying that there would be checks going between gb and northern ireland, that's not happening, why are you not sticking to your side of the deal? on the northern ireland protocol let's be absolutely clear, the purpose is to hold the belfast good friday agreement. and to make sure that we keep the balance in relationships in northern ireland, and of course there's a north—south dimension to that with northern ireland and the republic of ireland, making sure that the trade flows freely they are, but there's also an east—west dimension. that's very, very clearly at the heart of what the belfast
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good friday agreement is trying to do. so what we want to do is make sure that we can have a solution that guarantees the peace process, and protects the peace process but also guarantees the economic and territorial integrity of the whole united kingdom. and that's what it's all about. jill biden�*s security adviser says you are impeding that very peace process. i think that what we want is something that enables us to protect trade flows, east—west as well as north—south, and that's easily doable. i'm very optimistic about this, i think that's easily doable, and the reason to do that is because that is the way to preserve the central balance of the belfast good friday agreement which has to look at things both north—south with the island of ireland, but also east—west and don't forget that the bulk of the trade from northern ireland goes east—west. locally a very big week for cornwall, you have announced
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some town steals today, but we knew about this in 2019. what is the real legacy, because it is not that for cornwall? let's go back to raf mildenhall in suffolk — where joe wherejoe biden where joe biden has just wherejoe biden hasjust arrived on the stage. it's actually mrsjill biden who speaks first. the stage. it's actually mrs jill biden who speaks first.- the stage. it's actually mrs jill biden who speaks first. what a warm welcome! and _ biden who speaks first. what a warm welcome! and thank _ biden who speaks first. what a warm welcome! and thank you _ biden who speaks first. what a warm welcome! and thank you and - biden who speaks first. what a warm j welcome! and thank you and melissa for all— welcome! and thank you and melissa for all you _ welcome! and thank you and melissa for all you have done to lead and serve _ for all you have done to lead and serve at — for all you have done to lead and serve at this base. and congratulations on your new post at the us— congratulations on your new post at the us transportation command. it is wonderful— the us transportation command. it is wonderful to be here at militant. and for— wonderful to be here at militant. and for all— wonderful to be here at militant. and for all the little kids here, i hope _ and for all the little kids here, i hope you — and for all the little kids here, i hope you enjoyed your movie, did you? _ hope you enjoyed your movie, did you? we — hope you enjoyed your movie, did you? we are so grateful to disney and pixar— you? we are so grateful to disney and pixar who helped us find a way
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to celebrate youth through this movie — to celebrate youth through this movie. and joe and i are always excited — movie. and joe and i are always excited to— movie. and joe and i are always excited to visit with our troops and their— excited to visit with our troops and their families. you can sit down. i don't _ their families. you can sit down. i don't want — their families. you can sit down. i don't want you to stand for... laughter_ don't want you to stand for... laughter. | don't want you to stand for... laughter-— don't want you to stand for... | laughter-_joe. don't want you to stand for... - laughter-_joe. pay laughter. i love you jill! joe, pay attention. laughter _ laughter. i love you jill! joe, pay attention. laughter. _ laughter. i love you jill! joe, pay attention. laughter. as - laughter. i love you jill! joe, pay attention. laughter. as a - laughter. i love you jill! joe, pay i attention. laughter. as a daughter of a navy signalman _ attention. laughter. as a daughter of a navy signalman in _ attention. laughter. as a daughter of a navy signalman in world - attention. laughter. as a daughter of a navy signalman in world war ii, and a— of a navy signalman in world war ii, and a mother of a major who was in the delaware army national guard, and served a year in a rack, and now as your— and served a year in a rack, and now as your first — and served a year in a rack, and now as your first lady i am so proud to be here _ as your first lady i am so proud to be here with _ as your first lady i am so proud to be here with all of you to begin our first overseas trip. from those of you have — first overseas trip. from those of you have served more than 20 years
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to the _ you have served more than 20 years to the youngest military kids that i see in_ to the youngest military kids that i see in the — to the youngest military kids that i see in the crowd, you are our ambassadors to the world. and thank you for— ambassadors to the world. and thank you for representing us with dignity and pride — you for representing us with dignity and pride. our military families may not wear— and pride. our military families may not wear a _ and pride. our military families may not wear a uniform, but you are as crucial— not wear a uniform, but you are as crucial to— not wear a uniform, but you are as crucial to our— not wear a uniform, but you are as crucial to our military as radar is to a _ crucial to our military as radar is to a fighter— crucial to our military as radar is to a fighterjet. in the united states. — to a fighterjet. in the united states, we have an all volunteer force. _ states, we have an all volunteer force. and — states, we have an all volunteer force, and it continues only because generations — force, and it continues only because generations of americans see the honour, _ generations of americans see the honour, dignity and patriotism of military— honour, dignity and patriotism of military service. when you serve your— military service. when you serve your families serve as well. that's why supporting the physical, social and emotional health of our military families— and emotional health of our military families is— and emotional health of our military families is a national security imperative. and the leadership here
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at building _ imperative. and the leadership here at building hall understands this as well. at building hall understands this as welt in _ at building hall understands this as well. in preparation for our visit, the colonel— well. in preparation for our visit, the colonel wrote this about you and i the colonel wrote this about you and i quotem _ the colonel wrote this about you and i quote... you may be familiar with the term _ i quote... you may be familiar with the term military dependents, but i will tell— the term military dependents, but i will tell you over the past 15 months _ will tell you over the past 15 months it became abundantly clear 'ust months it became abundantly clear just who _ months it became abundantly clear just who exactly was depending on whom _ just who exactly was depending on whom 0ur— just who exactly was depending on whom. our military families already first in— whom. our military families already first in sacrifice are the true unsung _ first in sacrifice are the true unsung heroes. and quote. applause. and the colonel— unsung heroes. and quote. applause. and the colonel is _ unsung heroes. and quote. applause. and the colonel is right. _ unsung heroes. and quote. applause. and the colonel is right. you _ unsung heroes. and quote. applause. and the colonel is right. you are - and the colonel is right. you are heroes — and the colonel is right. you are heroes and _ and the colonel is right. you are heroes. and your commander—in—chief and i heroes. and your commander—in—chief
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and i believe _ heroes. and your commander—in—chief and i believe that as well. and that's— and i believe that as well. and that's why— and i believe that as well. and that's why supporting you is so personal— that's why supporting you is so personal to us. and one of my top priorities — personal to us. and one of my top priorities. through our white house initiative _ priorities. through our white house initiative to — priorities. through our white house initiative to support military families— initiative to support military families called joining forces, we are going — families called joining forces, we are going to work on military spouse employment and entrepreneurship, make _ employment and entrepreneurship, make sure — employment and entrepreneurship, make sure that you can get quality childcare _ make sure that you can get quality childcare when you need it, and provide — childcare when you need it, and provide the education that your children— provide the education that your children deserve.— finally, no one has more strength and grit _ finally, no one has more strength and grit and resilience than our military— and grit and resilience than our military families, but you can't do this alone — military families, but you can't do this alone. we have to help you carry— this alone. we have to help you carry this — this alone. we have to help you carry this weight by improving access— carry this weight by improving access to _ carry this weight by improving access to mental health resources
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ensuring _ access to mental health resources ensuring everyone can put food on the table — ensuring everyone can put food on the table and supporting caregiving families— the table and supporting caregiving families and survivors. joining forces — families and survivors. joining forces will— families and survivors. joining forces will expect every government agency— forces will expect every government agency to— forces will expect every government agency to step up and be a part of this effort — agency to step up and be a part of this effort. we are going to make sure that — this effort. we are going to make sure that the families of our service _ sure that the families of our service members and veterans, caregivers — service members and veterans, caregivers and survivors have what they need — caregivers and survivors have what they need to survive. to thrive. our military— they need to survive. to thrive. our military is— they need to survive. to thrive. our military is a — they need to survive. to thrive. our military is a community bound together— military is a community bound together by love. love for our country. — together by love. love for our country, love for the men and women who serve _ country, love for the men and women who serve beside you, your husbands and wives, _ who serve beside you, your husbands and wives, your mums and dads, and love for— and wives, your mums and dads, and love for the _ and wives, your mums and dads, and love for the communities that you built together. and it's our obligation to match that devotion. may god _ obligation to match that devotion. may god bless all of you, our
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troops, — may god bless all of you, our troops, and their families. and now, i'm troops, and their families. and now, i'm excited _ troops, and their families. and now, i'm excited to welcome our next speaker, — i'm excited to welcome our next speaker, someone who is so familiar with what— speaker, someone who is so familiar with what it — speaker, someone who is so familiar with what it means to be a part of a military— with what it means to be a part of a military family, sydney.— with what it means to be a part of a military family, sydney. applause. so that is the _ military family, sydney. applause. so that is the president's _ military family, sydney. applause. so that is the president's wife, - military family, sydney. applause. so that is the president's wife, of i so that is the president's wife, of course she is a teacher by profession so she is used to addressing children and she actually especially hopes whenjoe biden was elected last november that she would be able to carry on in some form with her teaching career which she sustained throughout his time with as a senator and as vice president under barack obama, a lovely evening in many parts of the country today so they have a good night to be there in front of air force one. an opportunity for the president to address notjust troops at opportunity for the president to
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address not just troops at that opportunity for the president to address notjust troops at that base but troops based all around europe for the us. he is visiting the nato summit in brussels after the g7 summit in brussels after the g7 summit can summer in some ways. some ways. some nato members including the britishjudging by the reaction from some of the military figures, actually believe that it was rather kind of precipitous of the president to announce the pulling out of us troops from afghanistan which caused the other country public troops to pull out as well. because of fear that they would be vulnerable to attack otherwise. and as we have heard earlier today a terrible attack on the halo trust volunteers. and again this the kind of thing that people are now worried about there being more of as a result of president biden's decision. so the president might get a bit of pushback from nato allies, possibly even the secretary—general. and that it was a courtesy to tell the other
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allies in advance but there were not consulted. may be a bit of bad feeling over that. it is the british don't think this was the right judgement or lease the british military does not. so we have seen president biden there waiting for his queue after we hear from president biden there waiting for his queue after we hearfrom one president biden there waiting for his queue after we hear from one of the daughters of one of the serving us service personnel. let's move away from what we are hearing... oh we are now going to hear from presidentjoe biden who is about to address that after an introduction from sydney there, who was one of the daughters... applause. cheering back. cheering. hello mildenhall! colonel, thank ou cheering. hello mildenhall! colonel, thank you for— cheering. hello mildenhall! colonel, thank you for that _ cheering. hello mildenhall! colonel, thank you for that introduction - cheering. hello mildenhall! colonel, thank you for that introduction and i thank you for that introduction and your service leading this team is such a difficult time. we know that
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a whole family who serves, but also i want to thank melissa. i know your next assignment as transportation command starts soon and congratulations and thank you, thank you. and sydney, you are 14 years old, when i was 14 if you, please come at ease. i keep forgetting i'm president. when i was 14 years old i would have been, and i mean this sincerely, scared to death. to stand up sincerely, scared to death. to stand up in front of a microphone in front of a large crowd or a small crowd because when i was a child i used to stutter badly for real. i had great difficulty speaking in front of other people, and so i expect that when you are president you will remember me. you are really quite a polished young woman, thank you. and
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it's got to be hard to have your dad deployed in afghanistan and also how proud you are of him. and your mum, chief master sergeant, for being part of the leadership team here. ourson part of the leadership team here. our son served as a us attorney for a while in kosovo for a while commit matterfact a while in kosovo for a while commit matter fact they erected a war monument to him. and he went on and joined the national guard, give up hisjob as attorney joined the national guard, give up his job as attorney general of delaware at so he could go with his unit two erect for a year. he got promoted to major and i said, beau, you are in no field grade officer. i was in and out about 20 at times to me i said no you are a field grade officer. he said dad, i have no illusions, i know who runs the military. chief master sergeant. so ijust military. chief master sergeant. so i just want you to know, military. chief master sergeant. so ijust want you to know, we know. applause.
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ijust want you to know, we know. applause-— applause. thank you for the incredible _ applause. thank you for the incredible dedication - applause. thank you for the incredible dedication and - applause. thank you for the - incredible dedication and service, and i want to thank you all and all yourfamilies for the and i want to thank you all and all your families for the sacrifices they have made and congratulations to just a wonderful child. it was awful lot of history at the space. a proud history for the british people. the brave bravery and heroism. i know everyone knows the history butjust six hours after britain and france declared war on germany in 1939, three wilmington bombers took off from mildenhall and bombed nazi battleships, and over the course of world war ii out of the space another 20,000 tonnes of bombs on nazi germany. this base has been significant source of british
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airpower, proud history of a proud nation. but i also know there's an awful lot of american air force pride in this room tonight. world war ii was when the us army air force formed the 100th bombardment group. and by the way, just so you know my uncle, who was killed in world war ii in new guinea was army, he was the army air corps, and got shot down and reconnaissance flight. he's thinking all these years looking down, my god, with this air force has become it is incredible. the 100th also ran more than 8000 sorties in hostile territory and supported operations from d—day to the battle of the bulge were another uncle of mine served. when they first arrived in the uk in 43 of the unit touched such heavy losses that earned the moniker that has been passed down this day, the blood
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eight 100th. passed down this day, the blood eight100th. ——. passed down this day, the blood eight 100th. --._ passed down this day, the blood eight 100th. --. applause. what about the eight 100th. “. applause. what about the special _ eight 100th. “. applause. what about the special operations - eight 100th. --. applause. what. about the special operations wing? there is team reconnaissance, members of the air mobility command, we have any folks here from the 48th fighter wing? we have any folks here from the 48th fighterwing? i we have any folks here from the 48th fighter wing? i think maybe! the 500 combat support wing from others. and this may be a historic first for an air force base by here just this may be a historic first for an air force base by herejust might this may be a historic first for an air force base by here just might be a few members of the united states army here tonight with us. to all of
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you soldiers i want to say thank you. we owe you. we are so damn proud of you. so you. we owe you. we are so damn proud of you-— proud of you. so proud. and i only wish my major— proud of you. so proud. and i only wish my major was _ proud of you. so proud. and i only wish my major was here _ proud of you. so proud. and i only wish my major was here to - proud of you. so proud. and i only wish my major was here to thank. proud of you. so proud. and i only. wish my major was here to thank as well. thank you for everything you are. there's nothing thatjill and i enjoy more than spending time with our troops and their families wherever we go in the world. i had a great honour of being in afghanistan and iraq well over 27, 28 times. i thinkjill is the only second lady in american history that is gone to into a war zone into baghdad with me as well. you are the best of our country, that's not hyperbole. you are the ones who sign up and run towards danger. when duty calls. less than 1% of americans make the choice that you make, that you made.
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at the rest of us, the other 99% of us, we owe you big. i have long said that as a nation we have many obligations but only one truly sacred obligation. on the one. and as to properly prepare and equip the met women and men we sent into harm's way and to care for you and yourfamilies harm's way and to care for you and your families both harm's way and to care for you and yourfamilies both while harm's way and to care for you and your families both while you are deployed and when you come home. and now that i have the incredible honour of serving as your commander—in—chief i believe that even more strongly. i want to give an extra special thank you to all the families. as you heard from jill we are proud military family when others notjust the person who wears the uniform, who serves but the whole family has to step up. while family makes sacrifices. famous irish poet this said they also serve
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and also stand and wait. i washed all those months but was in kosovo and all the years he was in, sir or the year he was in iraq. she was standing at the sink drinking her coffee i could see her lips sing that prayer hope you never got that phone call. and it's even more true this past year during the lockdowns with safety precautions, to curb the spread of number 119. everyone in this room knows our military families are essential, essential to our strength. as the key reasonjill relaunched joining forces to make sure we're doing everything we can to support our military spouses and childrenjust to support our military spouses and children just like they support all of you. not only did an amazing job keeping covid under control on the base, but you took care of each other and your mental health
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throughout the initiatives like your spouse to spouse connection and wellness advocacy team. cheering. applause. as you all know, this is a team sport. my mother would kill me if she were here, she said i should not turn my back here, i apologise. i have not figured out how to turn a 360. fulks, thousands of hours spent volunteering to make sure everyone got through this. it was so important, i know his last 15 months had a lot of new pressure from of all of the roast of the test together as one team. team mildenhall. and you never let up on your mission. i'm so proud to be
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here with all of you to kick off my first overseas trip as president. i've been in and out of here many times, i visited i've been in and out of here many times, ivisited it i've been in and out of here many times, i visited it well over 100 countries as president or the foreign relations committee or as vice president, this is my first overseas trip as president of the united states. i'm headed to the g7 and then nato and then to meet with vladimir putin to let him know what i want him to know.— i want him to know. cheering and applause — i want him to know. cheering and applause. and _ i want him to know. cheering and applause. and every _ i want him to know. cheering and applause. and every point - i want him to know. cheering and applause. and every point along l i want him to know. cheering and i applause. and every point along the wa we are applause. and every point along the way we are going _ applause. and every point along the way we are going to _ applause. and every point along the way we are going to make _ applause. and every point along the way we are going to make it - applause. and every point along the way we are going to make it clear - way we are going to make it clear that the united states is back anti—democracy is standing together to tackle the toughest challenges and the issues that matter most to our future. and the issues that matter most to ourfuture. that and the issues that matter most to our future. that we are committed to living with strength, defending our values and delivering for our
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people. america's better position to advance our national security under economic prosperity when we bring together like—minded nations to stand with us. these nations that have shed blood alongside of us in defence of our shared values from our unrivaled network of alliances and partnerships that are the key to american advantage in the world and have been. they have made the world safer for all of us, and they are how we are going to meet the challenges of today which are changing rapidly. we are going to meet it from a position of strength. our alliances were not billed by coercion or maintained by threats, they are grounded on democratic ideals and share visions of the future and where every voice matters. where the rights of all
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people are protected. the same reason so many of you signed up to serve them at your defend and honour the democratic values that are the wellspring of our national strength. if our british friends will excuse me quoting the declaration of independence... me quoting the declaration of independence. . ._ me quoting the declaration of - independence. . ._ america is independence... laughter. america is uniuue independence... laughter. america is uni . ue in independence... laughter. america is unique in all— independence... laughter. america is unique in all the — independence... laughter. america is unique in all the world _ independence... laughter. america is unique in all the world and _ independence... laughter. america is unique in all the world and that - independence... laughter. america is unique in all the world and that we - unique in all the world and that we are not foreign based on geography or ethnicity, or religion but on an idea. an idea, the omniscient in the world founded on the notion of an idea. we hold these truths to be self—evident that all men and women are created equal. endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights including life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. we mean it's commit no nation can defeat us.
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as long as we stick to our values. as long as we stick to our values. as our american creed that makes us who we are and draws friends and partners to our side. and for hundreds of years american patriots have fought and sometimes died defending those values. look, i'm often quoted by the press as saying america leads not by the example of its power, but by the power of our example. all of you, our service member stations around the world, you are the solid steel spine of america. around which alliances are built and strengthened, year after year. these partnerships have hardened and have been hardened in the fire of war and generations of americans and servicemembers have fought them. like the original 100
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and those raf pilots and their shared mission in world war ii flying, fighting, winning was done together. these bonds of history and shared sacrifice run deep and are strong. based on values. and they endure the connections and camaraderie between our troops. this community of american citizens stationed in the uk, us visiting forces and families, 20,000 strong are not only warriors, you are diplomats and you are bridge builders. you are the essential part of what makes up this special relationship between great britain and the united states. over the next few days i said i will be participating in meetings with many of our closest partners at the g7 in
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cornwall. and then onto brussels the nato summit of the eu and the eu summit, and this diplomacy is essential. because no signal nation acted alone my commit all the challenges we face today because the world is changing. another irish poet seeing the world has changed, changed utterly but terrible beauty has been born. we are in a different place than we were ten years ago. better position but a different place. we have to build a shared future we seek. the future of her nations are fee from coercion or dominance by more powerful states, where the global commons, the seas, the air argument where the global commons, the seas, the airargumentand where the global commons, the seas, the air argument and space remain open and accessible for the benefit of all. to tackle this most pressing challenges of this century we have to do it together. we have to and i for 119 notjust at home which we
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are doing but everywhere. there's no wall high enough to keep us safe from this pandemic or the next biological threat we face, and there will be others. it requires coordinated multilateral action. we was all commit to it an ambitious climate action if we are going to prevent the worst impact of climate change and limiting global warming to know more than 1.5 celsius. to make the global transition to clean energy technology. when i first was elected vice president with president obama, the military status down to let us know with the greatest threats facing america were. the greatest physical threats. this is not a joke. you know the joint chiefs told us the greatest threat facing america was? global warming. because there will be significant population movements, fights overland from millions of people leaving places because they
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are literally sinking below

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