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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 25, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today... growing condemnation of belarus after the forced landing of a ryanair plane — the eu imposes a flight ban and extends sanctions worth billions of dollars. people living in eight covid hotspots across england are told to avoid travelling in and out of their area, but local health officials say the government didn't warn them about the changes. inspirational young fundraiser tony hudgell lost both his legs after he was badly beaten by his birth parents. now there are calls for a child protection law in his name.
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good morning. 762jobs here at sheffield are on the line as liberty steel restructu res sheffield are on the line as liberty steel restructures its operations in order to survive. gareth southgate will name his provisional england squad for the euros today. he'll reveal who's made the final cut next tuesday. good morning. a cloudy start to the day. the cloud will break. we will have sunshine and showers. some of them will be thundery with hail. some rain coming into the south west. all the details later in the programme. it's tuesday, the 25th of may. our top story... european union leaders havejoined the uk in pledging to punish belarus over what it called the "state—sponsored hijacking" of a ryanairflight in order to arrest a prominent critic. belarusian carriers are now banned from entering
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the airspace of the uk and the eu, and more sanctions will follow. mark lobel reports. a hijacking. an affront to international norms. playing russian roulette with innocent civilians' lives. some of the charges levelled against belarus by the us, uk, eu and un after this ryanair plane was unexpectedly diverted to land in minsk. we've not seen anything quite as outlandish, as deceitful, dangerous as this for at least 30, 40, maybe 50 years. all apparently to kidnap this man, opposition journalist roman protasevich for running an opposition news channel on the social media platform, telegram, where anti—government protests are organised. roman was later seen in a video released by belarus authorities but we're not showing it because it looks like he was found under duress.
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—— filmed. roman's forehead looks bruised. his father is concerned at what he calls a terrorist act. translation: we hope that he will cope. - we hope that he will stay himself, not into any of their tricks. we are afraid to even think about it but it's possible he could be beaten or tortured. the eu is furious. its leaders are demanding roman protasevich be freed immediately and democracy return. they've agreed a ban on belarusian flights from all eu airspace and airports and further penalties on officials and assets in belarus. there will be additional sanctions on individuals that are involved in the hijacking but this time also on businesses and economic entities that are financing this regime. since disputed elections last august, this man, belarus's
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president, alexander lukashenko, has cracked down on dissent. he's had hundreds of activists detained. many others fled the country into exile. among them, roman protasevich. his capture from high in the sky may become the highest profile one yet. mark lobel, bbc news. let's get more on this from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good morning. it's a united front from eu and uk leaders, isn't it, adam? the uk and the eu have ended up in similar places in terms of the measures they had taken. they had taken those measures notjust because this is a situation about democracy and human rights and freedom of speech in belarus but because it is a global issue affecting the safety and security and the very concept of
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international travel. and the very concept of internationaltravel. i and the very concept of international travel. i think the uk and the eu want to send a clear message to belarus this is unacceptable but also to any other regimes where british or european planes fly over their territory anywhere else in the world. i think they had to do something quite tough to send that message. although there are people in the uk, mps in the commons he would like dominic raab to go even further, to functional people, to take action against things like the gas pipeline going from russia three belarus. also it is interesting that even though the uk has left the eu, it has happened, they are still facing the same issues in the rest of the world. —— brexit. health officials in covid hotspots across england have reacted with surprise after it emerged the government has changed travel restrictions. the new advice, published on friday, warns against travelling into or out of eight local authority areas. aruna iyengar has this report.
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if you live in bolton, you might not be aware that current government advice on coronavirus here is different to other parts of the country. on friday, the government issued guidance, urging people in eight council areas not to travel in or out of the area except for essential reasons. the areas are... north tyneside, bolton, blackburn with darwen, burnley, kirklees, leicester, bedford and hounslow. residents in these areas are also asked to meet outside and keep two metres apart from those they don't live with. health officials say they weren't told about changes to the advice, with one telling us... the bbc also spoke to north tyneside council, which said local officials knew
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nothing about the new guidance until last night. mps say ministers must urgently clarify their advice, saying no announcement about the updated guidance was a recipe for confusion and uncertainty. but the department of health says guidance was needed to encourage people to take an extra cautious approach when meeting others or travelling in areas hit hardest by the new variant, first identified in india. aruna iyengar, bbc news. today is the first anniversary of the death of george floyd — the african american killed by a white policeman in minneapolis. mr floyd's murder sparked global protests against racism and police brutality. barbara plett usher reports. in the year since george floyd died, rituals have helped to build and shape a movement. the standard—bearers drawn by a mix of the political and personal, like cortez rice — a symbolic pallbearer in a never—ending funeral. it's my beloved friend, man. he was like all good to me,
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like i say, i loved him and i miss him dearly. he was a role model to me. let me see all the hands. floyd's violent arrest and death over a minor crime was replayed at the recent trial of his killer — a white police officer convicted of murder. activists believe that pressure on the streets helped secure the guilty verdict. now cortez is focusing on using the law to change the way policing is done. that's why i recentlyjoined the naacp minneapolis chapter so i can be familiarised with the bills that's going on, and to help our people out. so it sounds to me like you're kind of giving yourself, like, a legal education. yeah, definitely. that's quite a change, no? yeah, definitely. that's a big change. many lives have changed, even if wider reforms have been slow to follow. it activated me. it activated me in ways i didn't know i could be activated. butchy austin lives in the neighbourhood where george floyd was killed.
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i saw an opportunity to have a deeper community with my neighbours, to have tougher conversations about systemic racism and police brutality. every sunday, he joins this service on the corner of the square where floyd died. faith gives them confidence, but the debate in the city over how to handle policing is messy. and officers say they're under such scrutiny they don't feel free to do theirjobs. it's long overdue that an officer thinks twice before engaging. and i know some people are frustrated about how many officers are leaving the force. and ifeel like police are being oppressed. again, if you're doing yourjob right, this shouldn't be happening. so this anniversary is a chance to reflect on a life lost, on battles won and struggles yet to be overcome. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. amazon is reportedly closing in on a deal to buy hollywood studio
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mgm for around $6 billion. it would give the technology giant's prime streaming service access to a vast back catalogue of iconic content including the james bond and hobbit franchises. the deal could be finalised this week. the lead singer of the italian glam rock band, which won the eurovision song contest, has returned a negative drugs test. damiano david denied taking drugs, following online speculation after footage showed him leaning over a table during the grand final on saturday. we spoke to the band yesterday on breakfast. the european broadcasting union said the allegation had overshadowed the spirit and the outcome of the contest and unfairly affected the band. they said they were deeply offended, didn't they? he told us a couple of hours after he spent two as he was going to have that test and there is. they said it had ruined what
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would be —— what was a brilliant weekend for them. this year compared with last year could not be more different, could it? provisional met office figures show in wales can may well prove to be the wettest may on record. records go back a fair old way to 1862. the weather today, sunny spells and scattered heavy showers. the showers will not be as frequent as they were yesterday. what is happening is the low pressure that brought the rain yesterday is moving away. another front is coming on across the south—west. that will bring in some rain as well. we are starting on a fairly cloudy note. rain in scotland, parts of england down into east anglia. showers developing during the day. some of those will be heavy and thundery with hail. quite breezy as well today. howden
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rain coming in across the isles of scilly, devon and, into the channel islands. across wales and the south—east and parts of eastern scotland, it is drier and brighter sunshine and fewer showers. temperatures ten in the north and 16 in the south. temperatures should be between 15 and 18 or 19 on average. this band of cloud and rain pushes away from the south—west. there will be residual cloud in its wake. we will see further showers coming in across the north and east. not a cold night. we are not anticipating problems with frost. a longer forecast in half—an—hour. over the past 12 months, we've been following the story of tony hudgell, the six—year—old double amputee, who raised more than £1.5 million for charity — proving that against all odds, anything is possible. his story is even more remarkable when you learn that tony lost his legs after being abused by his parents.
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now a new law, calling for tougher sentences for those who harm children, could be named after him. graham satchell has this exclusive report for breakfast. tony hudgell taking the final few steps of his extraordinary challenge last year. inspired by captain tom, tony walked 10 kilometres on his new legs and raised more than £1 million for the hospital that saved his life. tony was just a few weeks old when he suffered horrific life—threatening injuries. the evelina worked on him for three months. they never expected him to survive. paula hudgell, a foster carer, was asked to take tony in. presented in front of me was this tiny, broken, shut down, underweight, legs—in—plaster four month—old baby. i broke down in tears, absolutely sobbed, and thought, "i can't do this." but within two hours of being with him, there was no way
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i was going to leave him, he was coming home with us. tony's injuries were inflicted by his biological parents. he suffered multiple organ failure, septicaemia and fractures to both thighs, lower legs, ankles, toes and thumbs. this is tony with his natural parents, tony smith and jodie simpson. in 2018, they were convicted of causing serious physical harm to a child and cruelty to a person under 16. they were sentenced to ten years each, the maximum for this offence. ever since the child, paula has been campaigning with her local mp, tom tugendhat. she wants the maximum sentence for child cruelty to be made the same as serious offences against an adult, a life sentence. it's impossible for us to know the pain tony must have suffered in those first few weeks of his life. tom tugendhat
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in the house of commons last year. today he's introducing an amendment to the government's policing bill that would give judges the discretion to give life sentences for serious child cruelty. the purpose of tony's law is to increase the maximum sentence possible forjudges to resort to in the most serious cases to life imprisonment. serious physical harm to a child is relatively rare. between 2014 and 2018, for example, 114 offenders received an immediate custodial sentence for cruelty to children. hi. my name's tony and i'm walking 100 steps for captain tom. in recent weeks, tony has started walking without his crutches. he is a remarkable, inspirational little boy. good boy. keep going. his family now say people who abuse children in the future should face the most serious punishment. graham satchell, bbc news.
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we will be speaking to his mum a little bit later as well about all of that what she wants to see happen. loads to come in the this morning. let's take a look at today's papers. the metro leads on the foreign secretary's promise of sanctions against berlarus. dominic raab has called the diversion of a ryanair flight over a suspected bomb threat a "danger to civilian flights everywhere". the telegraph warns that having two doses of a covid jab won't mean an end to self—isolating if you come into contact with someone who tests positive. the paper says it understands that quarantine rules will remain in place after the 21stjune, when the government hopes to lift the final stages of restrictions in england. the daily mirror leads on marcus rashford's campaign to end child hunger. he's urged mps to "do the right thing" and "don't abandon hungry kids". ministers have been debating the footballer�*s petition to expand the availability of free school meals. and the bolton news focuses on new advice in england for people living in areas affected by the indian
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variant of coronavirus. bolton is one of those areas. the paper reports covid admissions to royal bolton hospital have jumped to 43. you know i like to talk about tv i am enjoying. and golf. and the. essentially... am i that obvious? those are my three subjects of interest. also cake and biscuits. i was not going to mention cake or biscuits or golf. are you interested in mayor of east town? kate winslet is unbelievable in this series. i reckon there is an absolute clincher on the way. it is brilliant and comes highly recommended. i have no papers to tell you about. ijust want to tell you it is a brilliant tv show. astronauts on future
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missions to the men may be able to whatsapp friends and watch netflix, apparently. this is thanks to efforts from a british company. internet satellites will be orbiting the moon. one of several uk firms passed by the european space agency with making telecommunication systems for the lunar surface. i would look at the view but i would not beyond the moon. remember donald who won £1 million on he wants to be a millionaire? he has given away about £700,000 of that money and has gone back to hisjob about £700,000 of that money and has gone back to his job as a teacher of politics and history. the only luxuries he bought were, he bought a
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mobile home and people his wife and new set of patio doors. he said he gave away the vast majority of that money because he says it was the right thing to do. in another blow to the british steel industry, the uk's third biggest manufacturer has announced plans to sell off its operation at stocksbridge near sheffield. so what does it mean for the workforce? nina's at the plant for us this morning. yes, good morning. sheffield was once known as steel city. the materials being —— material has been made here for hundreds of years. manyjobs are on the line. they belong to liberty steel. across the uk it makes materialfor everything from aeroplanes to oil and gas drills to dumpers and diggers. they belong to a man who specialises in
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taking flailing businesses and nursing them back to good health. so what has gone wrong for the man once dubbed the saviour of british steel? the uk was once a powerhouse in global steel. the uk was once a powerhouse in globalsteel. places the uk was once a powerhouse in global steel. places like china were making it faster and cheaper. steel works across britain close, taking with them thousands ofjobs. in 2017 snapped up the steelmakers, convinced he could save them. he entered into a complex financing agreement with a company called greensill capital, the same firm at the centre of a lobbying row. they went bust in march, raising big questions about how the steel
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business could survive. he said he was certain jobs were safe. it is was certain “obs were safe. it is our hard was certain jobs were safe. it is our hard work. _ was certain jobs were safe. it is our hard work. it _ was certain jobs were safe. it is our hard work. it is _ was certainjobs were safe. it 3 our hard work. it is still early. the steel industry has been decimated for the last few decades. i'm not going to give up on the uk. as long as i am in charge but my plants will stay open. he believes him now? the _ plants will stay open. he believes him now? the british _ plants will stay open. he believesj him now? the british government refused to supply a £170 million bailout over there is about transparency of the billionaire's elizabeth. unions say these plants must stay "saying they are strategically vital to uk defence, energy and aerospace. the company must sell off some of its plants to pay creditors and keep the business going. 3000 steeljobs at liberty are hanging in the balance. so what is this vast and impressive sight worth now? insiders here at
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liberty are suggesting perhaps it is being sold off to future proof the site. rather, a few miles up the road which we cycle steel, questions this morning what it is worth. —— rotherham. questions on the british cabinet about how serious they are about protecting british steel. this will be put to the british said —— business secretary later this morning. it is about theirjobs, theirfamilies and morning. it is about theirjobs, their families and communities that depend on them. back to you later. charities working with older people say demand for video calling and digital services has doubled over the last year. one of those to benefit was 79—year—old ron, who was widowed at the start of the pandemic. he says learning to video chat with people was "a godsend," as luxmy gopal reports. ron and jean were married for 56 years, but at the start of the pandemic, jean died of cancer.
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three weeks after we got the funeral over with, lockdown came — it couldn't have come at a worse time. stuck shielding at home for months, ron faced his grief alone — until he decided to learn how to video chat. hiya, ron. hello, there. nice to see you again. to be quite honest, without me ipad, i would have been totally lost. in my particular position it's brilliant, because i can't walk so it's been a godsend to be able to talk to people, you know, without going out of me house. he was remotely taught digital skills by local charities in leeds. after never having touched a tablet device before last year, he's now used his to find bereavement counselling and chat to people. at least you're not talking to faceless people — when you talk to them on the phone yet you can't imagine who you're really talking to. i've got in touch with a cousin of mine in kent, who i haven't
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spoken to for 45 years, and i've got through to her on messenger and all you do is press a camera thing and it gets you through — unbelievable. and ron's experience reflects a trend among his generation. an ofcom study found the proportion of over—65s using video calling nearly tripled after lockdown, and the leeds branch of age uk says during the pandemic it's seen a doubling in demand for its digital support services among older people. many charities say the online influx could be beneficial in the long term for delivering services — for example, to those with mobility issues or in bad weather. of course, it's not about replacing face—to—face contact, but simply offering more options. it's about giving people that choice. we're trying to give people the skills and the access to the devices and the connectivity, which are all challenges that we face. but if we can encourage people to give it a go so they can see what it's like and to use it if they need to.
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do you think this is something you're going to continue with in the future, even after lockdown and the pandemic is over? no doubt about it, no doubt about it. yeah, i'll keep on using it. there's work to be done to ensure wider access to the internet and devices for the older community. but the past year of lockdown has at least encouraged more engagement. and the final thought from ron on zoom. you're never too old to learn. it's as simple as that. i mean, if i can learn, anybody can. luxmy gopal, bbc news, leeds. it is really interesting to see. there are really positive things out there, out of digital culture we are living with but also other things are going on as well. perhaps you do not have a mobile phone and cannot download the app. i don't know if you saw last week, there was a lot of talk... family put on social media an older gentleman sitting in a pub he did not have a phone or the 3pp a pub he did not have a phone or the app and could not order anything. he
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sat there on his own with no food or drink. someone helped him in the end. otherwise he would not be able to have ordered anything. coming up on breakfast this morning... best—selling author and illustrator rob biddulph is asking children to dream big and come up with an idea for an unusual place to sleep in their home or garden, we'll be finding out why when we talk to him just after 9 o'clock. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. as many hospitals continue to have restrictions due to covid, london's evelina children's hospital has been using new technology to connect families. nurses on the neonatal wards have been recording and sharing videos of the babies in intensive care. it's also the first unit in the country to let parents record themselves. the clips are played to the newborns to help with bonding and development.
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it's more thanjust a clinical update. this is the emotional side of things, both with the partner that's here, the team, knowing that there's a whole family that you're taking care of. we've had messages from siblings reading stories to their baby brother or sister that's in hospital. extraordinary circumstances, really emotive, emotional and challenging. a new curriculum about black british history, developed by hackney council, has been introduced in schools around the country. the lessons teach children about the contributions of black people across the ages, through to windrush and beyond. it's now used by around 1,500 schools across the uk. brentford have called on football authorities and the government to increase the number of fans allowed to attend saturdays play—off final at wembley. the bees take on swansea for a place in the premier league. 10,000 spectators are being allowed in, while 21,000 were permitted at the fa cup final ten days ago.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on most lines this morning, but there are minor delays on thejubile linee and a planned closure at waterloo & city. turning to trains — on southeastern there are some cancellations for metro services following a derailment in the depot on the roads, in bounds green there are temporary traffic lights on the a406 north circular for repairs to a burst water main. they caused long delays yesterday, adding to the usual delays. in peckham, the a2215 consort road remains closed by the police following a shooting. nine bus routes are on diversion. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, believe it or not, our weather is set to improve over the next few days. the low pressure which brought those heavy, thundery downpours yesterday, is moving away further east. today, still could be one or two showers, but not as frequent and shouldn't be so heavy. some high cloud this morning, breaking into some decent spells of sunshine, but it's the heat
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in those sunny spells which may create one or two showers later. temperatures a little bit warmer at 16 celsius. overnight tonight, plenty of dry, clear spells, but again a risk of maybe one or two light showers. the minimum temperature between five and seven celsius, the wind reasonably light. now as we head into wednesday, again we're still at risk of maybe one or two showers, but they will be isolated. the wind light and for thursday, a ridge of high pressure builds in. and then things are set to settle down. plenty of fine and dry weather in the outlook. the wind is light and temperatures getting a little warmer, as we head towards the bank holiday weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. coming up on breakfast
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this morning... what a difference a year makes — this time last year we were enjoying blistering sunshine, but miserable may looks set to deliver even more rain. the medals keep coming for british swimming sensation adam peaty — sally will be chatting to him just after half past seven. and binoculars at the ready — springwatch is back from a brand new location. we'll be catching up with the programme's presenters chris packham and michaela strachan before nine o'clock. and if they can actually be with each other for the first time in a long time. an increasing number of people in england are struggling to access an nhs dentist, according to a leading patient watchdog. danjohnson is at a dental practice in north yorkshire for us this morning. dan, dentists are dealing with huge
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backlogs aren't they? yeah, they are ended. i think i was probably— yeah, they are ended. i think i was probably some sort of record for the most _ probably some sort of record for the most trips— probably some sort of record for the most trips to the dentist in the past _ most trips to the dentist in the past you — most trips to the dentist in the past you without having my teeth looked _ past you without having my teeth looked at — past you without having my teeth looked at. i've got closer to the chair_ looked at. i've got closer to the chair than — looked at. i've got closer to the chair than most people. there are huge _ chair than most people. there are huge waiting lists that have built up huge waiting lists that have built up because of the pandemic, during the time _ up because of the pandemic, during the time the dentist were closed, and to— the time the dentist were closed, and to them because of the restrictions that have been working under_ restrictions that have been working under in _ restrictions that have been working under in the past few months. the level_ under in the past few months. the level of— under in the past few months. the level of protective equipment and the amount of time they have to leave _ the amount of time they have to leave the — the amount of time they have to leave the surgery is between patients. that is what has led to this huge — patients. that is what has led to this huge backlog. lots of frustration for patients. and dentist, _ frustration for patients. and dentist, we are told, even considering leaving the profession, because _ considering leaving the profession, because whilst all these other industries have started opening up again— industries have started opening up again and — industries have started opening up again and getting back to normal, there _ again and getting back to normal, there is_ again and getting back to normal, there is no— again and getting back to normal, there is no sign of many more people's— there is no sign of many more people's mouths opening again because — people's mouths opening again because there is no road map back to normat— because there is no road map back to normal life _ because there is no road map back to normal life in — because there is no road map back to normal life in the dental industry. a year ago, the virtual waiting room was filling up,
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as dentistry ground to a halt. twelve months on, there's still a big queue to get back in the big chair. clare's been waiting more than two years already. now i'm very, very self conscious and i kind of really, you know, desperately want to have the work done and feel more confident in myself again, because it's knocked my confidence as well. extra measures to guard against the virus have slowed down dental appointments. so clearing last year's backlog has been near impossible. some patients were told to go private, or forced to travel miles. at some point it got as bad as wanting to bang my head against a brick wall, really. so, yeah. and i'm a complete dental—phobe anyway, so for me to actually want to go to a dentist, that says how bad it was, really. the british dental association says in england there were 28 million fewer appointments in the last year. and a survey of their members suggests things aren't getting better. nearly half of those who responded say they'll change career,
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or take early retirement in the next year, if working conditions don't improve. a significant number are thinking of changing career, or leaving the profession altogether. really working in the current situation, with the arrangements for the pandemic, with our standard operating procedures that we're working to at the moment, make delivering dentistry a very difficultjob to do. and it's currently reflected in the results of our survey. the department for health and social care says it is supporting dentists, and increasing access while protecting patients and staff. but the waiting lists were growing even before the pandemic. and dentists want to know how and when they can get back to something like normal, before more of their colleagues decide they've had enough. so, out of are things? ian gordon is the manager— so, out of are things? ian gordon is
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the manager of this practice and a few others— the manager of this practice and a few others across north yorkshire. how challenging are conditions? it how challenging are conditions? [it is very how challenging are conditions? it is very challenging. i do feel very sorry— is very challenging. i do feel very sorry for— is very challenging. i do feel very sorry for patients. _ is very challenging. i do feel very sorry for patients. they - is very challenging. i do feel very sorry for patients. they see - is very challenging. i do feel very| sorry for patients. they see other things— sorry for patients. they see other things opening _ sorry for patients. they see other things opening up _ sorry for patients. they see other things opening up and _ sorry for patients. they see other things opening up and they- sorry for patients. they see other things opening up and they are i sorry for patients. they see other i things opening up and they are still being _ things opening up and they are still being told — things opening up and they are still being told there _ things opening up and they are still being told there are _ things opening up and they are still being told there are restrictions - being told there are restrictions for access— being told there are restrictions for access to _ being told there are restrictions for access to dental— being told there are restrictions for access to dental care. - being told there are restrictions for access to dental care. it - being told there are restrictions for access to dental care. it is. for access to dental care. it is difficult _ for access to dental care. it is difficult. reading _ for access to dental care. it is difficult. reading the - for access to dental care. it is difficult. reading the report l difficult. reading the report yesterday. _ difficult. reading the report yesterday. you _ difficult. reading the report yesterday, you read - difficult. reading the report yesterday, you read about i difficult. reading the report . yesterday, you read about the chattenges _ yesterday, you read about the challenges of _ yesterday, you read about the challenges of nhs _ yesterday, you read about the challenges of nhs dentistry, i yesterday, you read about the . challenges of nhs dentistry, the private _ challenges of nhs dentistry, the private dentistry, _ challenges of nhs dentistry, the private dentistry, perhaps- challenges of nhs dentistry, the private dentistry, perhaps morel private dentistry, perhaps more openings — private dentistry, perhaps more openings in _ private dentistry, perhaps more openings in the _ private dentistry, perhaps more openings in the private - private dentistry, perhaps more openings in the private sector, i private dentistry, perhaps more i openings in the private sector, but we are _ openings in the private sector, but we are trying — openings in the private sector, but we are trying to _ openings in the private sector, but we are trying to do _ openings in the private sector, but we are trying to do and _ openings in the private sector, but we are trying to do and see - openings in the private sector, but we are trying to do and see as - openings in the private sector, but. we are trying to do and see as many nhs patients— we are trying to do and see as many nhs patients as _ we are trying to do and see as many nhs patients as we _ we are trying to do and see as many nhs patients as we possibly- we are trying to do and see as many nhs patients as we possibly can, i we are trying to do and see as manyl nhs patients as we possibly can, and itruly— nhs patients as we possibly can, and itruty believe — nhs patients as we possibly can, and i truly believe teams _ nhs patients as we possibly can, and i truly believe teams are _ nhs patients as we possibly can, and i truly believe teams are doing - i truly believe teams are doing everything _ i truly believe teams are doing everything they— i truly believe teams are doing everything they can. _ i truly believe teams are doing everything they can.— i truly believe teams are doing everything they can. what are the blockages? _ everything they can. what are the blockages? what _ everything they can. what are the blockages? what is _ everything they can. what are the blockages? what is holding - everything they can. what are the | blockages? what is holding things up? we _ blockages? what is holding things u . ? . . ., ., blockages? what is holding things u? . ., ., , blockages? what is holding things up? we could have a very long discussion _ up? we could have a very long discussion going _ up? we could have a very long discussion going back- up? we could have a very long discussion going back to - up? we could have a very long | discussion going back to before up? we could have a very long - discussion going back to before 2006 and the _ discussion going back to before 2006 and the nhs — discussion going back to before 2006 and the nhs contract. _ discussion going back to before 2006 and the nhs contract. and _ discussion going back to before 2006 and the nhs contract. and really- and the nhs contract. and really covid _ and the nhs contract. and really covid just— and the nhs contract. and really covid just brought _ and the nhs contract. and really covid just brought into— and the nhs contract. and really covid just brought into sharp - and the nhs contract. and really. covid just brought into sharp focus the problems— covid just brought into sharp focus the problems that _ covid just brought into sharp focus the problems that were _ covid just brought into sharp focus the problems that were already i covid just brought into sharp focus i the problems that were already there in the _ the problems that were already there in the system — the problems that were already there in the system. but _ the problems that were already there in the system. but you _ the problems that were already there in the system. but you can't - the problems that were already there in the system. but you can't expect l in the system. but you can't expect to close _ in the system. but you can't expect to close down — in the system. but you can't expect to close down dental— in the system. but you can't expect to close down dental practices - in the system. but you can't expect to close down dental practices for. to close down dental practices for nearly— to close down dental practices for nearly three — to close down dental practices for nearly three months _ to close down dental practices for nearly three months at _ to close down dental practices for nearly three months at the - to close down dental practices for. nearly three months at the beginning of the _ nearly three months at the beginning of the pandemic, _ nearly three months at the beginning of the pandemic, and _ nearly three months at the beginning of the pandemic, and then _ nearly three months at the beginning of the pandemic, and then be - nearly three months at the beginning of the pandemic, and then be on -
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of the pandemic, and then be on restrictions— of the pandemic, and then be on restrictions of— of the pandemic, and then be on restrictions of an _ of the pandemic, and then be on restrictions of an hour— of the pandemic, and then be on restrictions of an hour between i restrictions of an hour between appointments _ restrictions of an hour between appointments for— restrictions of an hour between appointments for another - restrictions of an hour between appointments for another fourl restrictions of an hour between i appointments for another four to five months. _ appointments for another four to five months, and _ appointments for another four to five months, and to— appointments for another four to five months, and to not- appointments for another four to five months, and to not have - appointments for another four to | five months, and to not have this sort of— five months, and to not have this sort of impact _ five months, and to not have this sort of impact. so, _ five months, and to not have this sort of impact. so, we _ five months, and to not have this sort of impact. so, we are - five months, and to not have this sort of impact. so, we are still. sort of impact. so, we are still working — sort of impact. so, we are still working under— sort of impact. so, we are still working under those _ sort of impact. so, we are still working under those sort- sort of impact. so, we are still working under those sort of. working under those sort of frustrations. _ working under those sort of frustrations. and _ working under those sort of frustrations. and staff, - working under those sort of frustrations. and staff, 13. working under those sort of| frustrations. and staff, 13 of working under those sort of- frustrations. and staff, 13 of our practices, — frustrations. and staff, 13 of our practices, we _ frustrations. and staff, 13 of our practices, we are _ frustrations. and staff, 13 of our practices, we are running - frustrations. and staff, 13 of our| practices, we are running urgent dental— practices, we are running urgent dental centres. _ practices, we are running urgent dental centres, they— practices, we are running urgent dental centres, they never - practices, we are running urgenti dental centres, they never close. staff _ dental centres, they never close. staff pretty — dental centres, they never close. staff pretty exhausted. _ dental centres, they never close. staff pretty exhausted. i- dental centres, they never close. staff pretty exhausted. i have - dental centres, they never close. staff pretty exhausted. i have toi staff pretty exhausted. i have to pay tribute — staff pretty exhausted. i have to pay tribute to _ staff pretty exhausted. i have to pay tribute to them _ staff pretty exhausted. i have to pay tribute to them because - staff pretty exhausted. i have to| pay tribute to them because they staff pretty exhausted. i have to - pay tribute to them because they are the ones _ pay tribute to them because they are the ones who— pay tribute to them because they are the ones who are _ pay tribute to them because they are the ones who are working _ pay tribute to them because they are the ones who are working in - pay tribute to them because they are the ones who are working in full- pay tribute to them because they are the ones who are working in full ppe| the ones who are working in full ppe day in _ the ones who are working in full ppe day in and _ the ones who are working in full ppe day in and day— the ones who are working in full ppe day in and day out _ the ones who are working in full ppe day in and day out. it's _ the ones who are working in full ppe day in and day out. it's difficult - day in and day out. it's difficult for conversation, _ day in and day out. it's difficult for conversation, it's— day in and day out. it's difficult for conversation, it's difficult . day in and day out. it's difficult. for conversation, it's difficult for patient — for conversation, it's difficult for patient flow _ for conversation, it's difficult for patient flow. and _ for conversation, it's difficult for patient flow. and where - for conversation, it's difficult for patient flow. and where we - for conversation, it's difficult for. patient flow. and where we might have seen. — patient flow. and where we might have seen, hygienists _ patient flow. and where we might have seen, hygienists might- patient flow. and where we might have seen, hygienists might have| have seen, hygienists might have seen _ have seen, hygienists might have seen three — have seen, hygienists might have seen three patients _ have seen, hygienists might have seen three patients an _ have seen, hygienists might have seen three patients an hour, - have seen, hygienists might have seen three patients an hour, they may be _ seen three patients an hour, they may be seeing _ seen three patients an hour, they may be seeing one _ seen three patients an hour, they may be seeing one patient - seen three patients an hour, they may be seeing one patient an- seen three patients an hour, they. may be seeing one patient an hour. it is may be seeing one patient an hour. it is hardly— may be seeing one patient an hour. it is hardly surprising _ may be seeing one patient an hour. it is hardly surprising we _ may be seeing one patient an hour. it is hardly surprising we have - may be seeing one patient an hour. it is hardly surprising we have got l it is hardly surprising we have got the backlogs _ it is hardly surprising we have got the backlogs. find _ it is hardly surprising we have got the backlogs-— the backlogs. and the staff are caettin the backlogs. and the staff are getting fed _ the backlogs. and the staff are getting fed op? _ the backlogs. and the staff are getting fed up? do _ the backlogs. and the staff are getting fed up? do you - the backlogs. and the staff are getting fed up? do you see - the backlogs. and the staff are l getting fed up? do you see signs the backlogs. and the staff are - getting fed up? do you see signs of that? _ getting fed up? do you see signs of that? ,, ., ' ., that? staff are finding it challenging. _ that? staff are finding it challenging. and - that? staff are finding it l challenging. and actually, that? staff are finding it - challenging. and actually, trying that? staff are finding it _ challenging. and actually, trying to bring _ challenging. and actually, trying to bring people — challenging. and actually, trying to bring people into _ challenging. and actually, trying to bring people into the _ challenging. and actually, trying to bring people into the profession. . bring people into the profession. our bring people into the profession. 0ur nursing _ bring people into the profession. our nursing staff— bring people into the profession. our nursing staff are _ bring people into the profession. our nursing staff are the - bring people into the profession. | our nursing staff are the lifeblood of our _ our nursing staff are the lifeblood of our business. _ our nursing staff are the lifeblood of our business. it _ our nursing staff are the lifeblood of our business. it is— our nursing staff are the lifeblood of our business. it is challenging i of our business. it is challenging enough — of our business. it is challenging enough recruiting _ of our business. it is challenging enough recruiting dentists - of our business. it is challenging enough recruiting dentists to - enough recruiting dentists to replace — enough recruiting dentists to replace people _ enough recruiting dentists to replace people who - enough recruiting dentists to replace people who wish - enough recruiting dentists to replace people who wish to i enough recruiting dentists to - replace people who wish to leave, but if _ replace people who wish to leave, but if we — replace people who wish to leave, but if we can't _ replace people who wish to leave, but if we can't get _ replace people who wish to leave, but if we can't get the _ replace people who wish to leave, but if we can't get the staff, - replace people who wish to leave, but if we can't get the staff, thenl but if we can't get the staff, then we have — but if we can't get the staff, then we have the _ but if we can't get the staff, then we have the same _ but if we can't get the staff, then we have the same problem. -
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but if we can't get the staff, then we have the same problem. they really— we have the same problem. they really to— we have the same problem. they really to be — we have the same problem. they really to be some _ we have the same problem. they really to be some sort _ we have the same problem. they really to be some sort of- we have the same problem. theyl really to be some sort of solution, whether— really to be some sort of solution, whether that — really to be some sort of solution, whether that is _ really to be some sort of solution, whether that is making _ really to be some sort of solution, whether that is making it - really to be some sort of solution, whether that is making it easier. really to be some sort of solution, i whether that is making it easier for dentists _ whether that is making it easier for dentists coming _ whether that is making it easier for dentists coming from _ whether that is making it easier for dentists coming from overseas, - whether that is making it easier for dentists coming from overseas, we lost one _ dentists coming from overseas, we lost one of— dentists coming from overseas, we lost one of the _ dentists coming from overseas, we lost one of the classic _ dentists coming from overseas, we lost one of the classic recruitmentl lost one of the classic recruitment lines. _ lost one of the classic recruitment lines. a _ lost one of the classic recruitment lines. a lot— lost one of the classic recruitment lines. a lot of— lost one of the classic recruitment lines, a lot of eu _ lost one of the classic recruitment lines, a lot of eu dentist, - lost one of the classic recruitment lines, a lot of eu dentist, that - lost one of the classic recruitmentj lines, a lot of eu dentist, that has dried _ lines, a lot of eu dentist, that has dried up. — lines, a lot of eu dentist, that has dried up. it— lines, a lot of eu dentist, that has dried up, it would _ lines, a lot of eu dentist, that has dried up, it would have _ lines, a lot of eu dentist, that has dried up, it would have dried - lines, a lot of eu dentist, that has dried up, it would have dried up . dried up, it would have dried up with— dried up, it would have dried up with covid — dried up, it would have dried up with covid anyway, _ dried up, it would have dried up with covid anyway, but - dried up, it would have dried up with covid anyway, but we - dried up, it would have dried up with covid anyway, but we needj dried up, it would have dried up - with covid anyway, but we need other solutions _ with covid anyway, but we need other solutions l— with covid anyway, but we need other solutions. . ., ., with covid anyway, but we need other solutions. . . ., ., ., solutions. i imagine in a rural area like this each _ solutions. i imagine in a rural area like this each dental _ solutions. i imagine in a rural area like this each dental practice - solutions. i imagine in a rural area like this each dental practice is - like this each dental practice is going — like this each dental practice is going to — like this each dental practice is going to be even more valuable, you can't afford — going to be even more valuable, you can't afford to lose any? no, going to be even more valuable, you can't afford to lose any?— can't afford to lose any? no, that's riuht. i can't afford to lose any? no, that's right- i see — can't afford to lose any? no, that's right- i see a _ can't afford to lose any? no, that's right. i see a number— can't afford to lose any? no, that's right. i see a number of— can't afford to lose any? no, that's right. i see a number of dental - right. i see a number of dental practices — right. i see a number of dental practices in _ right. i see a number of dental practices in big _ right. i see a number of dental practices in big cities— right. i see a number of dental practices in big cities and - right. i see a number of dental practices in big cities and i- right. i see a number of dental. practices in big cities and i think, come _ practices in big cities and i think, come on. — practices in big cities and i think, come on. think— practices in big cities and i think, come on, think outside _ practices in big cities and i think, come on, think outside the - practices in big cities and i think, come on, think outside the box, i come on, think outside the box, there _ come on, think outside the box, there are — come on, think outside the box, there are fantastic _ come on, think outside the box, there are fantastic areas - come on, think outside the box, there are fantastic areas to - come on, think outside the box, there are fantastic areas to live i come on, think outside the box, i there are fantastic areas to live in there are fantastic areas to live in the country— there are fantastic areas to live in the country where _ there are fantastic areas to live in the country where people - there are fantastic areas to live in the country where people would l the country where people would welcome — the country where people would welcome you _ the country where people would welcome you with _ the country where people would welcome you with open - the country where people would welcome you with open arms i the country where people would welcome you with open arms as the country where people would i welcome you with open arms as a dentist _ welcome you with open arms as a dentist there _ welcome you with open arms as a dentist. there are _ welcome you with open arms as a dentist. there are some - welcome you with open arms as a dentist. there are some great- dentist. there are some great opportunities _ dentist. there are some great opportunities. we _ dentist. there are some great opportunities. we have - dentist. there are some great opportunities. we have beenl dentist. there are some great- opportunities. we have been very fortunate — opportunities. we have been very fortunate that _ opportunities. we have been very fortunate that we _ opportunities. we have been very fortunate that we have _ opportunities. we have been very fortunate that we have run - opportunities. we have been very fortunate that we have run a - opportunities. we have been very fortunate that we have run a lot l opportunities. we have been very| fortunate that we have run a lot of training _ fortunate that we have run a lot of training practices. _ fortunate that we have run a lot of training practices. that— fortunate that we have run a lot of training practices. that has- fortunate that we have run a lot of training practices. that has been. training practices. that has been the mainstay _ training practices. that has been the mainstay. but— training practices. that has been the mainstay. but for— training practices. that has been the mainstay. but for other- the mainstay. but for other colleagues _ the mainstay. but for other colleagues it _ the mainstay. but for other colleagues it is— the mainstay. but for other colleagues it is very - the mainstay. but for other. colleagues it is very difficult. thank— colleagues it is very difficult. thank you _ colleagues it is very difficult. thank you very _ colleagues it is very difficult. thank you very much. - colleagues it is very difficult. thank you very much. we . colleagues it is very difficult. - thank you very much. we appreciate your time _ thank you very much. we appreciate your time. and having a cent. there is a challenge across dentistry and it will— is a challenge across dentistry and it will be _ is a challenge across dentistry and it will be discussed by mps at
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westminster later this morning. dan, thank ou. westminster later this morning. dan, thank you- see _ westminster later this morning. dan, thank you. see you _ westminster later this morning. dan, thank you. see you later. _ westminster later this morning. dan, thank you. see you later. i _ westminster later this morning. dan, | thank you. see you later. i remember those awful— thank you. see you later. i remember those awful stories _ thank you. see you later. i remember those awful stories last _ thank you. see you later. i remember those awful stories last year - thank you. see you later. i remember those awful stories last year of - those awful stories last year of people doing their own teeth. thank ou so people doing their own teeth. thank you so much — people doing their own teeth. thank you so much for— people doing their own teeth. thank you so much for reminding - people doing their own teeth. thank you so much for reminding us - people doing their own teeth. trisha; you so much for reminding us of that! morning. gareth southgate will announce a provisional england squad today for the european championship. several players are involved in the europa league and champions league finals this week, which is why he'll delay naming the final 26 until next tuesday. they got all the way to the semi—finals of their last major tournament in russia three years ago. plenty of those players will go again, along with some new faces. here's manchester city's phil foden. there's a lot of players at the moment on top of their games. so, yeah, i think we have a great attack — great everywhere, all over the pitch. and yeah, it must be a headache for gareth to pick a team. but thatjust shows how many quality players we've got and so, yeah,
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i think we definitely can start pushing on to win things now. manchester city boss pep guardiola has been voted the league managers association's manager of the year. the spaniard led city to their third premier league title in four years. no rest for the wicked though. on saturday, pep's team square up to chelsea in the champions league final. chelsea create problems, all the teams. we have to do how many problems we create them. difficult to stop them for the quality they have, for the set—up. the team is wide in the sides and depth, and they are so close, the distances, the players in between, they are so closer. chelsea boss emma hayes has been named fa women's super league manager of the year for the second consecutive time. hayes led the side in a historic campaign, with the blues winning back—to—back wsl titles, the continental league cup and reaching their first ever champions league final. chelsea striker fran kirby has also been named player of the year —
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she scored 16 goals in 18 appearances. after two seasons away, dundee are back in the scottish premiership. they beat kilmarnock in the play—off final. dundee won the second leg 2—1, to win the tie 4—2 on aggregate. joy for dundee, but disappointment for kilmarnock, who are relegated, ending a 28 year stay in scotland's top division. its a rest day at the giro d italia today, and simon yates is going to need all his powers of recovery. the british rider lost over two and a half minutes on stage 16 and slipped from second to fifth overall. he s now four minutes 20 seconds behind colombia s egan bernal. yates' compatriot hugh carthy finished fifth and is now third in the race. britain's liam broady beat jasonjung in the first round of qualifying for the french open. harriet dart is also through to the next stage, after knocking out barbara haas. britain's francesca jones is out, beaten in straight sets by vera zvonreva. jones made headlines after qualifying for the australian open in february,
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despite having been told she'd never become a professional player, after being born without several fingers and toes. former england internationals rio ferdinand and karen carney will manage a team of footballers from across the home nations, who'll attempt to tackle online abuse. brought together by their own experiences of online hate, hope united will feature in videos offering the skills to recognise and tackle hate crimes, and advice on how people can protect themselves online. and in less than an hour we will be talking to the man of the moment with all those gold medals from the weekend, adam peaty. swimmer adam peaty will talk to us just after half past seven. he peaty will talk to us 'ust after half past seven._ peaty will talk to us 'ust after half ast seven. , , ., , , half past seven. he is unstoppable, isn't it? he — half past seven. he is unstoppable, isn't it? he is. — half past seven. he is unstoppable, isn't it? he is. we _ half past seven. he is unstoppable, isn't it? he is. we had _ half past seven. he is unstoppable, isn't it? he is. we had mark- half past seven. he is unstoppable, isn't it? he is. we had mark foster| isn't it? he is. we had mark foster on the programme _ isn't it? he is. we had mark foster on the programme on _ isn't it? he is. we had mark foster on the programme on sunday - isn't it? he is. we had mark foster on the programme on sunday and| isn't it? he is. we had mark foster.
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on the programme on sunday and he said on air he will win gold in tokyo. barring injury and disaster. his first effort is quite early in the olympics. he his first effort is quite early in the olympics-— his first effort is quite early in the olympics. he has got such a treat the olympics. he has got such a great attitude _ the olympics. he has got such a great attitude as _ the olympics. he has got such a great attitude as well. _ the olympics. he has got such a great attitude as well. he - the olympics. he has got such a great attitude as well. he has i the olympics. he has got such a l great attitude as well. he has got of the mind completely right. so relaxed. so focused. he says he has done these competitions now, he is going back into the trenches. similar body to me as well. a lot of care and attention has gone into that. hold on a minute or why are you laughing so much?! we'll get the weather from carol shortly. but if the last three weeks is anything to go by, you can probably guess the outlook. rain, rain and more rain — for at least a couple more days. it isa it is a familiar view. with the uk on course for the wettest may on record, we decided to cheer ourselves up by sending breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin to a place where the british spirit can be dampened but never defeated — a campsite.
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it's going to be cold. there will be a significant wind chill. you can see the showers swirling around below. a lot of rain out - there at the moment. heavy and thundery again. may — not quite what we were hoping for. while may 2020 was the sunniest calendar month on record, may 2021 could become one of the wettest. good morning! oh, what a beautiful day! you big fib, chris! a bit of rain won't stop hardy campers like chris and karen in wales. is it all waterproof? no! well, it's already the wettest may on record since records began back in 1865. karen? yes. you're braved it. we have. hail, rain or snow, we were going to be here. enjoying it? yeah. what time does the bar open, karen? as soon as that's full! i didn't even bring a brolly. it is what it is, that's what i say. in the tent next door, wet weather hysteria is setting
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in with newlyweds tracey and julian. how has it been, newlyweds? lovely! ijust wish the sun would come out. it would be nice. was it quite the honeymoon period you envisaged? eh, it's been a little bit wetter than i imagined it would be, and possibly the wrong country. and i don't mean that...! i mean, somewhere in the sun and on the plane and disappeared... ..might have been nice. yes. but never mind. no. as long as we're together, as long as tracey�*s here, that's the main thing. # why does it always rain on me...# in llangolen, and across wales, they've had twice the average may rainfall, and may ain't over yet, people. it's been torrential. nearly every day, to be honest. we've had everything here, every torrential rain. i mean, flooding, thunder and lightning, hailstones... hailstones? massive — size of marbles, honestly. theyjust covered over the ground. and a tiny bit of
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sunshine — a tiny bit. oh, no! but is there a determination to fight through this weather? obviously there's a huge determination. i mean, honestly, sitting out in the rain under our brollies, having salad sandwiches. and we just sit there having a cup of tea all in this weather. as if the sun is cracking the flags? exactly. in as if the sun is cracking the flags? exactl . . ~ , ., exactly. in england, alistair flicked through _ exactly. in england, alistair flicked through the - exactly. in england, alistair flicked through the detailed exactly. in england, alistair- flicked through the detailed log from one of the uk plus my coldest weather stations. the from one of the uk plus my coldest weather stations.— weather stations. the museum has been collecting _ weather stations. the museum has been collecting data _ weather stations. the museum has been collecting data since - weather stations. the museum has been collecting data since 1882. . weather stations. the museum has l been collecting data since 1882. and what does been collecting data since1882. and what does it tell us about may? certainly the start of may was really cool. at one point it was looking like it was going to be the coolest since 1902. it looking like it was going to be the coolest since 1902.— looking like it was going to be the coolest since 1902. it has improved a little bit. — coolest since 1902. it has improved a little bit. but _ coolest since 1902. it has improved a little bit, but it _ coolest since 1902. it has improved a little bit, but it is— coolest since 1902. it has improved a little bit, but it is still— a little bit, but it is still officially a miserable may? it is currently the _ officially a miserable may? it 3 currently the wettest may since 1967. but obviously there is still a
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3rd of may to go. so it could get even wetter yet. it 3rd of may to go. so it could get even wetter yet.— 3rd of may to go. so it could get even wetter yet. it ain't over yet! no. so if even wetter yet. it ain't over yet! no- so if you — even wetter yet. it ain't over yet! no. so if you are _ even wetter yet. it ain't over yet! no. so if you are wondering - even wetter yet. it ain't over yet! no. so if you are wondering why | even wetter yet. it ain't over yet! i no. so if you are wondering why this is happening and will it get better, here is the man who knows. latte is happening and will it get better, here is the man who knows. we needed this throu . h here is the man who knows. we needed this through much _ here is the man who knows. we needed this through much of _ here is the man who knows. we needed this through much of the _ here is the man who knows. we needed this through much of the month. - here is the man who knows. we needed this through much of the month. at - this through much of the month. at the weekend it was so windy you could _ the weekend it was so windy you could hardly keep a hold of it. you can turn— could hardly keep a hold of it. you can turn it — could hardly keep a hold of it. you can turn it off now, charlotte. but why has _ can turn it off now, charlotte. but why has made's weather been so bad? it is why has made's weather been so bad? it is due _ why has made's weather been so bad? it is due to _ why has made's weather been so bad? it is due to the weather patterns getting — it is due to the weather patterns getting stuck. high pressure in russia — getting stuck. high pressure in russia and sending in incredibly warm _ russia and sending in incredibly warm air— russia and sending in incredibly warm air to russia and sending in incredibly warm airto the russia and sending in incredibly warm air to the arctic. i pressure across— warm air to the arctic. i pressure across greenland as well. that means we have _ across greenland as well. that means we have just — across greenland as well. that means we have just been stuck in the middle — we have just been stuck in the middle with low pressure after low pressure. — middle with low pressure after low pressure, bringing rain at times and dragging _ pressure, bringing rain at times and dragging down that cold wind that has dominated the month. but there is optimism — has dominated the month. but there is optimism on the horizon. it is looking — is optimism on the horizon. it is looking drier, it is looking warmer this weekend. adults aid too loudly, it's a bank— this weekend. adults aid too loudly, it's a bank holiday weekend and we know— it's a bank holiday weekend and we know what — it's a bank holiday weekend and we know what that can mean. —— don't say too _ know what that can mean. —— don't say too loudly. one _ say too loudly. one thing is absolutely certain.
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after all we have been through, bad weather won't stop us trying our very best to have fun.— weather won't stop us trying our very best to have fun. perfect day. we want rain- _ very best to have fun. perfect day. we want rain. there _ very best to have fun. perfect day. we want rain. there is _ very best to have fun. perfect day. we want rain. there is no - very best to have fun. perfect day. we want rain. there is no such - very best to have fun. perfect day. i we want rain. there is no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong choice of toys. as bad weather, 'ust the wrong choice of toys.— as bad weather, 'ust the wrong choice of to s. . ., ., choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is taettin choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is getting you _ choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is getting you wet- _ choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is getting you wet. give _ choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is getting you wet. give us - choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is getting you wet. give us a - choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is getting you wet. give us a twirl. l is getting you wet. give us a twirl. it has just chopped it down the it hasjust chopped it down the whole — it hasjust chopped it down the whole time. it hasjust chopped it down the whole time-— it hasjust chopped it down the whole time. ~ . it hasjust chopped it down the whole time. . ., ., whole time. never mind. we are going to en'o it. whole time. never mind. we are going to enjoy it- and — whole time. never mind. we are going to enjoy it. and the _ whole time. never mind. we are going to enjoy it. and the joy _ whole time. never mind. we are going to enjoy it. and the joy of _ whole time. never mind. we are going to enjoy it. and the joy of joy, - whole time. never mind. we are going to enjoy it. and the joy of joy, it - to enjoy it. and the 'oy of 'oy, it mitht, to enjoy it. and the 'oy of 'oy, it might. with to enjoy it. and the 'oy of 'oy, it might. mightjusth to enjoy it. and the joy of 'oy, it might, mightjust get h to enjoy it. and the joy of joy, it might, mightjust get better. i to enjoy it. and the joy of joy, it. might, mightjust get better. can to enjoy it. and the joy of joy, it - might, mightjust get better. can we have a twirl in your beautiful poncho? magnificent. and breathe. we just and breathe. wejust got and breathe. we just got to get through it. we have been looking through it. we have been looking through a microphone. this time last year it was blue skies, bikinis. wasn't it? well, i wasn't wearing a
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bikini! the memories! we wasn't it? well, i wasn't wearing a bikini! the memories!— wasn't it? well, i wasn't wearing a bikini! the memories! we are asking ou to bikini! the memories! we are asking you to send — bikini! the memories! we are asking you to send in _ bikini! the memories! we are asking you to send in your— bikini! the memories! we are asking you to send in your photos _ bikini! the memories! we are asking you to send in your photos of - you to send in your photos of miserable may. let's have a look. thank you for sending them. michael sent this picture of dark clouds over stonehaven bay near aberdeen. the dolphins don't mind. this over stonehaven bay near aberdeen. the dolphins don't mind.— the dolphins don't mind. this is from kent- _ the dolphins don't mind. this is from kent. you _ the dolphins don't mind. this is from kent. you can _ the dolphins don't mind. this is from kent. you can see - the dolphins don't mind. this is from kent. you can see the - the dolphins don't mind. this is| from kent. you can see the sun. the dolphins don't mind. this is - from kent. you can see the sun. the sun is trying its hardest to come through the clouds. i’m sun is trying its hardest to come through the clouds.— through the clouds. i'm 'ust noticin: through the clouds. i'm 'ust noticing rain. i through the clouds. i'm 'ust noticing rain. this �* through the clouds. i'm 'ust noticing rain. this is i through the clouds. i'm just noticing rain. this is from . through the clouds. i'm just noticing rain. this is from a | through the clouds. i'm just - noticing rain. this is from a bus tour of edinburgh at the weekend. this is apparently a view of edinburgh castle.— this is apparently a view of edinburgh castle. lovely. if you would like _ edinburgh castle. lovely. if you would like to _ edinburgh castle. lovely. if you would like to share _ edinburgh castle. lovely. if you would like to share your- edinburgh castle. lovely. if you l would like to share your pictures, embrace the misery, e—mail us at bbc breakfast. and you can tweet as well. i breakfast. and you can tweet as well. . . breakfast. and you can tweet as well. . , ., , , well. i have 'ust made myself ha ier well. i have 'ust made myself happier hy — well. i have just made myself happier by looking _ well. i have just made myself happier by looking at - well. i have just made myself happier by looking at last - well. i have just made myself. happier by looking at last year. well. i have just made myself- happier by looking at last year. you got anyjoy? i do. good morning. valour in north
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wales has had a 310% of the may average rainfall. that means it has had more than three times the rainfall we would expect during the whole of the month of may. not really surprising to learn that wales, provisionally, has had its wettest may on record since records began. that was way back in 1862. now what we have today, sunny spells, scattered heavy showers. some thundery with hail. they won't be as frequent as yesterday. the low pressure that brought all that rain yesterday is going into the north sea. we have another little system coming on across the south—west. that will introduce some rain later. a cloudy start to the day. the cloud will thin and break. sunny spells developing. then some showers. some of those will be heavy and thundery with some hail through parts of scotland, northern england, the north midlands towards east anglia. at the same time we have got this rain coming in across the
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south—west. for northern ireland and much of wales, for much of the midlands and into the south—east, you might catch the odd shower, but generally speaking, dry with sunshine. the same can be set across north—east scotland. temperatures above average for the time of the year. ten to 16. through this evening and overnight we hang on to the showers for a time. most of them will fade. you can see we lose also the rain from the south—west. in the far south—west corner we will hang on to a fair bit of clout. with all of this going on, it will not be a particularly cold night. no issues with frost. tomorrow, still some showers in eastern areas, some of them heavy. not much wind to move them heavy. not much wind to move them along. if you catch one, you will have it for a while. a lot of dry weather towards the south and west. a fair bit of sunshine. more cloud in the far south—east. 11 to 17 degrees are the temperatures. slowly starting to climb. on thursday we see a ridge of high
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pressure. things settle down. most will have a dry start. most will have a dry day generally with a fair bit of sunshine. but we do have a weather front bit of sunshine. but we do have a weatherfront coming in bit of sunshine. but we do have a weather front coming in from the west. it is bumping into this area of high pressure. so the rain is not going to be as intense as it has been for example yesterday. note the temperatures. 11 in the north to 19 and 20. somewhere could perhaps see 21. as we head through friday, high—pressure still with us. it will remain with us as we head through the weekend. again, keeping things fairly settled. on monday there is a small chance we mightjust see a weather front coming into the north—west, bringing in some rain. but the weekend are generally drier and warmer. to give you an idea, you can see what i mean. temperatures climbing up. some of us could see 21, 20 2 degrees climbing up. some of us could see 21,20 2 degrees in some sunshine. things are definitely changing towards the end of may.
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this is good news, carol. she does bring good news. she this is good news, carol. she does bring good news.— this is good news, carol. she does bring good news. she digs out of the hood bring good news. she digs out of the good news- — bring good news. she digs out of the good news. appreciate _ bring good news. she digs out of the good news. appreciate it, _ bring good news. she digs out of the good news. appreciate it, carol. - thank you. today marks the first anniversary of the killing of george floyd, who died while being detained by police in the state of minnesota. the images of the incident shocked people around the world prompting millions to take part in demonstrations. patrick ngwolo is a pastor in george floyd's home city of houston, and was also his friend. hejoins us now. patrick, thank you so much for joining us. tell us about how you are and what your thoughts are one year on? are and what your thoughts are one ear on? ~ ~' ., are and what your thoughts are one ear on? ~ ~ ., ., year on? well, i think the word that hrobabl year on? well, i think the word that probably encapsulates _ year on? well, i think the word that probably encapsulates my _ year on? well, i think the word that probably encapsulates my feeling i year on? well, i think the word that probably encapsulates my feeling is! probably encapsulates my feeling is bittersweet. bitter because someone i love. _ bittersweet. bitter because someone i love. the _ bittersweet. bitter because someone i love, the community icon from loves. _ i love, the community icon from loves. a — i love, the community icon from loves, a man has been taken from oz.
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i loves, a man has been taken from oz. i was _ loves, a man has been taken from oz. iwasjust_ loves, a man has been taken from oz. i wasjust there loves, a man has been taken from oz. i was just there the last few days looking _ i was just there the last few days looking at— i was just there the last few days looking at the murals and the things that had _ looking at the murals and the things that had been lifted up in celebration of george floyd and the fact that _ celebration of george floyd and the fact that a _ celebration of george floyd and the fact that a year later, we lost him. i fact that a year later, we lost him. hust— fact that a year later, we lost him. ijust felt— fact that a year later, we lost him. ijust felt this sense of loss that, man. _ ijust felt this sense of loss that, man. a _ ijust felt this sense of loss that, man, a leader, a loved one, eh, what we call— man, a leader, a loved one, eh, what we call in _ man, a leader, a loved one, eh, what we call in the — man, a leader, a loved one, eh, what we call in the hood, a diplomat, had been _ we call in the hood, a diplomat, had been taken — we call in the hood, a diplomat, had been taken from us. so that is the better— been taken from us. so that is the better part — been taken from us. so that is the better part. the sweet part is a year _ better part. the sweet part is a year later— better part. the sweet part is a year later knowing and understanding that the _ year later knowing and understanding that the sacrifice, the laying down of his— that the sacrifice, the laying down of his life. — that the sacrifice, the laying down of his life, if you will, has led to so much — of his life, if you will, has led to so much awareness about the issue of racial— so much awareness about the issue of racial injustice in this country. that's— racial injustice in this country. that's interesting what you say about awareness. what about a change? has it led to real change,
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or is it leading to real change? well, i that's interesting. ijust well, ithat's interesting. ijust look— well, ithat's interesting. ijust look back— well, ithat's interesting. ijust look back to see some of the things that i_ look back to see some of the things that i had _ look back to see some of the things that i had asked president trump to look into— that i had asked president trump to look into when this whole thing went down _ look into when this whole thing went down and _ look into when this whole thing went down and i— look into when this whole thing went down. and i couldn't check off any of the _ down. and i couldn't check off any of the tangible items that i had written — of the tangible items that i had written down and asked for the country— written down and asked for the country to— written down and asked for the country to look at. and so when i, looking _ country to look at. and so when i, looking back— country to look at. and so when i, looking back on that, i can't see that i_ looking back on that, i can't see that i see — looking back on that, i can't see that i see real change five years later~ _ that i see real change five years later. sorry, a year later. the george — later. sorry, a year later. the george floyd policing act is still not passed today. and i think that is indicative of where we are as a country — is indicative of where we are as a count . �* ,., is indicative of where we are as a count . ~ ., ., country. also, the impact of what ha-hened country. also, the impact of what happened has _ country. also, the impact of what happened has been _ country. also, the impact of what happened has been global. - country. also, the impact of what happened has been global. what| country. also, the impact of what i happened has been global. what do you make of that?—
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happened has been global. what do you make of that? well, when you see murals in war-torn _ you make of that? well, when you see murals in war-torn syria, _ you make of that? well, when you see murals in war-torn syria, and - you make of that? well, when you see murals in war-torn syria, and you - murals in war—torn syria, and you can connect— murals in war—torn syria, and you can connect them to murals in war-torn — can connect them to murals in war—torn third ward, houston, texas, you realise _ war—torn third ward, houston, texas, you realise that what we are watching _ you realise that what we are watching is this generation's martin luther— watching is this generation's martin luther king. so many people have been _ luther king. so many people have been inspired by his story and by his sacrifices. so that does bring us some — his sacrifices. so that does bring us some joy and some hope. that people _ us some joy and some hope. that people are — us some joy and some hope. that people are seeing, people understand and people are aware of the movement and people are aware of the movement and the _ and people are aware of the movement and the struggle. find and people are aware of the movement and the struggle-— and the struggle. and 'ust a final thou . ht and the struggle. and 'ust a final thought from t and the struggle. and 'ust a final thought from you, _ and the struggle. and 'ust a final thought from you, i _ and the struggle. and just a final thought from you, i know- and the struggle. and just a final thought from you, i know that i and the struggle. and just a final. thought from you, i know that you are marking this year. how are you doing that? this are marking this year. how are you doing that?— are marking this year. how are you doint that? , , ., ., ., ., doing that? this year, to morrow, we are ttoin doing that? this year, to morrow, we are going to — doing that? this year, to morrow, we are going to be _ doing that? this year, to morrow, we are going to be engaging _ doing that? this year, to morrow, we are going to be engaging in _ doing that? this year, to morrow, we are going to be engaging in the - doing that? this year, to morrow, we are going to be engaging in the 929 l are going to be engaging in the 929 challenge, where all across the
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country — challenge, where all across the country at, sorry, all across the world _ country at, sorry, all across the world at — country at, sorry, all across the world at 8:30pm, people will be joining _ world at 8:30pm, people will be joining into neil and to pray, for a moment— joining into neil and to pray, for a moment of— joining into neil and to pray, for a moment of silence for nine minutes. nine minutes on the 29 seconds. we are going _ nine minutes on the 29 seconds. we are going to— nine minutes on the 29 seconds. we are going to commemorate what, the sacrifice _ are going to commemorate what, the sacrifice he _ are going to commemorate what, the sacrifice he made, and praying for racial— sacrifice he made, and praying for racialjustice to be done in our land — racial 'ustice to be done in our land. �* , ., ., ~' racial 'ustice to be done in our land. �* ., ,, , ., land. and you would like people to reflect on that _ land. and you would like people to reflect on that across _ land. and you would like people to reflect on that across the - land. and you would like people to reflect on that across the world, i reflect on that across the world, would you? ltgfe reflect on that across the world, would you?— reflect on that across the world, would ou? ~ ., ., . would you? we would love it. and we ho he that would you? we would love it. and we hope that people _ would you? we would love it. and we hope that people would _ would you? we would love it. and we hope that people would join - would you? we would love it. and we hope that people would join in - would you? we would love it. and we hope that people would join in for - hope that people would join in for that moment of silence. it will start— that moment of silence. it will start at— that moment of silence. it will start at 8:30pm, wherever you are, whatever— start at 8:30pm, wherever you are, whatever you are, whatever your time zone. _ whatever you are, whatever your time zone. at _ whatever you are, whatever your time zone. at half— whatever you are, whatever your time zone, at half past eight for nine minutes— zone, at half past eight for nine minutes and 29 seconds. appreciate ou talkint minutes and 29 seconds. appreciate you talking to _ minutes and 29 seconds. appreciate you talking to us. _ minutes and 29 seconds. appreciate you talking to us. thank _ minutes and 29 seconds. appreciate you talking to us. thank you - minutes and 29 seconds. appreciate you talking to us. thank you very i you talking to us. thank you very much. it is the middle of the night where you are. it is today our time. thank you for talking to us and explaining what is going on. thank ou for
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explaining what is going on. thank you for having _ explaining what is going on. thank you for having me. _ explaining what is going on. thank you for having me. if— explaining what is going on. thank you for having me. if you - explaining what is going on. thank you for having me. if you have i explaining what is going on. thankj you for having me. if you have just you for having me. if you have 'ust switched fl you for having me. if you have 'ust switched on, good i you for having me. if you have 'ust switched on, good morning. i you for having me. if you have just switched on, good morning. we i you for having me. if you have just i switched on, good morning. we have got adam peaty coming your way. he will be talking to sally at half past seven. just after half past seven. he's been amazing in the swimming pool in the past few days and he has got a rather big summer coming up, hopefully, with yellow bricks as well. leagfe coming up, hopefully, with yellow bricks as well.— bricks as well. we are also talking about a miserable _ bricks as well. we are also talking about a miserable may. _ bricks as well. we are also talking | about a miserable may. sentencing your pictures. we would love see them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. the government is advising people not to travel in or out of hounslow, bedford due to fears over the indian variant of covid. the guidance published online says to avoid the eight areas hardest hit, unless essential for work or education. they're also urging people in those areas not to meet indoors. as many hospitals continue
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to have restrictions due to covid, london's evelina children's hospital has been using new technology to connect families. nurses on the neonatal wards have been recording and sharing videos of the babies in intensive care. it's also the first unit in the country to let parents record themselves. the clips are played to the newborns to help with bonding and development. it's more thanjust a clinical update. this is the emotional side of things, both with the partner that's here, the team, knowing that there's a whole family that you're taking care of. we've had messages from siblings reading stories to their baby brother or sister that's in hospital. extraordinary circumstances, really emotive, emotional and challenging. brentford have called on football authorities and the government to increase the number of fans allowed to attend saturdays play—off final at wembley. the bees take on swansea for a place in the premier league. 10,000 spectators are being allowed in, while 21,000 were permitted at the fa cup final ten days ago.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on most lines this morning, but there are minor delays on thejubilee line and a planned closure on the waterloo & city. turning to trains. on southeastern there are some cancellations for metro services following a derailment in the depot. on the roads... in bounds green, temporary traffic lights on the a406 north circular for repairs to a burst water main. they caused long delays yesterday, adding to the usual delays. peckham: a2215 consort road remains closed by the police following a shooting. nine bus routes are on diversion. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, believe it or not, our weather is set to improve over the next few days. the low pressure which brought those heavy, thundery downpours yesterday, is moving away further east. today, still could be one or two showers, but not as frequent and shouldn't be so heavy. some high cloud this morning, breaking into some decent spells
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of sunshine, but it's the heat in those sunny spells which may create one or two showers later. temperatures a little bit warmer at 16 celsius. overnight tonight, plenty of dry, clear spells, but again a risk of maybe one or two light showers. the minimum temperature between five and seven celsius, the wind reasonably light. now as we head into wednesday, again we're still at risk of maybe one or two showers, but they will be isolated. the wind light and for thursday, a ridge of high pressure builds in. and then things are set to settle down. plenty of fine and dry weather in the outlook. the wind is light and temperatures getting a little warmer, as we head towards the bank holiday weekend. that's it from me for the moment. plenty more on our website at the usual address. i'll be back with another update in half an hour.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today... growing condemnation of belarus after the forced landing of a ryanair plane and the arrest of a journalist — the eu imposes a flight ban and extends sanctions worth billions of dollars. people living in eight covid hotspots across england are told to avoid travelling in and out of their area, but local health officials say the government didn't warn them about the changes. going for gold again and again. we'll speak to adam peaty about his success at the european championships and how he hopes to peak at the olympics.
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good morning. we are starting off on a fairly cloudy note that some rain. we will see some sunshine developed and also some heavy, thundery showers some rain coming in across the south—west. it really improves from thursday. all the details in about ten minutes. it's tuesday, the 25th of may. our top story. european union leaders havejoined the uk in pledging to punish belarus over what it called the "state—sponsored hijacking" of a ryanairflight in order to arrest a prominent critic. belarusian carriers are now banned from entering the airspace of the uk and the eu — and more sanctions will follow. mark lobel reports. a hijacking. an affront to international norms. playing russian roulette with innocent civilians' lives. some of the charges levelled against belarus by the us, uk, eu and un after this ryanair plane was unexpectedly diverted to land in minsk.
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we've not seen anything quite as outlandish, as deceitful, as dangerous as this for at least 30, 40, maybe 50 years. all apparently to kidnap this man, opposition journalist roman protasevich for running an opposition news channel on the social media platform, telegram, where anti—government protests are organised. roman was later seen in a video released by belarus authorities but we're not showing it because it looks like he was filmed under duress. roman's forehead looks bruised. his father is concerned at what he calls a terrorist act. translation: we hope that he will cope. i we hope that he will stay himself, not give into any of their tricks. we are afraid to even think about it but it's possible he could be beaten and tortured. the eu is furious.
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its leaders are demanding roman protasevich be freed immediately and democracy returned. they've agreed a ban on belarusian flights from all eu airspace and airports and further penalties on officials and assets in belarus. there will be additional sanctions on individuals that are involved in the hijacking but this time also on businesses and economic entities that are financing this regime. since disputed elections last august, this man, belarus's president, alexander lukashenko, has cracked down on dissent. he's had hundreds of activists detained. many others fled the country into exile. among them, roman protasevich. his capture from high in the sky may become the highest profile one yet. mark lobel, bbc news.
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in a moment, we'll speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming in westminster but first let's get the latest from the bbc�*s moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. steve, what sort of sanctions would work against a man like president lukashenko? it isa it is a really interesting question. in fact one of russia's most popular newspapers today put it like this. it said were to scare the pachinko with sanctions is doomed to failure, they only egg him on and provoke him to do more because he has embraced the image of a crazed hooligan. what kind of sanctions do you have to try to make a hooligan change his ways? whether the latest eu sanctions worked or not, eu leaders must have come to the conclusion that what alexander lukashenko did was so brazen, reckless and so dangerous
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enforcing the ryanairjet to land in minsk, to arrest a political opponent, that they had to do something. there is no doubt the president will use the latest sanctions to go to the people around him, go to his people and say, i told you so, the west has got it in for us, the west wants to destroy belarus, if not with bullets with sanctions, to try to rally people around and use it to batten down the hatches. as long as he has the support of moscow, i think he will succeed. ., ~ support of moscow, i think he will succeed. ., ,, , ., ., , ., succeed. thank you for your analysis- — let's get more on this from our chief political correspondent adam fleming. both the uk leaders and those in the eu seem very much united on the issue. , ., ., . issue. they did not have much choice. issue. they did not have much choice- they _ issue. they did not have much choice. they want _ issue. they did not have much choice. they want to - issue. they did not have much choice. they want to send i issue. they did not have much choice. they want to send a i issue. they did not have much i choice. they want to send a message to belarus and any other regimes around the world that it is not on in 2021 that flight from one major capital to another nato capital, one
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eu capital to another eu capital can be intercepted by a fighterjet made to land under. pretenses and then a domestic opponent marched off the flight. that would call into question so many of the international norms around the law of the skies. both the uk and the eu wanted to send an incredibly strong message about it which is why they have ended up with basically the same package of measures. interestingly, there are lots of mps in the uk who would like dominic raab, the foreign secretary, to go even further and asking questions about whether this will actually make any difference to the domestic situation in belarus, which contains quite a lot of people here in the uk. another interesting aspect of this. even though brexit has happened in the uk has left the eu, it turns out they are still facing the same geopolitical challenges which quite often have the same answers. leagfe
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which quite often have the same answers. ~ ., ., . which quite often have the same answers. ~ . ., , ., , , answers. we had a number of guests comint u- answers. we had a number of guests coming up on — answers. we had a number of guests coming up on the _ answers. we had a number of guests coming up on the programme i answers. we had a number of guests coming up on the programme this i coming up on the programme this morning. we will be speaking to a friend of roman protasevich. he was going to meet her on the day he was taken off this flight. we will also be speaking to a pilot. coming up shortly... health officials in covid hotspots across england have reacted with surprise after it emerged the government has changed travel restrictions. the new advice, published on friday, warns against travelling into or out of eight local authority areas. aruna iyengar has this report. if you live in bolton, you might not be aware that current government advice on coronavirus here is different to other parts of the country. on friday, the government issued guidance, urging people in eight council areas not to travel in or out of the area except for essential reasons. the areas are... north tyneside, bolton, blackburn with darwen, burnley, kirklees, leicester, bedford and hounslow. residents in these areas are also asked to meet outside and keep two
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metres apart from those they don't live with. health officials say they weren't told about changes to the advice, with one telling us... he goes on to say that when central government was asked to provide any evidence to support the need for the new measures he did not receive any response. the bbc also spoke to north tyneside council, which said local officials knew nothing about the new guidance until last night. mps say ministers must urgently clarify their advice, saying no announcement about the updated guidance was a recipe for confusion and uncertainty. but the department of health says guidance was needed to encourage people to take an extra cautious approach when meeting others or travelling in areas hit hardest by the new variant, first identified in india. aruna iyengar, bbc news.
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amazon is reportedly closing in on a deal to buy hollywood studio mgm for around £6 billion. it would give the technology giant's prime streaming service access to a vast back catalogue of iconic content including the james bond and hobbit franchises. the deal could be finalised this week. the lead singer of the italian glam rock band, which won the eurovision song contest, has returned a negative drugs test. damiano david denied taking drugs following online speculation after footage showed him leaning over a table during the grand final on saturday. we spoke to the band yesterday on breakfast. the european broadcasting union said the allegation had overshadowed the spirit and the outcome of the contest and unfairly affected the band. he told us they are really offended by those allegations and he was going for a test shortly after he spoke to us. carol is looking at the
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weather today and we are also looking back to last year when it was a whole lot better. that would not have been too difficult. such a wet month may. still heavy showers in the forecast. not as many as yesterday but some sunshine as well. breezy as well. some of the showers will move along. rain across parts of scotland, england, wales, heading into the south—east. later the band of rain coming across the south—west. damp across scotland as well. still the rain at ten o'clock. the cloud is slowly starting to break up. in northern ireland you will get away with a largely dry day and an isolated shower. they are chummy across the north of england, the midlands, getting down towards east anglia. in the west back into some sunshine. through the day the cloud. to build across the eyes of
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scilly, cornwall and devon and then into the channel islands, heralding this band of rain. we will see further thundery showers. temperatures ten in the north to 16 in the south. this evening and overnight we continue with showers for a time. many of them will eventually fade. the band of rain moves away from the south west, leaving residual clout in its wake. with temperatures falling between four and seven, not a cold night and we are not to spreading any problems with frost. if you like the weather more unsettled, thursday is the day for you as a ridge of high pressure builds across us. —— more settled. more on that later. let's return to our top story now, and the continuing international
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outcry over a ryanair flight being forced to land in belarus. the act — described by eu leaders as a "state—sponsored hijacking" — enabled the belarusan authorities to arrest two of the passengers, the opposition journalist roman protasevich and his girlfriend sofia sapega. we can speak now to another belarusan exile, natalia kaliada, who was due to meet mr protasevich in europe this week. thank you very much for talking to us this morning live on the bbc. can you first tell us a little bit about roman protasevich. what sort of person is he in what is he like? good morning, everyone, from europe. currently we are travelling exactly for the purpose of that particular meeting that i hoped would take place this week. my husband, he is editor in chief of three major newspapers. all those newspapers got closed down in belarus. he knew
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rehman since he was 15 years old. he started to write when he was 15 years old. a person he was looking for the trees in order to bring all the information and spotlight on valerie's. —— belarus. i the information and spotlight on valerie's. -- belarus.— the information and spotlight on valerie's. -- belarus. i don't know how well you _ valerie's. -- belarus. i don't know how well you know— valerie's. -- belarus. i don't know how well you know his _ valerie's. -- belarus. i don't know how well you know his father i valerie's. -- belarus. i don't know how well you know his father but l valerie's. -- belarus. i don't know. how well you know his father but his father said he is concerned about his son at the moment stop no doubt he has seen the video released yesterday, which many of our viewers have seen as well. he is content his son will face the death penalty. do you share those sounds? —— he is concerned. fin you share those sounds? -- he is concerned-— concerned. on the list of compliments _ concerned. on the list of compliments where i concerned. on the list ofl compliments where death concerned. on the list of— compliments where death penalties are implemented, in 2011 and young people were executed due to a so—called terrorist attack. these
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included economic sanctions. they said alexander lukashenko would not execute those two young man because he was afraid of sanctions. in two days, there's two young men have been executed. the question now is for the european union, the united kingdom and america, will they finally move from words to actions? when they implement economic and financial sanctions to everyone propping the regime. leagfe financial sanctions to everyone propping the regime.— propping the regime. we were s-teakin propping the regime. we were speaking to — propping the regime. we were speaking to someone - propping the regime. we were speaking to someone he i propping the regime. we were speaking to someone he was l propping the regime. we were i speaking to someone he was saying the hardline has been taken against president alexander lukashenko well only full him further into the bunker stop how do you deal with a leader like that? —— will only full him will stop we submitted a full
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list of names for proper financial sanctions. ., ., , list of names for proper financial sanctions. ., . , ., sanctions. unfortunately, nothing was done. sanctions. unfortunately, nothing was done- it _ sanctions. unfortunately, nothing was done. it was _ sanctions. unfortunately, nothing was done. it was very _ sanctions. unfortunately, nothing was done. it was very symbolic i was done. it was very symbolic sanctions that did not work. it is necessary for the european union and the united kingdom to understand they must deal with russian and belarussian issues jointly. they must deal with russian and belarussian issuesjointly. it is not possible to resolve it one by one. it is necessary to understand while we have putin and alexander lukashenko in power, there is no stability for europe. we have been saying this for the past 27 years. our friends have been saying this for the past 27 years. ourfriends have been kidnapped and killed and bodies not found. those who did that are still in power and managed to hold hijacking of the aeroplane and hijacking of belarussian society. the question is, why, for now, nothing is done. very symbolic sanctions in place.
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there is a majorfear of very symbolic sanctions in place. there is a major fear of russia. what is interesting, the european union, the united kingdom and the united states show altogether they are in fear of russia. why? there are in fear of russia. why? there are major money backs. we are talking about corruption and the democratic rules of the united kingdom. and besides, we are asking for a meeting since august, in between prime minister borisjohnson and minister of foreign affairs, dominic raab. it did not happen. did ou dominic raab. it did not happen. did you see the video released by the belarussian authorities? in it, roman claimed he was being treated well. it roman claimed he was being treated well. . ., . roman claimed he was being treated well. , ., . ., .
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roman claimed he was being treated well. , ., . ., ~ , well. it is a chilling video. we see his face increases, _ well. it is a chilling video. we see his face increases, his _ well. it is a chilling video. we see his face increases, his neck i well. it is a chilling video. we see his face increases, his neck has . his face increases, his neck has bruises and his hands had bruises. the anything to say for now was he was tortured. the question is whether europe will move from its position wait and see to the point, nothing to wait and we must act and implement all those proper sanctions stop united nations security council has to sit and organise the meeting. international criminal court must open a criminal case and investigation because the filing was already done. investigation because the filing was already done-— already done. thank you very much for speaking _ already done. thank you very much for speaking to _ already done. thank you very much for speaking to us. _ already done. thank you very much for speaking to us. that _ already done. thank you very much for speaking to us. that is - already done. thank you very much for speaking to us. that is a - already done. thank you very much for speaking to us. that is a friend | for speaking to us. that is a friend of roman protasevich. in fact they were due to meet, as she said. that is why she has been travelling and was due to meet today roman protasevich before the flight was redirected. let's talk about the
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redirection and how it might have worked. captainjack netskar is a pilot with scandinavian airlines — he's also president of the international federation of air line pilots' associations. he joins us from norway. imean, i i mean, isuppose i mean, i suppose your comments on what happened. what would you make of what happened? first what happened. what would you make of what happened?— of what happened? first of all, thanks for _ of what happened? first of all, thanks for having _ of what happened? first of all, thanks for having me. - of what happened? first of all, thanks for having me. what. of what happened? first of all, - thanks for having me. what happened is very sad. it is kind of shocking. throughout the history, we have had many terrorist actions and bomb threats. normally, when you do get any kind of threat towards an aircraft, you have a well—qualified flight crew which makes assessments of the situations and they decide to take action. in this situation, normally, if you have alleged bomb
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threats, you would go to the nearest suitable airport. they find themselves in a situation where they have... intercepting them and telling them to go to minsk. that has to be upsetting for the pilot and flight safety of that light. it is absolutely shocking that this is happening. —— that flight. the is absolutely shocking that this is happening. -- that flight. the pilot would have — happening. -- that flight. the pilot would have been _ happening. -- that flight. the pilot would have been told, _ happening. -- that flight. the pilot would have been told, would - happening. -- that flight. the pilot would have been told, would he? l happening. -- that flight. the pilot. would have been told, would he? how would have been told, would he? how would it have worked? i do would have been told, would he? how would it have worked?— would it have worked? i do not have all the details. — would it have worked? i do not have all the details. he _ would it have worked? i do not have all the details. he must _ would it have worked? i do not have all the details. he must have - would it have worked? i do not have all the details. he must have been l all the details. he must have been either told by television air traffic controllers to follow the planes or it is being signalled from the fighter aircraft to follow them.
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there is a set of rules you can use in the air. most likely they were told so by the air traffic controllers in belarus. just tell us about the impact. _ controllers in belarus. just tell us about the impact. presumably - controllers in belarus. just tell us about the impact. presumably on | controllers in belarus. just tell us - about the impact. presumably on the pilot stop it is an alarming situation, all the crew and passengers as well. situation, all the crew and -aasseners as well. ~ , ~ , passengers as well. absolutely. as -ilots, passengers as well. absolutely. as ilots, we passengers as well. absolutely. as pilots. we are _ passengers as well. absolutely. as pilots, we are safety _ passengers as well. absolutely. as | pilots, we are safety professionals. you are being put in a situation between a rock and a hard place stop a really stressful one. you are being directed towards a different airport. he might never have been there. it is not included in fuel calculations. the whole setup here is so brutal towards light safety, so i kind of like words when a civilian aircraft is being
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intercepted by a state like that. presumably the skills of the pilot are really keen n or less. perhaps they would never have landed in that airport before. == they would never have landed in that airport before-— airport before. -- in all this. that could have _ airport before. -- in all this. that could have been _ airport before. -- in all this. that could have been a _ airport before. -- in all this. that could have been a totally - airport before. -- in all this. that| could have been a totally unknown airport. luckily, this went 0k, could have been a totally unknown airport. luckily, this went ok, but the pilot in command should never, everfind himself in the pilot in command should never, ever find himself in a situation like that. ., , like that. the eu and the uk is advisina like that. the eu and the uk is advising airlines _ like that. the eu and the uk is advising airlines not _ like that. the eu and the uk is advising airlines not to - like that. the eu and the uk is advising airlines not to fly - like that. the eu and the uk isi advising airlines not to fly over belarus. do you expect all airlines to be doing the same, or trying to avoid flying over belarus for now? i do expect that. you cannot have that uncertainty hanging in a situation when you are planning a flight from atb that you might be set up for
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something that is not planned, like this incident. i expect everybody to avoid belarus airspace. next question is, so is there any other places that this could happen? all the different international organisations, with the lead of the uk aviation branch, must develop more clarity in the procedures like this. nobody was expecting it that, further international cooperation is needed. ., , , ., ~ needed. really interesting talking to ou in needed. really interesting talking to you in getting _ needed. really interesting talking to you in getting your _ needed. really interesting talking| to you in getting your perspective. anki forjoining us this morning
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stop —— thank you. now when you go out to eat do you want to know how many calories are in the dishes you order? the government wants to add calorie counts to menus as part of its wider strategy to tackle obesity. from next april restaurants, cafes and pubs in england will have to display the calorie information on their menus. this will affect venues with more than 250 employees. the calorie count will need to be displayed on physical and online menus, food delivery platforms and food labels. customers can request menus without calorie information. but the charity beat, which works with people with eating disorders, says it will have a negative effect. we're nowjoined by mental health campaigner hope virgo, who is recovering from an eating disorder, and dr rachel ward. thank you for being with us this morning. what are your concerns about menus that the numbers of calories next to the feed we might be wanting to order.— be wanting to order. thank you so much for having _ be wanting to order. thank you so much for having me _ be wanting to order. thank you so much for having me on. _ be wanting to order. thank you so much for having me on. for - be wanting to order. thank you so much for having me on. for me, | be wanting to order. thank you so| much for having me on. for me, it be wanting to order. thank you so i much for having me on. for me, it is
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absolutely terrifying stop since this legislation has been announced, and over the last year having lots of conversations around this, i have been inundated with people affected ljy been inundated with people affected by eating disorders, he was so afraid of going into a restaurant and having the prospect of having those numbers staring back at them. it means people will feel triggered. there is already a period of heightened anxiety going into a restaurant. it will cause them to overthink what they are feeling that they will think they had to choose they will think they had to choose the lowest calorie option. if they do not they will have built and uncertainty. we are living in a society so focused on food, calories and bodies and this will put more and bodies and this will put more and more pressure on people to be looking and acting in a certain way around food. the looking and acting in a certain way around food-— around food. the government is sa inc around food. the government is saying people _ around food. the government is saying people can _ around food. the government is saying people can request - around food. the government is saying people can request a - around food. the government is i saying people can request a menu without a calorie count.— saying people can request a menu without a calorie count. would that make a difference? _ without a calorie count. would that make a difference? in _ without a calorie count. would that
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make a difference? in my- without a calorie count. would that make a difference? in my opinion, | make a difference? in my opinion, no. eating disorders are not a choice. someone does not choose to have one. if there is a menu with or without, we would want one without that we will probably go the other way because that is what eating disorder is telling us today. i would still be tempted to get the menu with the calories and because it is not a choice. i would not want to sit with all the fear around afterwards. to sit with all the fear around afterwards-— afterwards. yesterday a very well- known _ afterwards. yesterday a very well-known doctor _ afterwards. yesterday a very well-known doctor was - afterwards. yesterday a very i well-known doctor was talking afterwards. yesterday a very - well-known doctor was talking about well—known doctor was talking about theissue well—known doctor was talking about the issue of obesity and how much it is affecting so many people in the uk, particularly after the pandemic as well. what is your suggestion for maybe an alternative to this at the heart of what the government is trying to do, trying to meet the issue of obesity and trying to do something to control that. we have had calorie labels _ something to control that. we have had calorie labels on _ something to control that. we have
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had calorie labels on stuff - something to control that. we have had calorie labels on stuff also - had calorie labels on stuff also many years. in supermarkets, you can google stuff and find it on the internet. if it is at the people can find it and it is clearly not working. we need to look at what education we can put across the entire society, looking at what is going on for people mentally to impact eating behaviours, eating habits. people who are calorie counting, you are going to be affected by this are people who are going to be reading it. the majority of the world will not be going into restaurants, picking up a menu and looking at calories. it is about education and empowerment and looking at what we can do in schools to educate people on what healthy means but what a healthy lifestyle is a middle way from demonising food and people's weight as well. you is a middle way from demonising food and people's weight as well.— and people's weight as well. you say ou are 13 and people's weight as well. you say you are 13 years _ and people's weight as well. you say you are 13 years into _ and people's weight as well. you say you are 13 years into your _ and people's weight as well. you say you are 13 years into your recovery. i you are 13 years into your recovery. from your point of view, even now, as you say, this would affect you,
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would it? it as you say, this would affect you, would it? , ., , .,, would it? it definitely would stop i have been i— would it? it definitely would stop i have been i guess _ would it? it definitely would stop i have been i guess in _ would it? it definitely would stop i have been i guess in treatment. would it? it definitely would stop i i have been i guess in treatment when i was 17 and have been out of treatment since then. i am now 31. i know i had to challenge my eating behaviour disorder. given the year we have had and the number of people who have been struggling with food over the past year and the fact eating disorders thrive off that isolation, of the uncertainty. if i go into a restaurant it feels different and scary. if i can see calories, it would make it an easier time. i do not want to have a life dictated by food, calories and exercise. i know that would be that temptation will stop it would be so challenging to step away from that. from conversations i have had with others, people are too afraid to go out and miss out on meeting family
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and friends because they are so afraid of the calories being there. 100% i would be doing that. thank you forjoining us. let us know what you forjoining us. let us know what you think of that. other issues as well. we are dealing with measurable made today. exactly a year ago, we were looking at pictures. i was camping in the garden. it was 2a degrees. i took the kids to chatsworth house in derbyshire and swimming in the river, a lovely day. carol has been talking about record levels of rain for the past weeks. we are nearly at the end of may, aren't we. hopefully, adam peaty will be speaking about the olympics. good morning from bbc
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london, i'm alison earle. the government is advising people not to travel in or out of hounslow, beford, due to fears over the indian variant of covid. the guidance published online says to avoid the eight areas hardest hit, unless essential for work or education. they're also urging people in those area not to meet indoors. as many hospitals continue to have restrictions due to covid, the evelina has been using new technology to connect families. nurses at the children's hospital have been recording and sharing videos of the babies in intensive care. it's also the first unit in the country to let parents record themselves. the clips are played to the newborns to help with bonding and development. it's more thanjust a clinical update. this is the emotional side of things, both with the partner that's here, the team, knowing that there's a whole family that you're taking care of. we've had messages from siblings reading stories to their baby brother or sister that's in hospital.
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extraordinary circumstances, really emotive, emotional and challenging. brentford have called on football authorities and the government to increase the number of fans allowed to attend saturdays play—off final at wembley. the bees take on swansea for a place in the premier league. 10,000 spectators are being allowed in, while 21,000 were able to go to the fa cup final ten days ago. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on most lines this morning, but there is a planned closure on the waterloo & city. turning to trains — on southeastern there are some cancellations for metro services, following a derailment in the depot. on the roads, in bounds green there are temporary traffic lights on the a1t06 north circular for repairs to a burst water main. they caused long delays yesterday, adding to the usual delays. and in peckham, the a2215 consort road remains closed by the police following a shooting. nine bus routes are on diversion.
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now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, believe it or not, our weather is set to improve over the next few days. the low pressure which brought those heavy, thundery downpours yesterday, is moving away further east. today, still could be one or two showers, but not as frequent and shouldn't be so heavy. some high cloud this morning, breaking into some decent spells you of sunshine, but it's the heat in those sunny spells which may create one or two showers later. temperatures a little bit warmer at 16 celsius. overnight tonight, plenty of dry, clear spells, but again a risk of maybe one or two light showers. the minimum temperature between five and seven celsius, the wind reasonably light. now as we head into wednesday, again we're still at risk of maybe one or two showers, but they will be isolated. the wind light and for thursday, a ridge of high pressure builds in. and then things are set to settle down. plenty of fine and dry weather in the outlook. the wind is light and temperatures getting a little warmer, as we head
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towards the bank holiday weekend. that's it from me for the moment. plenty more on our website at the usual address. i'll be back with another update in an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. today is the first anniversary of the death of george floyd the african american killed by a white policeman mr floyd's murder sparked global protests against racism and police brutality. barbara plett usher reports. in the year since george floyd died, rituals have helped to build and shape a movement. the standard—bearers drawn by a mix of the political and personal, like cortez rice — a symbolic pallbearer in a never—ending funeral. it's my beloved friend, man. he was like all good to me, like i say, i loved him
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and i miss him dearly. he was a role model to me. let me see all the hands. floyd's violent arrest and death over a minor crime was replayed at the recent trial of his killer — a white police officer convicted of murder. activists believe that pressure on the streets helped secure the guilty verdict. now cortez is focusing on using the law to change the way policing is done. that's why i recentlyjoined the naacp minneapolis chapter so i can be familiarised with the bills that's going on, and to help our people out. so it sounds to me like you're kind of giving yourself, like, a legal education. yeah, definitely. that's quite a change, no? yeah, definitely. that's a big change. many lives have changed, even if wider reforms have been slow to follow. it activated me. it activated me in ways i didn't know i could be activated. butchy austin lives in the neighbourhood where george floyd was killed. i saw an opportunity
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to have a deeper community with my neighbours, to have tougher conversations about systemic racism and police brutality. every sunday, he joins this service on the corner of the square where floyd died. faith gives them confidence, but the debate in the city over how to handle policing is messy. and officers say they're under such scrutiny they don't feel free to do theirjobs. it's long overdue that an officer thinks twice before engaging. and i know some people are frustrated about how many officers are leaving the force. and feel like police are being oppressed. again, if you're doing yourjob right, this shouldn't be happening. so this anniversary is a chance to reflect on a life lost, on battles won and struggles yet to be overcome. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. and there will be lots of prayers as
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well. we were speaking to a friend of george floyd's earlier and he wants people tonight at half past eight tojoin in wants people tonight at half past eight to join in a prayer for wants people tonight at half past eight tojoin in a prayerfor nine minutes. eight to join in a prayer for nine minutes. , ., ., , minutes. something else we normally do at this time — minutes. something else we normally do at this time of _ minutes. something else we normally do at this time of the _ minutes. something else we normally do at this time of the year _ minutes. something else we normally do at this time of the year is - do at this time of the year is springwatch. a slight change to how they are going to be doing it. when we did autumnwatch and springwatch, they had to be in separate locations. michaela strachan and chris packham are going to be able to be together for the first time in their long time. we will be speaking to them together about the new series of springwatch a little bit later on. we series of springwatch a little bit later on. ~ ., .,, ., series of springwatch a little bit lateron. ~ ., ., ,, .,~ series of springwatch a little bit later on. ~ ., ., ,, .,~ ., later on. we are hoping to speak to adam peaty. _ later on. we are hoping to speak to adam peaty, aren't— later on. we are hoping to speak to adam peaty, aren't we, _ later on. we are hoping to speak to adam peaty, aren't we, sally? - adam peaty, aren't we, sally? yes. i wonder if he gives himself a day off after the weekend? it is tuesday. back at home. hugely successful weekend. he tuesday. back at home. hugely successful weekend.— tuesday. back at home. hugely successful weekend. he is probably trainina . successful weekend. he is probably training- he — successful weekend. he is probably training. he has— successful weekend. he is probably training. he has probably _ successful weekend. he is probably training. he has probably been - training. he has probably been trainina. training. he has probably been training. that's _ training. he has probably been training. that's what _ training. he has probably been training. that's what you - training. he has probably been training. that's what you have | training. he has probably been - training. that's what you have been doing this morning. yes. training. that's what you have been doing this morning.— doing this morning. yes, i've had weiaht doing this morning. yes, i've had
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weight sessions. _ doing this morning. yes, i've had weight sessions. he _ doing this morning. yes, i've had weight sessions. he has - doing this morning. yes, i've had weight sessions. he has had - doing this morning. yes, i've had weight sessions. he has had so l doing this morning. yes, i've had - weight sessions. he has had so much success, weight sessions. he has had so much success. hasn't _ weight sessions. he has had so much success, hasn't he? _ success, hasn't he? the swimming team has done brilliantly. i will be talking to adam about that. it is notjust adam. the whole team has been doing well. i don't want to jinx adam. the whole team has been doing well. i don't want tojinx it. you well. i don't want to 'inx it. you have to get * well. i don't want to 'inx it. you have to get it h well. i don't want to 'inx it. you have to get it right _ well. i don't want to jinx it. you have to get it right for - well. i don't want tojinx it. ym. have to get it right for the big meetings. have to get it right for the big meetings-— have to get it right for the big meetings. and that is how his trainin: meetings. and that is how his training as — meetings. and that is how his training as planned. - meetings. and that is how his training as planned. we - meetings. and that is how his training as planned. we have| meetings. and that is how his - training as planned. we have been working with the last few months, and adam says he is going back in the trench, going back into what he saysis the trench, going back into what he says is the dark place to train and train and train, and get for tokyo. while we are waiting, do you want to tell us about the rest of the sport? yes. there are so many england players in europa and champions league finals that gareth southgate will only name a provisional squad for the euros later today. he's worried about potential injuries and won't narrow it down to the final 26 for another week. if you want to, go to the bbc sport website and have a go at the euros squad picker. dundee are celebrating being back in the scottish premiership. they beat kilmarnock
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in the play—off final, winning the second leg 2—1, to make it lt—2 on aggregate. dundee delighted, but huge disappointment for kilmarnock, who drop down for the first time since 1993. japan have been assured by the united states that a 'no travel�* advisory will not affect american olympians. the tokyo games are just weeks away and on monday the us state department warned americans against travel to japan because of a surge in coronavirus cases in the country. but the united states olympic & paralympic committee says it still anticipates american athletes will be able to safely travel and compete. that news out of the united states yesterday. we have been talking about adam. you would think 13 world records, olympic, world, european and commonwealth titles would be more than enough silverware for most athletes —
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unless, of course, your name's adam peaty. the british swimming sensation has just added the quadruple quadruple to his medal haul, claiming his fourth title of the week at his fourth consecutive european championships. let's take a look. 0h, oh, you wouldn't want to swim against that, would you? he looks sensational. if you can get a decent start, by far the fastest swimmer through the water is adam peaty. here he comes. his swimming speed is so powerful. peaty is charging in the centre of that black cat. he really is. he is coming back so strong. adam peaty, a supreme racer, and he is beginning to reel in his rival. can he go for migraine in a row? it looks_ can he go for migraine in a row? it
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looks like — can he go for migraine in a row? it looks like it — can he go for migraine in a row? it looks like it is going to be peaty. peaty _ looks like it is going to be peaty. peaty gets the gold. 26.21. just 20 61 hundredths of a second outside of his own _ 61 hundredths of a second outside of his own world record. a masterclass of breaststroke swimming. job done. of breaststroke swimming. job done-— of breaststroke swimming. job done. ., ., ~ ., job done. the quad. the quad! adam, aood job done. the quad. the quad! adam, good morning- — job done. the quad. the quad! adam, good morning. great _ job done. the quad. the quad! adam, good morning. great to _ job done. the quad. the quad! adam, good morning. great to see _ job done. the quad. the quad! adam, good morning. great to see you. - job done. the quad. the quad! adam, | good morning. great to see you. good morninu. good morning. great to see you. good morning- loads _ good morning. great to see you. good morning. loads to _ good morning. great to see you. good morning. loads to talk _ good morning. great to see you. good morning. loads to talk about. - good morning. great to see you. good morning. loads to talk about. i - good morning. great to see you. good morning. loads to talk about. i just i morning. loads to talk about. i 'ust want to start — morning. loads to talk about. i 'ust want to start by fl morning. loads to talk about. i 'ust want to start by reflecting i morning. loads to talk about. i 'ust want to start by reflecting on i morning. loads to talk about. i just want to start by reflecting on that l want to start by reflecting on that weekend. it was perfection, wasn't it, for you? weekend. it was perfection, wasn't it. for you?— it, for you? yeah, there is no such thint as it, for you? yeah, there is no such thing as perfection. _ it, for you? yeah, there is no such thing as perfection. things - it, for you? yeah, there is no such thing as perfection. things still i it, for you? yeah, there is no such thing as perfection. things still do | thing as perfection. things still do io thing as perfection. things still do go wrong — thing as perfection. things still do go wrong. but that is why we train so hard _ go wrong. but that is why we train so hard we — go wrong. but that is why we train so hard. we train every single day, 35 hours— so hard. we train every single day, 35 hours a — so hard. we train every single day, 35 hours a week. doing gym and stuff like that _ 35 hours a week. doing gym and stuff like that. we try to stay there as much _ like that. we try to stay there as much as— like that. we try to stay there as much as we _ like that. we try to stay there as much as we can. it was a good week. no such— much as we can. it was a good week. no such thing — much as we can. it was a good week. no such thing as perfection. i totally get what you mean. but it went to plan. when you are planning with your coach, is this basically
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what you plan for?— with your coach, is this basically what you plan for? yeah. i mean, it's kind of _ what you plan for? yeah. i mean, it's kind of resilience _ what you plan for? yeah. i mean, it's kind of resilience at _ what you plan for? yeah. i mean, it's kind of resilience at the i what you plan for? yeah. i mean, it's kind of resilience at the end i it's kind of resilience at the end of the _ it's kind of resilience at the end of the day _ it's kind of resilience at the end of the day. we came to this meeting knowing _ of the day. we came to this meeting knowing we — of the day. we came to this meeting knowing we were going to be tired, knowing _ knowing we were going to be tired, knowing we were going to be tired, knowing we would have a challenge on our hands _ knowing we would have a challenge on our hands. but once we started swimming, once we started winning, the team _ swimming, once we started winning, the team got stronger and stronger, we got _ the team got stronger and stronger, we got more confident. it is looking .ood we got more confident. it is looking good now— we got more confident. it is looking good now because we have got a great mixture _ good now because we have got a great mixture we _ good now because we have got a great mixture. we have got the seniors in the team, _ mixture. we have got the seniors in the team, the youngsters in the team, _ the team, the youngsters in the team, and — the team, the youngsters in the team, and we have the middle age group _ team, and we have the middle age group as_ team, and we have the middle age group as well. we have got experience and hunger. so it's treat. i experience and hunger. so it's great. i notice _ experience and hunger. so it's great. i notice you _ experience and hunger. so it's great. i notice you said - experience and hunger. so it's great. i notice you said in i experience and hunger. so it's great. i notice you said in one | experience and hunger. so it's l great. i notice you said in one of your interviews it is like going back into the trenches. so tell me, what does that mean for the next few weeks heading into tokyo? the lat what does that mean for the next few weeks heading into tokyo?— weeks heading into tokyo? a lot of hard work to _ weeks heading into tokyo? a lot of hard work to do. _ weeks heading into tokyo? a lot of hard work to do. i've _ weeks heading into tokyo? a lot of hard work to do. i've lost _ weeks heading into tokyo? a lot of hard work to do. i've lost count i hard work to do. i've lost count now, _ hard work to do. i've lost count now. i— hard work to do. i've lost count now. i think— hard work to do. i've lost count now, i think we are about eight or nine _ now, i think we are about eight or nine weeks — now, i think we are about eight or nine weeks out. obviously there is still a _ nine weeks out. obviously there is still a lot— nine weeks out. obviously there is still a lot of— nine weeks out. obviously there is still a lot of uncertainty with the other— still a lot of uncertainty with the other pics — still a lot of uncertainty with the other pics. obviously with that stuff _ other pics. obviously with that stuff being released from japan and the us— stuff being released from japan and the us today. but i mean we can't train _ the us today. but i mean we can't train in _ the us today. but i mean we can't train in that— the us today. but i mean we can't train in that frame of mind, what if
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this happens, or should that happen? we have _ this happens, or should that happen? we have to _ this happens, or should that happen? we have to live in the present, enjoy— we have to live in the present, enjoy the — we have to live in the present, enjoy the present, enjoy this journey— enjoy the present, enjoy this journey and enjoy this gift i have been _ journey and enjoy this gift i have been given. i think hard work isn't really— been given. i think hard work isn't really that— been given. i think hard work isn't really that hard for me. i enjoyed being _ really that hard for me. i enjoyed being in— really that hard for me. i enjoyed being in the trench, as i call it, enjoy— being in the trench, as i call it, enjoy winning, enjoy racing. sol welcome — enjoy winning, enjoy racing. sol welcome the competition and i welcome — welcome the competition and i welcome all of the hard training that comes with it.— welcome all of the hard training that comes with it. adam, how easy is it to stay — that comes with it. adam, how easy is it to stay on _ that comes with it. adam, how easy is it to stay on track _ that comes with it. adam, how easy is it to stay on track mentally? i that comes with it. adam, how easy is it to stay on track mentally? you | is it to stay on track mentally? you heard that bit of news i read out from the united states about the coronavirus surge injapan. i remember speaking to you a few years ago and you are mentally in a very different place. you are in a great place now. how easy is it to stay there with all of this noise going on around the olympics? i there with all of this noise going on around the olympics?- there with all of this noise going on around the olympics? i think it's no different — on around the olympics? i think it's no different to _ on around the olympics? i think it's no different to social— on around the olympics? i think it's no different to social media, - on around the olympics? i think it's no different to social media, i i no different to social media, i don't — no different to social media, i don't think it's any different to any other— don't think it's any different to any other noise any athlete gets. it isjust— any other noise any athlete gets. it must that — any other noise any athlete gets. it isjust that it any other noise any athlete gets. it is just that it could potentially delay— is just that it could potentially delay one of the biggest things in your career. i delay one of the biggest things in your career. lam a delay one of the biggest things in your career. i am a very optimistic person _
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your career. i am a very optimistic person i'm — your career. i am a very optimistic person. i'm also a little bit of a realist. — person. i'm also a little bit of a realist. but— person. i'm also a little bit of a realist, but i'm a very optimistic person— realist, but i'm a very optimistic person and _ realist, but i'm a very optimistic person and i really believe that if you want — person and i really believe that if you want to get the bus to possible performance as an athlete, or even as a person. — performance as an athlete, or even as a person, you have to focus on the present _ as a person, you have to focus on the present. the past is already present — the present. the past is already present. there is no point equally worrying — present. there is no point equally worrying about the future. there is more _ worrying about the future. there is more wisdom than three years ago, four years _ more wisdom than three years ago, four years ago. i think that is what covid _ four years ago. i think that is what covid has — four years ago. i think that is what covid has done to me. it has given me a _ covid has done to me. it has given me a lot _ covid has done to me. it has given me a lot of— covid has done to me. it has given me a lot of time to think. a lot of time _ me a lot of time to think. a lot of time to— me a lot of time to think. a lot of time to kinda reflect on who i want to be _ time to kinda reflect on who i want to be and _ time to kinda reflect on who i want to be and who i need to be as an athlete — to be and who i need to be as an athlete do _ to be and who i need to be as an athlete. do i need to more patient? do i need _ athlete. do i need to more patient? do i need to— athlete. do i need to more patient? do i need to have a little bit more wisdom? — do i need to have a little bit more wisdom? do i need to take a step back? _ wisdom? do i need to take a step back? do— wisdom? do i need to take a step back? do i— wisdom? do i need to take a step back? do i need tojust swim? you back? do i need to 'ust swim? you talk about the i back? do i need tojust swim? gm. talk about the challenges of lockdown and how you have changed perhaps over the past 18 months. one of the big —— very big things that has happened is you are now a dad. how is your little boy george doing at the moment? is he at all aware of you being on the telly and swimming?
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he is. it's funny, actually, he is not aware — he is. it's funny, actually, he is not aware aware, but he looks and smiles _ not aware aware, but he looks and smiles when i am on tv. avery sends me videos— smiles when i am on tv. avery sends me videos of— smiles when i am on tv. avery sends me videos of when he watches me. he does this— me videos of when he watches me. he does this with his hands, trying to waive _ does this with his hands, trying to waive it— does this with his hands, trying to waive it is— does this with his hands, trying to waive. it is great obviously to have that kind _ waive. it is great obviously to have that kind of — waive. it is great obviously to have that kind of position as a dad now. it's great _ that kind of position as a dad now. it's great inspiring people through what i _ it's great inspiring people through what i do — it's great inspiring people through what i do in being an athlete. but there _ what i do in being an athlete. but there is— what i do in being an athlete. but there is nothing that will ever compare _ there is nothing that will ever compare to inspiring your own son, or your— compare to inspiring your own son, or your own— compare to inspiring your own son, or your own child. going compare to inspiring your own son, oryour own child. going into compare to inspiring your own son, or your own child. going into the olympics. — or your own child. going into the olympics, obviously i am going to miss— olympics, obviously i am going to miss that — olympics, obviously i am going to miss that. but i have got a job to do. miss that. but i have got a job to do i— miss that. but i have got a job to do i am — miss that. but i have got a job to do. i am fully aware that i have got to do— do. i am fully aware that i have got to do that — do. i am fully aware that i have got to do thatjob do. i am fully aware that i have got to do that job well. | do. i am fully aware that i have got to do that job well.— to do that 'ob well. i hate to pile more to do that job well. i hate to pile more pressure _ to do that job well. i hate to pile more pressure on _ to do that job well. i hate to pile more pressure on you, - to do that job well. i hate to pile more pressure on you, but i to do that job well. i hate to pile more pressure on you, but mike | more pressure on you, but mike foster was here on sunday and i heard him say the words, adam peaty does not lose until he retires. let's talk a little bit about tokyo and targets. what is the dream? i mean, the dream would be to come back with _ mean, the dream would be to come back with kind of personal best in everything, because that would mean
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i everything, because that would mean i -et everything, because that would mean i get gold. _ everything, because that would mean i get gold, not to sound arrogant. but i _ i get gold, not to sound arrogant. but i think— i get gold, not to sound arrogant. but i think i— i get gold, not to sound arrogant. but i think i want to do better as a team _ but i think i want to do better as a team as _ but i think i want to do better as a team as well. we have got huge potential— team as well. we have got huge potential and a huge opportunity in both of— potential and a huge opportunity in both of the relays now. i think the united _ both of the relays now. i think the united states are just ahead on both of them _ united states are just ahead on both of them. but when it gets down to the race, — of them. but when it gets down to the race, it — of them. but when it gets down to the race, it is anyone because my game _ the race, it is anyone because my game if— the race, it is anyone because my game if you _ the race, it is anyone because my game. if you have got a lead, you have _ game. if you have got a lead, you have got— game. if you have got a lead, you have got a — game. if you have got a lead, you have got a chance. i want to get back— have got a chance. i want to get back from — have got a chance. i want to get back from the olympics knowing that we have _ back from the olympics knowing that we have utilised every opportunity we have utilised every opportunity we have _ we have utilised every opportunity we have been given. and we have utilised every opportunity we have been given.— we have utilised every opportunity we have been given. and on hard how confident are — we have been given. and on hard how confident are you _ we have been given. and on hard how confident are you that _ we have been given. and on hard how confident are you that he _ we have been given. and on hard how confident are you that he will - we have been given. and on hard how confident are you that he will be i we have been given. and on hard how confident are you that he will be in i confident are you that he will be in tokyo and it will go ahead? —— hand on heart. tokyo and it will go ahead? -- hand on heart. . tokyo and it will go ahead? -- hand on heart. , ., on heart. untilthis morning trobabl on heart. untilthis morning probably 90%. _ on heart. untilthis morning probably 90%. but - on heart. untilthis morningj probably 9096. but probably on heart. untilthis morning i probably 9096. but probably 8096 on heart. untilthis morning _ probably 9096. but probably 8096 now. probably 90%. but probably 80% now. it is probably 90%. but probably 80% now. it is not _ probably 90%. but probably 80% now. it is not going to affect me. i am not going — it is not going to affect me. i am not going to think about it. i am going _ not going to think about it. i am going to — not going to think about it. i am going to get my head down, keep my own lane. _ going to get my head down, keep my own lane, channel and noise. going to get my head down, keep my own lane, channeland noise. enjoy this journey, — own lane, channeland noise. enjoy thisjourney, enjoy being an own lane, channeland noise. enjoy this journey, enjoy being an athlete in this journey, enjoy being an athlete in these _ this journey, enjoy being an athlete in these times which are very hard to enjoy — in these times which are very hard to enjoy it— in these times which are very hard to enjoy. it has been one of the hardest — to enjoy. it has been one of the
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hardest kind of moment probably in time _ hardest kind of moment probably in time the _ hardest kind of moment probably in time. the last year there have been so many— time. the last year there have been so many highs but equally so many laws _ so many highs but equally so many laws you — so many highs but equally so many laws. you can't get lost in the lows but equally — laws. you can't get lost in the lows but equally you can't get lost in the house. enjoy the moment and hopetully— the house. enjoy the moment and hopefully do some damage at the other— hopefully do some damage at the other pics. is hopefully do some damage at the other tics. . ., hopefully do some damage at the other tics. , ., ., , ., other pics. is that moustache going to stay present _ other pics. is that moustache going to stay present all _ other pics. is that moustache going to stay present all the _ other pics. is that moustache going to stay present all the way - other pics. is that moustache going to stay present all the way through | to stay present all the way through tokyo? that is what we really want to know! . tokyo? that is what we really want to know! , ., ., , to know! maybe through the heats. it didn't do me — to know! maybe through the heats. it didn't do me too _ to know! maybe through the heats. it didn't do me too badly _ to know! maybe through the heats. it didn't do me too badly out _ to know! maybe through the heats. it didn't do me too badly out the - didn't do me too badly out the europeans. is didn't do me too badly out the europeans-— didn't do me too badly out the euroteans. , ., ., , europeans. is it a lucky moustache? i think so, yeah. _ europeans. is it a lucky moustache? i think so, yeah. certainly _ europeans. is it a lucky moustache? i think so, yeah. certainly with i europeans. is it a lucky moustache? i think so, yeah. certainly with the l i think so, yeah. certainly with the water— i think so, yeah. certainly with the water bouncing off it.— i think so, yeah. certainly with the water bouncing off it. adam, great to see ou water bouncing off it. adam, great to see you this _ water bouncing off it. adam, great to see you this morning. _ water bouncing off it. adam, great to see you this morning. thank i water bouncing off it. adam, great. to see you this morning. thank you. see ou to see you this morning. thank you. see you again _ to see you this morning. thank you. see you again very _ to see you this morning. thank you. see you again very soon. _ to see you this morning. thank you. see you again very soon. lots i to see you this morning. thank you. see you again very soon. lots more | see you again very soon. lots more to come with adams —— adam throughout the coming week. so throughout the coming week. 50 great. such a throughout the coming week. so great. such a great attitude. so positive. great. such a great attitude. so ositive. ., ., , positive. confident without being arrouant. positive. confident without being arrogant. perfect. _ positive. confident without being arrogant. perfect. a _
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positive. confident without being arrogant. perfect. a bit - positive. confident without being arrogant. perfect. a bit like - positive. confident without being arrogant. perfect. a bit like your| arrogant. perfect. a bit like your whole self- _ arrogant. perfect. a bit like your whole self. body _ arrogant. perfect. a bit like your whole self. body double. - arrogant. perfect. a bit like your whole self. body double. i - arrogant. perfect. a bit like your whole self. body double. i am i whole self. body double. i am delighted to be able to tell you that two big projects we work done last year are in the running for national television awards. the long list for the award has just been announced this morning and are microfilm with marcus rashford feeding britain because my children is on that list. —— ourfilm. we followed his campaign tried to persuade the government to change their minds about free school meals for children during the pandemic. also, our documentary with rob burrow, my year with mnd, that is on the list as well. i talked to rob yesterday along with stephen dobbie and doddie weir. really happy to share this news with you. it is a public vote. that goes from the long list to the shortlist.— list to the shortlist. other programmes _ list to the shortlist. other programmes available - list to the shortlist. otherj programmes available but list to the shortlist. other i programmes available but it list to the shortlist. other - programmes available but it is a public vote. we
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programmes available but it is a public vote-— public vote. we have another nomination — public vote. we have another nomination in _ public vote. we have another nomination in another - public vote. we have another i nomination in another category. public vote. we have another - nomination in another category. bbc breakfast. figs nomination in another category. bbc breakfast. �* , nomination in another category. bbc breakfast. a ~ ., breakfast. as you well know, we don't like to _ breakfast. as you well know, we don't like to blow _ breakfast. as you well know, we don't like to blow our _ breakfast. as you well know, we don't like to blow our own - breakfast. as you well know, we l don't like to blow our own trumpet on this programme. what i do remember is i don't think i've ever seen such a positive response on social media to that rob burrow documentary. so many people, whether you like rugby league or not, were transfixed by his supreme athletic ability on the field. then to go to where he is now with motor neurone disease, his attitude and his dad and his family, and the way that he is, i think it touched so many people in such an incredible way. that programme was made with a lot of love, i can tell you. i am really proud of it. pride of everything we did last year. thanks, sally. good luck. you've probably noticed this already, but it's been a rotten may, weather—wise. let's just give you a few soggy statistics. we got off to a bad start. the uk saw nearly a month's worth of rain fall within the first two weeks of may.
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parts of northern england and south—west england got a particular soaking, receiving double the usual may rainfall within three weeks. and wales has seen the wettest may on record — and those records go back 160 years. compare this to last year — if you can bear it — when the uk basked in the sunniest and driest may on record. i challenge you all to go back on your phones and look at the pictures on your phone around this time last year. i bet they are full of sunny sunshine pictures. so this morning we're asking you to send in your photos of miserable may. once again you have not disappointed. let's take a look. gillian has sent us this photo. she was at chatsworth celebrating her 40th birthday on bank holiday monday. that is where i was on this day last yearin that is where i was on this day last year in that glorious sunshine. "it was a wash—out," she says. everyone is smiling. some ice cream as well. ., ., ~'
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everyone is smiling. some ice cream as well. ., , as well. look at the brooding sky here. as well. look at the brooding sky here- that _ as well. look at the brooding sky here. that is _ as well. look at the brooding sky here. that is actually _ as well. look at the brooding sky here. that is actually a _ as well. look at the brooding sky | here. that is actually a wonderful photograph. thank you doug. eileen from shrewsbury _ photograph. thank you doug. eileen from shrewsbury has _ photograph. thank you doug. eileen from shrewsbury has sent _ photograph. thank you doug. eileen from shrewsbury has sent us - photograph. thank you doug. e h”, from shrewsbury has sent us this picture of her grand daughter singing in the rain. she looks ready for a music festival in her princess dress and her wellingtons. and a gigantic bella. dress and her wellingtons. and a gigantic lmia-— gigantic bella. body in chester, i think i saw _ gigantic bella. body in chester, i think i saw that _ gigantic bella. body in chester, i think i saw that same _ gigantic bella. body in chester, i think i saw that same rainbow. i gigantic bella. body in chester, i l think i saw that same rainbow. he doesn't look very impressed. richard and jane sent it in. if you would like to share any of your pictures, you can e—mail us, tweet us. there is plenty of that going on on facebook and instagram. i think carol is going to look back hopefully to this time last year and tell us what it was like. i know what it was like. i looked at my phone and it was lovely. someone who's not complaining about the bad weather is self—titled chief umbrollogist at umbrella heaven, rob mcalister. morning to you. you have a having a
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lovely mate, aren't you? we morning to you. you have a having a lovely mate, aren't you?— morning to you. you have a having a lovely mate, aren't you? we are very crateful lovely mate, aren't you? we are very grateful for — lovely mate, aren't you? we are very grateful for the _ lovely mate, aren't you? we are very grateful for the rain _ lovely mate, aren't you? we are very grateful for the rain in _ lovely mate, aren't you? we are very gratefulfor the rain in may, - lovely mate, aren't you? we are very gratefulfor the rain in may, yes. - grateful for the rain in may, yes. not wanting to benefit from everyone else's _ not wanting to benefit from everyone else's misery, but here at umbrella heaven, _ else's misery, but here at umbrella heaven, it— else's misery, but here at umbrella heaven, it has been a good may after a very— heaven, it has been a good may after a very dry— heaven, it has been a good may after a very dryjanuary through to april. may. _ a very dryjanuary through to april. may, for— a very dryjanuary through to april. may, for us — a very dryjanuary through to april. may, for us this year, our sales are up may, for us this year, our sales are up by— may, for us this year, our sales are up by about— may, for us this year, our sales are up by about 500%. we are very glad of the _ up by about 500%. we are very glad of the rain _ up by about 500%. we are very glad of the rain here. definitely. it has obviously affected _ of the rain here. definitely. it has obviously affected sales. - of the rain here. definitely. it has obviously affected sales. how- of the rain here. definitely. it has. obviously affected sales. how does it work with umbrella sales? i know this is a niche area. you get a couple of days of rain and you see sales go through the roof, or does it need a prolonged period of miserable weather? ~ , miserable weather? absolutely. there is a correlation — miserable weather? absolutely. there is a correlation between _ miserable weather? absolutely. there is a correlation between the _ miserable weather? absolutely. there is a correlation between the weather. is a correlation between the weather and sales _ is a correlation between the weather and sales. one day's worth of rain doesn't _ and sales. one day's worth of rain doesn't make much difference. it is when _ doesn't make much difference. it is when you _ doesn't make much difference. it is when you get to around about day three _ when you get to around about day three that — when you get to around about day
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three that you reach the tipping point _ three that you reach the tipping point as— three that you reach the tipping point. as we are an online seller, we have — point. as we are an online seller, we have seen the numbers come rolling _ we have seen the numbers come rolling in — we have seen the numbers come rolling in. surprisingly also, in the summertime we rolling in. surprisingly also, in the summer time we sell a lot of umbrellas — the summer time we sell a lot of umbrellas as well. some parasols etc as well~ _ umbrellas as well. some parasols etc as well~ we _ umbrellas as well. some parasols etc as well. we do our sales all through the year. _ as well. we do our sales all through the year, really. we have got over 1000 _ the year, really. we have got over 1000 different styles and designs, traditional through to innovative, pretty— traditional through to innovative, pretty and practical, fun and functional. we sell pagoda —shaped umbrellas, heart—shaped umbrellas. flower— umbrellas, heart—shaped umbrellas. flower petal umbrellas. uv protection is the big thing at the moment — protection is the big thing at the moment. people are more and more protecting _ moment. people are more and more protecting themselves from the sun. surprisingly, as we move towards the summer. _ surprisingly, as we move towards the summer. our— surprisingly, as we move towards the summer, our sales hopefully will continue — summer, our sales hopefully will continue. , , ., , summer, our sales hopefully will continue. , ., , ,
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summer, our sales hopefully will continue. , . , continue. just really quickly, you have not continue. just really quickly, you have got lots _ continue. just really quickly, you have got lots of _ continue. just really quickly, you have got lots of different - continue. just really quickly, you i have got lots of different umbrellas behind you. is there a particularly good type of impeller for this kind of weather?— good type of impeller for this kind of weather? . . ., , of weather? yeah. we have designed an umbrella — of weather? yeah. we have designed an umbrella which _ of weather? yeah. we have designed an umbrella which we _ of weather? yeah. we have designed an umbrella which we have _ of weather? yeah. we have designed an umbrella which we have named i an umbrella which we have named after— an umbrella which we have named after covid~ — an umbrella which we have named after covid. i willjust show you that _ after covid. i willjust show you that it— after covid. i will 'ust show you that. ., , ., after covid. i will 'ust show you that. ., ., , after covid. i will 'ust show you that. ., , well done, you. wonderful to speak to you. i hope for you the rain stays but for the rest of us that it doesn't. thank you.— stays but for the rest of us that it doesn't. thank you. thank you very much indeed- _ doesn't. thank you. thank you very much indeed. i _ doesn't. thank you. thank you very much indeed. i dig _ doesn't. thank you. thank you very much indeed. i dig out _ doesn't. thank you. thank you very much indeed. i dig out the - doesn't. thank you. thank you very much indeed. i dig out the golf- much indeed. i dig out the golf umbrella at times like this. very wide. gives you a lot of coverage. you can get kids underneath that as well. ., ., , ., ., you can get kids underneath that as well. ., ., i. ., , you can get kids underneath that as well. ., ., ,, . , ., ., ~' well. carol, you have been looking back to this _ well. carol, you have been looking back to this day _ well. carol, you have been looking back to this day last _ well. carol, you have been looking back to this day last year. - back to this day last year. what was it like? yes indeed. high pressure was building in from the south so it was dry and settled and sunny. the top temperature was in teddington in south—west london. it
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reached 26.6. northern ireland, 20 degrees, generally between 20 and 2a degrees. quite different. temperatures have been below average for a while now during the course of the month of may. we saw some snow on the tops of the hills in may as well, especially in the north. today well, especially in the north. today we are looking at sunny spells and more scattered heavy showers. the showers less frequent. this shows you the temperature in the next few days. temperatures are going up. having been below average for the time of the year, they will end up being above average. some of us into bank holiday will see temperatures at 20 degrees, and for others 21, 22. this morning we have got a lot of cloud. that will break up. showers developing across the north and some parts of the east. we have got a band of rain in the south—west of england, into the channel islands. a drier slide through wales, the midlands and parts of east anglia. you can see in norfolk and northern england and parts of
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scotland, you will hang on to the showers. some will be heavy and thundery with hail. moving along on the breeze. north—east scotland and northern ireland seeing something brighter. hanging on the sunshine. temperatures, a stark difference to last year, ten on the richter i6 temperatures, a stark difference to last year, ten on the richter 16 in london. 10 degrees lower than it was on this day last year. through this evening and overnight we hang onto the showers for a time. many will fade and also the rain pushes away from the south—west, leaving some residual cloud. but at the same time we have got more rain across eastern counties. temperature wise we should have no issues with frost. we are looking at between four and 7 degrees. tomorrow we will hang onto this rain. apache in nature across eastern parts of scotland and england. —— patchy. towards the west, drierand england. —— patchy. towards the west, drier and brighter. england. —— patchy. towards the west, drierand brighter. if your showers. a fair bit of sunshine. cloud clinging on to the far
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south—west and the channel islands. temperatures tomorrow 11 to 16 degrees, cool along the north sea coastline but not so much of a breeze. you will have a shower for a wee while if you catch it. it is on thursday that the high pressure builds in. they will be some sunshine. fairweather builds in. they will be some sunshine. fair weather cloud. a weather front are trying to come in from the west will introduce some rain to western areas but as it bombs into the high pressure the rain won't be as heavy or intense as recent days. temperatures are slowly starting to climb. 18 to 20 degrees. into the weekend, high pressure remains with us. things remain fairly settled as well. we will see a lot of dry weather, some sunny spells, may be on bank holiday monday that we go to see a little bit of rain coming into the north—west. that could still north—west. that could still change. north-west. that could still chance. ., ~' north-west. that could still chane. ., ,, that could still change. thank you so much. with staycations and day trips on the rise because of foreign
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travel restrictions, beauty spots across the uk are reporting an increase in countryside litter. snowdonia is one of the places affected, and bosses at the national park hope that by asking people to share their reasons for dropping it they'll find a solution. helen pye from snowdonia national park authorityjoins us now. good morning to you. lovely to see you with the mountains behind you. tell us, what is going on and how much litter are you finding? give us an idea. ., ., ., much litter are you finding? give us an idea. ., ., ., , an idea. yeah, good morning. it has been quite — an idea. yeah, good morning. it has been quite a — an idea. yeah, good morning. it has been quite a challenging _ an idea. yeah, good morning. it has been quite a challenging year- an idea. yeah, good morning. it has been quite a challenging year to - an idea. yeah, good morning. it has been quite a challenging year to be | been quite a challenging year to be honest _ been quite a challenging year to be honest. we have always had an issue with litter— honest. we have always had an issue with litter and ourselves and volunteers spend a huge amount of time kind _ volunteers spend a huge amount of time kind of making sure that the national— time kind of making sure that the national park is cared for and clear of litter~ _ national park is cared for and clear of litter. but certainly in the last year. _ of litter. but certainly in the last year, where we have seen massive increase _ year, where we have seen massive increase in — year, where we have seen massive increase in popularity of people visiting — increase in popularity of people visiting countryside, i think because _ visiting countryside, i think because they have just been locked up because they have just been locked up for— because they have just been locked up for so _ because they have just been locked up for so long and need some freedom
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and space _ up for so long and need some freedom and space i_ up for so long and need some freedom and space, i think inevitably more people _ and space, i think inevitably more people just equals more litter, really~ — people just equals more litter, really~ so— people just equals more litter, really. so the volumes have been quite _ really. so the volumes have been quite significant. tell really. so the volumes have been quite significant.— quite significant. tell us a bit about this — quite significant. tell us a bit about this survey? _ quite significant. tell us a bit about this survey? did - quite significant. tell us a bit about this survey? did you i quite significant. tell us a bit - about this survey? did you imagine that people would be quite honest about why they are dropping litter? it is quite a guilt inducing thing as well, isn't it?— as well, isn't it? yeah, good question- — as well, isn't it? yeah, good question- it _ as well, isn't it? yeah, good question. it was _ as well, isn't it? yeah, good question. it was an - as well, isn't it? yeah, good l question. it was an interesting question— question. it was an interesting question to ask, wasn't it? i think a lot— question to ask, wasn't it? i think a lot of— question to ask, wasn't it? i think a lot of people thought, nobody is going _ a lot of people thought, nobody is going to _ a lot of people thought, nobody is going to answer that question honestly. but we have made it an anonymous— honestly. but we have made it an anonymous survey. and the types of things— anonymous survey. and the types of things that _ anonymous survey. and the types of things that we are asking and just, have you _ things that we are asking and just, have you ever dropped fruit peel, for example? i think a lot of people. _ for example? i think a lot of people, we are finding a lot of people — people, we are finding a lot of people don't see that as litter per se. particularly that is one of the things— se. particularly that is one of the things that — se. particularly that is one of the things that we are starting to see come _ things that we are starting to see come out — things that we are starting to see come out of the survey. but if you imagine _ come out of the survey. but if you imagine i— come out of the survey. but if you imagine i am standing with snowdon behind _ imagine i am standing with snowdon
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behind me — imagine i am standing with snowdon behind me. and we have over half a million _ behind me. and we have over half a million visitors going up snogging every— million visitors going up snogging every year. if you imagine each one of those _ every year. if you imagine each one of those dropped a fruit peel or an apple _ of those dropped a fruit peel or an apple core. — of those dropped a fruit peel or an apple core, that actually adds up to quite _ apple core, that actually adds up to quite a _ apple core, that actually adds up to quite a significant amount of litter~ — quite a significant amount of litter~ so— quite a significant amount of litter. so i guess what we are hoping — litter. so i guess what we are hoping is _ litter. so i guess what we are hoping is if we understand more about— hoping is if we understand more about white people do what they do, whether _ about white people do what they do, whether it's kind of deliberate or 'ust whether it's kind of deliberate or just because they don't really know or understand that that is a particular problem, then we can start— particular problem, then we can start shifting what we ask people to do and _ start shifting what we ask people to do and how we communicate. | start shifting what we ask people to do and how we communicate. i was there the other _ do and how we communicate. i was there the other day _ do and how we communicate. i was there the other day and _ do and how we communicate. i was there the other day and i _ do and how we communicate. i —" there the other day and i noticed that the sign which said, please don't leave your letter, there are no bins here. that is one of the nice things about it. —— litter. people should be taking everything off the mountain that they bring onto the mountain?— off the mountain that they bring onto the mountain? yeah, that would be amazing- — onto the mountain? yeah, that would be amazing- 0ne _ onto the mountain? yeah, that would be amazing. one of— onto the mountain? yeah, that would be amazing. one of the _ onto the mountain? yeah, that would be amazing. one of the things - onto the mountain? yeah, that would be amazing. one of the things we - onto the mountain? yeah, that would be amazing. one of the things we arej be amazing. one of the things we are seeing, _ be amazing. one of the things we are seeing, out _ be amazing. one of the things we are seeing, out of this survey, actually, _
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seeing, out of this survey, actually, is there are quite a lot of people — actually, is there are quite a lot of people already doing that. we have a _ of people already doing that. we have a huge amount of volunteers from _ have a huge amount of volunteers from organisations like the snowdonia society, but also kind of informally. — snowdonia society, but also kind of informally, people notjust taking their own — informally, people notjust taking their own litter, but other people's litter— their own litter, but other people's litter as— their own litter, but other people's litter as well. i think the challenge we have in an amazing beautiful — challenge we have in an amazing beautiful place like this is ourjob as a national park authority to look after this— as a national park authority to look after this place is to kind of look after— after this place is to kind of look after it— after this place is to kind of look after it without people realising we are looking after it, because what people _ are looking after it, because what people want to feel, like they are in a beautiful natural environment. so if we _ in a beautiful natural environment. so if we start putting bins everywhere and signs everywhere, it doesn't _ everywhere and signs everywhere, it doesn't really kind of add to that beauty. — doesn't really kind of add to that beauty, really. doesn't really kind of add to that beauty. really-— beauty, really. lovely to talk to ou, beauty, really. lovely to talk to you. helen- _ beauty, really. lovely to talk to you. helen- lt— beauty, really. lovely to talk to you, helen. it looks— beauty, really. lovely to talk to you, helen. it looks lovely- beauty, really. lovely to talk to i you, helen. it looks lovely behind ou. you, helen. it looks lovely behind you- thank _ you, helen. it looks lovely behind you- thank you — you, helen. it looks lovely behind you. thank you so _ you, helen. it looks lovely behind you. thank you so much. - you, helen. it looks lovely behind you. thank you so much. lovely l you, helen. it looks lovely behind| you. thank you so much. lovely to get a glimpse of it this morning. thank you. get a glimpse of it this morning. thank you-— get a glimpse of it this morning. thank ou. ,, , ., , thank you. simple really -- rule, reall , thank you. simple really -- rule, really. isn't _ thank you. simple really -- rule, really, isn't it? _ thank you. simple really -- rule, really, isn't it? if— thank you. simple really -- rule, really, isn't it? if you _ thank you. simple really -- rule, really, isn't it? if you brought - thank you. simple really -- rule, really, isn't it? if you brought it, | really, isn't it? if you brought it, take it with you. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today... new guidance for people living in eight covid hotspots across england — they're told to avoid travelling in and out of their area but the government's accused of causing confusion. growing condemnation of belarus after the forced landing of a ryanair plane and the arrest
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of a journalist — the eu imposes a flight ban and extends sanctions worth billions of pounds. inspirational young fundraiser tony hudgell lost both his legs after he was badly beaten by his birth parents — now there are calls for a child protection law in his name. good morning. nearly1000jobs on the line as liberty, one of the uk's guest steelmakers restructu res to survive. what does it mean here for communities in sheffield and what happens next? gareth southgate will name his provisional england squad for the euros today. he'll reveal who's made the final cut next tuesday. it's tuesday, the 25th of may. our top story... health bosses in areas affected by the coronavirus variant first detected in india say they haven't been consulted about new restrictions that have appeared on a government website. the new advice, published on friday,
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warns against travelling into or out of eight local authority areas. a downing street source said all the authorities were told about the additional restrictions. aruna iyengar has this report. if you live in bolton, you might not be aware that current government advice on coronavirus here is different to other parts of the country. on friday, the government issued guidance, urging people in eight council areas not to travel in or out of the area except for essential reasons. the areas are... north tyneside, bolton, blackburn with darwen, burnley, kirklees, leicester, bedford and hounslow. residents in these areas are also asked to meet outside and keep two metres apart from those they don't live with. health officials say they weren't told about changes to the advice, with one telling us...
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the bbc also spoke to north tyneside council, which said local officials knew nothing about the new guidance until last night. mps say ministers must urgently clarify their advice, saying no announcement about the updated guidance was a recipe for confusion and uncertainty. but the department of health says guidance was needed to encourage people to take an extra cautious approach when meeting others or travelling in areas hit hardest by the new variant, first identified in india. aruna iyengar, bbc news. let's get some reaction from our chief political correspondent adam fleming. adam, there's lots of confusion this morning about these local restrictions, isn't there? can you make it clear for us? can you make it clearfor us? i will
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give it a go. on the 14th of may, two weeks ago, the prime minister did a press conference where he said there was an issue in bolton where there was an issue in bolton where there was an issue in bolton where there was high rates of the indian variant coronavirus. he was asked a question, should people go and stay overnight in bolton or not? he said you should think carefully about it. in other areas where the indian variant have emerged, they have been added to the list of places where there is extra advice. that advice was updated on friday. journalists spotted it last night and asked health officials in the area whether they knew about it and they say that first they knew of it was when they got contacted by a journalist. the government has said they are not local lockdown is, they are advice, rather than the law. nothing is being shut down as a result. it
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seems there has been a bit of a breakdown in communications somewhere. breakdown in communications somewhere-— breakdown in communications somewhere. the government is reassuring _ somewhere. the government is reassuring people. _ somewhere. the government is reassuring people. lots - somewhere. the government is reassuring people. lots of - somewhere. the government is i reassuring people. lots of people are thinking, will this mean a return to local restrictions? there is the parable _ return to local restrictions? there is the parable of _ return to local restrictions? there is the parable of the _ return to local restrictions? there is the parable of the government| return to local restrictions? fuse is the parable of the government in the legislation that sets out the steps for the road map out of lockdown for that to be local restrictions. kind of like the ones last autumn which caused so much tension between government and local government. the power is there but the government is not using it at the government is not using it at the moment. they are relying on advice to people and a sense of responsibility. it is the point about this is advice about what you should do not laws and regulations preventing you from doing these things. european union leaders havejoined
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the uk in pledging to punish belarus over what it called the "state—sponsored hijacking" of a ryanairflight in order to arrest a prominent critic. belarussian carriers are now banned from entering the airspace of the uk and the eu — and more sanctions will follow. mark lobel reports. a hijacking. an affront to international norms. playing russian roulette with innocent civilians' lives. some of the charges levelled against belarus by the us, uk, eu and un after this ryanair plane was unexpectedly diverted to land in minsk. we've not seen anything quite as outlandish, as deceitful, as dangerous as this for at least 30, 40, maybe 50 years. all apparently to kidnap this man, opposition journalist roman protasevich for running an opposition news channel on the social media platform, telegram, where anti—government protests are organised.
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roman was later seen in a video released by belarus authorities but we're not showing it because it looks like he was filmed under duress. roman's forehead looks bruised. his father is concerned at what he calls a terrorist act. translation: we hope that he will cope. - we hope that he will stay himself, not give into any of their tricks. we are afraid to even think about it but it's possible he could be beaten and tortured. the eu is furious. its leaders are demanding roman protasevich be freed immediately and democracy returned. they've agreed a ban on belarusian flights from all eu airspace and airports and further penalties on officials and assets in belarus. there will be additional sanctions on individuals that are involved in the hijacking but this time also on businesses and economic entities that are financing this regime. since disputed elections last
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august, this man, belarus's president, alexander lukashenko, has cracked down on dissent. he's had hundreds of activists detained. many others fled the country into exile. among them, roman protasevich. his capture from high in the sky may become the highest profile one yet. mark lobel, bbc news. further details have emerged this morning about the shooting of the racial equality activist sasha johnson. the 27—year—old was shot in the head in the early hours of sunday. police called it a shocking incident but confirmed it wasn't a targeted attack. from our inquiries so far, we have established that sasha was in a party on sunday at consort road in peckham. this was early on sunday
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morning and at about 3am, a group of four black men, dressed in dark clothing, entered the garden of the property and discharged a firearm. they left the scene before police could arrive. we are aware of sasha's involvement in the black lives matter movement i understand concerned this would cause communities. the moment we have no indication that she was subject to a targeted attack. amazon is reportedly closing in on a deal to buy hollywood studio mgm for around £6 billion. it would give the technology giant's prime streaming service access to a vast back catalogue of iconic content including the james bond and hobbit franchises. the deal could be finalised this week. are you all right? yes. yes, i am, tv wife. we would like to confirm we
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are not married! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, everybody. early statistics show wales has already had its wettest may on record but records go back to 1862. today there will be heavy, thundery showers in the forecast but not as many as yesterday and there will be some sunny spells as well. low pressure pulling away but still having an influence across parts of the east. another front coming into the south—west introducing some rain. we are starting on a fairly cloudy note. patchy rain across scotland and parts of england as well. that will tend to break up through the day and we will see sunshine develop stop also some showers, they likely to be heavy and thundery with hail. also a breeze. they should not last for terribly long. also the area
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coming in from the atlantic bringing rain. in between dry weather, the odd isolated shower and sunshine with temperatures ranging from ten in the north to 16 in the south. this evening and overnight we hang on to the showers for a time but many of them will fade. we lose the rain in the south—west but we hang onto some cloud. further showers coming in across eastern parts of england in particular. it will not be a cold night. the temperature range falling away between four and 8 degrees. the the weather forecast in half—an—hour. —— a longer weather forecast. over the past 12 months, we've been following the story of tony hudgell, the six year old double amputee, who raised more than £1.5 million for charity — proving that against all odds, anything is possible. his story is even more remarkable when you learn that tony lost his legs after being abused by his birth parents. now a new law, calling for tougher sentences for those who harm children,
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could be named after him. graham satchell has this exclusive report for breakfast. tony hudgell taking the final few steps of his extraordinary challenge last year. inspired by captain tom, tony walked 10 kilometres on his new legs and raised more than £1 million for the hospital that saved his life. tony was just a few weeks old when he suffered horrific life—threatening injuries. the evelina worked on him for three months. they never expected him to survive. paula hudgell, a foster carer, was asked to take tony in. presented in front of me was this tiny, broken, shut down, underweight, legs in plasterfour—month—old baby. i broke down in tears, absolutely sobbed, and thought, "i can't do this." but within two hours of being with him, there was no way i was going to leave him, he was coming home with us. tony's injuries were inflicted
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by his biological parents. he suffered multiple organ failure, septicaemia and fractures to both thighs, lower legs, ankles, toes and thumbs. this is tony with his natural parents, tony smith and jodie simpson. in 2018, they were convicted of causing serious physical harm to a child and cruelty to a person under 16. they were sentenced to ten years each, the maximum for this offence. ever since the trial paula has been campaigning with her local mp, tom tugendhat. she wants the maximum sentence for child cruelty to be made the same as serious offences against an adult, a life sentence. it's impossible for us to know the pain tony must have suffered in those first few weeks of his life. tom tugendhat in the house of commons last year. today he's introducing an amendment to the government's policing bill that would give judges
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the discretion to give life sentences for serious child cruelty. the purpose of tony's law is to increase the maximum sentence possible forjudges to resort to in the most serious cases to life imprisonment. serious physical harm to a child is relatively rare. between 2014 and 2018, for example, 114 offenders received an immediate custodial sentence for cruelty to children. hi. my name's tony and i'm walking 100 steps for captain tom. in recent weeks, tony has started walking without his crutches. he is a remarkable, inspirational little boy. good boy. keep going. his family now say people who abuse children in the future should face the most serious punishment. graham satchell, bbc news. let's speak to mp tom tugendhat and to
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paula hudgell, tony's mum. morning to you both. thank you for joining us. paula, we have spoken to you so much over the last months. you are very passionate about this stuff how much difference do you think it would have made tony? lode think it would have made tony? we are think it would have made tony? , are extremely passionate about this. obviously, children are the most vulnerable in society. the sentences just don't reflect the seriousness of the crimes inflicted. in the case of the crimes inflicted. in the case of tony, as we'll know, the judge said it was the worst—case he had ever seen. they were given the maximum sentence that a judge was allowed to give. trying to bring these sentences in line with other offences is what we are trying to do. most offences now, a life means
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a life sentence. if a child dies why, in these circumstances, can we not have a life sentence? you why, in these circumstances, can we not have a life sentence?— not have a life sentence? you have tried to bring _ not have a life sentence? you have tried to bring this _ not have a life sentence? you have tried to bring this in _ not have a life sentence? you have tried to bring this in before. - not have a life sentence? you have tried to bring this in before. do - tried to bring this in before. do you think there will be a difference this time around? this you think there will be a difference this time around?— this time around? this policing bill is exactly the _ this time around? this policing bill is exactly the right _ this time around? this policing bill is exactly the right place _ this time around? this policing bill is exactly the right place stop - this time around? this policing bill is exactly the right place stop the l is exactly the right place stop the government wants to make sure the sentence fits the crime and we have the stiffest sentences available for these crimes. i think there is every chance we will get this through. what they are doing something very reasonable, recognising that while tony, who is too young to identify here struck the particular blows, could not see his birth parents charged with the appropriate crime. it will make sure responsibility is clear even though a babe cannot give evidence. i don't see why he should
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be punished for his abuser should get a lower punishment simply because he is too young. it does seem extraordinary _ because he is too young. it does seem extraordinary that - because he is too young. it does| seem extraordinary that offences against a child should be treated in against a child should be treated in a different way at this point. that is because. _ a different way at this point. that is because, reality _ a different way at this point. that is because, reality is, _ a different way at this point. that is because, reality is, in - a different way at this point. “inst is because, reality is, in our system, you have to quite rightly identify who specifically is guilty for whichever blow is struck, whichever offence is permitted. in a very rare situation like this, and i had to stress it is extremely rare, where both parents are in the same room at the same time, both parents whether, asking which one was responsible is ridiculous. they are both responsible, they are clearly both responsible, they are clearly both responsible. the idea you had to target each play separately and i think, in this case it shows you why the reality ofjoint action on this is different. the reality of 'oint action on this is different.—
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is different. give us an idea. i know he _ is different. give us an idea. i know he is— is different. give us an idea. i know he is stood _ is different. give us an idea. i know he is stood there - is different. give us an idea. i. know he is stood there listening into this, did you expect to get the support he received on this issue? no. we have had huge support from all round the country, even globally. we know that lots of followers of tony have also lobbied mmps to get behind us and tom to make this change the law. like tom said, sadly, luckily there is not that many offences. it is rare. obviously, during lockdown there has been a huge increase in child cruelty as well. this will make no difference to tony but we hope to make a difference for children going forwards and for those children who have already lost their lives as well. ., , ., have already lost their lives as well. ., ., well. from your point of view, tony has had a huge _ well. from your point of view, tony has had a huge impact, _ well. from your point of view, tony has had a huge impact, hasn't - well. from your point of view, tony has had a huge impact, hasn't he, l well. from your point of view, tony l has had a huge impact, hasn't he, in his young life? how important, if it
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becomes law, it be called tony's law? ., , becomes law, it be called tony's law? . , ., becomes law, it be called tony's law? ., , ., ., law? that is overwhelming, that it will be called _ law? that is overwhelming, that it will be called tony's _ law? that is overwhelming, that it will be called tony's law. - law? that is overwhelming, that it will be called tony's law. what - law? that is overwhelming, that it will be called tony's law. what a l will be called tony's law. what a legacy again for him. it shows from the worst possible start in life what you can go on to achieve. if it was not for his grit and determination, we would not even be here with tony's law. very proud. if we can get this through, tony's motto is he always wants to help everybody else. let's keep our fingers crossed and put pressure on the government to make these changes. the government to make these chanies. ., ., the government to make these chanies. ., . ,, ., the government to make these chances. . . y., ., . changes. can i ask you, how hard would it be _ changes. can i ask you, how hard would it be to _ changes. can i ask you, how hard would it be to get _ changes. can i ask you, how hard would it be to get those - changes. can i ask you, how hard would it be to get those changes| would it be to get those changes through? the government has made it clear in the past that higher sentences are available in the law already. sentences are available in the law alread . , , ., ., , already. this is one of those things where we have _ already. this is one of those things where we have to _ already. this is one of those things where we have to re-emphasise i already. this is one of those things| where we have to re-emphasise the where we have to re—emphasise the points— where we have to re—emphasise the points paula had made this morning.
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this is— points paula had made this morning. this is a _ points paula had made this morning. this is a campaign we can all be part— this is a campaign we can all be part of. — this is a campaign we can all be part of. we _ this is a campaign we can all be part of, we can all speak to our mps _ part of, we can all speak to our mps i— part of, we can all speak to our mps i do— part of, we can all speak to our mps. i do not need to speak to myself— mps. i do not need to speak to myself but speak to mps and get in touch— myself but speak to mps and get in touch with — myself but speak to mps and get in touch with out to get support on this _ touch with out to get support on this i_ touch with out to get support on this. i think this is a really important change. the point that pull very— important change. the point that pull very compassionately missed is the strength that tony has got he has got _ the strength that tony has got he has got from an amazing family. paula _ has got from an amazing family. paula and — has got from an amazing family. paula and all the kids have come round _ paula and all the kids have come round and — paula and all the kids have come round and rallied around tony and demonstrated what a real family is and what _ demonstrated what a real family is and what real love and support can .ive and what real love and support can give a _ and what real love and support can give a child — and what real love and support can give a child in tony's position and .ive give a child in tony's position and give him — give a child in tony's position and give him the strength to achieve so much _ give him the strength to achieve so much. tite— give him the strength to achieve so much. ~ ., give him the strength to achieve so much. . . , , , give him the strength to achieve so much. . . , ,, ., ., much. we have been witness to that over the last — much. we have been witness to that over the last months. _ much. we have been witness to that over the last months. i _ much. we have been witness to that over the last months. i feel - much. we have been witness to that over the last months. i feel like i much. we have been witness to that over the last months. i feel like we | over the last months. i feel like we had been on a journey with all of you over the last year or so that they cannot leave you without asking how tony is today. what they cannot leave you without asking how tony is today.— they cannot leave you without asking how tony is today. what is he up to? yes. what how tony is today. what is he up to? yes- what a — how tony is today. what is he up to? yes. what a journey _ how tony is today. what is he up to? yes. what a journey it _ how tony is today. what is he up to?
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yes. what a journey it has _ how tony is today. what is he up to? yes. what a journey it has been. i yes. what a journey it has been. especially over the last year. over the last three years since the trial, it has been a real roller—coaster. he inspires us everyday. he is a happy, six—year—old, just bonkers, he is absolutely bonkers. he keeps going and he is ourjoy. he is into everything at the moment. he is enjoying a bit of football he has been playing tennis, swimming. he is doing incredible, absolutely incredible.— doing incredible, absolutely incredible. ., ., ., . ., , incredible. you are also the chairs of -- as the _ incredible. you are also the chairs of -- as the chair— incredible. you are also the chairs of -- as the chair of— incredible. you are also the chairs of -- as the chair of the _ incredible. you are also the chairs of -- as the chair of the foreign i of —— as the chair of the foreign affairs committee. i am sure you have a view on one of our other main stories this morning about what has been happening with the devotion of the ryanair flight and the belarus president, alexander lukashenko. it seems the uk and eu leaders are
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united on this issue. haifa seems the uk and eu leaders are united on this issue.— seems the uk and eu leaders are united on this issue. how do you see it beini united on this issue. how do you see it being resolved? _ united on this issue. how do you see it being resolved? typing _ united on this issue. how do you see it being resolved? typing this - united on this issue. how do you see it being resolved? typing this is i united on this issue. how do you see it being resolved? typing this is a i it being resolved? typing this is a very good — it being resolved? typing this is a very good decision. i was calling on it on— very good decision. i was calling on it on sunday — very good decision. i was calling on it on sunday. —— i think this is a very— it on sunday. —— i think this is a very good — it on sunday. —— i think this is a very good decision. we were calling for it because it is quite clearly wrong — for it because it is quite clearly wrong to— for it because it is quite clearly wrong to put our own citizens in danger — wrong to put our own citizens in danger by — wrong to put our own citizens in danger by having them flying over the territory of someone who is willing — the territory of someone who is willing to — the territory of someone who is willing to stand up fighters to force — willing to stand up fighters to force a — willing to stand up fighters to force a civilian aircraft to the ground _ force a civilian aircraft to the ground. that in itself is really dangerous. we have a choice as the uk, the _ dangerous. we have a choice as the uk, the european union, the united states _ uk, the european union, the united states do _ uk, the european union, the united states. do we want to resolve the level— states. do we want to resolve the level of— states. do we want to resolve the level of aggression we are getting from russia and belarus or do we want _ from russia and belarus or do we want to— from russia and belarus or do we want to let — from russia and belarus or do we want to let it continue? if we want to end _ want to let it continue? if we want to end it. — want to let it continue? if we want to end it. we — want to let it continue? if we want to end it, we had to expose the corruption _ to end it, we had to expose the corruption and stop the money flow. we can— corruption and stop the money flow. we can do— corruption and stop the money flow. we can do that. we can expose corruption _ we can do that. we can expose corruption because sadly so much of it flows— corruption because sadly so much of it flows through our own financial institutions. it is as that is buying _ institutions. it is as that is buying energy from russia through pipelines _ buying energy from russia through pipelines or building another one.
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it is up _ pipelines or building another one. it is up to— pipelines or building another one. it is up to us. it is a choice and we can— it is up to us. it is a choice and we can make _ it is up to us. it is a choice and we can make it.— it is up to us. it is a choice and we can make it. ., . ., ,, we can make it. tom tugendhat, thank ou for we can make it. tom tugendhat, thank you for talking — we can make it. tom tugendhat, thank you for talking to _ we can make it. tom tugendhat, thank you for talking to us _ we can make it. tom tugendhat, thank you for talking to us about _ we can make it. tom tugendhat, thank you for talking to us about that. - you for talking to us about that. paula, as ever, thank you. hopefully we will speak to you soon.— we will speak to you soon. thank ou. in another blow to the british steel industry, the uk's third biggest manufacturer has announced plans to sell off its operation at stocksbridge near sheffield. so what does it mean for the worker force? nina's at the plant for us this morning. morning. good morning. this vast site behind me is a slice of british history. steel has been made here for 175 years. it started off a steal for umbrellas and got bigger making steel for aeroplane engines and drills for oil and gas sites. now 162jobs here on and drills for oil and gas sites. now 162 jobs here on the line, and drills for oil and gas sites. now 162jobs here on the line, as well as hundreds more at two sites
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downstream. they belong to liberty steel and sanjeev gupta. his legacy is across the globe. he was once known as the saviour of british steel. how did it come to this? the uk was once a powerhouse in global steel. by the turn of the millennium, places like china were making it faster and cheaper. so steelworks across britain closed, taking with them thousands ofjobs. in 2017, sanjeev gupta snapped up specialist steelmakers, convinced he could be the man to save them. but to fund his plans, he entered into a complex financing agreement with a company called greensill capital, the same firm at the centre of a recent government lobbying row, including former prime minister david cameron. they went bust in march, raising big questions about how gupta's steel business could survive. he told the bbc he was
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certain jobs were safe. all our steel operations in the uk — one after another — was in the process of shutting. it's our hard work which means they now have a future. it's still a tough journey ahead. the uk has many disadvatages. the uk steel industry has been decimated for the last few decades. we still have a lot of work to do. i'm not going to give up on the uk. as long as i'm in charge, my plants will stay open. but who believes him now? the british government refused to supply a £170 million bailout over fears about transparency of the billionaire's business affairs. unions say these plants must stay open, saying they are strategically vital to uk defence, energy and aerospace. but the company must sell off some of its plants to pay its creditors and keep the business going. 3,000 steeljobs at liberty are hanging in the balance.
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so what next for this huge site which plays such an integral role in the community? i was chatting to the butcher earlier that his dad worked here for his entire career and it is a place that will be known to every family locally. this man has been at this plant for more than a0 years. your grandad works here commit your son works here. explain what it means to the community here. it is the community- — means to the community here. it is the community. the village has been built around — the community. the village has been built around the steelworks. that is for people — built around the steelworks. that is for people not working there now, they had _ for people not working there now, they had done in the past. they work for a supply— they had done in the past. they work for a supply chain that the foetus in the _ for a supply chain that the foetus in the shops, everything. what are ou in the shops, everything. what are you making _ in the shops, everything. what are you making here — in the shops, everything. what are you making here that _ in the shops, everything. what are you making here that unions i in the shops, everything. what are you making here that unions argue make it integral to uk defence, uk aerospace? what specifics are coming out of the plant? lode
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aerospace? what specifics are coming out of the plant?— out of the plant? we make all steel, all stainless — out of the plant? we make all steel, all stainless types. _ out of the plant? we make all steel, all stainless types. landing - out of the plant? we make all steel, all stainless types. landing gear- all stainless types. landing gear for planes, engine parts for electric— for planes, engine parts for electric cars, batteries. all sorts. if we lose — electric cars, batteries. all sorts. if we lose this _ electric cars, batteries. all sorts. if we lose this site, _ electric cars, batteries. all sorts. if we lose this site, release i if we lose this site, release production of those products in the uk. ., , ., , ., , uk. yeah stop the argument is if it closes it will _ uk. yeah stop the argument is if it closes it will future _ uk. yeah stop the argument is if it closes it will future proof - uk. yeah stop the argument is if it closes it will future proof the i uk. yeah stop the argument is if it closes it will future proof the site i closes it will future proof the site at rotherham where there are as many 'obs at rotherham where there are as many jobs and _ at rotherham where there are as many jobs and it— at rotherham where there are as many jobs and it works in steel recycling. we have always worked with rotherham hand in hand. since this shutdown years ago, we have had supplies— this shutdown years ago, we have had supplies coming from rotherham. they make steel— supplies coming from rotherham. they make steel which we roll and finish and turn _ make steel which we roll and finish and turn it— make steel which we roll and finish and turn it into specialised steel. you work— and turn it into specialised steel. you work hand in glove together. you know that sanjeev gupta is in trouble. he may have to sell their self. if he is not the man to save
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this site, what should the government do? we this site, what should the government do? . ., ,, , , government do? we would like support to make sure — government do? we would like support to make sure it — government do? we would like support to make sure it is _ government do? we would like support to make sure it is sold _ government do? we would like support to make sure it is sold on _ government do? we would like support to make sure it is sold on to _ to make sure it is sold on to someone _ to make sure it is sold on to someone who is a proper owner, who will look— someone who is a proper owner, who will look after the plant. gk. someone who is a proper owner, who will look after the plant.— will look after the plant. ok. two ensure its — will look after the plant. ok. two ensure its future. _ will look after the plant. ok. two ensure its future. the _ will look after the plant. ok. two ensure its future. the business i ensure its future. the business secretary said yesterday to have a strong and sustainable steel sector is a priority for the government. we stand in support of the industry. we will find out exactly what the government means later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. the government is advising people not to travel in or out of hounslow and bedford, due to fears over the indian variant of covid—19.
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the guidance published online says to avoid the eight worst affected areas, unless essential for work or education. they're also urging people in those places not to meet indoors. the leaders of some councils involved have criticised ministers for not consulting them first. the evelina children's hospital is using new technology to connect families separated due to covid restrictions. nurses in the neonatal wards have been recording and sharing videos of the babies in intensive care. it's also the first unit in the country to play clips to the newborns recorded by parents, to help with bonding and development. a new curriculum about black british history, developed by hackney council, has been introduced in schools around the country. the lessons teach children about the contributions of black people across the ages through to windrush and beyond. i think we recognise the importance of every young person knowing about the positive contributions of all their community. and i think it's really important that no matter where you are,
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in the world, across the uk, it's really important to empower our children with those stories, because hackney is an anti—racist borough, and we really take that role seriously about empowering our young people to be anti—racist leaders of the future. brentford have called on football authorities and the government to increase the number of fans allowed to attend saturday's play—off final at wembley. the bees take on swansea for a place in the premier league. 10,000 spectators are being allowed in, while 21,000 were able to go to the fa cup final ten days ago. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on most lines this morning. turning to trains, on southeastern there are some cancellations for metro services following a derailment in the depot. on the roads, in bounds green there are temporary traffic lights on the aa06 north circular for repairs to a burst water main. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, believe it or not, our weather is set to improve
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over the next few days. the low pressure which brought those heavy, thundery downpours yesterday, is moving away further east. today, still could be one or two showers, but not as frequent and shouldn't be so heavy. some high cloud this morning, breaking into some decent spells of sunshine, but it's the heat in those sunny spells which may create one or two showers later. temperatures a little bit warmer at 16 celsius. overnight tonight, plenty of dry, clear spells, but again a risk of maybe one or two light showers. the minimum temperature between five and seven celsius, the wind reasonably light. now as we head into wednesday, again we're still at risk of maybe one or two showers, but they will be isolated. the wind light and for thursday, a ridge of high pressure builds in. and then things are set to settle down. plenty of fine and dry weather in the outlook. the wind is light and temperatures getting a little warmer, as we head towards the bank holiday weekend. that's it for now. you'll find more updates
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on our website at the usual address. i'll be back in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. and just to confirm, not married. we and 'ust to confirm, not married. we are and just to confirm, not married. , are married, but not to each other! there has been no secret wedding here. if there has been no secret wedding here. , ., . there has been no secret wedding here. i. ., ., . there has been no secret wedding here. , ., ., ., . ., here. if you are watching at eight o'clock, here. if you are watching at eight o'clock. dan. _ here. if you are watching at eight o'clock. dan. by _ here. if you are watching at eight o'clock, dan, by mistake, - here. if you are watching at eight o'clock, dan, by mistake, called| here. if you are watching at eight i o'clock, dan, by mistake, called me louise walker. i’m o'clock, dan, by mistake, called me louise walker.— louise walker. i'm not. sorry, i've iota louise walker. i'm not. sorry, i've got a small— louise walker. i'm not. sorry, i've got a small brain _ louise walker. i'm not. sorry, i've got a small brain and _ louise walker. i'm not. sorry, i've got a small brain and it's - louise walker. i'm not. sorry, i've got a small brain and it's easy i louise walker. i'm not. sorry, i've got a small brain and it's easy to l got a small brain and it's easy to get confused. morning live is back and coming up straight after breakfast on bbc one. kym and gethin can tell us what they have in store. we we re we were thinking about continuing the theme. sol we were thinking about continuing the theme. so i might ask you to marry— the theme. so i might ask you to marry me — the theme. so i might ask you to marry me on the show today. i�*ve the theme. so i might ask you to marry me on the show today. i've got an old dress — marry me on the show today. i've got an old dress knocking _ marry me on the show today. i've got an old dress knocking around - an old dress knocking around somewhere!— an old dress knocking around somewhere! thank you. it's a beautiful _ somewhere! thank you. it's a beautiful thing. _ coming up on morning live today, we busted some of the biggest anti—vax myths yesterday. today we're doing the same
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for side effects. dr punam will set the record straight on whether having had covid really does increase the risk of feeling ill after the jab, and she'll clear up whether less side effects means less protection. and rav�*s back in the studio with advice to keep you safe from scammers. yes, new for this series - is my warning of the week" — and today, i'll be telling you why you shouldn't always trust - caller id on your phone. also on the show — he's going for gold again. record—breaking gymnast max whitlock tells us why team gb is determined to make britain proud at this year's tokyo olympics, and how his daughter has been helping him to train. comedianjason manford is getting his game face on as he turns quizmaster for his brand new show that has a very unusual twist. we'll chat to him about that plus his new role as a "vaxi—driver", getting the vulnerable and elderly to their covid jabs. and we're spoilt for guests today. her bafta award—winning sitcom gavin and stacey put barry and billericay on the map — and gave us plenty of laughs too.
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find out how actor ruthjones is preparing for her big screen debut. and luba will be getting us in shape with a lower body work—out in strictly fitness. she means business today. she saw amy yesterday and that was fun. she will be _ amy yesterday and that was fun. she will be going at it again today. we'll see you at 9.15. and many happy returns to you, dan. no, back— and many happy returns to you, dan. no, back at— and many happy returns to you, dan. no, back at you. can we come to the wedding? no, back at you. can we come to the weddini? . , . ., wedding? absolutely. we will get a bi cake. if wedding? absolutely. we will get a big cake- if you _ wedding? absolutely. we will get a big cake. if you are _ wedding? absolutely. we will get a big cake. if you are going _ wedding? absolutely. we will get a big cake. if you are going to - wedding? absolutely. we will get a big cake. if you are going to have i wedding? absolutely. we will get a big cake. if you are going to have a| big cake. if you are going to have a best man. — big cake. if you are going to have a best man. do _ big cake. if you are going to have a best man, do you _ big cake. if you are going to have a best man, do you go _ big cake. if you are going to have a best man, do you go for— big cake. if you are going to have a best man, do you go for ralph i big cake. if you are going to have a best man, do you go for ralph ori big cake. if you are going to have a| best man, do you go for ralph or do you go for dr xand? you best man, do you go for ralph or do you go for dr xand?— you go for dr xand? you cannot do that! can i — you go for dr xand? you cannot do that! can i go _ you go for dr xand? you cannot do that! can i go for— you go for dr xand? you cannot do that! can i go for ollie _ you go for dr xand? you cannot do that! can i go for ollie the - you go for dr xand? you cannot do that! can i go for ollie the dog?! i that! can i go for ollie the dog?! thank— that! can i go for ollie the dog?! thank you — an increasing number of people in england are struggling to access an nhs dentist, according to a leading patient watchdog. danjohnson is at a dental practice in north yorkshire for us this morning.
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dan, lots of reviewers have been getting in touch talking about the struggle to get a seat in the dentist's chair?— struggle to get a seat in the dentist's chair? . , ,., , , ., dentist's chair? absolutely, yeah. there it is. _ dentist's chair? absolutely, yeah. there it is, the _ dentist's chair? absolutely, yeah. there it is, the chair _ dentist's chair? absolutely, yeah. there it is, the chair that - dentist's chair? absolutely, yeah. there it is, the chair that loads i dentist's chair? absolutely, yeah. there it is, the chair that loads of| there it is, the chair that loads of people _ there it is, the chair that loads of people now— there it is, the chair that loads of people now want to see after being fearful _ people now want to see after being fearful of _ people now want to see after being fearful of it for so many years. you can't _ fearful of it for so many years. you can't get _ fearful of it for so many years. you can't get near it. i've spent loads of time _ can't get near it. i've spent loads of time at — can't get near it. i've spent loads of time at the dentist over the past year but _ of time at the dentist over the past year but even i have not had my teeth _ year but even i have not had my teeth looked at. there are huge weights — teeth looked at. there are huge weights because there are so many challenges facing dentists and the dental— challenges facing dentists and the dental profession. they were closed for a period — dental profession. they were closed for a period at the start of the pandemic _ for a period at the start of the pandemic. that meant waiting list built up— pandemic. that meant waiting list built up and they are still working under— built up and they are still working under restrictive practices to control— under restrictive practices to control the virus. if you think about— control the virus. if you think about it. _ control the virus. if you think about it. in _ control the virus. if you think about it, in people's mouth, dentists _ about it, in people's mouth, dentists are at the front line. lots of protective equipment, there is also time — of protective equipment, there is also time between patients to make sure that _ also time between patients to make sure that things are ok. it means there _ sure that things are ok. it means there is— sure that things are ok. it means there is pressure on the dentist and there is pressure on the dentist and the staff— there is pressure on the dentist and the staff are working practices, and there _ the staff are working practices, and there is— the staff are working practices, and there is frustration for patients. while _ there is frustration for patients. while other industries are busy opening — while other industries are busy opening up, there is no sign of people — opening up, there is no sign of people getting back into the chair
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and opening their mouth any time soon _ a year ago, the virtual waiting room was filling up, as dentistry ground to a halt. twelve months on, there's still a big queue to get back in the big chair. clare's been waiting more than two years already. now i'm very, very self conscious and i kind of really, you know, desperately want to have the work done and feel more confident in myself again, because it's knocked my confidence as well. extra measures to guard against the virus have slowed down dental appointments. so clearing last year's backlog has been near impossible. some patients were told to go private, or forced to travel miles. at some point it got as bad as wanting to bang my head against a brick wall, really. so, yeah. and i'm a complete dental—phobe anyway, so for me to actually want to go to a dentist, that says how bad it was, really. the british dental association says in england there were 28 million fewer appointments in the last year. and a survey of their members suggests things aren't getting better.
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nearly half of those who responded say they'll change career, or take early retirement in the next year, if working conditions don't improve. a significant number are thinking of changing career, or leaving the profession altogether. really working in the current situation, with the arrangements for the pandemic, with our standard operating procedures that we're working to at the moment, make delivering dentistry a very difficultjob to do. and it's clearly reflected in the results of our survey. the department for health and social care says it is supporting dentists, and increasing access while protecting patients and staff. but the waiting lists were growing even before the pandemic. and dentists want to know how and when they can get back to something like normal, before more of their colleagues decide they've had enough.
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now one of those dentists is mark. let now one of those dentists is mark. let me _ now one of those dentists is mark. let me introduce you. he is wearing the full— let me introduce you. he is wearing the full protective equipment that dentists _ the full protective equipment that dentists have two where to do these aerosol _ dentists have two where to do these aerosol generating procedures. this is when _ aerosol generating procedures. this is when you — aerosol generating procedures. this is when you are in the patient's's mouths. — is when you are in the patient's's mouths, and i will let you take some of that— mouths, and i will let you take some of that off— mouths, and i will let you take some of that off so you can talk to us. it is _ of that off so you can talk to us. it is very— of that off so you can talk to us. it is very restrictive. even communicating with patients is difficult — communicating with patients is difficult with all of that on. exactly _ difficult with all of that on. exactly. that's the point. when you are trying _ exactly. that's the point. when you are trying to — exactly. that's the point. when you are trying to get _ exactly. that's the point. when you are trying to get across _ exactly. that's the point. when you are trying to get across the - exactly. that's the point. when you i are trying to get across the message to someone — are trying to get across the message to someone who _ are trying to get across the message to someone who does _ are trying to get across the message to someone who does not _ are trying to get across the message to someone who does not want i are trying to get across the message to someone who does not want to i are trying to get across the message | to someone who does not want to be here, _ to someone who does not want to be here dentists— to someone who does not want to be here, dentists are _ to someone who does not want to be here, dentists are not _ to someone who does not want to be here, dentists are not popular- here, dentists are not popular places— here, dentists are not popular places to _ here, dentists are not popular places to go. _ here, dentists are not popular places to go, but _ here, dentists are not popular places to go, but when - here, dentists are not popular places to go, but when you i here, dentists are not popular. places to go, but when you have here, dentists are not popular- places to go, but when you have got someone _ places to go, but when you have got someone in — places to go, but when you have got someone in your— places to go, but when you have got someone in your are _ places to go, but when you have got someone in your are trying - places to go, but when you have got someone in your are trying to - someone in your are trying to communicate _ someone in your are trying to communicate, normally- someone in your are trying to communicate, normally it i someone in your are trying to| communicate, normally it was someone in your are trying to - communicate, normally it was fine, you could _ communicate, normally it was fine, you could pull— communicate, normally it was fine, you could pull the _ communicate, normally it was fine, you could pull the mask— communicate, normally it was fine, you could pull the mask down- communicate, normally it was fine, you could pull the mask down and i| you could pull the mask down and i could _ you could pull the mask down and i could liberate. _ you could pull the mask down and i could liberate. when _ you could pull the mask down and i could liberate. when you _ you could pull the mask down and i could liberate. when you have i you could pull the mask down and i could liberate. when you have that| could liberate. when you have that .ear could liberate. when you have that gear on. _ could liberate. when you have that gear on. to — could liberate. when you have that gear on, to communicate - could liberate. when you have that gear on, to communicate with- gear on, to communicate with somebody— gear on, to communicate with somebody hard _ gear on, to communicate with somebody hard of— gear on, to communicate with somebody hard of hearing, i gear on, to communicate withl somebody hard of hearing, the gear on, to communicate with- somebody hard of hearing, the fans going. _ somebody hard of hearing, the fans going. the — somebody hard of hearing, the fans going, the circulation _ somebody hard of hearing, the fans going, the circulation that - somebody hard of hearing, the fans going, the circulation that we - somebody hard of hearing, the fans going, the circulation that we have i going, the circulation that we have to have _ going, the circulation that we have to have to— going, the circulation that we have to have to reduce... _ going, the circulation that we have to have to reduce... the _ to have to reduce... the communication- to have to reduce... the communication is- to have to reduce... the communication is very i to have to reduce... the - communication is very difficult to have to reduce... the _ communication is very difficult when you have _ communication is very difficult when you have that— communication is very difficult when you have that gear— communication is very difficult when you have that gear on. _ communication is very difficult when you have that gear on. that - communication is very difficult when you have that gear on. that is- communication is very difficult when you have that gear on. that is one i you have that gear on. that is one thing _ you have that gear on. that is one thing the — you have that gear on. that is one thing. the problem _ you have that gear on. that is one thing. the problem is— you have that gear on. that is one thing. the problem is you - you have that gear on. that is one thing. the problem is you end i you have that gear on. that is one thing. the problem is you end upl thing. the problem is you end up being _ thing. the problem is you end up being in— thing. the problem is you end up being ina— thing. the problem is you end up being ina bag— thing. the problem is you end up
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being in a bag cooking. _ being in a bag cooking. unfortunately, - being in a bag cooking. unfortunately, we i being in a bag cooking. | unfortunately, we have being in a bag cooking. i unfortunately, we have got air—conditioning. _ unfortunately, we have got air—conditioning. the- unfortunately, we have got air-conditioning.— unfortunately, we have got air-conditioning. the staff, it is exhausting- _ air-conditioning. the staff, it is exhausting. you _ air-conditioning. the staff, it is exhausting. you have _ air-conditioning. the staff, it is exhausting. you have got i air-conditioning. the staff, it is exhausting. you have got this i exhausting. you have got this ventilation machine in the corner. that— ventilation machine in the corner. that makes— ventilation machine in the corner. that makes a noise as well? it does, eah. you that makes a noise as well? it does, yeah- you are _ that makes a noise as well? it does, yeah. you are working _ that makes a noise as well? it does, yeah. you are working under - yeah. you are working under different— yeah. you are working under different conditions- yeah. you are working under different conditions to - yeah. you are working under different conditions to what i yeah. you are working underj different conditions to what i yeah. you are working under- different conditions to what i was working _ different conditions to what i was working in— different conditions to what i was working in prior— different conditions to what i was working in prior to— different conditions to what i was working in prior to covid. - different conditions to what i was working in prior to covid. that. different conditions to what i was working in prior to covid. that is| working in prior to covid. that is the big — working in prior to covid. that is the big chains _ working in prior to covid. that is the big chains.— the big chains. everything is different- — the big chains. everything is different. this _ the big chains. everything is different. this is _ the big chains. everything is different. this is why - the big chains. everything is different. this is why the i the big chains. everything is i different. this is why the waiting list got _ different. this is why the waiting list got so — different. this is why the waiting list got so big and are not any shorter? _ list got so big and are not any shorter? , . .,, list got so big and are not any shorter? , . ., shorter? yes, we were closed for re shorter? yes, we were closed for pretty much _ shorter? yes, we were closed for pretty much a — shorter? yes, we were closed for pretty much a month. _ shorter? yes, we were closed for pretty much a month. some i shorter? yes, we were closed for pretty much a month. some of i shorter? yes, we were closed for| pretty much a month. some of us opened _ pretty much a month. some of us opened in — pretty much a month. some of us opened in may _ pretty much a month. some of us opened in may. the _ pretty much a month. some of us opened in may. the rest- pretty much a month. some of us opened in may. the rest of- pretty much a month. some of us opened in may. the rest of the i opened in may. the rest of the profession— opened in may. the rest of the profession opened _ opened in may. the rest of the profession opened in _ opened in may. the rest of the profession opened injune. i opened in may. the rest of the profession opened injune. but opened in may. the rest of the i profession opened injune. but with limited _ profession opened injune. but with limited capacity _ profession opened injune. but with limited capacity. 20%_ profession opened injune. but with limited capacity. 20% from - profession opened injune. but with limited capacity. 20% from june i profession opened injune. but with limited capacity. 20% from june tol limited capacity. 20% from june to december, — limited capacity. 20% from june to december, 45%~ _ limited capacity. 20% from june to december, a5%. now— limited capacity. 20% from june to december, a5%. now we - limited capacity. 20% from june to december, a5%. now we are i limited capacity. 20% from june to december, a5%. now we are two. december, a5%. now we are two thirds — december, a5%. now we are two thirds not— december, a5%. now we are two thirds. not quite _ december, a5%. now we are two thirds. not quite at— december, a5%. now we are two thirds. not quite at 60%. - december, a5%. now we are two thirds. not quite at 60%. we - december, a5%. now we are two thirds. not quite at 60%. we had december, a5%. now we are two i thirds. not quite at 60%. we had a backlog _ thirds. not quite at 60%. we had a backlog previously. _ thirds. not quite at 60%. we had a backlog previously. there - thirds. not quite at 60%. we had a backlog previously. there was i thirds. not quite at 60%. we had a backlog previously. there was a i backlog previously. there was a waiting — backlog previously. there was a waiting list— backlog previously. there was a waiting list before _ backlog previously. there was a waiting list before covered. i backlog previously. there was a| waiting list before covered. now backlog previously. there was a - waiting list before covered. now we have got _ waiting list before covered. now we have got an — waiting list before covered. now we have got an even _ waiting list before covered. now we have got an even greater— waiting list before covered. now we have got an even greater waiting i have got an even greater waiting list. have got an even greater waiting list and — have got an even greater waiting list. and dentist— have got an even greater waiting list. and dentist are _ have got an even greater waiting list. and dentist are finding - have got an even greater waiting list. and dentist are finding it. list. and dentist are finding it very— list. and dentist are finding it very stressful. _ list. and dentist are finding it very stressful. the _ list. and dentist are finding it very stressful. the teams - list. and dentist are finding it very stressful. the teams arei very stressful. the teams are finding — very stressful. the teams are finding it _ very stressful. the teams are finding it very— very stressful. the teams are finding it very stressful. - very stressful. the teams are finding it very stressful. the i finding it very stressful. the receptionist _ finding it very stressful. the receptionist are _ finding it very stressful. the receptionist are dealing - finding it very stressful. the i receptionist are dealing with thyroid — receptionist are dealing with thyroid patients. _ receptionist are dealing with - thyroid patients. understandablyl read _ thyroid patients. understandablyl read we — thyroid patients. understandablyl read we are _ thyroid patients. understandablyl read. we are trying _ thyroid patients. understandablyl read. we are trying our— thyroid patients. understandablyl read. we are trying our best. - thyroid patients. understandably i. read. we are trying our best. trying to get— read. we are trying our best. trying to get as _ read. we are trying our best. trying to get as many— read. we are trying our best. trying to get as many people _ read. we are trying our best. trying to get as many people through - read. we are trying our best. trying to get as many people through the i to get as many people through the door as _ to get as many people through the door as possible. _ to get as many people through the door as possible. horat— to get as many people through the
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door as possible.— door as possible. how are you feelin: door as possible. how are you feeling about _ door as possible. how are you feeling about the _ door as possible. how are you feeling about the future - door as possible. how are you feeling about the future of- door as possible. how are you | feeling about the future of this profession?— feeling about the future of this profession? feeling about the future of this rofession? , , ., , . , profession? this is the worst it has been ever in _ profession? this is the worst it has been ever in my — profession? this is the worst it has been ever in my 26 _ profession? this is the worst it has been ever in my 26 years _ profession? this is the worst it has been ever in my 26 years of- profession? this is the worst it has been ever in my 26 years of doing l been ever in my 26 years of doing it. been ever in my 26 years of doing it it _ been ever in my 26 years of doing it it is _ been ever in my 26 years of doing it it is a — been ever in my 26 years of doing it it is a point _ been ever in my 26 years of doing it. it is a point of, _ been ever in my 26 years of doing it. it is a point of, i— been ever in my 26 years of doing it. it is a point of, i see _ been ever in my 26 years of doing it. it is a point of, i see that - been ever in my 26 years of doing it. it is a point of, i see that the l it. it is a point of, i see that the can has— it. it is a point of, i see that the can has ireen— it. it is a point of, i see that the can has been kicked _ it. it is a point of, i see that the can has been kicked down - it. it is a point of, i see that the can has been kicked down the l it. it is a point of, i see that the i can has been kicked down the road with contract — can has been kicked down the road with contract reform _ can has been kicked down the road with contract reform for _ can has been kicked down the road with contract reform for a - can has been kicked down the road with contract reform for a long - with contract reform for a long tinre — with contract reform for a long tinre it— with contract reform for a long time. it needs _ with contract reform for a long time. it needs to _ with contract reform for a long time. it needs to be _ with contract reform for a long time. it needs to be done, - with contract reform for a long - time. it needs to be done, something about— time. it needs to be done, something about it. _ time. it needs to be done, something about it. that— time. it needs to be done, something about it. that is— time. it needs to be done, something about it, that is going _ time. it needs to be done, something about it, that is going to— time. it needs to be done, something about it, that is going to solve - time. it needs to be done, something about it, that is going to solve the - about it, that is going to solve the probient — about it, that is going to solve the probient i— about it, that is going to solve the problem idont— about it, that is going to solve the problem. i don't know— about it, that is going to solve the problem. i don't know what - about it, that is going to solve the problem. i don't know what the i problem. idon't know what the answer— problem. idon't know what the answer wiii— problem. i don't know what the answer will be _ problem. i don't know what the answer will be what _ problem. i don't know what the answer will be what it - problem. i don't know what the answer will be what it needs i answer will be what it needs discussion~ _ answer will be what it needs discussion. we _ answer will be what it needs discussion. we need - answer will be what it needs discussion. we need an- answer will be what it needs| discussion. we need an open answer will be what it needs - discussion. we need an open debate about— discussion. we need an open debate about what— discussion. we need an open debate about what the — discussion. we need an open debate about what the nhs _ discussion. we need an open debate about what the nhs offers _ discussion. we need an open debate about what the nhs offers the - about what the nhs offers the population _ about what the nhs offers the population. we _ about what the nhs offers the population. we only— about what the nhs offers the population. we only had - about what the nhs offers the population. we only had half. about what the nhs offers the l population. we only had half of about what the nhs offers the - population. we only had half of the population— population. we only had half of the population accessing _ population. we only had half of the population accessing it _ population. we only had half of the population accessing it before. - population. we only had half of the| population accessing it before. now that half— population accessing it before. now that half cannot _ population accessing it before. now that half cannot even _ population accessing it before. now that half cannot even get _ population accessing it before. now that half cannot even get in. - population accessing it before. now that half cannot even get in. where| that half cannot even get in. where will the _ that half cannot even get in. where will the rest — that half cannot even get in. where will the rest of _ that half cannot even get in. where will the rest of them _ that half cannot even get in. where will the rest of them fit _ that half cannot even get in. where will the rest of them fit in? - that half cannot even get in. where will the rest of them fit in? it - will the rest of them fit in? it would — will the rest of them fit in? it would be _ will the rest of them fit in? it would be difficult. _ will the rest of them fit in? it would be difficult.— will the rest of them fit in? it would be difficult. what about your future? i have _ would be difficult. what about your future? i have reduced _ would be difficult. what about your future? i have reduced my- future? i have reduced my commitments _ future? i have reduced my commitments because - future? i have reduced my commitments because i i future? i have reduced my. commitments because i could future? i have reduced my- commitments because i could not future? i have reduced my— commitments because i could not keep doin- commitments because i could not keep doing what— commitments because i could not keep doing what i_ commitments because i could not keep doing what i am— commitments because i could not keep doing what i am doing. _ commitments because i could not keep doing what i am doing. i— commitments because i could not keep doing what i am doing. i had _ commitments because i could not keep doing what i am doing. i had my- commitments because i could not keep doing what i am doing. i had my own. doing what i am doing. i had my own practice _ doing what i am doing. i had my own practice untit— doing what i am doing. i had my own practice until three _ doing what i am doing. i had my own practice until three years _ doing what i am doing. i had my own practice until three years ago. - doing what i am doing. i had my own practice until three years ago. even i practice until three years ago. even before _ practice until three years ago. even before covid — practice until three years ago. even before covid it _ practice until three years ago. even before covid it was _ practice until three years ago. even before covid it was getting - practice until three years ago. even before covid it was getting very - before covid it was getting very difficult — before covid it was getting very difficult my— before covid it was getting very difficult. my blood _ before covid it was getting very difficult. my blood pressure - before covid it was getting very| difficult. my blood pressure was through— difficult. my blood pressure was through the _ difficult. my blood pressure was through the roof. _ difficult. my blood pressure was through the roof. the _ difficult. my blood pressure was through the roof. the doctor- difficult. my blood pressure wasl through the roof. the doctor was about— through the roof. the doctor was about to — through the roof. the doctor was about to put _ through the roof. the doctor was about to put me _ through the roof. the doctor was about to put me on— through the roof. the doctor was about to put me on tablets. - through the roof. the doctor was about to put me on tablets. i- through the roof. the doctor was| about to put me on tablets. i had through the roof. the doctor was i about to put me on tablets. i had to look after— about to put me on tablets. i had to look after nry — about to put me on tablets. i had to look after my health, _ about to put me on tablets. i had to look after my health, so _ about to put me on tablets. i had to look after my health, so i _ about to put me on tablets. i had to look after my health, so i sold - about to put me on tablets. i had to look after my health, so i sold the l look after my health, so i sold the practice _ look after my health, so i sold the practice i— look after my health, so i sold the ractice. ., . look after my health, so i sold the ractice. . . ., ., practice. i am cutting down now. that has got _ practice. i am cutting down now. that has got to _ practice. i am cutting down now. that has got to be _ practice. i am cutting down now. that has got to be bad _ practice. i am cutting down now. that has got to be bad news, - that has got to be bad news, especially in a rural area like this? — especially in a rural area like
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this? . especially in a rural area like this?- thank _ especially in a rural area like this?- thank you. - especially in a rural area like this?- thank you. it. especially in a rural area like this?- thank you. it is | especially in a rural area like | this?- thank you. it is a especially in a rural area like - this?- thank you. it is a tough this? yeah. thank you. it is a tough time for the — this? yeah. thank you. it is a tough time for the staff _ this? yeah. thank you. it is a tough time for the staff and _ this? yeah. thank you. it is a tough time for the staff and for— this? yeah. thank you. it is a tough time for the staff and for patients. those _ time for the staff and for patients. those lists— time for the staff and for patients. those lists look like they will get ionger~ _ those lists look like they will get longer it — those lists look like they will get longer. it is an issue that will be discussed — longer. it is an issue that will be discussed by mps this morning at westminster. we have asked the chief dental— westminster. we have asked the chief dental officer if she to us. she westminster. we have asked the chief dental officer if she to us.— dental officer if she to us. she was not available _ dental officer if she to us. she was not available for _ dental officer if she to us. she was not available for an _ dental officer if she to us. she was not available for an interview. - dental officer if she to us. she was not available for an interview. we l not available for an interview. we will keep asking. sally's got the sport for us this morning. we had a fantastic chat with adam peaty. where are we going this time? we are going to start with gareth southgate. big day for him today. gareth southgate will announce a provisional england squad today for the european championship. several players are involved in the europa league and champions league finals this week, which is why he'll delay naming the final 26 until next tuesday. they got all the way to the semi—finals of their last major tournament in russia three years ago. plenty of those players will go again, along with some new faces. we'll hear from southgate at a press conference at two o'clock. we should get details of the players involved an hour before that. potentially half of his squad are in those european finals this week, so he will be
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worried about injuries. if you want to work through the different options go to the bbc sport website and have a go at the euros squad picker. you can see what sort of headache gareth southgate really has. japan have been assured by the united states that a no travel advisory will not affect american olympians. the tokyo games are just weeks away, and on monday, the us state department warned americans against travel to japan because of a surge in coronavirus cases in the country. but the united states olympic & paralympic committee says it still anticipates american athletes will be able to safely travel and compete. the pga of america has apologised, after spectators overwhelmed security officials and swarmed around phil mickelson and brooks koepka on the final hole of the pga championship. when eventual champion mickelson's approach shot found the green at the 18th at kiawah island, spectators raced to follow him up the fairway, enveloping
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him in the crowd. his playing partner koepka, who is recovering from a dislocated kneecap, said he had been "dinged" a few times in the knee by the crowd. so you can see from those still pictures that we have, it was not ideal. phil mickelson's caddy, his brother, was working really hard to try to keep everybody away from him. but i guess people are so used to crowding in as a last minute, they shouldn't have done it.— crowding in as a last minute, they shouldn't have done it. we'll get the weather from carol shortly. but if the last three weeks are anything to go by, you can probably guess the outlook. rain, rain and more rain for at least a couple more days. it isa it is a familiar view. yes, the uk is on course for the wettest may on record. but it takes more than a few million gallons of water to dampen the british spirit — even for those who are camping, as breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin has been finding out. it's going to be cold. there will be a significant wind chill.
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you can see the showers swirling around below. a lot of rain out - there at the moment. heavy and thundery again. may — not quite what we were hoping for. while may 2020 was the sunniest calendar month on record, may 2021 could become one of the wettest. good morning! oh, what a beautiful day! you big fib, chris! a bit of rain won't stop hardy campers like chris and karen in wales. is it all waterproof? no! well, it's already the wettest may on record since records began back in 1865. karen? yes. you're braved it. we have. hail, rain or snow, we were going to be here. enjoying it? yeah. what time does the bar open, karen? as soon as that's full! i didn't even bring a brolly. it is what it is, that's what i say. in the tent next door, wet weather hysteria is setting in with newlyweds tracey and julian. how has it been, newlyweds?
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lovely! ijust wish the sun would come out. it would be nice. was it quite the honeymoon period you envisaged? eh, it's been a little bit wetter than i imagined it would be, and possibly the wrong country. and i don't mean that...! i mean, somewhere in the sun and on the plane and disappeared... ..might have been nice. yes. but never mind. no. as long as we're together, as long as tracey�*s here, that's the main thing. # why does it always rain on me...# in llangolen, and across wales, they've had twice the average may rainfall, and may ain't over yet, people. it's been torrential. nearly every day, to be honest. we've had everything here, every torrential rain. i mean, flooding, thunder and lightning, hailstones... hailstones? massive — size of marbles, honestly. theyjust covered over the ground. and a tiny bit of sunshine — a tiny bit. oh, no! but is there a determination
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to fight through this weather? obviously there's a huge determination. i mean, honestly, sitting out in the rain under our brollies, having salad sandwiches. and we just sit there having a cup of tea all in this weather. as if the sun is cracking the flags? exactly. in england, alistairflicked through the detailed log from one of the uk's oldest weather stations. the museum has been collecting data since 1882. and what does it tell us about may? certainly the start of may was really cool. at one point it was looking like it was going to be the coolest since 1902. it has improved a little bit, but it is still officially a miserable may? it is currently the wettest may since 1967. but obviously there is still a third of may to go. so it could get even wetter yet. it ain't over yet? no. so if you are wondering
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why this is happening, and if it will get better, here is the man who knows. we needed this through much of the month. at the weekend it was so windy you could hardly keep a hold of it. you can turn it off now, charlotte. but why has may's weather been so bad? it is due to the weather patterns getting stuck. high pressure in russia is sending in incredibly warm air to the arctic. high pressure across greenland as well. that means we have just been stuck in the middle with low pressure after low pressure, bringing rain at times and dragging down that cold wind that has dominated the month. but there is optimism on the horizon. it is looking drier, it is looking warmer this weekend. and don't say it too loudly, it's a bank holiday weekend and we know what that can mean. one thing is absolutely certain. after all we have been through, bad weather won't stop us trying our very best to have fun.
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perfect day. we want rain. there is no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong choice of toys. rain? maria, nothing is getting you wet. give us a twirl. it hasjust chucked it down the whole time. never mind. we are going to enjoy it. and thejoy ofjoy, it might, mightjust get better. can we have a twirl in your beautiful poncho? magnificent. they skip into the rainy distance. you have to enjoy it. thank you for your miserable made pictures. here are a few more. current talk this. this is in wigan. just before the heavens opened.—
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this is in wigan. just before the heavens opened. here is a similar scene in wiltshire. _ heavens opened. here is a similar scene in wiltshire. these - heavens opened. here is a similar scene in wiltshire. these crops i scene in wiltshire. these crops about to get a good watering. thanks to annabel. �* . ., about to get a good watering. thanks to annabel. . , . ., ., ~' about to get a good watering. thanks to annabel. . , . ., ., ~ . to annabel. alistair took a motorcycle _ to annabel. alistair took a motorcycle trip _ to annabel. alistair took a motorcycle trip to - to annabel. alistair took a motorcycle trip to the - to annabel. alistair took a motorcycle trip to the isle | to annabel. alistair took a i motorcycle trip to the isle of to annabel. alistair took a - motorcycle trip to the isle of skye to get this snap. that is the old man of storton. find to get this snap. that is the old man of storton.— to get this snap. that is the old man of storton. and this photo was taken in may _ man of storton. and this photo was taken in may by _ man of storton. and this photo was taken in may by ciaran _ man of storton. and this photo was taken in may by ciaran in _ man of storton. and this photo was taken in may by ciaran in south - taken in may by ciaran in south wales. , . ., ., . taken in may by ciaran in south wales. , . ., wales. dolly parton once said if you want at the — wales. dolly parton once said if you want at the rainbow _ wales. dolly parton once said if you want at the rainbow you _ wales. dolly parton once said if you want at the rainbow you have - wales. dolly parton once said if you want at the rainbow you have to - wales. dolly parton once said if you | want at the rainbow you have to put up want at the rainbow you have to put up with the rain. perhaps she had been to bridlington with sarah. we went to bridlington for my wife's birthday. we had that every single day and it was freezing and wet. let's finish with a scene which must have room repeated outside every pub in may. hot water bottles and flasks. winter coats. everything you could possibly need for a point. brilliant. , . ., could possibly need for a point. brilliant. , , ., .., . . , brilliant. just to confirm, that was bridlinaton brilliant. just to confirm, that was bridlington with _ brilliant. just to confirm, that was bridlington with my _ brilliant. just to confirm, that was bridlington with my actual- brilliant. just to confirm, that was
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bridlington with my actual wife! . bridlington with my actual wife! do you know what? you are just beginning to worry me. i do you know what? you are 'ust beginning to worry me.�* do you know what? you are 'ust beginning to worry me. i can show ou beginning to worry me. i can show you photographic— beginning to worry me. i can show you photographic evidence, - beginning to worry me. i can show you photographic evidence, i - beginning to worry me. i can show you photographic evidence, i am l you photographic evidence, i am married. not to her though. goad married. not to her though. good mornin: married. not to her though. good morning to _ married. not to her though. good morning to the — married. not to her though. good morning to the other— married. not to her though. good morning to the other mrs - married. not to her though. good morning to the other mrs walker. here is carol with the weather. which isn't me!— here is carol with the weather. which isn't me! this is becoming awkward now- — which isn't me! this is becoming awkward now. it _ which isn't me! this is becoming awkward now. it was _ which isn't me! this is becoming awkward now. it was bad - which isn't me! this is becomingj awkward now. it was bad before. which isn't me! this is becoming - awkward now. it was bad before. i'm not married to carol or louise, or anyone else other than my actual wife, right? although they are all lovely. so wife, right? althou~hthe are all lovel . ., although they are all lovely. so are ou, dan. although they are all lovely. so are you. dan- good _ although they are all lovely. so are you, dan. good morning _ although they are all lovely. so are | you, dan. good morning everybody. this morning we have had a lot of cloud to start the day. and also, some rain. the rain fairly light and patchy. it will give way to sunny spells and also some scattered heavy showers. the showers will not be as plentiful as they were yesterday. we are hearing that it has been pretty cool during the month of may. today is no exception. temperatures not getting up to where they should be
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at this time of the year, 18 in the north, to 20 in the south. if you run the sequence, look what happens. some yellows across us. it is thursday, friday, into the weekend that temperatures rise. some will see 20, 21, even 22 degrees. what is happening today is the cloud is breaking up. sunny skies developing and also the showers. across scotland, northern and eastern england. some will be heavy and thundery with some hail. some of them will move away quickly on the breeze. at the other end of the country we have rain in the isles of scilly, devon and cornwall and the channel islands. north of that, back into drier and brighter conditions and some sunshine, mostly dry today across northern ireland and the north—east of scotland. you can see we have got the showers in northern and western scotland, and also parts of northern england as well. temperatures today, 11 in the north to 15. we might get a 17 as we push further south. through this evening
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and overnight we start with those showers. they will fade as we go into the second part of the night. the rain moving away from the south—west. it will leave cloud and showers. more cloud in the north and east, with patchy rain and eastern coastal areas. tomorrow we start off with all of these cloud in the patchy rain in the north and the east. we also have some dry weather, some sunshine in northern ireland, wales, southern england, and not much of a breeze if you catch a shower tomorrow. temperatures ten in the north to 17 in glasgow and also in london. salt temperatures rising a little bit more for some of us. in thursday, high pressure pulse across us, so things become more settled. a lot of dry weather, sunshine, turning hazy in the afternoon. then we have got this weather front coming in from the west. that will introduce some rain. as it meets the high pressure, the rain and it will
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not be as intense as we have seen of late. and into the bank holiday weekend, there will be a few showers but a lot of us will have dry weather, temperatures are rising. on monday you might see some rain in the north west. i monday you might see some rain in the north west. i will monday you might see some rain in the north west. i will keep monday you might see some rain in the north west. i will keep you monday you might see some rain in the north west. i will keep you posted monday you might see some rain in the north west. i will keep you posted on monday you might see some rain in the north west. i will keep you posted on that. thank you, carol. it may not feel much like spring at the moment, but here's something to cheer you up — the bbc�*s flagship nature programme springwatch returns to our screens tonight. let's talk to presenters chris packham and michaela strachan who join us now. good morning. you are back together, which is great. how are you? yes! good morning. you are back together, which is great. how are you?— which is great. how are you? yes! we are back together _ which is great. how are you? yes! we are back together but _ which is great. how are you? yes! we are back together but we _ which is great. how are you? yes! we are back together but we are - which is great. how are you? yes! we are back together but we are not - are back together but we are not married! — are back together but we are not married! ., are back together but we are not married!- lt _ are back together but we are not married!- it is _ are back together but we are not married!- it is a - are back together but we are not married!- it is a great i married! leave it! it is a great leasure married! leave it! it is a great pleasure to — married! leave it! it is a great pleasure to have _ married! leave it! it is a great pleasure to have michaela - married! leave it! it is a greatl pleasure to have michaela back married! leave it! it is a great - pleasure to have michaela back here. it is pleasure to have michaela back here. it is really _ pleasure to have michaela back here. it is really good. we are slightly disappointed by the weather forecast. particularly for us in norfoli
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the future — it is definitely having an impact on the future stars of our three week show, _ the future stars of our three week show, which starts tonight. the birds _ show, which starts tonight. the birds are — show, which starts tonight. the birds are a _ show, which starts tonight. the birds are a little bit behind, aren't— birds are a little bit behind, aren't they?— birds are a little bit behind, aren't the ? , . ., , ., aren't they? they certainly are. normally at _ aren't they? they certainly are. normally at this _ aren't they? they certainly are. normally at this time _ aren't they? they certainly are. normally at this time of - aren't they? they certainly are. normally at this time of the - aren't they? they certainly are. l normally at this time of the year aren't they? they certainly are. - normally at this time of the year we have got— normally at this time of the year we have got lots — normally at this time of the year we have got lots of— normally at this time of the year we have got lots of checks. _ normally at this time of the year we have got lots of checks. a _ normally at this time of the year we have got lots of checks. a lot - normally at this time of the year we have got lots of checks. a lot of- have got lots of checks. a lot of those _ have got lots of checks. a lot of those birds _ have got lots of checks. a lot of those birds are _ have got lots of checks. a lot of those birds are now _ have got lots of checks. a lot of those birds are now sitting - have got lots of checks. a lot of those birds are now sitting on i have got lots of checks. a lot of- those birds are now sitting on eggs. we have _ those birds are now sitting on eggs. we have got— those birds are now sitting on eggs. we have got a — those birds are now sitting on eggs. we have got a few _ those birds are now sitting on eggs. we have got a few to _ those birds are now sitting on eggs. we have got a few to show- those birds are now sitting on eggs. we have got a few to show people. i those birds are now sitting on eggs. i we have got a few to show people. we we have got a few to show people. c have -ot we have got a few to show people. have got a buzzard out in the woods not too _ have got a buzzard out in the woods not too far— have got a buzzard out in the woods not too far from where we are at the nronrent _ not too far from where we are at the nronrent it — not too far from where we are at the moment. it has two chicks. we have been _ moment. it has two chicks. we have been watching them being diligently looked _ been watching them being diligently looked after by the adults. the buzzard — looked after by the adults. the buzzard is a big bird, so when we had torrential rain here yesterday, the female went back to the nest and formed _ the female went back to the nest and formed an— the female went back to the nest and formed an umbrella with her wings. easy for— formed an umbrella with her wings. easy for a _ formed an umbrella with her wings. easy for a big bird under cover. but more _ easy for a big bird under cover. but more difficult for smaller birds and certainly— more difficult for smaller birds and certainly for those out in the open. what _ certainly for those out in the open. what i _ certainly for those out in the open. what i love — certainly for those out in the open. what i love about the birds of prey is they— what i love about the birds of prey is they take — what i love about the birds of prey is they take a _ what i love about the birds of prey is they take a long _ what i love about the birds of prey is they take a long time _ what i love about the birds of prey is they take a long time to - what i love about the birds of prey is they take a long time to fledge.| is they take a long time to fledge. we can— is they take a long time to fledge. we can watch— is they take a long time to fledge. we can watch them _ is they take a long time to fledge. we can watch them grow - is they take a long time to fledge. we can watch them grow in - is they take a long time to fledge. we can watch them grow in the i is they take a long time to fledge. i we can watch them grow in the next few weeks — we can watch them grow in the next few weeks we _ we can watch them grow in the next few weeks. we have _ we can watch them grow in the next few weeks. we have got— we can watch them grow in the next few weeks. we have got birds- we can watch them grow in the next few weeks. we have got birds like i few weeks. we have got birds like swallows — few weeks. we have got birds like swallows that _ few weeks. we have got birds like swallows that we _ few weeks. we have got birds like swallows that we will _ few weeks. we have got birds like swallows that we will see - few weeks. we have got birds like swallows that we will see maybe i few weeks. we have got birds like - swallows that we will see maybe next week _
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swallows that we will see maybe next week. ., ., . swallows that we will see maybe next week. . . , , ., . week. that was the question i wanted to ask both of — week. that was the question i wanted to ask both of you. _ week. that was the question i wanted to ask both of you. i _ week. that was the question i wanted to ask both of you. i have _ week. that was the question i wanted to ask both of you. i have noticed - week. that was the question i wanted to ask both of you. i have noticed i i to ask both of you. i have noticed i have seen quite a few birds nests. sometimes the birds go quickly. it depends on the birds, how long it takes them to fledge, does it? yeah, it does. takes them to fledge, does it? yeah, it does- most — takes them to fledge, does it? yeah, it does. most of— takes them to fledge, does it? yeah, it does. most of our— takes them to fledge, does it? yeah, it does. most of our smaller - takes them to fledge, does it? yeah, it does. most of our smaller speciesl it does. most of our smaller species are floating — it does. most of our smaller species are floating normally about 15 to 19 days. _ are floating normally about 15 to 19 days, things like great tips, butit's. _ days, things like great tips, butit's, the warblers, finches, those — butit's, the warblers, finches, those of— butit's, the warblers, finches, those of things. they are feeding their— those of things. they are feeding their chicks principally on insects at this— their chicks principally on insects at this time of the year but they are struggling because it is so cold — are struggling because it is so cold if— are struggling because it is so cold if it— are struggling because it is so cold. if it is not that warm, those insects _ cold. if it is not that warm, those insects can't _ cold. if it is not that warm, those insects can't be active, which means the birds _ insects can't be active, which means the birds can't catch as many of them _ the birds can't catch as many of them that _ the birds can't catch as many of them. that means either their brood size diminishes, very sadly the young — size diminishes, very sadly the young parish in the nest, or it will take _ young parish in the nest, or it will take them — young parish in the nest, or it will take them longer to get them out. there _ take them longer to get them out. there are — take them longer to get them out. there are a — take them longer to get them out. there are a number of variables. large _ there are a number of variables. large birds— there are a number of variables. large birds like the buzzard are in the nest— large birds like the buzzard are in the nest for 35 to 40 days, simply because _ the nest for 35 to 40 days, simply because they are bigger and they need _ because they are bigger and they need to— because they are bigger and they need to get their feathers down before — need to get their feathers down before they can properly fledge and start flying around as young birds.
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another— start flying around as young birds. another surprising one that takes along _ another surprising one that takes along time — another surprising one that takes along time is— another surprising one that takes along time is a _ another surprising one that takes along time is a pigeon. _ another surprising one that takes along time is a pigeon. i- another surprising one that takes along time is a pigeon. i have - another surprising one that takesj along time is a pigeon. i have got one outside — along time is a pigeon. i have got one outside my— along time is a pigeon. i have got one outside my hotel— along time is a pigeon. i have got one outside my hotel room. - along time is a pigeon. i have got one outside my hotel room. that| along time is a pigeon. i have got. one outside my hotel room. that will be in _ one outside my hotel room. that will be in the _ one outside my hotel room. that will be in the nest— one outside my hotel room. that will be in the nest for— one outside my hotel room. that will be in the nest for a _ one outside my hotel room. that will be in the nest for a while. _ one outside my hotel room. that will be in the nest for a while. they- one outside my hotel room. that will be in the nest for a while. they are i be in the nest for a while. they are about— be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 _ be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 40 — be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 40 days _ be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 40 days as _ be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 40 days as well. - be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 40 days as well. we - be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 40 days as well.- be in the nest for a while. they are about 30 40 days as well. we can see the chicks in — about 30 40 days as well. we can see the chicks in the _ about 30 40 days as well. we can see the chicks in the buzzard's _ about 30 40 days as well. we can see the chicks in the buzzard's nest. - about 30 40 days as well. we can see the chicks in the buzzard's nest. at. the chicks in the buzzard's nest. at no buzzard at the moment. mum has probably flown off somewhere to get some food. we have this multi camera view which can show all the pictures at all the various nests at your location. give us an idea, michaela, of some of the highlights we have got in the next few weeks? melt. got in the next few weeks? well, that's the whole _ got in the next few weeks? well, that's the whole thing. _ got in the next few weeks? well, that's the whole thing. we - got in the next few weeks? well, that's the whole thing. we don'tl that's the whole thing. we don't really— that's the whole thing. we don't really know— that's the whole thing. we don't really know because _ that's the whole thing. we don't really know because cameras i that's the whole thing. we don'tl really know because cameras are being _ really know because cameras are being put— really know because cameras are being put on— really know because cameras are being put on nests— really know because cameras are being put on nests all— really know because cameras are being put on nests all the - really know because cameras are being put on nests all the time i being put on nests all the time throughout— being put on nests all the time throughout the _ being put on nests all the time throughout the weeks - being put on nests all the time throughout the weeks that - being put on nests all the time throughout the weeks that we i being put on nests all the time i throughout the weeks that we are here _ throughout the weeks that we are here we — throughout the weeks that we are here we can— throughout the weeks that we are here. we can see _ throughout the weeks that we are here. we can see kestrel, - throughout the weeks that we are i here. we can see kestrel, swallow, the buzzard, — here. we can see kestrel, swallow, the buzzard, abbas— here. we can see kestrel, swallow, the buzzard, abbas said. _ here. we can see kestrel, swallow, the buzzard, abbas said. we - here. we can see kestrel, swallow, the buzzard, abbas said. we have i the buzzard, abbas said. we have already— the buzzard, abbas said. we have already got— the buzzard, abbas said. we have already got a _ the buzzard, abbas said. we have already got a fantastic— the buzzard, abbas said. we have already got a fantastic selection i the buzzard, abbas said. we have| already got a fantastic selection of birds on _ already got a fantastic selection of birds on the — already got a fantastic selection of birds on the nest. _ already got a fantastic selection of birds on the nest. we _ already got a fantastic selection of birds on the nest. we will- already got a fantastic selection of birds on the nest. we will be - birds on the nest. we will be featuring _ birds on the nest. we will be featuring them _ birds on the nest. we will be featuring them in _ birds on the nest. we will be featuring them in our- birds on the nest. we will be featuring them in our show. birds on the nest. we will be - featuring them in our show tonight at eight _ featuring them in our show tonight at eight o'clock. _ featuring them in our show tonight at eight o'clock. but _ featuring them in our show tonight at eight o'clock. but you _ featuring them in our show tonight at eight o'clock. but you can - featuring them in our show tonight at eight o'clock. but you can watch those _ at eight o'clock. but you can watch those cameras _ at eight o'clock. but you can watch those cameras online _ at eight o'clock. but you can watch those cameras online between- at eight o'clock. but you can watch i those cameras online between 10am and 10pm _ those cameras online between 10am and 10pm i— those cameras online between 10am and 10pm. i know— those cameras online between 10am and 10pm. i know a _ those cameras online between 10am and 10pm. i know a lot— those cameras online between 10am and 10pm. i know a lot of— those cameras online between 10am and 10pm. i know a lot of people - and10pm. i know a lot of people really— and 10pm. i know a lot of people really enjoy — and 10pm. i know a lot of people really enjoy watching _ and 10pm. i know a lot of people really enjoy watching the - really enjoy watching the development _ really enjoy watching the development of- really enjoy watching the development of those i really enjoy watching the - development of those checks. we
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really enjoy watching the development of those checks. we are not watching — development of those checks. we are not watching the _ development of those checks. we are not watching the birds _ development of those checks. we are not watching the birds just _ development of those checks. we are not watching the birdsjust here - development of those checks. we are not watching the birdsjust here in - not watching the birdsjust here in norfolk _ not watching the birdsjust here in norfolk. we are watching them in scotland — norfolk. we are watching them in scotland. north of inverness. and gillian _ scotland. north of inverness. and gillian is — scotland. north of inverness. and gillian is in — scotland. north of inverness. and gillian is in northern ireland at strangford lough castle. we are doing _ strangford lough castle. we are doing everything we can to cover all of the _ doing everything we can to cover all of the corners of the uk. we have been _ of the corners of the uk. we have been out — of the corners of the uk. we have been out and about for the last few weeks _ been out and about for the last few weeks making films as well, being battered _ weeks making films as well, being battered by that cold and unseasonably wet weather. what we have some _ unseasonably wet weather. what we have some gems in the can. fire unseasonably wet weather. what we have some gems in the can.- have some gems in the can. are you also talking — have some gems in the can. are you also talking about _ have some gems in the can. are you also talking about rewilding? - have some gems in the can. are you also talking about rewilding? yes, i also talking about rewilding? yes, we are here _ also talking about rewilding? yes, we are here at _ also talking about rewilding? yes, we are here at wild _ also talking about rewilding? yes, we are here at wild ken _ also talking about rewilding? yes, we are here at wild ken hill. a fabulous — we are here at wild ken hill. a fabulous farm going through a transition of using contemporary or industrial— transition of using contemporary or industrial farming. transition of using contemporary or industrialfarming. it is transition of using contemporary or industrial farming. it is scaling back, — industrial farming. it is scaling back, so— industrial farming. it is scaling back, so it _ industrial farming. it is scaling back, so it is giving some of its space _ back, so it is giving some of its space over— back, so it is giving some of its space over to conventional conservation. it has got a rewilding area which— conservation. it has got a rewilding area which is experimental and very exciting _ area which is experimental and very exciting. the working part of the farm _ exciting. the working part of the farm is _ exciting. the working part of the farm is now practising regenerative farming, _ farm is now practising regenerative farming, so — farm is now practising regenerative farming, so they have cut out of the use of— farming, so they have cut out of the use of pesticides and as much
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fertiliser— use of pesticides and as much fertiliser as possible. they are looking — fertiliser as possible. they are looking at using that land any more wildlife _ looking at using that land any more wildlife friendly way. in our initial— wildlife friendly way. in our initial observations, we have only been _ initial observations, we have only been here — initial observations, we have only been here for a few days, is that it is working — been here for a few days, is that it is working. there are a very large number— is working. there are a very large number of— is working. there are a very large number of foreign birds which have declined _ number of foreign birds which have declined elsewhere.— declined elsewhere. honestly, you walk over the _ declined elsewhere. honestly, you walk over the fields _ declined elsewhere. honestly, you walk over the fields and _ declined elsewhere. honestly, you walk over the fields and you - declined elsewhere. honestly, you walk over the fields and you don'tl walk over the fields and you don't think— walk over the fields and you don't think there — walk over the fields and you don't think there is _ walk over the fields and you don't think there is anything. _ walk over the fields and you don't think there is anything. suddenly| think there is anything. suddenly these _ think there is anything. suddenly these years— think there is anything. suddenly these years -- _ think there is anything. suddenly these years —— years _ think there is anything. suddenly these years —— years will- think there is anything. suddenly these years —— years will pop - think there is anything. suddenly these years —— years will pop upi think there is anything. suddenly i these years —— years will pop up and you will_ these years —— years will pop up and you will see — these years —— years will pop up and you will see so — these years —— years will pop up and you will see so many— these years —— years will pop up and you will see so many hairs. - these years —— years will pop up and you will see so many hairs. hedgesl you will see so many hairs. hedges all over— you will see so many hairs. hedges all over the — you will see so many hairs. hedges all over the place. _ you will see so many hairs. hedges all overthe place. in— you will see so many hairs. hedges all over the place. in those - you will see so many hairs. hedges all over the place. in those who - all over the place. in those who have _ all over the place. in those who have got— all over the place. in those who have got nests, _ all over the place. in those who have got nests, you _ all over the place. in those who have got nests, you have - all over the place. in those who have got nests, you have got. all over the place. in those who| have got nests, you have got all sorts _ have got nests, you have got all sorts of— have got nests, you have got all sorts of insects, _ have got nests, you have got all sorts of insects, a _ have got nests, you have got all sorts of insects, a lot _ have got nests, you have got all sorts of insects, a lot of- have got nests, you have got all| sorts of insects, a lot of wildlife. a very _ sorts of insects, a lot of wildlife. a very exciting _ sorts of insects, a lot of wildlife. a very exciting place _ sorts of insects, a lot of wildlife. a very exciting place to - sorts of insects, a lot of wildlife. a very exciting place to be. - sorts of insects, a lot of wildlife. a very exciting place to be. we l sorts of insects, a lot of wildlife. - a very exciting place to be. we have so often _ a very exciting place to be. we have so often been — a very exciting place to be. we have so often been at _ a very exciting place to be. we have so often been at rspb_ a very exciting place to be. we have so often been at rspb reserves- a very exciting place to be. we have so often been at rspb reserves thati so often been at rspb reserves that are managed — so often been at rspb reserves that are managed for— so often been at rspb reserves that are managed for wildlife, _ so often been at rspb reserves that are managed for wildlife, so- so often been at rspb reserves that are managed for wildlife, so you - are managed for wildlife, so you would _ are managed for wildlife, so you would expect— are managed for wildlife, so you would expect to _ are managed for wildlife, so you would expect to see _ are managed for wildlife, so you would expect to see a _ are managed for wildlife, so you would expect to see a lot - are managed for wildlife, so you would expect to see a lot of - would expect to see a lot of wildlife _ would expect to see a lot of wildlife. what— would expect to see a lot of wildlife. what is— would expect to see a lot of wildlife. what is great - would expect to see a lot of| wildlife. what is great about would expect to see a lot of - wildlife. what is great about here is it is— wildlife. what is great about here is it is a _ wildlife. what is great about here is it is a working _ wildlife. what is great about here is it is a working farm _ wildlife. what is great about here is it is a working farm that - wildlife. what is great about here is it is a working farm that is - is it is a working farm that is working _ is it is a working farm that is working with _ is it is a working farm that is working with wildlife. - is it is a working farm that is working with wildlife. for. is it is a working farm that is working with wildlife.- is it is a working farm that is working with wildlife. for us that it's really exciting. _ working with wildlife. for us that it's really exciting. brilliant. - it's really exciting. brilliant. lovely to talk to you both. i'm sure the catch up with you again soon. thank you to chris and mckenna. —— michaela. and springwatch 2021 starts tonight
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at 8pm on bbc 2 and then it's available on the bbc iplayer. our children are obsessed with birds and nests. we go online and watch those nest cams live. they are open from ten in the morning to ten at night. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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hi, good morning, welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire, here are the headlines. downing street insist local authorities were told about new restrictions in eight areas in england, as people are urged not to travel in or out of the places and avoid meeting indoors there. and if you live in bolton, blakcburn kirklees, bedford, burnley, leicester hounslow and north tyneside — what do you think of the advice? the gov denies is a local lockdown by stelath — is it? i'm on twitter @vicderbyshire or you can email me on victoria@bbc.co.uk. friends of the journalist being held in belarus after his plane was diverted say he looks like he's been beaten and forced to make a television confession. government borrowing is down by about £15 billion from this time last year, reaching £31] billion last month as parts of the economy reopened.

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