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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 25, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines council leaders and officials in eight areas of england hardest hit by the indian coronavirus variant have strongly criticised the way the government issued new guidance for people living there. no one in our system was told about this change in the presentation of the guidance and obviously since then, there's been a huge amount of confusion across the system and this would appear to be, in my view, a major communications ever. local authority leaders for the areas concerned have met with government officials and issued a joint statement this afternoon emphasising there are no local lockdowns — just sensible
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precautions and advice. will give your child to proper mummy and daddy because you can't possibly be a parent, you are a child. you are not fit to be a mother. hundreds of british women forced into giving up their babies for adoption between the 1950s and 70s, call on the prime minister to issue an official apology. a report into the conservative party's handling of discrimination claims, criticises borisjohnson�*s comments about women wearing the burka, which he made while he was a journalist. after images are released of the belarusian dissident arrested off a ryanairflight, the eu bans belarusian airlines from european skies. events are being held to mark the first anniversary of the murder of george floyd; members of his family will meet president bidenlater at the white house. and, the england manager gareth southgate announces his provisional squad for the upcoming european championships.
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the government has been accused of creating confusion for more than two million people directly affected by new coronavirus guidance issued in eight areas of england where there have been significant rises in cases of the indian variant. the advice suggests limiting travel and indoor gatherings. but many council leaders and health officials have sharply criticised the government for not informing them of the changes before they were put on a government website. labour have called for the guidance to be scrapped — saying it amounts to local lockdowns by the back door. local authority public health leaders for the areas concerned have met with government officials and issued a joint statement this afternoon emphasising there are no new travel restrictions or local lockdowns — just sensible precautions and advice.
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our health correspondent katharine da costa reports. an extra push to vaccinate here in bedford, one of the hotspots in england receiving additional support to target the faster spreading variant first detected in india. but several councils were surprised to learn of new guidance advising people against nonessential travel in or out of the worst affected areas. this is in effect a lockdown by stealth. i don't agree with the government's assessment of this, this is clearly telling people they should not be doing things they have been legally permitted to do. bolton is probably spent more time and knocked on the end of the other part of— and knocked on the end of the other part of the _ and knocked on the end of the other part of the country. and since july last year. — part of the country. and since july last year, there really hasn't been hardly— last year, there really hasn't been hardly any— last year, there really hasn't been hardly any period of time where there _ hardly any period of time where there has— hardly any period of time where there has not been some degree of lockdowh — it's unfortunately another example of the government doing to us - without working with us. so it's caused a lot of confusion, we were only alerted to it - byjournalists last night,
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late last night. - on friday, government guidance was updated on its website for eight council areas where the indian variant is spreading fastest. it advises them to meet outside rather than inside where possible, to keep two metres apart from people outside of their household or support bubble, and to avoid travelling in and out of affected areas unless for essential reasons such as work or education. downing street denies it amounts to local lockdowns, ministers say the guidance serves as extra caution on top of surge testing and vaccinations. but labour say the failure to alert local leaders was shameful and in the commons this lunchtime, called for an urgent update. as the prime minister said, mr speaker, we want the whole country to move out of these restrictions together and we are trusting, trusting people to be responsible and act with caution and common sense as they have done throughout this pandemic, and to make decisions about how best
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to protect themselves and their loved ones, informed by the risks. can the minister understand how upsetting it is, can he understand how insulting it is to have new restrictions imposed upon us, local lockdowns by stealth, by the back door, and the secretary of state does not even had of state does not even have the courtesy to come and tell us. nightclubs and other businesses are still waiting to hear whether all restrictions will be lifted as planned on the 21st ofjune. ministers have said they are increasingly confident they will, but the decision will depend on how much faster the indian variant is spreading and how well the vaccines stop it causing serious illness and putting pressure on hospitals. katharine da costa, bbc news. katharine dacosta joins me now tell us little more about this joint statement issued by the local councils affected. it statement issued by the local councils affected.— statement issued by the local councils affected. , ., ., councils affected. it comes down to a big breakdown _
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councils affected. it comes down to a big breakdown in _ councils affected. it comes down to j a big breakdown in communications because it seems to be a meeting with the councils and government officials were there some reassurance. it is worth stating that the government had previously said that these were guidelines only. not restrictions in law. and the people needed to remain cautious, to act responsibly, to use common sense. so, the are still in level three. on behalf of burnley, bedford, blackburn, lester, london and they said that they have met with officials and confirm there is no restrictions on travel in or out of our areas and there are no local lockdown. they say in areas where new covid—i9 variants are spreading, we are working together to boost testing and supports of isolation. the guidance is still on the government website. but wood has not changed is the way to reduce the risk of spreading this virus. people ahead of the bank holiday, they are
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still reminded to remember hands, face, space, fresh air and get tested twice a week in take part in search testing and isolate and take effect vaccine when offered one. i wonder if some of the confusion has been caused by the language used by each side and that the government has been talking about guidance and the local councils are talking about restrictions and the government might say remembrance of the restrictions in this area, there was guidance only. irate restrictions in this area, there was guidance only-— restrictions in this area, there was guidance only. we are at the vaccine ministers saying _ guidance only. we are at the vaccine ministers saying that _ guidance only. we are at the vaccine ministers saying that it's _ guidance only. we are at the vaccine ministers saying that it's about - ministers saying that it's about common sense and being responsible and it won't always be a case of following rules set by the government once restrictions were lifted and eased earlier this month. we are now in a stage where people do have to use common sense. we know there's less transmission outside than inside for example, that people should carry on working from home when possible. we are now using
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masks in no that reduces spreading in public areas. and that may have erupted out of, what do you mean by restrictions or guidance and actually, that could've avoided a lot of the spy better communication in the first place. let's speak to shadow health secretary and labour mp for leicester south jonathan ashworth: good afternoon to you. i don't know if you manage to hear catherine there. we are talking about some of there. we are talking about some of the confusion or whether or not it came through the language. issuing guidance, it is not talking about restrictions, its guidance, it's advice. �* , , , restrictions, its guidance, it's advice. �*, , ,~ . advice. it's been utterly chaotic da and advice. it's been utterly chaotic day and of _ advice. it's been utterly chaotic day and of course, _ advice. it's been utterly chaotic day and of course, i _ advice. it's been utterly chaotic day and of course, i speak- advice. it's been utterly chaotic day and of course, i speak for. advice. it's been utterly chaotic. day and of course, i speak for the labour party on health matters but also a member of parliament for leicester south very city that wasn't locked lockdown for the whole of last year and when this guidance
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was stumbled upon, it cost tremendous upset and that's why i suggested that they withdraw this guidance because it is causing confusion. people should not travel unless it is essential, but should families that have booked a few days away expected to cancel their holidays now? we did not need to be here. why did they put this on their website on friday night and not alert people? why did they talk to the health experts on the ground. this came completely out of the blue for the health experts on the ground with the fight against covid—i9 in places like blackburn and leicester. it's been a fiasco today and i am pleased that at least a leicester, the guidance is not to be enforced if you can still go on their holidays if they booked holidays. but what a mess. this really could been handled so much better today. you're saying the government should
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withdraw its guidance. isn't it a case that should clarify this and if there's a problem in a particular area and other measures need to be brought and, people need to be told that clearly, don't they? your saying that the guidance should be withdrawn, why should it be if there an issue? the withdrawn, why should it be if there an issue? ., withdrawn, why should it be if there an issue? ._ . , ., ., an issue? the way in which you deal with these hotspot _ an issue? the way in which you deal with these hotspot areas _ an issue? the way in which you deal with these hotspot areas with - an issue? the way in which you deal with these hotspot areas with a - with these hotspot areas with a variance, there's a great prevalence of it is by fixing issues like sick pay, investing in contract tracing but also running a vaccination more generally. we know that one dose of the vaccine is less effective in this particular variant. and we should also be vaccinating those who had no dose. this should be in local areas. but not issuing guidance that people cannot go on holiday, or they can mix, they are also being told of
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the same time that the restrictions are lifting everywhere in this moment to enjoy the freedoms which are flowing back to us. the messaging from the government is completely contradictory and priorities everything when inviting the pandemic —— fighting. this the pandemic -- fighting. this ruidance the pandemic -- fighting. this guidance from _ the pandemic -- fighting. this guidance from the _ the pandemic —— fighting. this guidance from the government amounts to local lockdown spy the back door, i mean, that is not what they were saying. they were not issuing local lockdown. they were issuing guidance, advice.— lockdown. they were issuing guidance, advice. they are telling eo - le guidance, advice. they are telling peeple not _ guidance, advice. they are telling peeple not to _ guidance, advice. they are telling people not to travel _ guidance, advice. they are telling people not to travel and - guidance, advice. they are telling people not to travel and only - guidance, advice. they are telling | people not to travel and only travel to work purposes. and not to mix indoors. that is what they are suggesting stop by their advising people to be careful. again, it comes back to the questions than. if you've got your holiday looked for half term next week, does the government want you to cancel it or not. if you have a wedding organised and you have 30 guests coming to your wedding from across the country, diff to cancel your wedding
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now? the government should issue clear regulations or they should say that everyone follows the same rules now in these particular areas where there is a problem, we will invest more vaccination, more sick pay isolation support in the like contact tracing. that is i think the government should do and i would be the way in which we can get on top of the virus in places like leicester, burnley. the latest government figures should the new cases in the latest 2a hour period. turning to the vaccination programme, more than 38 million people have now got the firstjab and with a 23 million people have their second dose. british travellers to austria will — from today — need an essential reason to enter the country, because of concern about the indian variant.
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direct flights from the uk to austria will be banned for three weeks, from the 1st ofjune. an independent report into allegations of racial discrimination within the conservative party has found �*anti—muslim sentiment remains a problem'. the inquiry was commissioned by the conservatives following claims of islamophobia among its members. the report says the party recorded more than 1,400 complaints about alleged discrimination over a five year period — sanctions were issued in 231 cases. the report said borisjohnson's past comments about women wearing the burka gave the impression that the tories are "insensitive to muslim communities". but it said claims of "institutional racism" were not borne out by the way complaints were handled. the party's co—chair amanda milling apologised "to anyone who has been hurt by discriminatory behaviour — or failed by our system". so the report that professor singh has published today does make uncomfortable reading for us
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in the conservative party and the first thing i want to say, i want to say sorry to anybody who has kind of had any experience of discrimination in the party and any hurt that they have felt. the report is detailed and thorough and includes 27 recommendations which we have accepted in full today. this was the reaction from senior conservative mp sajid javid — home secretary under theresa may and chancellor under borisjohnson. i call from this investigation during the leadership contest in 2019 and i'm really pleased the report has finally been published. but the report, it is a thorough piece of work, very candid and forthright and of course, that is good to see. and also having reflected on it, i think while at one level, it says there is no evidence of any kind of institutional or systemic
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discrimination and the complaints process, it is nevertheless set out what i think is a very distressing example of anti—muslim prejudice at the local association and at the individual level and it goes on to say that the whole complaints process needs a complete overhaul, both in terms of resources, and terms of training its transparency. lots of reasons he gives for this and i must say having read it, i fully support him and his conclusions and i would strongly urge the party to adopt all of his recommendations in full with no conditionality. we can speak to lord sheikh, the president of the conservative muslim forum. do you agree with him there that the recommendation should be implemented in full and do you agree with the findings in the report? i in full and do you agree with the findings in the report?— findings in the report? i think it is a aood findings in the report? i think it is a good report. _
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findings in the report? i think it is a good report. the _ findings in the report? i think it is a good report. the report - findings in the report? i think it - is a good report. the report defines the problem and the issue regarding discrimination and also puts forward good recommendations. i had a meeting this morning and i am pleased that they said that it is uncomfortable reading. she apologised what is happened but we need to do it so work in progress further and deal with the issues and they think, identifying problems and important points are, it sets out what needs to be done after six weeks and six months and what needs to be done after one year and there is a conservative fear, that the recommendations of the people are fully implemented in the report does save that if any of the recommendations cannot be implemented, all in all, i agree with sajid javid and admitted that
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we have identified the problems and we have identified the problems and we are certain we deemed to make sure that the issues are ironed out a one nation party. a member of the party for 15 years and i do not agree with the comments some of us is made. and there is no institutional racism but... to be fair, the report _ institutional racism but... to be fair, the report did _ institutional racism but... to be fair, the report did not - institutional racism but... to be fair, the report did not suggest| fair, the report did not suggest that there was institutional racism and the party. he did want to ask you, part of the problem, people at the top of the party or is seeing and have been found to have made insensitive comments which include the prime minister before he became prime minister when he said that women were broker look like letterboxes and bank robbers and also the mayoral candidate for london in 2016 second goldsmith, the language that he used in the report
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says that he accepts that he showed poorjudgment in the way that his campaign was conducted. isn't this part of the problem that people of the top of the party have not set the top of the party have not set the right tone? i the top of the party have not set the right tone?— the top of the party have not set the right tone? i think they are in the right tone? i think they are in the ast. the right tone? i think they are in the past- we _ the right tone? i think they are in the past. we must— the right tone? i think they are in the past. we must bear- the right tone? i think they are in the past. we must bear in - the right tone? i think they are in the past. we must bear in mind. | the right tone? i think they are in i the past. we must bear in mind. it's not that long ago. i _ the past. we must bear in mind. it's not that long ago. i have _ the past. we must bear in mind. it's not that long ago. i have spoken - the past. we must bear in mind. it's not that long ago. i have spoken on| not that long ago. i have spoken on this issue before. _ not that long ago. i have spoken on this issue before. but _ not that long ago. i have spoken on this issue before. but i _ not that long ago. i have spoken on this issue before. but i think- not that long ago. i have spoken on this issue before. but i think what l this issue before. but i think what we should do from now on words, i think you must bear in mind, the members from the community who are members from the community who are members of the cabinet, as well as ministers. indeed, iwould reiterate that we should be a one nation party, what is happened in the past, i think we should put that behind us. in i think we should put that behind us. , ., ._ . us. in terms of the way in which some of the _ us. in terms of the way in which some of the other _ us. in terms of the way in which some of the other complaints i us. in terms of the way in which i some of the other complaints were investigated, there were about one over a thousand complaints in the period that the report was looking
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at only 230 of them were satisfactorily resolved. does that suggest to you that there just hasn't been a robust enough complaint procedure within the party? i complaint procedure within the .a ? ., ., , , ., complaint procedure within the -a ? ., ., party? i would approve that. particularly _ party? i would approve that. particularly at _ party? i would approve that. particularly at a _ party? i would approve that. particularly at a local - party? i would approve that. particularly at a local level. | party? i would approve that. j particularly at a local level. i think the professor has identified the problem and they need training. it is very important that people are told what they should do. they should be trained, there should be one code of conduct and think this needs to be done and that is in the recommendation and that needs to be done by the party within a period of six months and i'm sure that will be done. . ~ six months and i'm sure that will be done. . ,, ,., six months and i'm sure that will be done. . ~' ,. , six months and i'm sure that will be done. . ,, y., , . six months and i'm sure that will be done. . ~ ,, , . ., six months and i'm sure that will be done. . ,, , . ., done. thank you very much for your time. the conservative mp rob roberts has apologised for what he called a �*breach of trust�* — after a complaints panel ruled that he broke parliament's
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sexual misconduct policy. the independent expert panel has recommended he be suspended from parliament for six weeks. it said that mr roberts, mp for delyn in north wales, made repeated and unwanted sexual advances towards a male parliamentary staff member. hundreds of women who were forced into giving up their babies for adoption in the 1950s, 60s and 70s, have called on the prime minister to issue a government apology. the women say around a quarter of a million birth mothers in britain — many of them teenagers — were shamed into handing over their babies by social workers, church groups, doctors and nurses. many were told they were unfit to be mothers, whilst others were denied pain relief during birth. today, they ve written to borisjohnson urging him to follow the lead set by other countries like australia and apologise. duncan kennedy has this special report. the angelic faces of some of those of the centre of the story. a story
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of the centre of the story. a story of social taboos, unmarried mothers and forced adoptions. taste of socialtaboos, unmarried mothers and forced adoptions.— and forced adoptions. we became intimate and _ and forced adoptions. we became intimate and i _ and forced adoptions. we became intimate and i got _ and forced adoptions. we became intimate and i got pregnant. - and forced adoptions. we became intimate and i got pregnant. it - and forced adoptions. we became| intimate and i got pregnant. it was 1965, intimate and i got pregnant. it was 1965. veronica _ intimate and i got pregnant. it was 1965, veronica smith _ intimate and i got pregnant. it was 1965, veronica smith was - intimate and i got pregnant. it was 1965, veronica smith was one - intimate and i got pregnant. it was 1965, veronica smith was one of. 1965, veronica smith was one of those unmarried women. it was seen as so shameful that she was sent to as so shameful that she was sent to a mother and baby home. she even wrote fake letters to her father, claiming she was working in spain. my claiming she was working in spain. my mother did not tell my father because it she said it would kill him. so he never knew? — she said it would kill him. so he never knew? no. _ she said it would kill him. so he never knew? no. never? - she said it would kill him. so he| never knew? no. never? never. she said it would kill him. so he - never knew? no. never? never. she became pregnant _ never knew? no. never? never. she became pregnant at _ never knew? no. never? never. she became pregnant at 16. _ never knew? no. never? never. she became pregnant at 16. she - never knew? no. never? never. she became pregnant at 16. she said - never knew? no. never? never. she became pregnant at 16. she said she| became pregnant at 16. she said she was shamed by a social worker. you will rive was shamed by a social worker. you will give your— was shamed by a social worker. you will give your child a proper mother and father— will give your child a proper mother and father because you cannot possibly— and father because you cannot possibly be a parent to your child. you are _ possibly be a parent to your child. you are not. — possibly be a parent to your child. you are not, you are not fit to be a mother _
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you are not, you are not fit to be a mother. �* , you are not, you are not fit to be a mother. . , , .. , ., ., mother. and she became pregnant at 17 and said even _ mother. and she became pregnant at 17 and said even as _ mother. and she became pregnant at 17 and said even as she _ mother. and she became pregnant at 17 and said even as she gave - mother. and she became pregnant at 17 and said even as she gave birth, i 17 and said even as she gave birth, she was denied pain relief on purpose. she was denied pain relief on --urose. ~ she was denied pain relief on ”urose, . ., ., , purpose. when i asked for help, i was i purpose. when i asked for help, i was i given _ purpose. when i asked for help, i was i given any — purpose. when i asked for help, i was i given any hope _ purpose. when i asked for help, i was i given any hope for- purpose. when i asked for help, i was i given any hope for pain. - purpose. when i asked for help, i was i given any hope for pain. i i purpose. when i asked for help, i l was i given any hope for pain. i was told, ou was i given any hope for pain. i was told. you will— was i given any hope for pain. i was told, you will remember— was i given any hope for pain. i was told, you will remember this. - was i given any hope for pain. i was told, you will remember this. so you will not _ told, you will remember this. so you will not be _ told, you will remember this. so you will not be wicked _ told, you will remember this. so you will not be wicked again. _ told, you will remember this. so you will not be wicked again. you - told, you will remember this. so you will not be wicked again. you are - told, you will remember this. so you will not be wicked again. you are a l will not be wicked again. you are a bad girl, _ will not be wicked again. you are a bad girl, you — will not be wicked again. you are a bad girl, you will— will not be wicked again. you are a bad girl, you will not— will not be wicked again. you are a bad girl, you will not be _ will not be wicked again. you are a bad girl, you will not be wicked - bad girl, you will not be wicked again — bad girl, you will not be wicked aaain. , bad girl, you will not be wicked aiain. , , again. dan is said in her delivery room, a again. dan is said in her delivery room. a nurse — again. dan is said in her delivery room, a nurse was _ again. dan is said in her delivery room, a nurse was equally - again. dan is said in her delivery - room, a nurse was equally heartless. diane r. , , room, a nurse was equally heartless. diane r. , _ , ., diane r. this baby is flexed for adaption- _ diane r. this baby is flexed for adaption- l _ diane r. this baby is flexed for adoption. iwill_ diane r. this baby is flexed for adoption. i will take _ diane r. this baby is flexed for adoption. i will take her- diane r. this baby is flexed for adoption. i will take her away. | diane r. this baby is flexed for - adoption. i will take her away. and adoption. iwill take her away. and icah_ adoption. iwill take her away. and i can rememberyelling adoption. iwill take her away. and i can remember yelling and saying please, _ i can remember yelling and saying please, bring her back! and they left me _ please, bring her back! and they left me there for four hours. i can 'ust left me there for four hours. i can just remember lying there thinking, that _
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the pressure on unmarried women to give up their babies came from doctors, religious... it give up their babies came from doctors, religious...— doctors, religious... it was coercion- _ doctors, religious... it was coercion. the _ doctors, religious... it was coercion. the phrase - doctors, religious... it was coercion. the phrase was, | doctors, religious... it was - coercion. the phrase was, this will be for— coercion. the phrase was, this will be for the — coercion. the phrase was, this will be for the best. _ coercion. the phrase was, this will be for the best. this— coercion. the phrase was, this will be for the best. this will— coercion. the phrase was, this will be for the best. this will be - coercion. the phrase was, this will be for the best. this will be for- be for the best. this will be for the baby, — be for the best. this will be for the baby, this'll_ be for the best. this will be for the baby, this'll be _ be for the best. this will be for the baby, this'll be the - be for the best. this will be for the baby, this'll be the best i be for the best. this will be for| the baby, this'll be the best for you _ the baby, this'll be the best for you. because— the baby, this'll be the best for you. because if— the baby, this'll be the best for you. because if you _ the baby, this'll be the best for you. because if you really- the baby, this'll be the best for you. because if you really lovel the baby, this'll be the best for- you. because if you really love this baby, _ you. because if you really love this baby, you — you. because if you really love this baby, you will— you. because if you really love this baby, you will make _ you. because if you really love this baby, you will make sure - you. because if you really love this baby, you will make sure that i you. because if you really love this baby, you will make sure that it i you. because if you really love thisl baby, you will make sure that it has a different— baby, you will make sure that it has a different life _ baby, you will make sure that it has a different life and _ baby, you will make sure that it has a different life and not _ baby, you will make sure that it has a different life and not with - baby, you will make sure that it has a different life and not with you. i a different life and not with you. for most — a different life and not with you. for most birth _ a different life and not with you. for most birth members, - a different life and not with you. for most birth members, the i a different life and not with you. i for most birth members, the moment of giving up the baby was the worst. some women can never forget the day. she was asleep. she never woke up. and they took her from me. she was asleep. she never woke up. and they took herfrom me. i couldn't find the people waiting in the next room to adopt her. and that
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was it! but my mum was waiting for me downstairs. and we went shopping. we went shopping! i loved her so much! i still love her! i am her mum! legal experts believe around a quarter of a million unmarried women in britain were pressured into handing over their babies in the three decades after the second world war. many now say they should receive a government apology. this a olo we receive a government apology. ti 3 apology we moved in the senate. receive a government apology. this| apology we moved in the senate. as to what happened to a quarter of million women in australia. take responsibility _ million women in australia. take responsibility and _ million women in australia. ts: age:
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responsibility and apologise. million women in australia. take l responsibility and apologise. other governments _ responsibility and apologise. other governments have _ responsibility and apologise. other governments have since _ responsibility and apologise. other governments have since followed. now birthmothers in britain have written to borisjohnson, asking for an official apology here. ids, to boris johnson, asking for an official apology here. a historical in'ustice is official apology here. a historical injustice is what _ official apology here. a historical injustice is what happened i official apology here. a historical injustice is what happened here. | injustice is what happened here. other— injustice is what happened here. other countries— injustice is what happened here. other countries have _ injustice is what happened here. other countries have recognised j injustice is what happened here. i other countries have recognised it and its— other countries have recognised it and it's high— other countries have recognised it and it's high time _ other countries have recognised it and it's high time ours _ other countries have recognised it and it's high time ours did. - other countries have recognised it and it's high time ours did. it- and it's high time ours did. would be very good if and it's high time ours did.- would be very good if someone said i'm sorry. it would be so powerful to show people that would happen to us was wrong. the to show people that would happen to us was wrong-— to show people that would happen to us was wrong. the government says it acce ts us was wrong. the government says it accepts forced — us was wrong. the government says it accepts forced adoptions _ us was wrong. the government says it accepts forced adoptions did _ us was wrong. the government says it accepts forced adoptions did take i accepts forced adoptions did take place, but those laws have changed since that era. many women like veronica smith did not have any more children and says it is time said sorry. what if you missed out on? i don't know how to mother. i don't. it's notjust me, it's thousands of
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women. it was so wrong. i'm joined by ann keen, who had her baby taken from her aged 17, in the 1960s. ann is now a nurse, and was formerly a labour mp. very difficult to watch the testimony from yourself and the other women in duncan's report. it's only shocking to a modern audience this might happen. oi only shocking to a modern audience this might happen.— this might happen. of course it is. in the expressions _ this might happen. of course it is. in the expressions that _ this might happen. of course it is. in the expressions that are - this might happen. of course it is. in the expressions that are used i this might happen. of course it is. | in the expressions that are used all the time. she gave him up. she gave her baby away. it's so hurtful and i want this apology, notjust her baby away. it's so hurtful and i want this apology, not just for somebody in the present government is not to blame. it's about our feelings. i would like my name
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cleared, i would like you cleared that i did not do that. i did not give him up. i would like to think that people cared enough about us to see are you all right now? what is the mental health issue. what are the mental health issue. what are the issues? to you, yourfamilies, your children, some reunited some not united. some happy, some not. nobody has asked us are we ok? and we know from statistics, i know from experience that being in this wonderful group of mothers saying that alcohol, drug dependency, other, suicide attempts, when i listen to those in saying what they said. we went shopping. i was told forget all about it now. it's impossible to have that experience, that love is difficult to describe. the love of a mother and a child is
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well recorded. it is special. and yes, i became a nurse as many other mothers in my situation did, to make sure that we give compassion. i made sure that we give compassion. i made sure as best as they could fit no patient suffered the indignity, injustices, i always know campaign on that level. it injustices, i always know campaign on that level.— on that level. it was compassion that ou on that level. it was compassion that you did _ on that level. it was compassion that you did not _ on that level. it was compassion that you did not receive. - on that level. it was compassion i that you did not receive. absolutely not. i'm wondering, _ that you did not receive. absolutely not. i'm wondering, you _ that you did not receive. absolutely not. i'm wondering, you have i that you did not receive. absolutely| not. i'm wondering, you have clearly carried the pain _ not. i'm wondering, you have clearly carried the pain with _ not. i'm wondering, you have clearly carried the pain with you _ not. i'm wondering, you have clearly carried the pain with you throughout| carried the pain with you throughout your life. this all happened quite a while ago. why are you mounting this campaign now?— campaign now? well, and the report, he mentions — campaign now? well, and the report, he mentions australia. _ campaign now? well, and the report, he mentions australia. very - he mentions australia. very recently, ireland gave an apology
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and even more recently, northern ireland which is in the uk, have said they are now looking at what happened in northern ireland and if other commonwealth countries can do it. surely our prime minister and our country can do it. i know that people would want this to happen. it is just about asking for the same as someone else. why not? why can't we be the same as other mothers and families in other countries within the commonwealth and this is regular practice. this is something that will stay with me all my life. you mentioned i was a former mp. i could not give my oath easily and for this to the three days. i did not feel
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worthy. ile to the three days. i did not feel worth . �* ., , , worthy. he didn't feelworthy, why not? because _ worthy. he didn't feelworthy, why not? because of— worthy. he didn't feelworthy, why not? because of the _ worthy. he didn't feelworthy, why not? because of the shame - worthy. he didn't feelworthy, why not? because of the shame that i worthy. he didn't feel worthy, why i not? because of the shame that had been embedded _ not? because of the shame that had been embedded in _ not? because of the shame that had been embedded in me. _ not? because of the shame that had been embedded in me. i— not? because of the shame that had been embedded in me. iwas- not? because of the shame that had been embedded in me. i was told i not? because of the shame that had been embedded in me. i was told atj been embedded in me. i was told at all times to go from being in that unmarried mothers home to being elected to parliament to continue to going to be a minister. it is something i still reflect back on of course, with pride and amazement, but i cannot believe that i had that privilege because i wasn't entitled to any privilege with what i was told. forso to any privilege with what i was told. for so long and people that have been in that position, we all relate to the same. it is not about just an apology, there are consequences of what happened to us. serious as i've mentioned, medical, mental health, also it's of care that we just want someone to say how are you, how's your family please make can we look at this? who paid
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for the homes? why was i never given the opportunity to be told i could have the state back to me? poor tour of the opposite, you have no money, nowhere to live, your baby, that is not love. make sure your baby is adopted if you love. that was not true. ~ , ., true. will you ever reunited with our true. will you ever reunited with your child? _ true. will you ever reunited with your child? l _ true. will you ever reunited with your child? i was _ true. will you ever reunited with your child? i was indeed - true. will you ever reunited with your child? i was indeed and i true. will you ever reunited with your child? i was indeed and 28 | your child? i was indeed and 28 ears your child? i was indeed and 28 years later- _ your child? i was indeed and 28 years later. amazing. _ your child? i was indeed and 28 years later. amazing. euphoric. still, to be perfectly honest, sometimes i can't believe, it has consequences, all sorts of programmes are on at the moment and i'm happy. but there will be consequences because there is a deep, deep hurt for the children, for a child to think they know that they were given away. given up. of
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those words go through me. i have no issue with the lovely people that adopted my baby. i decided i would love them because they had my baby. they were in a legal situation. nothing untoward to happen. but that was not how it happened. i went from a baby into the nursery home on the eighth day because i knew i could have him for ten and on the eighth day, he was not there. and when i asked why, the midwife said to me, no, you are getting far too close. if you look over there and you pointed to a window, he is in that building waiting for his new mummy. and you can now come with me into the bathroom, she made sure i was in the bathroom, she made sure i was in the bath, expressed my breasts of the bath, expressed my breasts of the milk and told me i had no need for this. that is not right. that is
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not how adoption should be. that is very, very wrong. not how adoption should be. that is very. very wrong-— not how adoption should be. that is very, very wrong. thank you so much for speaking — very, very wrong. thank you so much for speaking to _ very, very wrong. thank you so much for speaking to us _ very, very wrong. thank you so much for speaking to us so _ very, very wrong. thank you so much for speaking to us so movingly. i for speaking to us so movingly. thank you so much. she had her baby taken away from her at the age 17, but was reunited with them many years later. thank you. and you can see more on that story in a documentary this weekend on the bbc news channel. if you love your baby, the story of forced adoptions is on this saturday at 1—30pm and 8—30pm and will also be on the bbc iplayer now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. while more of you are driving, rain clouds are still plaguing parts of the area, some heavy and into the evening thundershowers and some were persistent rain to the southwest. and the sunshine is out and temperatures of 60 degrees to finish
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the day with the sunny spells. we see the rain position to the south with some gusty winds the channel islands this evening. pushing off an offensive or night, plenty of cloud across scotland northeast england and some clear skies are out, co—ordinate to come tonight and temperature that are on two or three degrees from parts of the southwest in particular. and in wednesday, we go with more cloud, more showers speeding up to scotland in northern england, speeding up towards east anglia during the day. much of the central southern england, wales, northern ireland predominately dry and asked us to be a bit warmer with 17 or 18 degrees the highs on wednesday afternoon and as they finish the day, fuse thunderstorms in northeast england, they will gradually fade the next few days and there will be some rain and overall dry and warmer in the weekend. hello this is bbc news with reeta chakrabarti. the headlines: council leaders and officials in eight areas of england hardest hit by the indian coronavirus variant have strongly criticised the way the government issued new guidance
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for people living there. nobody in our system was told about this change in the presentation of the guidance and strength than there have been huge amounts of confusion across the system and this would appear to be in my view a fairly major communications error. local authority leaders for the areas concerned have met with government officials and issued a joint statement this afternoon emphasising there are no local lockdowns — just sensible precautions and advice. hundreds of british women forced into giving up their babies for adoption between the 1950s and 70s, call on the prime minister to issue an official apology. a report into the conservative party's handling of discrimination claims, criticises borisjohnson's comments about women wearing the burka, which he made while he was a journalist.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. the brilliant summer of sport feels closer because gareth southgate has named a provisional 33 man squad where they rescheduled euro 2020 but the england manager said he does not possess an ideal hand of cards due to the involvement of so many of his players and the europa league and champions league final this week. he will not take his final 26 until next tuesday. for now, here is the squad. there are four uncapped players in there. the goalkeeper samjohnson four uncapped players in there. the goalkeeper sam johnson and erin lonsdale plus defend their bank free and ben white. there are four in there including trent alexander—arnold and there are three teenagers in the squad. in midfield there department and manchester
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united forward mason greenwood. they are both 19. notable nations include tottenham's eric and james madison. southgate has been telling our sports editor he has got some big decisions ahead. oi sports editor he has got some big decisions ahead.— sports editor he has got some big decisions ahead. of the threat -- of the 33 names. _ decisions ahead. of the threat -- of the 33 names, still— decisions ahead. of the threat -- of the 33 names, still have _ decisions ahead. of the threat -- of the 33 names, still have 12 - decisions ahead. of the threat -- of the 33 names, still have 12 to i decisions ahead. of the threat -- of the 33 names, still have 12 to play l the 33 names, still have 12 to play in the european finals and we had two big injuries last weekend. so there is a risk of that. we have got for players who will be there injured currently were returning from injury and although we have had good communication is medically listed in the dark of the full picture of those guys so we can see them with their own eyes even on the training page. haifa them with their own eyes even on the training page-— training page. how important is it that our training page. how important is it that your team — training page. how important is it that your team take _ training page. how important is it that your team take advantage i training page. how important is it that your team take advantage of| that your team take advantage of this wonderful opportunity in terms of what is effectively home advantage and if you go all the way all but one of the matches will be at wembley. it all but one of the matches will be at wembley— all but one of the matches will be at wembley. it is a great thrill for us to be able _ at wembley. it is a great thrill for us to be able to _ at wembley. it is a great thrill for us to be able to play _ at wembley. it is a great thrill for us to be able to play when - at wembley. it is a great thrill for us to be able to play when b i at wembley. it is a great thrill for us to be able to play when b and| us to be able to play when b and with fans back in the stadium. that is something the whole country is
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looking forward to. we recognise there is a part for us to pray and of a country getting back on its feet and we are heading to make a direction now for the vaccination programme and it appears to be successful which is brilliant for everybody. we hope we can bring some enjoyment and entertainment to people. enjoyment and entertainment to --eole. ., enjoyment and entertainment to eo le, ., ., enjoyment and entertainment to --eole. ., ., ., ., ., enjoyment and entertainment to --eole. ., ., ., .,., ., ., people. not long to go on to it all iets people. not long to go on to it all gets under— people. not long to go on to it all gets under way- _ people. not long to go on to it all gets under way. after _ people. not long to go on to it all gets under way. after the - people. not long to go on to it all gets under way. after the euros, | gets under way. after the euros, he'll be taking over as the new germany manager and will replace who he served as an assistant for eight years winning the world cup together in 2014. he is stepping down after the tournament this summer when he left his role as head coach of bayern munich last week. manchester united may vary out and get europa league final tomorrow evening. bruno fernandez has been instrumental since signing injanuary of last year. he says the first trophy for the club since 2017 would definitely show their improvement. it is
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the club since 2017 would definitely show their improvement.— show their improvement. it is a siinal show their improvement. it is a signal for _ show their improvement. it is a signal for us — show their improvement. it is a signal for us and _ show their improvement. it is a signal for us and we _ show their improvement. it is a signal for us and we have i show their improvement. it is a signal for us and we have to i signal for us and we have to understand we are growing up step—by—step. this was a good step, i think. we could do much better this season. we know that. because we went for another semifinal. we went for a quarterfinal and we could go through in the champions league. we could be many games. many things. but, at this point, most importantly we get that step to being in the final and now we have to do well to win the final. final and now we have to do well to win the final-— win the final. great britain were narrowly beaten _ win the final. great britain were narrowly beaten in _ win the final. great britain were narrowly beaten in their- win the final. great britain were narrowly beaten in their third i win the final. great britain were i narrowly beaten in their third game of the ice hockey world championship in latvia after losing their opening two matches, the forced overtime against denmark but eventually lost 3-2. the against denmark but eventually lost 3—2. the brits got off to a great start as well. giving then they leave inside the first three minutes. afterfalling behind gb then drew level with the force of a time that it was denmark who went on to get the winner. britain face belarus in their fourth game
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tomorrow. that breaks are seventh in that group of eight. the top four from each group goes through to the quarterfinals. there is much more on all of those stories on our website including reaction to gareth southgate england squad announcement on the bbc sport website. that is all of the sports for now. we will have more at sports day at 6:30 p:m.. thank you. the eu has imposed sanctions on belarus, after it forced a ryanair passenger plane to divert and land in minsk — so that it could arrest a dissident who was onboard. friends of roman protasevich say he's been beaten and forced to make a filmed confession. the prime minister said the video of the captured journalist was 'deeply distressing' and called for his release. mr protasevich had been heading to lithuania before the plane was diverted. steve rosenberg reports from moscow. the first image of him in custody. it's taken from a video we are not
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showing. it's believed to have been filmed under duress. the opposition activist was arrested after this ryanair activist was arrested after this rya nair flights activist was arrested after this ryanair flights from greece to lithuania was forced to land in belarus. western governments have called it air piracy and state terrorism. in protest, last night eu leaders decided to ban belarusian airlines from european skies. and eu airlines from european skies. and eu airlines will stop flying over belarus. . airlines will stop flying over belarus. , ., ., ., , airlines will stop flying over belarus. ., ., ,, ., ., belarus. this outrageous behaviour needs a strong _ belarus. this outrageous behaviour needs a strong answer. _ belarus. this outrageous behaviour needs a strong answer. therefore l belarus. this outrageous behaviour i needs a strong answer. therefore the european council decided they will be additional sanctions on individuals that are involved in the hijacking but this time also on businesses and economic entities that are financing this regime. but with alexander lukashenko care? belarus's authoritarian president is feeling emboldened after surviving huge antigovernment protest last
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year. he was accused of stealing an election. previous sanctions failed to stop what has become a brutal crackdown on opponents. vladimir putin has stuck by him. his support from the kremlin that has helped keep lukashenko in power. alexander lukashenko does not have to many friends left. he is a pariah in the west. that means having to rely more and more on the kremlin for support. and that since president putin just fine as moscow pushes for closer ties with belarus and greater influence there. the two men are get to meet in russia later this week. criticised by the last, this is one place the leader of belarus can still expect a warm welcome. russian president vladimir putin and his us counterpart joe biden will meet for talks in geneva on the sixteenth ofjune.
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on the agenda — the troubled state of ties between moscow and washington. the kremlin said in a statement that the two leaders will also discuss problems related to strategic nuclear stability, and other issues including cooperation in the fight against covid—19 and regional conflicts. today is the first anniversary of the murder of george floyd — the african american man killed by a white policeman in minneapolis. his death sparked global protests against racism and police brutality, after mobile phone footage emerged, showing george floyd saying: "i can't breathe." some members of his family will meet presidentjoe biden later, while others willjoin campaigners and activists in minneapolis — as the campaign for racial justice continues. barbara plett usher reports from minneapolis. in the year since george floyd died, rituals have helped to build and shape a movement. the standard—bearers drawn by a mix of the political
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and personal, like cortez rice — a symbolic pallbearer in a never—ending funeral. it's my beloved friend, man. he was like an uncle to me, like i say, i loved him and i miss him dearly. he was a role model to me. let me see all the hand. floyd's violent arrest and death over a minor crime was replayed at the recent trial of his killer — a white police officer convicted of murder. activists believe that pressure on the streets helped secure the guilty verdict. now cortez is focusing on using the law to change the way policing is done. that's why i recentlyjoined the naacp minneapolis chapter so i can be familiarised with the bills that's going on, and to help our people out. so it sounds to me like you're kind of giving yourself, like, a legal education. yeah, definitely. that's quite a change, no? yeah, definitely. that's a big change. many lives have changed, even if wider reforms have been slow to follow. it activated me. it activated me in ways i didn't
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know i could be activated. butchy austin lives in the neighbourhood where george floyd was killed. i saw an opportunity to have a deeper community with my neighbours, to have tougher conversations about systemic racism and police brutality. every sunday, he joins this service on the corner of the square where floyd died. faith gives them confidence, but the debate in the city over how to handle policing is messy, and officers say they're under such scrutiny they don't feel free to do theirjobs. it's long overdue that an officer thinks twice before engaging. and i know some people are frustrated about how many officers are leaving the force, and they feel like police are being oppressed. again, if you're doing yourjob right, this shouldn't be happening. so this anniversary is a chance to reflect on a life lost, on battles won and struggles
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yet to be overcome. police in london investigating the shooting of a prominent black lives matters activist say there's no information to suggest she was the victim of a targeted attack. sasha johnson, who's 27, remains in critical care in hospital after being shot in the head. commander alison heydari is from the metropolitan police: we are aware of sasha in the black lives matter movement in the uk and understand the concern that this will cause some communities. however, i waste to stress that at this time there is nothing to suggest that sasha was a victim of a targeted attack. we are also not aware of any reports of threats made against her since then. our correspondent chi chi izundu said police are searching for a group of men seen outside the house where sasha johnson was attending a party they say that for black men dressed
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in dark clothing entered the garden of the party that sasha was attending in south london and started shooting. they say there is no indication that sasha knew or these men knew of sasha. the only other thing that is of interest is that the campaign group that sasha is part of, that taking the initiative party had hit back strongly against the police saying that they do believe that this was a targeted attack. in a statement on their website, they asked several questions including how have the police come to this conclusion without being able to speak to sasha regarding the death threats and investigate. to the police know who the target of the attack was? in order to conclude that sasha was not? as you heard in that clip by the metropolitan police they are adamant that they did not know of any threats against sasha johnson before she was shot on sunday morning. and they say they have no
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evidence that this was a targeted attack against her. sasha remains in attack against her. sasha remains in a critical condition in hospital. the director—general of the bbc, tim davie, says the findings of an investigation into how the journalist martin bashir was rehired by the corporation in 2016 will be published next week. last week, an inquiry by a former seniorjudge found that the bbc covered up "deceitful behaviour" by bashir, when he secured an interview with princess diana 25 years ago. our correspondent, david sillito says recent management decisions still need to be answered this week it's all been about how is the bbc going to respond? he already said it's going to look at its editorial and whistle—blowing policies because people at the time did raise concerns. but also other questions of who knew what and when and also question about why was martin they share giving that there were concerns raised about him we
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hired in 2016 as a religious affairs correspondent and the director general of the bbc today announced on the programme that there would be another bbc investigation into that matter. we another bbc investigation into that matter. ~ . , another bbc investigation into that matter. . , ., ., matter. we are in the course of a iuick matter. we are in the course of a quick investigation _ matter. we are in the course of a quick investigation now _ matter. we are in the course of a quick investigation now or - quick investigation now or independently within the bbc who is not part— independently within the bbc who is not part of me is management and we are interviewing people and getting documents and we should be able to publish _ documents and we should be able to publish something next week. so it�*s publish something next week. so it's a short investigation _ publish something next week. so it's a short investigation and _ publish something next week. so it's a short investigation and mps - publish something next week. so it's a short investigation and mps on i a short investigation and mps on their media select committee would be interested because they have been raising those concerns as well about that rehiring in 2016. nearly half of all dentists in england are considering leaving their practice is quote —— if covid—19 restrictions stay in place. over the past year, most non—urgent medical appointments have been postponed or cancelled. they say that staff morale have been severely
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damaged by a long waiting lists, frustrated patients, and the stress of having to use ppe. over the last year, routine medical appointments, nonurgent treatment and operations have been plagued by restrictions, with dentistry also left in a hole. a study released today by the british dental association, seen exclusively by the bbc, suggests that almost half of all dentists surveyed are considering changing career or seeking early retirement if covid restrictions remain in place over the next 12 months in england. long hours working with ppe, coupled with a strained workload, has been chipping away at morale. people in the profession are quite disillusioned, and they are suffering from a lot of mental health problems. they have been exposed to an unprecedented level of abuse from patients who are directing their anger and frustration at the staff on the front line because they are unable to get a dental appointment or are in pain. clinical staff have to wear masks
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that are difficult to breathe in, eight, nine hours a day. phone rings, answerphone message plays. dentists say patients have become increasingly frustrated, with fewer available appointments a side—effect of restrictions, and the report estimates that potentially almost 30 million appointments have been missed in england since the pandemic started. claire has been waiting more than two years already. i'm very, very self—conscious and i kind of really, you know, desperately want to have the work done and feel more confident in myself again. it has knocked my confidence as well. really, working in the current situation with the arrangements for the pandemic with our standard operating procedures that we are working to the moment, made delivering dentistry a very difficultjob to do. the association wants the government to set out a clear route map for reform and relaxation of covid restrictions.
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in response, a spokesperson for the department of health said they were continuing to support the dental sector, working closely with the nhs to supply affordable health care whilst protecting staff and patients. tomos morgan, bbc news. the uk is on course for the wettest may on record. jayne mccubbin reports. it's going to be cold. there will be a significant wind chill. you can see the showers swirling around below. heavy rain out there at the moment. heavy and thundery again. may — not quite what we were hoping for. while may 2020 was the sunniest calendar month on record, may 2021 could become one of the wettest. good morning! jayne laughs. oh, what a beautiful day! you big fib, chris! a bit of rain won't stop hardy campers like chris and karen in wales. is it all waterproof? no! well, it's already the wettest may
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on record since records began back in 1865. karen? yes. you've braved it. we have. hail, rain or snow, we were going to be here. enjoying it? yeah. what time does the bar open, karen? as soon as that's full! i didn't even bring a brolly. it is what it is, that's what i say. in the tent next door, wet weather hysteria is setting in with newlyweds tracey and julian. how has it been, newlyweds? lovely! we just wish the sun would come out. it would be nice. was it quite the honeymoon period you envisaged? eh, it's been a little bit wetter than i imagined| it would be, and possibly the wrong country. - and i don't mean that...! i mean, somewhere in the sun i and on the plane and disappeared... ..might have been nice. yes. but never mind. no. as long as we're together, - as long as tracey's here, that's the main thing. # why does it always rain on me...# in llangolen, and across wales,
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they've had twice the average may rainfall, and may ain't over yet, people. it's been torrential. nearly every day, to be honest. we've had everything here, every torrential rain. i mean, flooding, thunder and lightning, hailstones... hailstones? massive — size of marbles, honestly. in may? theyjust covered over the ground. and a tiny bit of sunshine — a tiny bit. oh, no! but is there a determination to fight through this weather? obviously, there's a huge determination. i mean, honestly, everybody sitting out in the rain under our brollies, having salad sandwiches. and we just sit there having a cup of tea all in this weather. as if the sun is cracking the flags? exactly. in england, alistairflicks through the detailed log from one of the uk's oldest weather stations. the museum has been collecting data since 1882. wow! and what does that data
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tell us about may? certainly the start of may was really cool. at one point it was looking like it was going to be the coolest since 1902. 0h! yeah. it has improved a little bit, but it is still officially a miserable may? it is currently the wettest may since 1967. but obviously there is still a third of may to go. so it could get even wetter yet. it ain't over yet? no. so if you are wondering why this is happening, and will it get better, here is the man who knows. we needed this through much of the month. at the weekend it was so windy you could hardly keep a hold of it. you can turn it off now, charlotte. but why has may's weather been so bad? it is due to the weather patterns getting stuck. high pressure across in russia is sending in incredibly warm air to the arctic. high pressure across greenland as well. that means we have just been stuck in the middle with low pressure after low pressure, bringing rain at times and dragging down that cold wind that
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has dominated the month. but there is optimism on the horizon. it is looking drier, it is looking warmer this weekend. and don't say it too loudly, it's a bank holiday weekend and we know what that can mean. matt laughs. one thing is absolutely certain. # sunshine on a rainy day...# after all we have been through, bad weather won't stop us trying our very, very best to have fun. perfect day. we want rain. there is no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong choice of toys. rain? ha! we've dealt with worse! maria, nothing is getting you wet. give us a twirl. it has just chucked it down the whole time. never mind. what we have, we are going to enjoy it. and thejoy ofjoy, it might,
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mightjust get better. can we have a twirl in your beautiful poncho? magnificent. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. max taylor was they are promising better times ahead. here is the weather. the stark contrast between this me and asked me could perhaps not be greater. last may was the 70th month on record. we saw temperatures across the uk about 20 degrees on 21 days. this may has been far different. it's been raining relentlessly and there's been one day so far about 20 celsius but that is likely to change. into the bank holiday weekend we could see temperatures quite widely above the 20 degrees mark. something for some of you to look forward to. a big contrast this afternoon. 15, 16 degrees and marched sunshine across some parts of central and southern england and wales and northern
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ireland. heavy showers west of scotland, cool breeze, strong winds with persistent rain towards devon and cornwall. and then into the channel islands as we head for the first part of the night. overnight we will continue its showers across the eastern part of scotland and the northeast of england. most of the areas becoming dry with clear skies around. temperatures down towards the channel could get to two or three degrees for some as we start tomorrow. a bright start here because much of england and wales and northern ireland. in scotland some outbreaks of rain and heavy showers into the afternoon. some thunder as well. more appealing have a dry day tomorrow. it may start to feel warmer across southern and western areas. temperatures around 60 17 western areas. temperatures around 6017 degrees. finishing that daily heavy showers. seven scotland and northeast of england and they fade away into thursday. high pressure is building across the country with extent cloudiness bubbling up. but it could be fair for many. showers are very few and far between. most
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will be dry and feeling warmer. it could be a few spots above 20 celsius by thursday. high pressure holding off the weather fronts but into friday night we will see push across ireland and western fringes of the uk. because it's running into high pressure they may be huge amounts of rain. it will be a case of lots of mixed and the crowd around and a great day for someone friday. some rain and drizzle and scotland across northern areas. further east the sunshine will break through the cloudiness and we will see temperatures above 20 degrees by this stage. it would increase in sunshine three saturday and sunday. the bank holiday weekend could see some rain across the northern areas on monday. it could be dry and warmer in effect.
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today at six. a day of confusion after the latest covid guidelines for areas where the indian variant is spreading council leaders in eight hotspots say they were not consulted about the guidelines — it's left many unsure about what they can and can't do. obviously half—term next week, so a lot of people will be wanting to travel, including ourselves, and nobody knows what's going on really. we'll be asking whether the rise in cases of the indian variant affect the final stage of the lockdown road map. also tonight. islam and the tories — a report calls for an overhaul of the party's complaints procedures after finding evidence of discrimination. the social taboos that pushed thousands of babies into forced adoption — decades on their mothers are scarred
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and want an apology,

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