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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 30, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben mundy, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. celebrations for chelsea fans after their team wins the all—english champions league final against manchester city to lift the european cup for a second time. calls for the uk government to have an open debate with the public about plans to ease restrictions injune. the group that represents nhs trusts in england warns of the pressures faced by hospitals. we think there are significant numbers of people who have put off coming into hospital and actually have now reached the stage where they must come in and get treatment, but because they have left it so long, it means that the treatment required will take longer and it's more complex.
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we will share the evidence that the country— we will share the evidence that the country on — we will share the evidence that the country on the 14th ofjune to basically— country on the 14th ofjune to basically explain exactly where we are on_ basically explain exactly where we are on infection rates, and hospitalisation, and of course, sadly. — hospitalisation, and of course, sadly. of— hospitalisation, and of course, sadly, of death. neighbours reunited — the leaders of australia and new zealand meet for talks for the first time in 15 months after covid border restrictions are lifted between the two countries. and britain's prime minister, borisjohnson, marries his fiancee carrie symonds in a secret ceremony at westminster cathedral. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. chelsea fans are celebrating after their team won the champions league final in porto.
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they beat fellow english side and premier league champions manchester city in a 1—0 victory after seven tense minutes of injury time — to pick up their second european cup. more than 16,000 supporters were allowed into the stadium in portugal, after the venue was switched from turkey because of covid—19. tim allman watched the action. champions, champions of europe! victory is always sweet, even when there's a pandemic on. only a few thousand chelsea fans were able to savour their team's win first—hand, but not one of them was complaining. wonderful. fantastic, fantastic. we just can't believe it. beginning of the season, we'd never have thought this. we're exhausted but we're overjoyed. just delighted. ecstatic! unbelievable! there's no words on this planet to describe how every chelsea soul out there, in there feels. cheering.
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it was a similar story back home in the bars and pubs of west london, as well as the streets surrounding stamford bridge — an eruption of mad euphoria. champions of europe! that's who we are! champions of europe? brilliant, absolutely... look, it's brought us all back together. covid has gone out the window. it's just been amazing. amazing. well, that's not quite true. coronavirus meant only a limited crowd was allowed into the stadium in porto. witnessing a game where the rich boys of europe would play the even richer boys. and in the end, only a single goal would separate them. kai havertz doing the honours just before half—time. what a night for thomas tuchel. he only took over at chelsea injanuary, and now he's a champions league—winning manager. it's a huge step to arrive in the final. it's an even bigger one to fight your way through
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and make it all the way to the cup. it's a fantastic achievement, congratulations to everybody. some commiserations for manchester city. they've spent fortunes reaching their first champions league final, but still the big prize eludes them. for now, the european cup is heading back to england and to chelsea. blue really is the colour. 0ur sport correspondent 0lly foster is in porto. he said last night's celebrations were restricted by bar curfews. by the time the match finished, and chelsea and manchester city fans got to the centre of town, all the bars had shut and there was a curfew at half past ten. that is what the authorities decided to do around this match, but it has been fantastic for the best part of two or three days, all those fans finding a way to get here. first getting their lucky ticket, because there was a reduced capacity in the stadium because of covid,
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but porto and portugal stepping in to rescue the champions league once again, as they did last year as well. there was anxiety that suddenly out of nowhere 16,500 from outside their shores descending on the city, because portugal, like lots of other nations, have had it really tough with covid for the last year or so, but it has gone really well and really well for chelsea. what we have seen here behind us, we came down and wondered where to go first thing in the morning, why don't we go down to the big inflatable champions league trophy when all the selfies are taken? and as we got here, they took the air out of it, which kind of sums up the state of mind of manchester city this morning but what a performance for chelsea. they were probably
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the slight underdogs yesterday. we will hopefully catch up with a view chelsea fans later in the hour. the group that represents health service trusts in england says hospitals in holiday hotspots in the country will struggle to cope with the extra demand caused by increased domestic tourism this summer. nhs providers say that while covid admissions are nowhere near their peak, hospitals are dealing with a backlog of cases and a rise in demand for urgent care. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa has the details. london's twickenham stadium, now a surge vaccination centre ready to deliver 15,000 doses on bank holiday monday as the extra push to vaccinate as many people as possible continues. but despite the more infectious variant first detected in india, so far, hospitals haven't seen a spike in admissions. trust leaders in some of england's worst affected areas say most covid patients are unvaccinated, either because they are younger and not yet been invited for a jab, or hadn't taken up the offer — a clear sign, they say,
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the vaccines are working. but nhs providers warns hospitals are still under pressure with trusts working flat out to reduce record waiting lists for non—urgent operations. there's also been an increase in demand for urgent care. doctors think significant numbers of patients have been putting off seeking treatment and now require more complex care and longer stays. some trusts in holiday areas also worry an influx of tourists will leave them struggling to cope. ahead of any decision to lift the remaining legal restrictions in england onjune 21st, nhs providers wants the government to lead an informed debate on the trade—offs that need to be made. it points out that while vaccines are helping to break the link between infection,
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serious illness and death, there are still many more people to vaccinate. katharine da costa, bbc news. chris hopson of nhs providers says hospitals face increasing pressures from non—covid patients. the pressure is coming from the fact that there's three things going on at once at the moment. we've got these big care backlogs that we are trying to get through as quickly as possible and we are tackling the most complex cases to start with and it means those patients need to have overnight stays because they are difficult cases. the second thing that's happening is we think there are significant numbers of people who have put off coming into hospital and actually have now reached the stage where they must come in and get treatment, but because they have left it so long, it means that the treatment required will take longer and its more complex. the third bit is yes, in those areas where we are seeing an up—tick, it's a small up—tick, in covid—19 pressures, it is adding to the pressure as well.
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new zealand and australia's relative success in fighting the coronavirus pandemic has been on show as the countries' leaders held in person meetings without wearing masks. jacinda ardern and scott morrison discussed how to further ease tough covid—19 border controls. it's the first time the two leaders have met since a quarantine free travel corridor opened between new zealand and australia last month. phil mercer, who's in sydney, has been following the story. this is a discussion between prime ministerjacinda ardern and her australian counterpart, scott morrison, and trying to highlight the relative success of those two countries in combating the pandemic. and also about an exit strategy. both countries have shut their borders to most foreign nationals, and if you look at the figures, about 30,000 confirmed coronavirus cases here in australia
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and about 2,700 in new zealand, these figures are pretty good compared to many, many other countries. and what we have heard today, that trans—tasman travel bubble that opened on the 19th of april, australia is hoping it could soon be extended to other parts of the pacific, including the archipelago of fiji and vanuatu and perhaps other island nations as well. this is all about australia and new zealand trying to chart a way to reconnect with the rest of the world but it will be a slow process and as you say the prime ministers meeting without masks in a way to highlight what these two countries have done since the pandemic began. efforts are under way to form a new israeli government that could see benjamin netanyahu ousted as prime minister. the opposition leader, yair lapid, has been holding talks with the far—right yamina party, amid signs that a deal could be close. the centrist opposition leader has until wednesday to form a new government, joining with parties
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from across the political spectrum who oppose mr netanyahu. the long—serving prime minister is facing trialforfraud but still emerged with the largest number of seats in march's election. russia will go ahead with a second $500 million loan to belarus. it's a sign of moscow's determination to support its ally. there's been uproar in the west over the grounding of a passengerjet in minsk and the arrest of a dissident blogger. across europe, demonstrations have been held to show solidarity with the people of belarus. gail maclellan has the latest. support in poland for the opposition in neighbouring belarus. frustration and anger too. pro—democracy rallies all but eliminated in belarus itself by the fear of autocratic president alexander lukashenko. here and in other european
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countries, they are calling for the release of a belarussian dissident who, along with his girlfriend, was arrested when their flight was diverted to land in minsk. the pair's detention sparked global outrage and prompted the eu to urge airlines to avoid belarussian airspace. at a rally in warsaw, roman protasevich�*s mother called on the eu and the us to help free her son and others imprisoned by the belarussian regime. president alexander lukashenko, who's been in powerfor 27 years, has been nicknamed europe's last dictator. a huge police crackdown has curbed street protests and sent opposition leaders to prison or into exile. one of those responded to the rallies in lithuania. translation: i am excited about the support i see - in lithuania and other parts of the world. it's a pity that a year has passed and we are not yet at the final point. i believe that there
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will be changes very soon. there will be new elections because there can be no other way. belarussians will not give up. meanwhile, talks in russia between president vladimir putin and mr lukashenko continued into a second day. mr putin later confirmed russia would move ahead with a second $500 million loan to belarus next month. russia is mr lukashenko's strongest political ally, even though personal relations between the two long—time presidents are at times said to be strained. the situation in the democratic republic of congo remains serious but under control, according to the country's president, a week after a devastating volcanic eruption in the east of the country. hundreds of thousands of people fled the city of goma as mount nyiragongo erupted. yesterday, the government mistakenly announced a second eruption was imminent, causing more panic and evacuations.
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0ur correspondent emery makumeno has been following events in the nearby city of goma. there are still tremors going on and people are afraid of a second eruption, because the earthquakes that have been happening here provoked cracks on the ground, and from those cracks the possible emission of molten lava could emerge. and especially if it emerges from the lakejust emerge. and especially if it emerges from the lake just next to me here, it could be devastating, because the lake has a concentration of methane gas which could cause an explosion or asphyxia to the population. the headlines on bbc news:
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chelsea fans have been celebrating after their team won the all—english champions league final against manchester city in portugal. there are calls for the uk government to have an open debate with the public about restriction easing plans onjune the 21st. the group that represents nhs trusts in england is warning of the pressures being faced by hospitals. and neighbours reunite — the leaders of australia and new zealand have met for talks for the first time in 15 months after coronavirus border restrictions are lifted between the two countries. chelsea fans have been celebrating after their team won the all—english champions league final against manchester city in portugal. chelsea fans have been celebrating their team's victory in the champions league final. they beat manchester city 1—0 in portugal. well, let's talk to three of them. david johnstone is the founder the chelsea supporters trust. he's on his way back from porto with season ticket holders james and beau frowd. it's13—year—old beau's first international game. great to see all three of you, let's
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start with you, david, how are you feeling this morning? i think i have floated from my hotel back to the airport, it looks like my feet are on the ground, but trust me they are at least six inches off it. we weren't sure whether we would do it yesterday, all the chelsea supporters, and the team were fantastic, it is an absolutely brilliant, brilliant achievement, and our thanks go to all the players for what they have done for us. james, biggest game in european club football, _ james, biggest game in european club football, even more sweet that you beat a _ football, even more sweet that you beat a fellow english side? most definitely, you know, the media, everyone — definitely, you know, the media, everyone wrote us said city was going _ everyone wrote us said city was going to — everyone wrote us said city was going to beat us, but we are chelsea, _ going to beat us, but we are chelsea, when the odds are against us, we _ chelsea, when the odds are against us, we come out fighting. we have -ot us, we come out fighting. we have got youth — us, we come out fighting. we have got youth on our side, and there will be _ got youth on our side, and there will be many more of these days to
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come _ will be many more of these days to come. ~' will be many more of these days to come. ~ ., .,, .,, come. oh, i think we have lost those three, come. oh, i think we have lost those three. hepefully _ come. oh, i think we have lost those three, hopefully we _ come. oh, i think we have lost those three, hopefully we will _ come. oh, i think we have lost those three, hopefully we will try _ come. oh, i think we have lost those three, hopefully we will try to - come. oh, i think we have lost those three, hopefully we will try to get. three, hopefully we will try to get them back a little later, but if not congratulations to them, chelsea winning the champions league final last night by beating manchester city, the premier league champions, 1-0. city, the premier league champions, 1—0. let's move on. protestors have ta ken to the streets in brazil's largest cities to demand the impeachment of presidentjair bolsonaro over his response to the coronavirus pandemic. brazil has the world's second highest covid death rate, after the us — nearly half a million people have lost their lives. president bolsonaro says his opposition to lockdowns is designed to protect the economy. at least seven civilians have been killed in a mortar attack in northern afghanistan. local officials said the mortar landed on a house where a wedding ceremony was taking place in kapisa province. eight others were wounded. reports said the incident happened as the security forces clashed with the taliban in a nearby area. both sides blamed each other for the mortar attack.
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earlier, a roadside bomb hit a bus carrying university employees in the province of parwan, killing four of them. the colombian government has deployed 7,000 troops across some of its major towns and cities in a bid to end two months of deadly protests and riots. we can go back to those chelsea fans beau, yourfirst we can go back to those chelsea fans beau, your first trip abroad, you might as well give up now! at beau, your first trip abroad, you might as well give up now! at the end of the day. — might as well give up now! at the end of the day, everyone - might as well give up now! at the end of the day, everyone is - might as well give up now! at the | end of the day, everyone is happy about_ end of the day, everyone is happy about it — end of the day, everyone is happy about it it— end of the day, everyone is happy about it. ., �* ., , , about it. it don't get any better, ou about it. it don't get any better, you know? _ about it. it don't get any better, you know? champions _ about it. it don't get any better, you know? champions of - about it. it don't get any better, l you know? champions of europe, about it. it don't get any better, - you know? champions of europe, what a first— you know? champions of europe, what a first away— you know? champions of europe, what a first away game! | you know? champions of europe, what a first away game!— a first away game! i wondered if we could talk to _ a first away game! i wondered if we could talk to you _ a first away game! i wondered if we could talk to you about _ a first away game! i wondered if we could talk to you about the - could talk to you about the experience of the night given the covid restrictions, james. taste experience of the night given the covid restrictions, james. we had to no throu . h covid restrictions, james. we had to go through a — covid restrictions, james. we had to go through a lodge _ covid restrictions, james. we had to go through a lodge to _ covid restrictions, james. we had to go through a lodge to get _ covid restrictions, james. we had to go through a lodge to get out - covid restrictions, james. we had to go through a lodge to get out here, | go through a lodge to get out here, numerous _ go through a lodge to get out here, numerous tests, obviously there were checkpoints _ numerous tests, obviously there were checkpoints around the stadium, but once who _ checkpoints around the stadium, but once who was in there in the game started. _ once who was in there in the game started. it — once who was in there in the game started, it was all forgotten about, the drama — started, it was all forgotten about, the drama and stress of the last few
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weeks. _ the drama and stress of the last few weeks, turkey in the first instance, then to _ weeks, turkey in the first instance, then to hear. — weeks, turkey in the first instance, then to hear, it has all been worth it. then to hear, it has all been worth it it _ then to hear, it has all been worth it it is _ then to hear, it has all been worth it. it is moments like this, money can't _ it. it is moments like this, money can't truy— it. it is moments like this, money can't truy it. — it. it is moments like this, money can't buy it, it is great, you now, champions — can't buy it, it is great, you now, champions of _ can't buy it, it is great, you now, champions of europe, you know? david, _ champions of europe, you know? david, what — champions of europe, you know? david, what you think this means for english football, given that there were two english sides competing in the final and with the context of the final and with the context of the european super league debacle in a few weeks ago. the european super league debacle in a few weeks ago-— a few weeks ago. well, the thing about that _ a few weeks ago. well, the thing about that is _ a few weeks ago. well, the thing about that is where _ a few weeks ago. well, the thing about that is where you - a few weeks ago. well, the thing about that is where you put - a few weeks ago. well, the thing about that is where you put the l about that is where you put the european super league to bed, the chelsea supporters led the protest against it. all the english supporters got together and, you know, from praising us for smashing the european super league, uefa has basically turned the supporters over in many ways. you know, we are secondary to the people running football, and as far as being supporters are concerned, they are clueless, i am afraid. they made it very, very difficult for a lot of people to enjoy the game, and they
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made it very, very difficult for people to get out here. and, you know, how they had the cheek to expect the british government to lead 3000 people in to watch a football match without restrictions, and ordinary people who don't even like football would have had to spend ten days quarantining and pay £1500 for a hotel, the british government made the right decision about wembley, it is a shame for all the people who could not get out here. you either need to buck their ideas up, i'm afraid. you here. you either need to buck their ideas up, i'm afraid.— ideas up, i'm afraid. you three definitely _ ideas up, i'm afraid. you three definitely enjoyed _ ideas up, i'm afraid. you three definitely enjoyed it. _ ideas up, i'm afraid. you three definitely enjoyed it. beau, - ideas up, i'm afraid. you three definitely enjoyed it. beau, i. ideas up, i'm afraid. you three l definitely enjoyed it. beau, ijust wondered if you could talk us through how you reacted when kai havertz scored the winning goal, no swearing, we are on live tv! it havertz scored the winning goal, no swearing, we are on live tv!- swearing, we are on live tv! it was like the whole _ swearing, we are on live tv! it was like the whole stadium _ swearing, we are on live tv! it was like the whole stadium went - swearing, we are on live tv! it was like the whole stadium went really| like the whole stadium went really loud, _ like the whole stadium went really loud. it _ like the whole stadium went really loud. it is — like the whole stadium went really loud, it is something _ like the whole stadium went really loud, it is something i— like the whole stadium went really loud, it is something i have - like the whole stadium went really loud, it is something i have neverl loud, it is something i have never heard _ loud, it is something i have never heard before _ loud, it is something i have never heard before.— heard before. there was a lot of tears, heard before. there was a lot of tears. you _ heard before. there was a lot of tears, you know! _ heard before. there was a lot of
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tears, you know! the _ heard before. there was a lot of tears, you know! the context i heard before. there was a lot of tears, you know! the context ofj heard before. there was a lot of. tears, you know! the context of a second european _ tears, you know! the context of a second european cup _ tears, you know! the context of a second european cup for- tears, you know! the context of a second european cup for chelsea, what does it mean for them next season, and what can they build on with thomas tuchel? it season, and what can they build on with thomas tuchel?— with thomas tuchel? it takes us to the next level— with thomas tuchel? it takes us to the next level now, _ with thomas tuchel? it takes us to the next level now, we _ with thomas tuchel? it takes us to the next level now, we can - with thomas tuchel? it takes us to the next level now, we can go - with thomas tuchel? it takes us to the next level now, we can go for. the next level now, we can go for the next level now, we can go for the world—class players that we should — the world—class players that we should be getting, haaland, hazard came— should be getting, haaland, hazard came to— should be getting, haaland, hazard came to us— should be getting, haaland, hazard came to us in 2012, and look what we've _ came to us in 2012, and look what we've done — came to us in 2012, and look what we've done from there on in. hopefully, like i say, with youth on our side, _ hopefully, like i say, with youth on our side, overthe next ten hopefully, like i say, with youth on our side, over the next ten years we will have _ our side, over the next ten years we will have many years like last night, — will have many years like last night, and it is amazing, you know? i night, and it is amazing, you know? ican't _ night, and it is amazing, you know? ican't put _ night, and it is amazing, you know? ican't put it— night, and it is amazing, you know? i can't put it into words.— i can't put it into words. great to talk to all— i can't put it into words. great to talk to all three _ i can't put it into words. great to talk to all three of _ i can't put it into words. great to talk to all three of you, - i can't put it into words. great to talk to all three of you, david, i talk to all three of you, david, james and beau, have a safe flight back. , the colombian government has deployed 7,000 troops across some of its major towns and cities in a bid to end two months of deadly protests and riots. demonstrators have vowed to march on the streets of the capital city, bogota, today, as they continue their stand against poverty, police violence and tax rises. 0ur latin america correspondent
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will grant reports. colombia is no stranger to violence but these scenes have shocked the nation. two months after the protests began, they are showing no sign of letting up. what started as an outpouring of anger over a proposed tax hike has now exploded into pitched battles in several major cities. the epicentre of the anti—government protests is cali, a city which suffers from all of colombia's social ills, from poverty to paramilitaries and drug cartels. every day, peaceful protests soon descend into burning barricades and stone throwing. the authorities responding with tear gas and live rounds. the latest incident to enrage demonstrators was the sight of civilian gunmen shooting at protesters with the police. the president, ivan duque, announced the deployment of some 7000 military personnel around the country. translation: i want to make it absolutely clear|
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that the maximum deployment of military assistance to the national police begins as of tonight. they won't find it easy, though — the protesters are in no mood to back down. this violence bring back painful memories of colombia's 50—year civil war between left—wing farc rebels and the state. indeed, many say the open wounds from that conflict have fanned the flames of these clashes. now, instead of strengthening the peace, colombia's long and bloody history of social unrest has simply started a new chapter. will grant, bbc news. more than 100 long—tailed macque monkeys that were being illegally smuggled in the back of a pickup truck have been rescued in thailand. a field hospital has been set up to treat 80 of them. you may find some of the images in russell trott�*s report distressing. sedated but safe. rescued macaque monkeys, many pregnant, being treated
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by thai medical teams. more than 100 were discovered — terrified, struggling and gasping for air, in mesh bags tied together and being transported to the cambodian border. 18 didn't make it. translation: the monkeys were exhausted and dehydrated for a long time. some of them had respiratory problems because of overcrowding during the smuggling operation. wildlife smuggling in asia is nothing new — tigers, along with other animals have been traded, dead or alive, to neighbouring countries in what is a lucrative, if illegal, business. the authorities have been intercepting the banned wildlife shipments, but closing down the ruthless gangs behind it is a more difficult proposition. the smuggling of the monkeys was a carefully planned operation. a pickup truck was eventually intercepted at a checkpoint and taken to a field hospital
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equipped with ultrasound scanners and breathing tubes. the driver of the truck says he didn't know the animals were in the back of the vehicle. he's being detained and questioned about wildlife smuggling. russell trott, bbc news. downing street has this morning confirmed that borisjohnson and carrie symonds married yesterday at london's roman catholic westminster cathedral. a picture issued by number ten of the couple in downing street's garden after the wedding saw them gazing at each other, with mrsjohnson wearing a long white dress and a floral headband. the prime minister in a dark suit and blue tie. the twice—divorced borisjohnson's wedding took place at the secret event in front of close friends and family. the wedding comes at the end of a difficult week for the prime minister in which his former aide dominic cummings branded him unfit for office.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. 0ur beautiful bank holiday weather forecast set to continue. a good deal of dry, settled and sunny weather out there as you can see clearly from berwick earlier on. hardly a cloud in the sky for some areas. a perfect day for an outside afternoon hike in wales as well. beautiful, and the sunshine and warmth will continue. high pressure will be with us for the next couple of days. it is drifting off slowly into the north sea and that means more of a breeze developing particularly for bank holiday monday. we have seen some low cloud, mist and fog coming in off the north sea. this was the satellite picture earlier on. west was best in terms of sunshine but that sunshine will continue to nibble away at the cloud into the afternoon with the isolated risk of an isolated shower may be
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cropping up in scotland. temperatures will peak at around 20 to 23 degrees perhaps somewhere in the west where we have had the early morning sunshine. always cooler on the east coast. as we go through the evening and overnight the potential for more cloud to roll back and off the north sea, so another misty and murky start for eastern areas potentially on monday. a relatively mild start. temperatures widely out in the west in double figures. so early morning sunshine. more of a breeze develops, but it comes from a south—easterly direction. slightly warmer so if anything bank holiday monday will be warmer still for many. temperatures peaking at 2a are 25 degrees to close out the month of may. we got there in the end. for the beginning ofjune, it looks likely to stay dry, sunny and warm to begin with but, from wednesday into thursday at the risk potentially of some thundery showers developing. still, behind it a lot of dry, warm and relatively sunny weather. this frontal system moves through the middle part of the week
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and a level of uncertaintyjust where that front will be sitting and where the showers are likely to crop up but it is worth bearing in mind the further west you are through wednesday and potentially into thursday but could see some sharp, possibly thundery downpours. as they clear away it will be fresher, but we close out the week with a dry weather. further east you might not see the showers at all, but tuesday will be the peak of the heat. getting a little cooler towards the end.
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hello, this is bbc news with me, ben mundy. the headlines: celebrations for chelsea fans after their team wins the all—english champions league final against manchester city to lift the european cup for a second time. calls for the uk government to have an open debate with the public about restriction easing plans onjune the 21st. the group that represents nhs trusts in england warns of the pressures being faced by hospitals. neighbours reunited — the leaders of australia and new zealand meet for talks for the first time in 15 months after coronavirus border restrictions are lifted between the two countries. and britain's prime minister borisjohnson marries his fiancee carrie symonds in a secret ceremony at westminster cathedral. now, time for dateline london.
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hello, i'm shaun ley. welcome to the programme which brings together leading uk columnists, bbc specialists, and the foreign correspondents who write, broadcast and blog from abroad for audiences back home from the dateline, london. this week, pandemic panic, as borisjohnson's former top adviserjustified his damning indictment of britain's prime minister as unfit for the job. and a year after george floyd was murdered by an officer sworn to protect, what does congressional deadlock on police reform tell us about american politics and president biden? joining us, one of dateline's original contributors, the jamican—bornjournalist bernard burrell, steve richards has been writing and broadcasting about british politics for 30 years now. with me in the studio, presenter and bbc foreign
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correspondent, clive myrie. good to have you all with us.

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