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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 9, 2021 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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hello, i'm philippa thomas, this is outside source. in an hour plus my time, the us president will land in the uk for his first overseas trip since taking office. president biden is heading to the summit in cornwall with one key message— america's back, trying to reestablish global lever stomach leadership. i back, trying to reestablish global lever stomach leadership.- lever stomach leadership. i think we'll be showing _ lever stomach leadership. i think we'll be showing through - lever stomach leadership. i think we'll be showing through our- lever stomach leadership. i think i we'll be showing through our deeds that the united is capable. right now, today, of delivering bold and decisive action to help solve problems that afflict people everywhere around the world. the eu sa s it's everywhere around the world. the eu says it's patience _ everywhere around the world. the eu says it's patience is _ everywhere around the world. the eu says it's patience is wearing - everywhere around the world. the eu says it's patience is wearing thin - says it's patience is wearing thin with the uk in talks over avoiding a trade war over checks and northern
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ireland. . ,, trade war over checks and northern ireland. ., i. ., trade war over checks and northern ireland. . ,, ., , , trade war over checks and northern ireland. ., ., , , ., ireland. that you will not shy away from acting _ ireland. that you will not shy away from acting swiftly _ ireland. that you will not shy away from acting swiftly and _ ireland. that you will not shy away from acting swiftly and resolutelyl from acting swiftly and resolutely to ensure — from acting swiftly and resolutely to ensure that the uk abides by international law obligations —— the eu. international law obligations —— the eu el_ international law obligations -- the eu. ., ., international law obligations -- the eu. el salvador becomes the first count to eu. el salvador becomes the first country to make _ eu. el salvador becomes the first country to make bitcoin - eu. el salvador becomes the first country to make bitcoin legal- country to make bitcoin legal tender. hello. the leaders of the wealthiest seven nations are meeting today in cornwall. it is two years since the last summit, you can see the leaders there in france, and there's been quite a few leadership changes since then, including the significant change in the us administrations. presidentjoe biden is due to touch down in the uk in the next hour or so, and this it will be his first overseas trip since taking office. he set off today from andrews air force base in the us. the us media has been talking about one thing to deal with his departure, and it was
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this moment. see the president there swatting away a cicada, a huge brood of the insects has emerged from the ground across the eastern united states, as they do every 17 years. they are a largely harmless to humans but can be pretty disruptive. in fact, the plane carrying precedent, —— accompanying the president was delayed due to swarms of the insect. joe biden has flown to eastern england. we are watching the ground there, he will be meeting with us troops at milton hall and theirfamilies, then he will be flying in air force one to newquay. from there and helicopter, he'll fly to a trick in a castle where the g7 is being held. preparations going ahead and carve a spay and st ives, we can show you the security services they are prepping for the leaders to arrive. these are both small and seaside towns and popular with uk holiday—makers. usejon kay with uk holiday—makers. usejon kay with more on the preparations.
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cornwall, you know, that laid—back corner of the country where nothing much happens. st ives does not have a police station, but there are now 6,000 officers here from across the uk. they look like they are well—prepared and we're putting our lives in their hands. from tomorrow, there will be less of a holiday vibe here. the two hotels where global leaders will discuss things like the pandemic and the environment are sealed off. cornwall�*s airborne predators now have some serious competition. fishing boats now have company. oceans told i couldn't go inside a certain area. oceans told i couldn't go inside a certain area-— oceans told i couldn't go inside a certain area. when this fisherman tried to reach _ certain area. when this fisherman tried to reach as _ certain area. when this fisherman tried to reach as lobster— certain area. when this fisherman tried to reach as lobster pot - certain area. when this fisherman tried to reach as lobster pot this | tried to reach as lobster pot this morning, he was turned back by worship. were you not giving warning about this? h0
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worship. were you not giving warning about this? ., ., ., ., about this? no warning or nothing. we presumed _ about this? no warning or nothing. we presumed the _ about this? no warning or nothing. we presumed the navy _ about this? no warning or nothing. we presumed the navy would - about this? no warning or nothing. we presumed the navy would be . we presumed the navy would be coming. they really should have given us a heads up.— coming. they really should have given us a heads up. some worry about covid _ given us a heads up. some worry about covid and _ given us a heads up. some worry about covid and protests. - given us a heads up. some worry about covid and protests. but - given us a heads up. some worry i about covid and protests. but next door to the summit, there is pride that cornwall�*s big moment is here. what does that mean for boris johnson? our political editor laura kuenssberg is there in carcass pay. this is a big, serious diplomatic get together after an extraordinary yearfor get together after an extraordinary year for democracies across the world. it's a huge opportunity for borisjohnson who wants to be seen as the host with the most. any opportunity for him is particularly important in two areas for downing street. one, firstly, the opportunity to show that after the turbulence of the trump years, that the relationship between the united kingdom and the united states is reaffirmed as stronger than ever,
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and he hopes that even though he'll be meeting president biden in person for the very first time, that the two men will show when they meet tomorrow that they can get business done and the relationship between the two countries is strong and secure. but borisjohnson also wants to show that after these stresses and strains of the pandemic, that the world's big democracies working together can achieve more than they can do a part. now, this administration has been looking to distance itself from the previous one. in particular in the area of international diplomacy. as his national security adviser jake sullivan explained to my colleaguejon sopel. from our perspective, actions will speak a lot louder than words, just giving reassurances won't be enough. what will be enough is showing the world that the united states still has what it takes to rally the world's democracies to solve the
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great problems of our time. when we show up in cornwall, we will be there to help lead the g7 in ending there to help lead the g7 in ending the pandemic. we will be there with incredible domestic growth to help power a global economic recovery. we will be coming out of a climate leader summit that president biden hosts in handing off the baton to prime ministerjohnson for the glasgow climate summit later this year, with the us hoping to galvanise a global response to the coronavirus crisis. putting all that together, i think will be showing through our deeds that the unit six is capable, right now today, eventually delivering bold and decisive actions to help solve problems that affect people around the world. rob watsonjoins me. what do you think we could call realistic objectives? first what do you think we could call realistic objectives?— what do you think we could call realistic objectives? realistic ob'ectives? first of all, i must realistic objectives? first of all, i must say. _ realistic objectives? first of all, i must say. good _ realistic objectives? first of all, i must say, good to _ realistic objectives? first of all, i must say, good to be - realistic objectives? first of all, i must say, good to be with - realistic objectives? first of all, i must say, good to be with youj realistic objectives? first of all, - i must say, good to be with you and i'm very much looking forward to drawing the thong in cornwall, i'll
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try not to add to problems facing the local police force. i think mr biden's objective is pretty clear, to try and reassure the united states's western allies that the trump administration was some form of aberration, the united states will not become some sort of nationalist isolationist power. and to convince the european countries at the eu, the japanese and the canadians that this is a one—off. that will not be an easy task because europeans are wondering if there could be another donald trump. they look at the state of the republican party which still has strong allegiance to the former president. you will have a lot of persuading to do. perhaps the way to think of it is if you think of the broader western alliance is represented by the g7 as a sort of house that crumbled and collapsed during the time of donald trump,
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that this summit in cornwall won't be rebuilding the entire house, it be rebuilding the entire house, it be mr biden hopefully digging a few foundations and persuading the other members to get on the building site and help them rebuild. in members to get on the building site and help them rebuild.— and help them rebuild. in terms of rebuilding. — and help them rebuild. in terms of rebuilding, both _ and help them rebuild. in terms of rebuilding, both leaders— and help them rebuild. in terms of rebuilding, both leaders have - and help them rebuild. in terms of i rebuilding, both leaders have talked about post pandemic building back and growth. here in the uk, everyone's wondering when lockdown will finally be absently over. so there's a lot of pressure on both of them? , . ., , them? yes, in particular there is ressure them? yes, in particular there is pressure on _ them? yes, in particular there is pressure on the _ them? yes, in particular there is pressure on the united - them? yes, in particular there is pressure on the united states i them? yes, in particular there is. pressure on the united states and the uk bilaterally to agree on a time for opening up, because of course, travel and trade between the us and the uk is hugely important to both sides, it's particularly important to a post—brexit britain for borisjohnson to get travel moving again. what the white house has said is that this will be determined by science — which strangely enough, or strangely not
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enough, is the sort of lines used by downing street. they understand how impatient everybody is to lift the lockdowns and given the success of the vaccine programmes in both countries. but they both say it will be determined by the science. the uk is not only hosting _ be determined by the science. the uk is not only hosting the _ be determined by the science. the uk is not only hosting the g7, _ be determined by the science. the uk is not only hosting the g7, but - be determined by the science. the uk is not only hosting the g7, but it - is not only hosting the g7, but it will be hosting the really important summit on climate later in the year, so something else borisjohnson as it's already talking up. yes. so something else boris johnson as it's already talking up.— it's already talking up. yes, he is. and i it's already talking up. yes, he is. and i think _ it's already talking up. yes, he is. and | think that's _ it's already talking up. yes, he is. and i think that's something - it's already talking up. yes, he is. and i think that's something that l it's already talking up. yes, he is. l and i think that's something that he shares with president biden. and if you want to think about this g7, it's not about delivering finished solutions. it's the world leaders looking at whether they can agree on a coordinated position on climate change for the summer later this year is met can they really agree on putting flash on those words of building back better? can they agree
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on coordinated positions on russia and china — which all of the various members of the g7 see as a threat, but in somewhat different ways. so if you like, this is the chance for leaders of western democracy to see themselves in person and figure out if there is something more concrete they can do than just slogans. there's plenty they all agree on, they'd all like to build back better and tackle climate change, they want to defeat covid. but at the end of these three days, will be the —— there be something concrete they can point to? you there be something concrete they can oint to? ., , ., , ., point to? you will be able to tell us, rob. thank _ point to? you will be able to tell us, rob. thank you _ point to? you will be able to tell us, rob. thank you very - point to? you will be able to tell us, rob. thank you very much. l after the g7 meeting, president biden will go onto meet president putin as well as the members of nato.
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top of that agenda will be cyber security. this is in the wake of a number of serious ransomware attacks in the us. here's jake sullivan again. especially as it relates to ransomware attacks on critical infrastructure. when ransomware infrastructure. when ra nsomwa re causes infrastructure. when ransomware causes the shutdown of a pipeline or causes the shutdown of a pipeline or causes major disruption to food supplies, or because of some disruption to an electricity grid — thatis disruption to an electricity grid — that is a national security issue. and president biden intends to consult closely with partners of the g7, with allies in nato at how we can have a collective response of this. and he intends to say to vladimir putin privately what we've said publicly — which is that we don't believe the russian government is behind these ransomware attacks, but the russian government shares responsibility to deal with the criminals on their soil who are conducting them and to prevent them from conducting further attacks. you can read more _ from conducting further attacks. you can read more on what jake sullivan can read more on whatjake sullivan told the bbc in the interview online, will also be looking at what he said about another subject,
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sharing vaccines with the world, later in the programme. now let's turn to brexit — the eu has doubled down on its threat to take action against the uk after talks about post—brexit trading arrangements in northern ireland brokedown today. the uk's chief negotiator, lord david frost, says he wants to keep talking — the eu's negotiator says his patience is wearing thin. there weren't any breakthroughs. there weren't any breakthroughs. there aren't any breakdowns, either, and we will carry on talking. but we all need to do now is, very urgently, find some solutions which support the belfast good friday agreement, support the peace process and allow things to return to normal. ., ., ., normal. today, i can say that we are at a crossroads _ normal. today, i can say that we are at a crossroads in _ normal. today, i can say that we are at a crossroads in our _ normal. today, i can say that we are at a crossroads in our relationship i at a crossroads in our relationship with the _ at a crossroads in our relationship with the uk. trust, which should be at the _ with the uk. trust, which should be at the heart — with the uk. trust, which should be at the heart of every partnership, needs— at the heart of every partnership, needs to — at the heart of every partnership, needs to be restored. the uk must abide _ needs to be restored. the uk must abide by— needs to be restored. the uk must abide by its — needs to be restored. the uk must abide by its legal obligations and perform — abide by its legal obligations and perform these controls.
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unfortunately, there are still numerous and fundamental gaps in the uk's implementation of our agreement. so what's the issue? well, for the uk it's to do with the way the northern ireland protocol works. in order to ensure that there wasn't a hard border on the island of ireland — the protocol left northern ireland still following many eu rules — while the rest of the united kingdom — england wales and scotland — do not. that means that when certain goods cross from great britain to northern ireland, the eu requires checks to ensure they meet eu's standards. effectively creating a border in the irish sea. something that infuriated unionists and is already causing issues on exports and imports. one example of that issue is chilled meat. here's our reality check correspondent chris morris on why. there's been a grace period for what would be a ban on chilled meats. this is the sausage row that's been in a lot of papers, being moved from great britain and the dutch in
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northern ireland for. 17 great britain and the dutch in northern ireland for. ? because the eu law specifically _ northern ireland for. ? because the eu law specifically bans _ northern ireland for. ? because the eu law specifically bans the - northern ireland for. ? because the eu law specifically bans the importl eu law specifically bans the import of chilled meat into the single market. �* ._ of chilled meat into the single market. �* ., �* of chilled meat into the single market. . ._ �* ., market. and the way the brexit deal has been organised, _ market. and the way the brexit deal has been organised, again, - market. and the way the brexit deal has been organised, again, this - has been organised, again, this government signed up for this, is that northern ireland basically follows, when it comes to goods, eu rules. so if the end of this month and nothing has changed, the uk must decide, do we unilaterally say we will abide by this, then legal challenges get worse? or is some sort of compromise found? so while the uk is asking for the eu to be more flexible, the eu is telling the uk to stick to the deal that the uk parties actually signed. a deal that when it was signed at the end of 2020 — was publically celebrated by the uk government. here's cabinet minister michael gove. businesses in northern ireland have the opportunity to enjoy the best of both worlds. access to the single market, at the same time, unfettered access to the rest of the uk market.
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injust over six months, that opinion has clearly changed in the government. in this opinion piece in the financial times on sunday, lord frost now seems to be saying that the uk didn't properly understand the consequences of the protocol. he writes... his claims have been rejected by those within the eu. ireland's foreign minister simon coveney tweeted. .. the claims have also been rejected from those who sat in negotiations. here's theresa may's cheif of staff gavin barwell who was part of brexit negotiaitons up until 2019 speaking to bbc radio 4's today programme.
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and, of course, there's another big player in this very high—stakes game — the united states. as we were reporting earlier in the programme, us presidentjoe biden is due to land on his visit to the uk within the next hour — and this is a politician who is hugely proud of his irish roots — and has made it very clear since being elected that the health of the good friday peace agreement is paramount. it's likely to be a key topic of discussion between the two leaders on the sidelines of the summit. president bidens' national security adviserjake sullivan commented on it during his exclusive interview with the bbc.
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the northern ireland protocol is part of the agreement between the uk and the european union. it is critical to ensuring that the spirit promised and future of the good friday agreement is protected. that said, the uk and that you need to work out the specifics and modality on that, they need to find some way to proceed that works both for the eu and the uk. but whatever way they find a proceed, it must at its core fundamentally protect the gains of the good friday agreement and not imperil that. i'm joined now by our political correspondent hellen catt. so complicated but so important. i suppose there must be a trade board to dashboard or somewhere? part suppose there must be a trade board to dashboard or somewhere?- to dashboard or somewhere? part of the issue on — to dashboard or somewhere? part of the issue on brexit _ to dashboard or somewhere? part of the issue on brexit is, _ to dashboard or somewhere? part of the issue on brexit is, where - to dashboard or somewhere? part of the issue on brexit is, where do - to dashboard or somewhere? part of the issue on brexit is, where do you| the issue on brexit is, where do you putit? the issue on brexit is, where do you put it? because of the sensitivities on ireland, all sides decided they didn't want a halt. a hard border
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between the two, they didn't want checks and a border post happening there. the solution they came up with was that goods would need to be checked as they went from great britain, across the irish sea into northern ireland. and part of the problem here is that so far, there was a grace period of six months where some of these things didn't apply, the uk has been holding back on putting full checks on things like goods going into irish supermarkets and all parcels, which is particularly problematic. then there's the other issue around the movement of chilled meets from great britain into northern ireland that, because the eu doesn't allow the import of chilled meets from a non—eu country, when this grace period expires in three weeks' time, what that'll also do is it an effective ban those moving from northern ireland into great britain. so these are the issues behind this, and of course, there's all the political sensitivities that go around that. this is why it has proved so difficult to come up with
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a solution. ~ , ., ., ,, proved so difficult to come up with a solution. ~ ., ,, ., a solution. when you talk about olitical a solution. when you talk about political sensitivities, _ a solution. when you talk about political sensitivities, there - a solution. when you talk about political sensitivities, there are | political sensitivities, there are layers upon layers. but the timing matters because we are getting close to the marching season when emotions do tend to run higher?— do tend to run higher? political sensitivities _ do tend to run higher? political sensitivities are _ do tend to run higher? political sensitivities are always - do tend to run higher? political sensitivities are always very - do tend to run higher? political. sensitivities are always very high around northern ireland. it's coming up around northern ireland. it's coming up to marching season when you've got people literally on the streets, and there are worries — the concern that underlies all this is that this will perhaps inflame tensions that are always there further. that's what everyone is trying to avoid here and what is at the bottom of all this. ., , here and what is at the bottom of all this. . , . we have live pictures from raf milton hall, the base in suffolk in eastern england, air force one has just landed. just as scheduled, air force one has touched down in the uk, joe biden is on board. his first
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foreign trip since entering the white house this january, and it's also reminding me of the covering of donald trump in the uk four years ago. i think i was broadcasting from the bbc�*s buckingham palace, and as donald trump landed, he was furiously tweeting and insulting the mayor of london. in true trump style. joe biden is trying to show he's different in many different ways. you will have to call on all his double medic skills though, because when he arrives in cornwall, we've been hearing about all the different issues at play here, haven't we? he will be talking about g7 priorities, climate change, talking about coming out of the pandemic, how economies build back, about how inequalities, inequities and financial systems, sony people having suffered through the pandemic — he will want to talk to his allies, you'll want to talk to boris johnson about issues, about northern
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ireland. he's also in touch with the irish republic and with eu members about the way brexit is proceeding in practice. so there's quite a lot on his plate, quite a lot to deal with, and of course we will be hanging on every word as we see the official press conferences and find outjust official press conferences and find out just what they've been talking about. so we will watch what happens asjoe about. so we will watch what happens as joe biden about. so we will watch what happens asjoe biden is here in eastern england, and he'll be taking off her cornwall in the next hour or so. el salvador has adopted bitcoin as legal tender — becoming the first country to make it an official national currency. the president tweeted after tuesday night's vote... here's that historic moment.
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congressional approval means the cryptocurrency will become legal tender, alongside the us dollar, in 90 days. every business must accept bitcoin as legal tender for goods or services, unless it is unable to provide the technology needed to do the transaction. to the president's mind, it will make it easier for salvadorans living abroad to send money home. we as humanity can do almost anything we can think of. our ingenuity, what separates us from other species. we are trying to rescue this idea and start to design the culture for the future. in the short term, this will generate jobs and help provide financial inclusion to thousands outside the formal economy. cryptocurrency advocates around the world understandably reacted with excitement. the website wyre, which leverages blockchain technology, tweeted. ..
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some were more cautious, however. this from john gallagher, professor at the information systems department of boston college... i'm joined by tracy angulo, director of financial services at global consultancy guidehouse. so tracy, what could go wrong? thank you for having me. what could to thank you for having me. what could no wron: ? thank you for having me. what could go wrong? i — thank you for having me. what could go wrong? i apologise! _ thank you for having me. what could go wrong? i apologise! well, - thank you for having me. what could go wrong? i apologise! well, you - go wrong? i apologise! well, you know, obviously _ go wrong? i apologise! well, you know, obviously it _ go wrong? i apologise! well, you know, obviously it is _ go wrong? i apologise! well, you know, obviously it is a _ go wrong? i apologise! well, you know, obviously it is a volatile i know, obviously it is a volatile currency, it is a digital asset unlike your legal tender which you can touch and feel. and there are some security concerns, there are certainly concerns about the volatility of the asset itself. right now, bitcoin is up tojust
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over $35,000, and that fluctuates on a day—to—day basis, intraday, as well. it a day-to-day basis, intraday, as well. , ., ., ., , well. it is volatile, intangible. for those _ well. it is volatile, intangible. for those who _ well. it is volatile, intangible. for those who want _ well. it is volatile, intangible. for those who want relief - well. it is volatile, intangible. | for those who want relief from bitcoin, how do you pitch it, how do you explain it? i bitcoin, how do you pitch it, how do you expiain it?— you explain it? i don't necessarily itch for you explain it? i don't necessarily pitch for or _ you explain it? i don't necessarily pitch for or against _ you explain it? i don't necessarily pitch for or against bitcoin - you explain it? i don't necessarily pitch for or against bitcoin or - pitch for or against bitcoin or crypto currency. it is typically accepted because it is a decentralised digital asset that allows people access to global markets, global economies. it is very transparent, it is easy to use, it's very accessible. those are some of the pros for crypto currency. the resident of the pros for crypto currency. the president has said in el salvador that businesses will have to use it unless they don't have the technology. so what extras do they need? 50 technology. so what extras do they need? . .. , technology. so what extras do they need? , ,., technology. so what extras do they need? , ,, ., need? so they need some access to either a crypto _ need? so they need some access to either a crypto exchange _ need? so they need some access to either a crypto exchange or- need? so they need some access to either a crypto exchange or an - either a crypto exchange or an ability to accept what we call a digital wallet. so some way to
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connect and receive that crypto currency as payment for those goods and services. this currency as payment for those goods and services-— and services. this does set a precedent- — and services. this does set a precedent. what _ and services. this does set a precedent. what other - and services. this does set a - precedent. what other economies do you think — i understand you're not pitching for it, you're analysing for —— it, but what sort of other economies you think might be looking at this particular interest? fight; at this particular interest? any country with — at this particular interest? sin; country with specific at this particular interest? 2'ny country with specific socioeconomic situation, so and number of countries in africa, like zimbabwe, there is an extensive use of bitcoin and other crypto currencies because it gives the un—banked the opportunity to get into the global economy. it's very successful, you can use it through them over —— through your mobile phone touch accessible. and for those countries, they feel like it is a viable alternative to legal tender. tracy, thanks so much _
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alternative to legal tender. tracy, thanks so much for— alternative to legal tender. tracy, thanks so much for being - alternative to legal tender. tracy, thanks so much for being with - alternative to legal tender. tracy, thanks so much for being with us. and there's a lot more on our website about all our stories and developing stories. do stay with us on bbc news. good evening. it was very warm where we saw sunshine persist, temperatures into the mid—20s, wills further west it wasn't sunny. in fact, it was quite grey and damp around some of the irish sea coasts. the north sea coast maintained sunshine for longer. the reason we got all that cloud in the west is because the azores high is just drifting a little bit further southwards, allowing these weakening weather fronts to come in. but they'll pick up with time. a lot of clout around through this evening, even the sharp shower in the west, and as that cloud eases overnight it'll prevent those temperatures from falling, so a warmer night and muqqy from falling, so a warmer night and muggy night, as well, really notable where we have those clear skies first thing this morning. it also means there be more clout around, grey and misty conditions first
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thing. tomorrow our low pressures close in, isobars are more tightly packed with more breeze around and more clout. so it's the partial social democratic clips which starts in the morning, but please don't look directly into the sun. obviously we will have a bit of clout around with proximity to the north of the west. even further south and east where we had more sunshine, there will be more cloud around. it takes time for the sunshine to work through, but it is strong and will come through in the afternoon. certainly a bit more breeze to contend with in northern and western areas, perhaps some heavier rain later. but it's still warm, perhaps warmer than it spent today in the north and east of scotland, and parts of northern ireland, eastern england, those areas favoured to see higher temperatures. through friday, that weather front and isobars are with us, but we change to a fresher weather and cloudier rather pushing south. but again, it's very tenuous,
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sunshine is coming through and it will be strong, even though it'll feel a bit fresher towards the north. so we will freshen up towards the end of the weekjust a little bit, but by the weekend that high pressure, the azores high will reestablish itself across the united kingdom, and that'll allow more sunshine to come through. and again, as a result, temperatures will start to rise once again to become pretty hot potentially by the end of the weekend. that means temperatures pushing towards 30 celsius, particularly in southern and eastern areas. more as ever is on the website.
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it's much hello, i'm philippa thomas, this is outside source. it's much in an hour's time the us president will land in the uk for his first overseas trip since taking office president biden is heading to the g7 summit in cornwall with one key message, america is back — trying to re—establish global leadership the president will head i think we will be showing through our deeds that the united states is capable right now, today, that actually dealing with board and decisive action to solve problems that affect people everywhere around the world. with northern ireland. the eu says its patience is "wearing very thin" with the uk —— in talks aimed at avoiding a trade war — over border checks with northern ireland.
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we will not be shy and acted swiftly, firmly and resolutely that the uk advice by the international law obligations. and leaked documents allege america's most famous billionaires, including amazon'sjeff bezos and tesla's elon musk, pay far less tax than ordinary workers. high on the g7�*s agenda is what has become known as vaccine diplomacy. members of the group of seven have some of the highest vaccinated populations in the world. 51% of the population in the us have received at least one dose. the united kingdom has vaccinated 59% of its population and germany has vaccinated 45%. now, it's important to remember that these countries do have significant vaccine development or production capabilities. they have also ordered too many doses for their populations. and there are now calls on them
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to share their vaccines. there have also been strong criticisms that they lag behind china and russia in terms of sharing those vaccines. here's jake sullivan again. when it's all said and done, it will be the united states in the western democracy that did the lion's share of the work from the developed world in terms of helping to end this pandemic globally and let me give you three reasons why. at the end of this month alone, the united states will have shared more vaccines by orders of magnitude than either china or russia but by the end of june, we arejust china or russia but by the end of june, we are just getting started. secondly, we are not seeking to extract concessions or demand favours or coerce or intimidate other countries in order to get our vaccines. we are not asking anything. we are giving them because it is the right thing to do and third and finally, i believe the g7
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is going to come together in cornwall a plan notjust to make sure that we can vaccinate the world but we can build strong resilient health systems to ensure that we are ready for the next pandemic. we heard earlierfrom the american national security adviser. he told the bbc that america would be at the forefront of vaccine diplomacy. so let's have a look at who has shared the most vaccines. well the us has pledged 80 million vaccines around the world. and the eu has promised over 1.5 billion doses to be made available by the vaccine producers. but there has been criticism of both of vaccine hoarding and vaccinating their own populations first. here's the director general of the world health organization. at the assembly, i called for a massive global effort to vaccinate at least 10% of the population of all countries by september and that leaves 70 persons by the end of the year. to reach this target, we need
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an additional 250 million doses by september and we need 100 million dosesjust injune and september and we need 100 million doses just injune and july. this weekend, the leaders of the g7 countries will meet for the annual summit. the seven nations have the power to meet these targets and calling on the g7 to sharing those, but to commit to sharing them in june and july. and, argubly china has been at the forefront of sharing vaccines around the world. it's a policy that president xi is calling the health silk road. a spin off from the chinese infrastructure investment project. they have pledged millions of vaccines around the world. they're providing free vaccines to 69 countries and commercially
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exporting them to 28 more. they have been exported around the world, often to countries with low vaccination rates, here they are being used in sri lanka. and it's worth mentioning that less of the chinese population are vaccinated than the us. and they shared their vaccines earlier than the us had. there's also a huge amount of the eu has, however, already promised 500 euros million in grant funding and guarantees to the covax facility. the us has donated $2 billion to covax in recent months. this likely shortfall might explain why china has donated vaccines to at least 2a countries but delivered to each only a minuscule number of doses compared with their populations, typically in the range of 20,000 to 300,000. they have twisted arms and demanded concessions in order to give the vaccine, the united states is not done so and when it comes down to it, as we have managed to vaccinate the majority of our population, we now have the wherewithal to begin to distribute high—quality vaccines, not for any geopolitical favour. we are doing so and they're heading out the door now we are rapidly passing
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both china and russia in terms of the provision of her vaccines to others. so is that a fair assessment? the us is not alone in its doubts over it's criticism over it's perceived vaccine roll—out. the president of the european council said: yanzhong huang is from the council on foreign relations. how true is that claim by jake sullivan? we look at china's vaccine diplomacy. we have to make a distinction between the amount of vaccines sold via commercial channels in the vaccines that were donated to other countries. as far
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as the donations are concerned, i think the us government has referred to the total donated vaccines amounted to 22 million doses and thatis amounted to 22 million doses and that is less than 10% of the total amount and quantity of vaccines that are shipped overseas and in that sense, the number itself is indeed not very large, it is less than 10% of the total vaccine shipped overseas but it still makes china the largest vaccine exporter as far as what is already been donated and the other larger donors.— the other larger donors. putting it in context is _ the other larger donors. putting it in context is important _ the other larger donors. putting it in context is important with - the other larger donors. putting it in context is important with the i in context is important with the bigger numbers but is it fair to say that the west is sometimes reluctant to credit china with generosity
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where it exists is yellow it can be used to chain of being generous and especially when we are dealing with a global challenge that is a global challenge that 3 everybody's business. we should everybody�*s business. we should encourage china to be as generous as possible and in the meantime, certainly we should also be careful that we are not that generous, especially now since we are still having to prioritise our own domestic vaccination efforts. taking you back to suffolk. joe
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biden's plane is on the runway we were able to show you earlier the press plane arriving in advance of the president has not touched down and it is important for the uk and the us in cornwall but as werejoe biden after getting the chance to meet some of the staff on the space, also important for the us because this is his first foray into what he plans to get from the uk and his meetings in the eu with nato leaders and of course going on to meet present and prudent. there is a lot in store for the new president and there is a lot at stake and so, there we see air force one is landing and it is the first stop on british soil and going on before delivering joe biden to the g7 summit. and he has landed in
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the g7 summit. and he has landed in the middle of a lot of thorny negotiations, not least of the uk and the commercial shape of the uk as brexit beds and in northern ireland politics is thejoe biden does know about and he's proud of his irish roots and irish politicians and we know there's huge sensitivity over the across the island of ireland which is between northern ireland, the british province of northern ireland and the irish republic and the importance he attracts to the good friday peace deal is something that will be voiced by his senior advisers over the next few days.
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the islamic state group says it carried out a deadly attack on a compound in afghanistan housing workers involved in landmine clearing. at least ten people were shot dead when masked gunmen scaled the walls of the halo trust compound in baghlan province late on tuesday. more than a dozen others were injured. the executive director of the halo trust — a uk—based charity — says its work in afghanistan is vital and he has no intention of leaving the country. secunder kermani reports. rushed to hospital, the victims of afghanistan's latest atrocities. afg hanistan's latest atrocities. those afghanistan's latest atrocities. those targeted, employees of de—mining charity risking their lives to help others. fiee de-mining charity risking their lives to help others.— de-mining charity risking their lives to help others. five or six armed men — lives to help others. five or six armed men wearing _ lives to help others. five or six armed men wearing masks, i lives to help others. five or six - armed men wearing masks, forced us into a room, since this man. thea;r into a room, since this man. they asked if we _ into a room, since this man. they asked if we are _ into a room, since this man. they asked if we are from _ into a room, since this man. they asked if we are from a _ into a room, since this man. they asked if we are from a certain community and they started firing at
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everyone. i was hit but managed to escape through a window. the victims work for the halo trust. helping clear landmines and other explosives. the british charity has beenin explosives. the british charity has been in afghanistan since 1988. it's work in conflict zones across the world has been supported by princess diana amongst others. this is a great injustice.— diana amongst others. this is a great injustice. great in'ustice. these people were servinu great injustice. these people were serving the — great injustice. these people were serving the country, _ great injustice. these people were serving the country, they - great injustice. these people were serving the country, they are - serving the country, they are civilians _ serving the country, they are civilians. �* . serving the country, they are civilians. . ., . ., , serving the country, they are civilians. . ., , ., civilians. afghan officials have blamed the — civilians. afghan officials have blamed the taliban _ civilians. afghan officials have blamed the taliban for - civilians. afghan officials have blamed the taliban for the i civilians. afghan officials have i blamed the taliban for the attack although they denied responsibility. violence across afghanistan has been flaring ever since us and international troops began their final withdrawal last month. peace talks of the taliban might be restarting but they've yet to see any real progress and many fear the worst is yet to come.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... the us presidentjoe biden has headed off for his first foreign trip since taking office, travelling the uk to join world leaders at the g7 summit in cornwall. five days after the most populous country in africa banned twitter, nothing has changed, as many privately—owned media outlets continue to defy the order by using private networks. this is what you see when you try and access the social media site from within nigeria. it all started last wednesday, when the social network deleted a post by president muhammadu buhari for allegedly violating its rules on abuse. the presidency denied the subsequent
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ban was an act of retaliation. on monday, the country's foreign minister met with foreign diplomats to discuss the government's decision. we are not saying that twitter is threatening the country or any such thing like that. we have taken this measure to see to what extent we can re—balance this media as forces of good and stop them being used as platforms for destabilisation. but many sites have continued to defy the ban, such as news outlet punch, for example, who tweeted this just a few hours ago — "ban insecurity, not twitter" is their message. let's bring in our correspondent mayenijones, who's in lagos. i thousands of private companies are
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able to get around this and quite a widespread fashion. yes. able to get around this and quite a widespread fashion.— able to get around this and quite a widespread fashion. yes, quite a few of them are — widespread fashion. yes, quite a few of them are tweeting _ widespread fashion. yes, quite a few of them are tweeting every _ widespread fashion. yes, quite a few of them are tweeting every day - widespread fashion. yes, quite a few of them are tweeting every day and l of them are tweeting every day and thatis of them are tweeting every day and that is because they need to twitter. as journalists, that is because they need to twitter. asjournalists, twitter is so baked into the way we work, a lot of these websites will publish a story on mine and then use twitter to drive traffic to the website and so they can't afford to not use the platform, they continue to use them as as several other nigerians of high following. everyone has adopted social private networks. thank god for vpn was trending in people using these private networks to access the platform. d0 these private networks to access the latform. ,, ,, these private networks to access the latform. i. ~ , .,, platform. do you think people were savvy about — platform. do you think people were savvy about this — platform. do you think people were savvy about this beforehand - platform. do you think people were savvy about this beforehand or- platform. do you think people were | savvy about this beforehand or have they had to learn quickly? some --eole they had to learn quickly? some people like _ they had to learn quickly? some people like to — they had to learn quickly? some people like to learn _ they had to learn quickly? some people like to learn quite - they had to learn quickly? fine people like to learn quite quickly, particularly in anecdotally, some of the order generations have been asking what is it and how can i get
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one? but many have been using it to access websites like netflix and amazon prime, to watch the series that they want to watch and for some of them, particularly those on twitter who tend to be more tech savvy, they already had this and need to switch them on. it’s sawy, they already had this and need to switch them on. it's quite a face-off this — need to switch them on. it's quite a face-off this versus _ need to switch them on. it's quite a face-off this versus the _ need to switch them on. it's quite a face-off this versus the state - need to switch them on. it's quite a face-off this versus the state and l face—off this versus the state and potentially quite embarrassing for the government.— potentially quite embarrassing for the government. yeah, this is part of a story that _ the government. yeah, this is part of a story that i — the government. yeah, this is part of a story that i think _ the government. yeah, this is part of a story that i think your - the government. yeah, this is part of a story that i think your have i of a story that i think your have yours or understand across the world, various governments have had issues with much say social media has in new gets to say what when and the president had this tweet that many nigerians complained about and said it was threatening to a secessionist movement in the southeast and then decided to delete the tweet and the presidents administration was particularly
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happy about that and they have said that this was not in retaliation to that this was not in retaliation to that but they believe twitter has been used, notjust for the secessionist movement but by people who seek to destabilise nigeria in general and it is hard to say exactly what they mean by that, what would this mean practically for twitter and i think this is what the government and twitter not have to discuss and learn to negotiate. i was iwasa i was a bit distracted because i could see the cameras watching this spot. this is air force one just landed on british soil and insightful and we are waiting for joe biden and the first ladyjill biden to disembark and it is such a key moment and it does make me think that during, there he comes. his first foreign trip. this is the president read the campaign for
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office largely behind a mask and behind closed doors because the pandemic. this was his first foreign trip after taking office injanuary and so, at this moment forjoe biden represents landing in britain, seeing a key ally, but also the start of a tour of europe, a tour meeting nato ended toward meeting vladimir putin which is going to be key to the reset that he is trying to achieve in terms of america's relationship with the world. here is joe biden being greeted at the foot of the steps by staff at the base and he is going to be talking about and he is going to be talking about and to airmen and their families and before they take him to cornwall for the formal business summit. you can see the camera adjusting there, everything is happening asjoe biden
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comes to the uk on his first foreign trip and that's going to give us lots of views of the next few days. let's move on. there are manyjobs right now, at least most of my friends are really frustrated. the onlyjobs that they are required for our internships. so most of them are angry and
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frustrated because they had been working already, they've had experience, and they are still required to be paid less and work in worse conditions. her professor says a lack of opportunities predates covid. provoking many to leave the province. translation: ideally, they should finish their studying here, - work here, pay their taxes here, create wealth here and start their businesses here. but it takes the creation of 36,000 companies to absorb all the unemployment in the province of cadiz. globally, more than a billion young people have missed in zimbabwe, this training session is taking a different route. helping young people set up on their own succulent 80% of are you up democrat youth are interested in entrepreneurship, so that shows that only 30% are interested in a job with an 8—5 environment. globally, more than a billion
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young people have missed out on employment, education and training. but so far, the battle against covid has been focused on protecting the physical health of the elderly. the brunt of this is being borne by young people to some extent because they are the ones who need those early opportunities. so it's in the interests of not widening inequality in society as a whole that more of an effort is made to support young people to finish their education and get into employment. what are the risks if those who can make a difference, policymakers, businesses, ignore that kind of advice? well, we are throwing away the potential of 1.8 billion young people. wherever you are, there is no easy solution. ignoring young people's prospects now could blight their lives for decades. alternatively, there's the opportunity to equip them better for the jobs of the future. darshini david, bbc news.
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a buckingham palace source has told the bbc that the queen was "never asked" for permission by prince harry and meghan to name their daughter lilibet, which was the queen's childhood nickname. earlier today, the law firm schillings — which acts for the couple — has written to some news organisations saying that claim is false and defamatory. our royal correspondentjonny dymond says that two different versions of events had emerged. maybe it's an issue of interpretation, but let's rakitic — sunday night we get an announcement from harry and meghan about the naming of their second child, their daughter will be a little bit diana mountbatten windsor. lilibet is the queen's childhood nickname, given to her by her grandfather, george v, used by her closeness and relatives. the name she used on the funeral wreath for her dearest friend, earl mountbatten. so it means a lot, lilibet. over the next couple days, stories start to come out from various different sources citing generally friends of prince harry that the queen had given permission for little bit to be used. and as
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you mentioned, a palace source told the bbc that she was never asked —— lilibet. within hours there was response from harry and megan's spokesperson, saying harry had spoken to his grandmother, the queen, as the first person to tell about the baby before the announcement was made. that he had shared their hope of naming their daughter lilibet, and that had she not been supportive, then she would —— they would not have used the name. so two pretty contradictory accounts there of what happened stop the palace source at least a very keen to set the record straight as they saw it, and equally harry and meghan very firm that they thought that they had gone through all the proprietary is involved. a momentous occasion, presidentjoe
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biden hasjust arrived in a momentous occasion, presidentjoe biden has just arrived in the a momentous occasion, presidentjoe biden hasjust arrived in the uk on his first foreign visit since becoming us president. he became president injanuary and this is his first foray abroad. him in the first lady disembarking and they will later go on to cornwall which is where the g7 leaders will be gathering and so much to talk about, including post—pandemic recovery and the urgent flight against climate change. now, he will be going inside and he will be in this, you can see that there is a big welcome here at milton hall and he will be addressing air force men and their families and his first remarks before he goes to cornwall. this would be the first time that we hear what he has to say about his themes, his key themes. this is been looking
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to distance itself from the previous one in the area of international diplomacy. we all remember donald trump's four years in office where many key allies in the eu and in nato felt that he had rather turn his back on them and was going it alone and then taking washington in the united states with them. the message from joe biden and from his national security adviser speaking to the bbc today has very much ben, america is back and america wants to reassert leadership in the field of global diplomacy and he has a lot of challenges ahead of him. not least the ones to deal with climate change and rebuilding it with issues of equity, economic fairness as so many people have been hit so hard by the pandemic and will be giving you all of the developments and there's a lot more on the bbc website as well.
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thank you for being with us here on bbc news. good evening. it was very warm where we saw sunshine persist, temperatures into the mid—20s, whilst further west it wasn't sunny. in fact, it was quite grey and damp around some of the irish sea coasts. the north sea coast maintained sunshine for longer. the reason we got all that cloud in the west is because the azores high isjust drifting a little bit further southwards, allowing these weakening weather fronts to come in. but they'll pick up with time. a lot of cloud around through this evening, even the sharp shower in the west, and as that cloud eases overnight it'll prevent those temperatures from falling, so a warmer and muggy night, as well, really notable where we have those clear skies first thing this morning. it also means there be more cloud around, grey and misty conditions first thing. tomorrow our low pressures close in,
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isobars are more tightly packed with more breeze around and more cloud. so it's the partial social democratic clips which starts so it's the partial solar eclipse which starts in the morning, but please don't look directly into the sun. obviously we will have a bit of clout around with proximity to the north of the west. even further south and east where we had more sunshine, there will be more cloud around. it takes time for the sunshine to work through, but it is strong and will come through in the afternoon. certainly a bit more breeze to contend with in northern and western areas, perhaps some heavier rain later. but it's still warm, perhaps warmer than it spent today in the north and east of scotland, and parts of northern ireland, eastern england, those areas favoured to see higher temperatures. through friday, that weatherfront and isobars are with us, but we change to a fresher weather and cloudier weather pushing south. but again, it's very tenuous, sunshine is coming through and it will be strong, even though it'll feel a bit fresher towards the north.
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so we will freshen up towards the end of the weekjust a little bit, but by the weekend that high pressure, the azores high will reestablish itself across the united kingdom, and that'll allow more sunshine to come through. and again, as a result, temperatures will start to rise once again to become pretty hot potentially by the end of the weekend. that means temperatures pushing towards 30 celsius, particularly in southern and eastern areas. more, as ever, is on the website.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm — the us presidentjoe biden has just landed in the uk, making just landed in the uk, his first overseas trip since his making his first overseas trip since his inauguration injanuary. i am paul adams live at raf mildenhall. the president arrived just half an hour ago at the start of a busy week of global diplomacy. the european union warns its relationship with the uk is at a crossroads over the implementation of post—brexit trade rules in northern ireland. the cornish village that's used to welcoming tourists — now it's host to the world's top leaders, and thousands of police officers. the high court rules the government acted unlawfully, when michael gove awarded a covid contract, worth half a million pounds, to a firm run by friends of dominic cummings.

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