Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 23, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

11:30 pm
first the headlines. as lockdown eases — a push for people to get both covid vaccine doses — as a study shows high protection against the indian variant. at the same time — ministers reject claims from a former downing street adviser of a �*herd immunity�* plan at the start of the pandemic. a ryanair plane is forced to land in belarus amid claims of a bomb on board — but was it just a ploy to detain a dissidentjournalist. in northern italy — a cable car crashes to the ground — killing 14 people. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me tonight are france 24's uk correspondent benedicte paviot and the sunday times's deputy political editor caroline wheeler. tomorrow's front pages starting with... let's start with the financial times — and the ryanair plane flying
11:31 pm
from greece to lithuania that was forced to divert to minsk so a belarus opposition activist could be arrested. the guardian carries the picture of the cable car which tragically fell about 20m on a mountain in northern italy causing the death of 14 people, including at least one child. on the times — the culture secretary calls for changes at the bbc. he accuses the corportation of a �*we know best attitude�* in the wake of the martin bashir scandal. the telegraph says that britain is at risk of "replacing the covid crisis with a cancer crisis" — with more than 300,000 people missing urgent checks since the start of the pandemic. on the mail, a report reveals that dental patients are being forced to wait until up to 2024 for nhs appointments — with surgeries dealing with thousands of patients on their waiting lists. and according to the sun, the prime minister could soon be tying the knot with carrie symonds with a wedding expected next summer.
11:32 pm
so let's begin... with a wedding expected next summer. thank with a wedding expected next summer. you forjoir benedicte thank you forjoining us. just go to benedicte and start with the sp. this belarus arrest. —— the financial time. this belarus arrest. —— the financialtime. quite this belarus arrest. —— the financial time. quite a condemnation across europe. financial time. quite a condemnation across eur0pe-_ financial time. quite a condemnation across europe-— across europe. yes. it seems that whether it — across europe. yes. it seems that whether it is — across europe. yes. it seems that whether it is the _ across europe. yes. it seems that whether it is the uk, _ across europe. yes. it seems that whether it is the uk, france, - across europe. yes. it seems that. whether it is the uk, france, nato, eu, there is real concern tonight that they have been very quick and very fast statements from the phone lines must be absolutely buzzing because this is a very serious incident. it deserves to be headline news for all kinds of reasons. the uk foreign secretary has said this is outlandish action which will have serious implications and he says the uk is alarmed by these reports of the arrest of the journalist. in the
11:33 pm
circumstances that led to his flight being forced to live in minsk. interestingly, he adds we are coordinating with allies in this outlandish action by lukashenko will have serious implications. very similar things being said by the french foreign secretary. they are saying this is absolutely unacceptable and there needs to be a firm in translating answer in a unified answer from firm in translating answer in a unified answerfrom europeans. this is indispensable he says and that all the passengers of this flight, including any person from the opposition he is referring clearly to the belarussian journalist activist, must be released and there is real concern also from the eu commission president who actually says this is outrageous and illegal behaviour of the regime in belarus and will have consequences this was and will have consequences this was a commercialflight, ryan air going from athens were supposed to land in lithuania and as it was about to
11:34 pm
leave belarussian airspace, was diverted allegedly on a bomb scare you will be interesting to see what sanctions are taken and how quickly and what the nature of this will be and what the nature of this will be and this needs to be that would quickly before another state decides to do similar things. the quickly before another state decides to do similar things.— to do similar things. the switch to the daily telegraph. _ to do similar things. the switch to the daily telegraph. caroline, - the daily telegraph. caroline, cancer crisis, risk replacing pandemic. cancer crisis, risk replacing pandemic-— cancer crisis, risk replacing andemic. , ., ., ., pandemic. yes, a real concern for politicians — pandemic. yes, a real concern for politicians right _ pandemic. yes, a real concern for politicians right throughout - pandemic. yes, a real concern for politicians right throughout the i politicians right throughout the pandemic. the daily telegraph reveals — pandemic. the daily telegraph reveals today that there is 300,000 people _ reveals today that there is 300,000 people who have missed routine cancer— people who have missed routine cancer checks which raises the possibility of a real problems in cancer— possibility of a real problems in cancer crisis care with people missing — cancer crisis care with people missing lumps and tumours and fears that actually fears that were raised during _ that actually fears that were raised during the — that actually fears that were raised during the pandemic that missing these _ during the pandemic that missing these kind of appointments was actually— these kind of appointments was actually going to lead to more deaths — actually going to lead to more deaths potentially then those people that were dying of coronavirus and these _
11:35 pm
that were dying of coronavirus and these reports that we will see happen— these reports that we will see happen more and more and the fallout of the _ happen more and more and the fallout of the pandemic giving us an idea of what the _ of the pandemic giving us an idea of what the impact was of all those people _ what the impact was of all those people there were very much avoiding --oin people there were very much avoiding going to _ people there were very much avoiding going to the gp and avoiding going to in a85 — going to the gp and avoiding going to in a&e and following the advice which _ to in a&e and following the advice which was — to in a&e and following the advice which was to keep the nhs safe by allowing _ which was to keep the nhs safe by allowing the nhs to deal with those coronavirus cases and loads of people — coronavirus cases and loads of people were going and that they were actually— people were going and that they were actually contract the illness if they— actually contract the illness if they went. this goes with the daily telegraph— they went. this goes with the daily telegraph mission really which is about— telegraph mission really which is about the — telegraph mission really which is about the fact that our triage system — about the fact that our triage system in which we access treatment has to— system in which we access treatment has to dramatically since the pandemic started. and i certainly know— pandemic started. and i certainly know from — pandemic started. and i certainly know from personal experience we are still hot _ know from personal experience we are still not really seeing our gps face—to—face, stilla still not really seeing our gps face—to—face, still a lot of treatment being done of resume. and concerns— treatment being done of resume. and concerns that some of those easily are detectable cancers may should not be _ are detectable cancers may should not be detected if people are still
11:36 pm
being _ not be detected if people are still being seen in a virtual capacity. it being seen in a virtual capacity. [it is not being seen in a virtual capacity. is notjust being seen in a virtual capacity. it is notjust cancer being seen in a virtual capacity. it is not just cancer patients either. is notjust cancer patients either. if we look to be daily mail, they are saying the dentist will see you in three years, some nhs patients forced to wait till 2024 for an appointment. forced to wait till 2024 for an appointment-— forced to wait till 2024 for an appointment. this is extremely serious. appointment. this is extremely serious- as _ appointment. this is extremely serious. as caroline _ appointment. this is extremely serious. as caroline was - appointment. this is extremely| serious. as caroline was saying, appointment. this is extremely - serious. as caroline was saying, you have as far as cancer is concerned, it is concentrating on covid—i9 jazz but you replace it with a cancer crisis, either people are being delayed in the treatment or actually going missing and the fact they are not actually put through by the gp that has been told to triage them here we have dentist clearly with three year long waits in this is clearly very wearing. some dentists allegedly very much promoting pushing under all this pressure and effect they have got to be very careful of course with all the covid—i9 measures they have invested
11:37 pm
in, trained in, all theirstaff, getting people to do private treatment. that is available much more quickly and then you have allegedly some dentists who actually are saying getting rid of patients and saying there simply isn't enough room for you. so we know also that dentist can diagnose other serious illness from the condition in your mouth, so this is the very wearing. it is notjust about covid—i9. we must remember now where 15 months into this. there are other complaints and there are also people who will go to a&e having overdosed on painkillers. this has real consequences and is a very whirring dilemma which i think very much needs to be addressed as the cancer crisis that is by the government. a, crisis that is by the government. a horrible line in that piece about diy feelings. —— vy i feelings. let's not go there. diy feelings. -- w i feelings. let's not go there.— diy feelings. -- w i feelings. let's not go there. let's not. let's turn to the —
11:38 pm
let's not go there. let's not. let's turn to the time. _ let's not go there. let's not. let's turn to the time. the _ let's not go there. let's not. let's turn to the time. the culture - turn to the time. the culture secretary calling for changes to the bbc. -- the secretary calling for changes to the bbc. —— the financial time. a, lot secretary calling for changes to the bbc. -- the financial time.- bbc. -- the financial time. a lot of rumblings — bbc. -- the financial time. a lot of rumblings around _ bbc. -- the financial time. a lot of rumblings around the _ bbc. -- the financial time. a lot of rumblings around the bbc - bbc. -- the financial time. a lot of| rumblings around the bbc following that lord _ rumblings around the bbc following that lord dyson report that came out last week— that lord dyson report that came out last week which effectively accused marthr— last week which effectively accused martin bashir, who did the famous interview— martin bashir, who did the famous interview with princess diana of wealth — interview with princess diana of wealth 25 — interview with princess diana of wealth 25 years ago now were in effect _ wealth 25 years ago now were in effect he — wealth 25 years ago now were in effect he has been accused of fabricating evidence supporting documents. —— princess of wales with that which— documents. —— princess of wales with that which effectively led to diana to feel— that which effectively led to diana to feel that she needed to come out and say— to feel that she needed to come out and say things they gave her side of the story— and say things they gave her side of the story and suggestions that anyway— the story and suggestions that anyway she was coerced into giving the interview. the sunday times today— the interview. the sunday times today had — the interview. the sunday times today had an interview with mike bashir— today had an interview with mike bashir where he gave an account of himself— bashir where he gave an account of himself for— bashir where he gave an account of himself for that behaviour but that has not _ himself for that behaviour but that has not really stopped the deep murmurings and rumblings about the corporation _ murmurings and rumblings about the corporation and we hear on the front pa-e corporation and we hear on the front page of— corporation and we hear on the front page of the — corporation and we hear on the front page of the times today for the culture — page of the times today for the culture secretary really talking about — culture secretary really talking about the necessity for the changes to the _
11:39 pm
about the necessity for the changes to the corporation and suggestions they are _ to the corporation and suggestions they are guilty of groupthink and i think— they are guilty of groupthink and i think we _ they are guilty of groupthink and i think we will hear much more about this in_ think we will hear much more about this in the _ think we will hear much more about this in the coming weeks and months ahead _ this in the coming weeks and months ahead. given the fact that now the government seems to be committed to the root _ government seems to be committed to the root of— government seems to be committed to the root of charter review said, something _ the root of charter review said, something we were expecting for a something we were expecting fora number— something we were expecting fora number of— something we were expecting for a number of years, the midterm review, that could _ number of years, the midterm review, that could have wide ranging implications for the corporation if the government seeks to punish the bbc for— the government seeks to punish the bbc for this. of course, the rhetoric— bbc for this. of course, the rhetoric around the bbc has been quite _ rhetoric around the bbc has been quite as— rhetoric around the bbc has been quite as violent as it was while domihic— quite as violent as it was while dominic cummings was the prime minister— dominic cummings was the prime minister and chief adviser when we heard _ minister and chief adviser when we heard a _ minister and chief adviser when we heard a lot — minister and chief adviser when we heard a lot of briefings against the bbc. there have been much more of a kind of— bbc. there have been much more of a kind of cease—fire in that regard but of— kind of cease—fire in that regard but of course the lord dyson report has hothihg — but of course the lord dyson report has nothing to help the corporation in terms _ has nothing to help the corporation in terms of— has nothing to help the corporation in terms of dampening that fire. if in terms of dampening that fire. if i in terms of dampening that fire. i may. i on in terms of dampening that fire. it i may. i on the in terms of dampening that fire. it i may. ion the death of diana i may. i on the death of diana unfortunately, the breaking news in then herfuneral. different service,
11:40 pm
then herfuneral. different service, the bbc world service. —— i reported on the death. and the bbc world news. i think martin bashir, what he did while he was rehired from all those are important questions and indeed it is clear that mps really want to submit bbc bosses to give testimony about this martin bashir scandal. i won't go into excellent article that was done by the sunday times today, but as somebody who was working there at the time, i think so manyjournalists throughout the bbc and staff in the bbc will feel so let down by some very top bosses and that does need to be looked into and that does need to be looked into and that does need to be looked into and that government. the bbc is the world—class institution, notjust world—class institution, not just the world—class institution, notjust the british treasury, it needs to have the governance it deserves. i wanted to quickly get on another story of the time. at the very top of the time for the parents opposing
11:41 pm
longer school days to help children catch up. 60% suppose extending hours, 30% agree according to this new golf for the time. i’m hours, 30% agree according to this new golf for the time.— new golf for the time. i'm not entirely surprised _ new golf for the time. i'm not entirely surprised by - new golf for the time. i'm not entirely surprised by this. - new golf for the time. i'm not entirely surprised by this. it l new golf for the time. i'm not l entirely surprised by this. it has been _ entirely surprised by this. it has been one — entirely surprised by this. it has been one of the recommendations we fired time _ been one of the recommendations we fired time and time again from the government in terms of dealing with that post _ government in terms of dealing with that post pandemic chasm and gap in the studies _ that post pandemic chasm and gap in the studies of students who missed out on _ the studies of students who missed out on six _ the studies of students who missed out on six months or so or even more of education — out on six months or so or even more of education during the various lockdowns. as a mum of three myself, my children _ lockdowns. as a mum of three myself, my children have missed out as much as anyone _ my children have missed out as much as anyone but i'm not sure that it is more _ as anyone but i'm not sure that it is more schooling they need at this point _ is more schooling they need at this point. they— is more schooling they need at this point. they need to be socialised, they need — point. they need to be socialised, they need to be talking to their friends — they need to be talking to their friends and need to be getting back to that _ friends and need to be getting back to that activities in sports that have _ to that activities in sports that have been so sorely missed during those _ have been so sorely missed during those lockdowns. so i'm not particularly surprised that the parents — particularly surprised that the parents are particularly on the side of more _ parents are particularly on the side of more education and staying in the institutions — of more education and staying in the institutions. what they would want to see _ institutions. what they would want to see is _ institutions. what they would want to see is much more of a focus on the social— to see is much more of a focus on the social skills that they have
11:42 pm
missed — the social skills that they have missed out on and certainly i've noticed — missed out on and certainly i've noticed that with my own children. they are _ noticed that with my own children. they are much more focused on ipad as a technology that perhaps they were before and that was always in addiction _ were before and that was always in addiction the first place sol were before and that was always in addiction the first place so i think getting _ addiction the first place so i think getting young people out and about a-ain getting young people out and about again and _ getting young people out and about again and doing extra curricular activities — again and doing extra curricular activities that take them out of themselves is far more important than sitting down and giving them formal— than sitting down and giving them formal learning.— formal learning. those tablets. ma be formal learning. those tablets. maybe they _ formal learning. those tablets. maybe they need _ formal learning. those tablets. maybe they need a _ formal learning. those tablets. maybe they need a holiday. - formal learning. those tablets. maybe they need a holiday. if l formal learning. those tablets. i maybe they need a holiday. if we turn to the daily mirror, 100,000 bricks off the holiday this pain. 80 flights today will leave this week as taurus defy the government advice. ' :: :: :: :: :: as taurus defy the government advice. ':: :: 11:11: , advice. --100,000 bricks. extraordinary _ advice. --100,000 bricks. extraordinary front - advice. --100,000 bricks. extraordinary front that - advice. --100,000 bricks. l extraordinary front that what advice. --100,000 bricks. - extraordinary front that what an incredible number. this amber traffic light system is just not working. ——100,000 brits. people arejust desperate to working. ——100,000 brits. people are just desperate to get away, desperate with this rainy weather. as somebody who did much longer hours than amazed to see school was normal out at 3:30 p:m., certainly in the front system you have much longer hours and you have much more
11:43 pm
homework from a very young age and i don't think you did me any harm but what is interesting about that is actually in the polls you see that a lot of people do not believe schools really prepare people for life. anyway, you prepare for a holiday? a lot of people think they are in there will be 80 flights a day to spain. it looks like they may very well be full. let's hope that the amber system and quarantining doesn't change massively in all these people are caught in difficult situations and good luck to them. please be cautious.— please be cautious. very quickly, caroline. please be cautious. very quickly, caroline- we _ please be cautious. very quickly, caroline. we are _ please be cautious. very quickly, caroline. we are running - please be cautious. very quickly, caroline. we are running at - please be cautious. very quickly, caroline. we are running at a - please be cautious. very quickly, l caroline. we are running at a time. why isn't the government message about the tractor like system getting through the thing? i think ersonall getting through the thing? i think personally is _ getting through the thing? i think personally is it — getting through the thing? i think personally is it is _ getting through the thing? i think personally is it is incredibly - personally is it is incredibly confusing. you have a red list which is understandable. don't go to these countries. _ is understandable. don't go to these countries, they are not open or say. if countries, they are not open or say. if you _ countries, they are not open or say. if you go _ countries, they are not open or say. if you go to— countries, they are not open or say. if you go to them, you have to pay an enormous— if you go to them, you have to pay an enormous money to stay in a quarantine — an enormous money to stay in a quarantine hotel and come back. in the green _ quarantine hotel and come back. in the green list of countries are not
11:44 pm
places— the green list of countries are not places that you will want to go and visit _ places that you will want to go and visit and — places that you will want to go and visit. and this amber lefts of countries _ visit. and this amber lefts of countries that seem to be saying it is 0k_ countries that seem to be saying it is ok to _ countries that seem to be saying it is ok to visit them as long as you guarantine — is ok to visit them as long as you quarantine on the way back. in the litany— quarantine on the way back. in the litany of— quarantine on the way back. in the litany of messages coming from different— litany of messages coming from different ministers as to what that means. _ different ministers as to what that means, don't go there under any circumstances are go there and quarantine, go to see family but not io quarantine, go to see family but not go on _ quarantine, go to see family but not go on holiday, incredibly confusing. i am absolutely sympathetic to anybody — i am absolutely sympathetic to anybody that is thinking about this summer— anybody that is thinking about this summer and wondering what they will do. summer and wondering what they will do tide_ summer and wondering what they will do. ~ . ., ., ., ,, do. we have run out of time. thank ou both. that is it for the papers. goodbye for now. hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode, rounding up the best movies
11:45 pm
available in cinemas and in the home. uk cinemas reopened this week with films that have previously been available on streaming services such as minari, mortal kombat and raya and the last dragon playing alongside new releases like those who wish me dead. why'd they put you in a fire tower? well, i'mjust lucky, i guess. angelina jolie plays smoke jumper hannah, combating forest fires in montana. hannah is a wild card, haunted by guilty memories of a mission in which she misjudged the wind, with grim consequences. having been sent to spend a season alone atop a fire tower, her path conveniently crosses
11:46 pm
with that of a young boy lost

17 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on