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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 26, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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if what that did was help to. communicate about science. the contents about stephen hawkins' office will be transferred to the science museum in london. most iconic of all is his wheelchair, a symbol of the physical challenges he faced and also the strength and determination he had to overcome them. the eventual aim is to reconstruct his entire office. there are very few scientific spaces that survive, so actually having stephen's office is wonderful because he is extraordinary, but it sends a big, powerful message about the prestige of science as well. future generations will now be able to learn about the life and work of a man who inspired us with his brilliance, courage and humanity. pallab ghosh, bbc news. football, and manchester united have been in action against villareal in the final
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of the europa league tonight in gdansk in poland. 2000 united fans travelled to the match, despite covid protocols making travel to poland far from straightforward. 0lly foster has been watching the play. manchester united fans are used to european jaunts, but the journey to gdansk has been like no other. covid tests to get in, quarantine on return. i was considering cancelling because i thought there might not be any of this, and no fun or anything. i'm so glad i didn't cancel. tests and everything have cost well over £300, and my ticket was 34 quid and the flight was 189. united subsidised the flight by 200 quid. everyone was tested on the flight. you know, everyone was going to be covid—free, so we were actually- pretty comfortable in the end. though it's not the top prize in europe, united hadn't won a trophy for four years, so even without the challenges to get here, this felt big. standing in their way, villareal, veterans of this competition, but appearing in their first major european final.
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their manager, unai emery, is a master of the europa league. and with the spaniards�* first opportunity, gerard moreno muscled his way onto the end of a free kick. so often the super sub in his playing days, could 0le gunnar solskjaer engineer a comeback from the sidelines? they made a bright start to the second half. within ten minutes, they were level through edinson cavani. and this should've put them ahead. marcus rashford was left cursing himself. the dugout looked very lonely with the clock ticking down. the match was heading for extra time. and they are still in extra time, injury time. it is excruciating for the 2000 manchester united fans in there, it is still 1—1, it looks like it is heading for penalties. 0n 269099, ole like it is heading for penalties. 0n 269099, 0le gunnar scored a late
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winner to win manchester united three champions league. if they are to win the european league, they have left it very, very late. studio: thank you, 0lly foster. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the guardian's chief leader writer sonia sodha and times radio presenter tom newton dunn. lovely to have both of you with us this evening. thank you very much for having a look through the pages. let's bring you up—to—date with some of the papers we have had so far this evening. the metro looks at what it calls "domshell" revelations — focusing on the former advisor�*s criticism of borisjohson
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and his health secretary matt hancock. the telegraph does the same, referring to mr cummings' attack on the two men as "revenge". the financial times pays particular attention to the commons made about borisjohnson, after mr cummings said he felts ——the financial times pays particular attention to the comments made about borisjohnson, after mr cummings said he felts he was "unfit" to be pm he also said tens of thousands of people died unnecessarily as a result of the government's response to the pandemic, which the guardian leads with the i also looks at this line, whilst noting that the chief scientific advisers — patrick vallance and chris whitty — were spared. let's begin with the daily mail. i think it was, a lot of speculation before today about how much impact this will make with the public. at the proof is, it was a really significant day of testimony from the prime minister's former senior
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adviser. i think the reason for that, it wasn't even so much the fine—grained details of dominic cummings account that we got, and he said some pretty explosive things about matt hancock, accused him of lying on several occasions, some pretty explosive things about what the prime minister has said stop at the prime minister has said stop at the end of the day, this is just one man's testimony, and when we get to a proper inquiry, we will have a lot more testimony to put into the mix. when you think what to date they provided us with, it was much more evidence that fills in the gaps of some of what of what we already knew about the government's really significant failings over the last 14 months. so what we saw dominic cummings talk about, he talked about theissue cummings talk about, he talked about the issue with care homes, people being sent into care homes with no test. he talked about failures around ppe procurements, notjust looking down too late in march, but
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really significantly the fact that we had a prime minister who came out of the first lockdown not saying, well, we should've locked him sooner, shouldn't we, so we wouldn't have to do it is on, but actually, we shouldn't have lockdown at all, and it sounds like that really, really impacted the prime minister's judgment. he held off introducing a lockdown in september, october when scientific advisers were saying is really needed. that's why a lot of experts think we have had such a deadly second wave. more people died in the second wave and the first wave, so i think this isjust more evidence that fits with what we know already. if it's the jigsaw pieces that we already have about a prime minister who is completely unfit to govern. i agree with dominic cummings on much in this assessment of the prime minister, and the prime minister's ability and capabilities to take tough political decisions during a national crisis. obviously the chief writer _ during a national crisis. obviously the chief writer at _ during a national crisis. obviously the chief writer at the _ during a national crisis. obviously the chief writer at the guardian i the chief writer at the guardian from your plenty to work with. in a sense, and obviously as a former
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adviser to ed miliband from the liber of the later party —— labour party. the politics of this and how this will be used over the coming weeks and months. tom, you probably corridors of westminster for years, and then as political editor, the front page of the daily mail has four bombshells from dominic cummings, including one about his own infamous road trip to bernard castle last year which he said, i didn't tell you the truth, and gave an explanation why that was. is there a danger with this that there are so many targets that actually even for the paper writers, even though they have had the luxury of watching the whole thing today and are writing it up for tomorrow, they are writing it up for tomorrow, they are kind of losing the wood for the trees? it’s are kind of losing the wood for the trees? �* , ., ., are kind of losing the wood for the trees? �*, ., ., , trees? it's one of those days where it is actually — trees? it's one of those days where it is actually really _ trees? it's one of those days where it is actually really rather— trees? it's one of those days where it is actually really rather hard - trees? it's one of those days where it is actually really rather hard to i it is actually really rather hard to cram _ it is actually really rather hard to cram it _ it is actually really rather hard to cram it all— it is actually really rather hard to cram it all in forjournalists and make _ cram it all in forjournalists and make some sort of order, the military— make some sort of order, the military analogies are running thick and fast, _ military analogies are running thick and fast, that the mail also has grenades — and fast, that the mail also has grenades. hand you can say dominic cummings— grenades. hand you can say dominic cummings machine—gunned pretty
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everybody he could find in whitehall yesterday _ everybody he could find in whitehall yesterday leaving bullet marks absolutely everywhere, and look at what the _ absolutely everywhere, and look at what the daily mail have done page one endorsement, and then four to 15. one endorsement, and then four to 15 now. _ one endorsement, and then four to 15 now. the — one endorsement, and then four to 15. now, the daily mail to that extent— 15. now, the daily mail to that extent unless they have got an awful lot to _ extent unless they have got an awful lot to work _ extent unless they have got an awful lot to work with. it was an extraordinary performance. it was quite _ extraordinary performance. it was quite spellbinding for an incredibly lon- quite spellbinding for an incredibly long time, all of us were transfixed to the _ long time, all of us were transfixed to the screens for over seven hours listening _ to the screens for over seven hours listening to — to the screens for over seven hours listening to office. it was really quite _ listening to office. it was really quite directing. i think coming into this, _ quite directing. i think coming into this, a _ quite directing. i think coming into this, a lot — quite directing. i think coming into this, a lot of people thought, well, look, _ this, a lot of people thought, well, look. we _ this, a lot of people thought, well, look, we kind of know what happened, we know _ look, we kind of know what happened, we know the _ look, we kind of know what happened, we know the government lockdown too late twice, _ we know the government lockdown too late twice, both emerge and in september. when his dominic cummings iioii'i september. when his dominic cummings going to _ september. when his dominic cummings going to tell us —— what is he going to tell— going to tell us —— what is he going to tell us _ going to tell us —— what is he going to tell us that we don't already khow— to tell us that we don't already know because my two things that i think— know because my two things that i think were — know because my two things that i think were brand—new for me, one of the sheer— think were brand—new for me, one of the sheer venom with which he treated — the sheer venom with which he treated matt hancock with and the allegations against matt hancock which _ allegations against matt hancock which range from everything from failure _ which range from everything from failure for— which range from everything from failure for —— ppe to lying to the payments— failure for —— ppe to lying to the payments or multiple times, including doing things to bolster
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his ego. — including doing things to bolster his ego, devastating array of stuff. everything — his ego, devastating array of stuff. everything that we did know isjust all that— everything that we did know isjust all that extraordinary technicolor. as analogies from independence day, from hollywood films that's highly colourful— from hollywood films that's highly colourful language that we won't repeat _ colourful language that we won't repeat here on the bbc news channel, and you've _ repeat here on the bbc news channel, and you've got a real sense, certaihly _ and you've got a real sense, certaihly i _ and you've got a real sense, certainly i thought in the run—up to the march — certainly i thought in the run—up to the march lockdown ofjust the pandemonium, chaos and total terror that transfixed the entire government as they realised the couhtry— government as they realised the country was going to be gripped by this appalling pandemic. thel country was going to be gripped by this appalling pandemic. the i often does a lot of — this appalling pandemic. the i often does a lot of text, _ this appalling pandemic. the i often does a lot of text, but _ this appalling pandemic. the i often does a lot of text, but here, - this appalling pandemic. the i often does a lot of text, but here, they i does a lot of text, but here, they have gone not only text in the headline and another sub headline in headline and another sub headline in head low —— another side headline and yellow, but more text, there is and yellow, but more text, there is a lot here to absorb. there is so much detail that actually most readers kind of don't really have time to go through this and the papers are fascinated by it, but maybe the general public is, dare i
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say, not quite as fascinated to that degree. say, not quite as fascinated to that de . ree. ,, ., say, not quite as fascinated to that detree. ,., say, not quite as fascinated to that decree. . �*, degree. so, you might say that's, i think, degree. so, you might say that's, i think. actually. _ degree. so, you might say that's, i think, actually, dominic— degree. so, you might say that's, i think, actually, dominic cummingsj degree. so, you might say that's, i. think, actually, dominic cummings is one of— think, actually, dominic cummings is one of those — think, actually, dominic cummings is one of those cut through subjects. everybody — one of those cut through subjects. everybody knows who he is, everybody has a view _ everybody knows who he is, everybody has a view on — everybody knows who he is, everybody has a view on him. he broke through during _ has a view on him. he broke through during the _ has a view on him. he broke through during the famous renard castle eveht _ during the famous renard castle event which was a year ago yesterday. he hasn't remained in the public— yesterday. he hasn't remained in the public consciousness ever since. domihic— public consciousness ever since. dominic cummings has rather love to culture _ dominic cummings has rather love to culture that _ dominic cummings has rather love to culture that image of the bad guy, also loved — culture that image of the bad guy, also loved as well. so he does come through— also loved as well. so he does come through with the power of persuasion he has _ through with the power of persuasion he has come of the extraordinary arrogance — he has come of the extraordinary arrogance he exudes commit all creates — arrogance he exudes commit all creates visit image that people love to know _ creates visit image that people love to know about. certainly, we know our broadcasting figures came in front— our broadcasting figures came in front of— our broadcasting figures came in front of the committee today. i suspect — front of the committee today. i suspect paper sales will go up because — suspect paper sales will go up because people want to read about this sky— because people want to read about this sky for— because people want to read about this sky for good or for bad. and as ou uuite this sky for good or for bad. and as you quite rightly _ this sky for good or for bad. and as you quite rightly said _ this sky for good or for bad. and as you quite rightly said commit - you quite rightly said commit affects all of us. just looking at the telegraph, sonia, dominic
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cummings take his revenge as he lays blame onjohnson and hancock. picking up on sonia's point —— tom's point, perhaps people don't know all that they might have seen the drama documentary about him played by benedict cumberbatch, that might�*ve given them a positive view, and then a negative view because of what happened i'm bernard castle, who knows? but is that a potential problem in terms of reporting this story, that's, you know, people have almost made up their minds about him? i almost made up their minds about him? ~ . , almost made up their minds about him? ~' , , . him? i think he is definitely a marmite figure, _ him? i think he is definitely a marmite figure, but - him? i think he is definitely a marmite figure, but i - him? i think he is definitely a marmite figure, but i don't i him? i think he is definitely a i marmite figure, but i don't think that really takes away from the seriousness of what he was saying today, unless you think he was kind of completely lying about it all. for me, watching that testimony, it was so detailed, he is not a totally reliable witness, and you should neverjust reliable witness, and you should never just go reliable witness, and you should neverjust go on the account of one person as to what happened behind the scenes. this is why we really need a full public inquiry, and i think they are right to call for
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that. , . , w' , think they are right to call for that, . , x' , ., that. just very quickly, we do get matt hancock _ that. just very quickly, we do get matt hancock apparently - that. just very quickly, we do get matt hancock apparently in - that. just very quickly, we do get matt hancock apparently in front| that. just very quickly, we do get l matt hancock apparently in front of the house of commons tomorrow, which could answer some of these questions. could answer some of these questions— could answer some of these cuestions. . , ., ., questions. that will be one to watch. questions. that will be one to watch- he _ questions. that will be one to watch. he will _ questions. that will be one to watch. he will also _ questions. that will be one to watch. he will also be - questions. that will be one to watch. he will also be giving l questions. that will be one to | watch. he will also be giving a press conference to journalists tomorrow evening. so he has a lot to answer, a lot of extremely serious allegations about him that we have not heard before about direct lives that —— direct lies that he told colleagues which is incredibly serious. i think we need to listen to what he has got to say. dominic cummings is very much a marmite figure, but i don't think that tracks —— detracts from the seriousness of what he was saying. although we shouldn't regard him as a completely 100% reliable witness, a completely 100% reliable witness, a lot of what he is saying just kind of fits with what has been reported already with the facts of what we know happens, the wrong decisions that the prime minister has taken. so it kind of fits with what we know, so i think even people who are not big fans of dominic cummings who really engage with this in some detail and will have watched the
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testimony today, even if you don't really like the man from you don't like what he stands for comedian think he is the most trustworthy of figures can you understand that he will have put his own spin on events, you know, it's very clear that he's going for borisjohnson and for matt hancock. he really sidesteps saying anything critical about rishi sunak for example, sidesteps saying anything critical about rishi sunakfor example, you know, there is no question there is his own spin on this, but the fact of the matter is that when you take a step back, when you take a step back from the soap opera nature of who said what when you know, the charges leveled against the prime minister are so serious, and they stack up. it's his senior former adviser saying this guy is not fit to lead the country. he took terrible decisions. in fact, he swerved all over the place like a supermarket shopping trolley. he was swayed by newspaper editorials rather than the scientific evidence. but that is good news for your profession, his dick was mellow well, look, ithink, righti
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profession, his dick was mellow well, look, ithink, right- well, look, ithink, right i write newsuaper_ well, look, ithink, right i write newspaper editorials... - newspaper editorials... you hope they're influential, yes. but do i think the prime ministers should be looking at one newspaper's at a trail and taking decisions about a global pandemic based on that? or do i thank you should be listening to scientific advisers? obviously... i listening to scientific advisers? obviously- - -— listening to scientific advisers? obviousl . , obviously... i hope that is murder -- rhetorical _ obviously... i hope that is murder -- rhetorical question. _ obviously... i hope that is murder -- rhetorical question. let's - obviously... i hope that is murder -- rhetorical question. let's go i -- rhetorical question. let's go with the scientific _ -- rhetorical question. let's go with the scientific consensus. l -- rhetorical question. let's go l with the scientific consensus. so -- rhetorical question. let's go i with the scientific consensus. so i am sure mostjournalists would want the prime minister to be listening to the scientific consensus. so, you know, i think it is very, very significant. hejust can't know, i think it is very, very significant. he just can't get away from that, no matter what you think about dominic cummings.— from that, no matter what you think about dominic cummings. sonia, thank ou ve about dominic cummings. sonia, thank you very much- — about dominic cummings. sonia, thank you very much- tom. — about dominic cummings. sonia, thank you very much. tom, another - about dominic cummings. sonia, thank you very much. tom, another story - about dominic cummings. sonia, thank you very much. tom, another story in l you very much. tom, another story in the front of the telegraph, which, perhaps on a different day might appear more prominently on other papers. france orders uk seven—day quarantine. asked me to have a feeling that that might— asked me to have a feeling that that miqhtiust _ asked me to have a feeling that that mightjust be splashed over every front— mightjust be splashed over every front page with that bombshell we were all— front page with that bombshell we were all treated to today. an interesting story. who would book a foreign _ interesting story. who would book a foreign summer holiday anytime soon? here we _ foreign summer holiday anytime soon? here we go. _ foreign summer holiday anytime soon?
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here we go, just when we thought it was safe _ here we go, just when we thought it was safe to — here we go, just when we thought it was safe to go back into the travel agents. _ was safe to go back into the travel agents, albeit, france is not quite on the _ agents, albeit, france is not quite on the green list yet, very much in amber— on the green list yet, very much in amber list — on the green list yet, very much in amber list destination, hopes abound that france _ amber list destination, hopes abound that france would soon turn into a green _ that france would soon turn into a green list — that france would soon turn into a green list country. but before we can do— green list country. but before we can do that, guess what? they are banninq _ can do that, guess what? they are banninq us~ — can do that, guess what? they are banning us. 0r can do that, guess what? they are banning us. or they are certainly quarantining us. this is a story announced _ quarantining us. this is a story announced by france today, britain was effectively going on france's amber— was effectively going on france's amber list, tit—for—tat amber list retaliation— amber list, tit—for—tat amber list retaliation perhaps. but of very much _ retaliation perhaps. but of very much french concern, but because of the indian _ much french concern, but because of the indian variant which is circling quite _ the indian variant which is circling quite widely here now, almost certainly— quite widely here now, almost certainly the dominant variance everywhere, france are now very concerned — everywhere, france are now very concerned about british going there, germans _ concerned about british going there, germans closed their doors to british— germans closed their doors to british a — germans closed their doors to british a couple of days ago, the funds— british a couple of days ago, the funds are — british a couple of days ago, the funds are now following suit. i wouldn't — funds are now following suit. i wouldn't be surprised at all as much of europe _ wouldn't be surprised at all as much of europe takes the same course. in fact, of europe takes the same course. in fact. even— of europe takes the same course. in fact. even if— of europe takes the same course. in fact, even if we are a logical tier up fact, even if we are a logical tier up on _ fact, even if we are a logical tier up on holiday, we just simply want to be _ up on holiday, we just simply want to be able — up on holiday, we just simply want to be able to get in any longer. that— to be able to get in any longer. that is— to be able to get in any longer. that is very interesting, because only a few days ago, sonia, the spanish government saying, actually, no, we want you to come, you are
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welcome. it is and amber country, so when you come back

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