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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 20, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8 the famous diana panorama interview — a report is highly critical about how the bbc obtained the scoop there were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded. it was explosive — but an inquiry says the bbc reporter was deceitful — and now earl spencer links his sister's death to that interview the irony is that i met him on the sist the irony is that i met him on the 31stof_ the irony is that i met him on the 31st of august, 1995. exactly two years _ 31st of august, 1995. exactly two years later, she died. i do draw a line between the two _ she died. i do draw a line between the two of— she died. i do draw a line between the two of them. martin bashir became famous after the interview — but the bbc is accused of covering up what it knew about his methods
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if you're an organisation that cares about truthful honest journalism if you're an organisation that cares about truthful honestjournalism and proper practice, i think it is a very difficult read. the un secretary general calls for a ceasefire in the conflict between israelis and palestinians in gaza ijust i just received a ijust received a message in the message says victory! elation as hundreds of women are declared eligible for compensation after being given faulty breast implants. and — proposals for the biggest shake—up of the rail network in 25 years, including a new state—owned body to set timetables and ticket prices.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the bbc has issued a full and unconditional apology after a highly critical report into the way it obtained an interview with diana, princess of wales in 1995. it was on that occasion that diana — for the first time — publicly spoke about why her relationship to prince charles had broken down, famously telling reporter martin bashir that "there were three of us in this marrriage". last year, after diana's brother, earl spencer, raised questions about the interview, the bbc ordered an independent inquiry by lord dyson which has been published today. in the 100 plus pages of his report lord dyson says: mr bashir was deceitful in the way he obtained the interview. that the bbc�*s own investigation at the time was woefully ineffective. and that the bbc covered up what it
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actually knew about how the interview was obtained. today, the bbc�*s director general accepted that the bbc�*s behaviour fell far short of what its audiences expect. here's our media editor amol rajan on the murky background to what was regarded as the scoop of the decade — and just to warn you, this report contains flashing images. it was the interview of the century. well, there were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded. watched by almost 23 million people, martin bashir�*s panorama shocked the world. but only now do we know the real story behind the story. in a devastating critique of the bbc, lord dyson has laid bare a catalogue of moral and editorialfailures. he says bashir was devious and dishonest, lying repeatedly to secure the interview and explain his conduct. lord dyson says the bbc investigation into how the interview was obtained was woefully ineffective, and he adds that
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without justification, the bbc fell short of the high standards of integrity and transparency which are its hallmark, including by covering up crucial information about what it knew. princess diana and prince charles were already separated at the time of the interview. early in september 1995, bashir met earl spencer. he showed him fake bank statements to suggest they must have been made he showed him fake bank statements to suggest payments had been made to informants around diana. earl spencer introduced bashir to diana. this constituted a serious breach of the guidelines at the time. the interview aired, but soon journalists at the daily mail group and elsewhere started asking questions. an investigation led by tony hall, later director—general, cleared bashir, though earl spencer was not approached, a big mistake, according to dyson. in august 1996, prince charles and princess diana were divorced. she died a year later.
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and in an interview for panorama which is airing tonight, earl spencer explicitly links the interview with her death. well, the irony is that i met martin bashir on 31 august, 1995, because exactly two years later, she died — and i do draw a line between the two events. this is a young girl in her mid—30s who has lived this extraordinarily turbulent, difficult time in the public eye. she didn't know who to trust — and in the end, when she died two years later, she was without any form of real protection. martin bashir won a bafta for the programme and spoke about it backstage afterwards. i can tell you, being 33 years old and facing up to the fact that actually, you probably will never do another interview like that again in your life, you will never make a programme like that, that is daunting. he left the bbc last week, having been rehired in 2016, and has long argued that diana would have agreed to speak to him without the fake bank statements.
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in a statement, bashir said... lord hall of birkenhead, as the director of bbc news, led the investigation into bashir�*s conduct and was, until last august the bbc�*s director—general, apologised today and said he was wrong to give bashir the benefit of the doubt. his successor was similarly contrite. there are multiple failures for the bbc to reflect on. 25 years ago, but they are still very serious and if you're an organisation that cares about truthful, honestjournalism and proper practice, i think it's a very difficult read. do you think you will ever be queen? no, i don't. why do you think that? i would like to be a queen - of people's hearts, in people's hearts, but i don't see myself
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being queen of this country. tonight the bbc has said that it has no plans to run martin bashir�*s panorama in full again. amol rajan, bbc news. earlier my colleague, george alagiah, asked amol rajan just how damaging lord dyson's report is to the bbc�*s reputation journalism is meant to be the truth business and the fact is, he accuses them of deceit to his sources and colleagues. how that panorama came about, those conducted by lord hall, then director of news, director general. he does notjust say that it was a big mistake not to interview earl spencer in that investigation, he rejects as inadequate the reasons given for that decision and as an indictment, not on lord hall's integrity but is judgment. on the charge of covering
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up judgment. on the charge of covering up the truth it's not totally clear how the decision to keep silent on the facts with the bbc new was made, and there was no evidence to suggest there was licensed by walter hall. that organisation should have come up that organisation should have come up the public was deceived and it was an appalling portrayal of the principle on which was founded. chris blackhurst is a former editor of the independent, and was the firstjournalist to question how the interview had been secured. he gave evidence to lord ido i do not understand why it has taken 25 years. i think all credit to tim, i have had time to read the report. this is an amazing report and i cannot be critical of the lord davidson. it is an incredible report but unfortunately, two of the main players in the report, princess
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diana and steve hewitt who was the producer at the time, martin bashir�*s boss. they are no longer with us. and why it took so long, i do not know. a lot of the people around knew what was going on within the bbc, none of them broke cover. it's almost like there was a vow of silence among some of the people at the top of the bbc. it started with the top of the bbc. it started with the anniversary last year, the 25th anniversary of the interview and documentaries than. and it is now blown up. lord grade is a former controller of bbc1, a former chief executive of channel 4 and later, chairman of the bbc. he assisted lord dyson in this report as a witness. earlier he spoke to the bbc and described lord dyson's report as "shocking". lord dyson is very clear that it was
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a cover—up. first of all, the statements that the bbc made at the time were very economical with what they knew to be the truth. they never checked with earl spencer, whether his version would tally with the various versions of the story that martin bashir had given them. and then, bbc news outlets, never cover the story. he never investigated it. if it had been a channel for lapse, bbcjournalist channel for lapse, bbc journalist would have channel for lapse, bbcjournalist would have been crawling all over it. it is shocking in the cover—up is, it has taken 25 years to get the truth. it raises the question of how many more cover—ups are there in the files of the bbcjournalism? and you can watch tonight's panorama programme on the bashir interview, how it was obtained, and how the bbc responded, on the bbc iplayer — that's �*princess diana, martin bashir and the bbc.�*
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it's almost a case of back to the future — 25 years after the privatisation of the railways ministers are now preparing to take significant parts of it back under state control. a government owned body is going to be responsible for setting timetables and rail fares in england. the transport secretary grant shapps said it would replace an overcomplicated and fragmented system, but did not rule out a rise in fares. here's our consumer affairs correspondent coletta smith. regular commuters here are used to the pluses and problems of travelling by train and it doesn't long to think of a few things that need to be fixed. overcrowding, they are not being enough trains. if it's busy, the rest of the day they are empty. public transport needs to be reasonable so people who need it can afford it. it shouldn't be sucking all the money you earnjust to be able to get around.
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after timetabling disasters and franchise collapses, this centralised system should mean everyone knows where the buck stops when things go wrong. they are going to create a new public body called great british railways to set timetables, prices and sell all tickets in england, bring in a new plexi season ticket that will be cheaper than buying a full—time one, as millions of people face a hybrid return to the office. and they are scrapping franchising. the government will pay companies, rather than letting private companies charge passengers directly. melitta is relieved if it means things will get simpler. there are so many providers and it's such a stress coming to the station on a friday night and choosing what provider to go to to get to birmingham because they have differently priced tickets. so just tapping your card to get on a train and enjoy your evening instead of having to preplan a 15 minute train journey would be amazing. the transport minister says
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he is trying to help passengers navigate the system. which ticket should you buy and from which of the competing ticket machines, for any given route? great british railways will mean that is completely simplified, including four walk up tickets. one thing i want people to do is not to have to get a ticket, butjust use contact us. butjust use contact lists. i understand you are typifying the situation, but passengers want to know if it is going to be cheaper? i can't guarantee what will happen with fares forever. i can say that today is about driving down costs, which is why we are introducing this flexi to get to save people money. new flexi season tickets will be available next month, but below platform level, there are much bigger changes planned. the system will take a different shape in scotland and wales, but in england, franchises will be scrapped. today's proposals are going to change massively the way operators would go about providing railway services. so instead of being rewarded for selling lots of tickets, they will actually be incentivised and rewarded for running services on time, for instance.
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and for melita, knowing that your train will be on time is what matters. colletta smith, bbc news, in wolverhampton. well, for more on this, we can speak to gareth dennis, who is a rail writer and engineer. thank you forjoining us here. what do you make of the review that we heard about earlier and the government taking back control, essentially? i government taking back control, essentially?— essentially? i think for starters, it's worth saying _ essentially? i think for starters, it's worth saying this _ essentially? i think for starters, it's worth saying this report, - essentially? i think for starters, it's worth saying this report, i l it's worth saying this report, i went through it in reasonable detail. it's pretty positive. not as radical as people are making out. it's just a natural step, radical as people are making out. it'sjust a natural step, it radical as people are making out. it's just a natural step, it was already collapsing before and it is in the process of collapsing before the pandemic. the pandemic to smell the pandemic. the pandemic to smell the cotton that shut and so, this next step for government to take in
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the franchises and. it will be more like the transport for london model where you've got a concession and see if the pay a contractor to run the train service and there are still some emissions and some may argue this doesn't actually go far enough stop by the transport for london model, send effective when on such a big system? they say that's going to be on a regional basis. yes, there will be great british railways, some may think it's a slightly unappealing name. great british railways is going to cover the whole country but be broken into regional areas. the whole country but be broken into regionalareas. so, the whole country but be broken into regional areas. so, you'll probably have these areas looking similar in shape to what the current franchise map looks like. on one side of the country and the other. these regions, it looks like they'll be kept broadly in line with that. but
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the passengers, what they will experience is one overall operator and for example, he may be able to tap intojust like and for example, he may be able to tap into just like they do in london, short—term will have 12 or 15, however many it is websites we can go onto to a ticket. so, simplification and the passengers. there are other issues. at the moment, the trains themselves, the actual rolling stones and vehicles of sit on, at the moment, their operating companies, a consortium of banks. that is not changed and that is a major shortcoming because that is a major shortcoming because that is essentially one area where the industry is bleeding a lot of cash and releasing the stuck with the reality is, that you just be owned by the people running the trains. the people running the trends should also on the trains. it's not perfect. also on the trains. it's not perfect-— also on the trains. it's not erfect. . , a , ., perfect. can i 'ust quickly asked, will it involve — perfect. can ijust quickly asked, will it involve the _ perfect. can ijust quickly asked,
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will it involve the same - perfect. can ijust quickly asked, will it involve the same people i will it involve the same people running this new model and how long, realistically, will it take to get it in place?— it in place? never corel is the organisation _ it in place? never corel is the organisation that _ it in place? never corel is the organisation that currently . it in place? never corel is the i organisation that currently owns it in place? never corel is the - organisation that currently owns and manages the infrastructure in britain and wales and scotland as well. this was and the evolution comes in and that body is notjust going to turn into great british railways. to be a organisation that will subsume network rail and to run over railway requires lots of very skilled people and those people don't suddenly appear out of thin air and need don't suddenly appear out of thin airand need all don't suddenly appear out of thin air and need all the skills that are currently running there now. everyone will transfer to great british railways. as far as the timeline, you might see some branding changes within a few months. dobby talked about in the white paper but it's still a huge set of changes, they would take years to filter to two or three more years to filter to two or three more years before we can see everything thatis
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years before we can see everything that is detailed in the white paper actually coming to fruition.- actually coming to fruition. thank ou ve actually coming to fruition. thank you very much — actually coming to fruition. thank you very much for _ actually coming to fruition. thank you very much for that. _ the headlines on bbc news. report highly critical about how the bbc obtained the scoop. the un secretary general calls for an immediate ceasefire in the conflict between israelis and palestinians in gaza plans for the biggest shake—up of the rail network in 25 years, including a new state—owned body to set timetables and ticket prices. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. it's very tight at the leaderboard for day one of the us pga championship. americans keegan bradley and aaron wise and victor of norway have all tied for the lead on
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three and having finished their rounds, mexico's carlos ortiz and corey connors also tied on three and still in the course. just one shot behind them is martin laird start another great day for rory mcelroy. he finished on three over. suffering a heavy loss in the finals to barcelona, achieving a mess of trouble with the title and the league cup already secured. there in action on the fifth round against everton and the goal they had things to this effort here. and, these are the life pictures from the second half. live coverage of the game on the bbc website in the iplayer. lots of ways to watch that one. tottenham striker does not want to end his career with any regrets. speculation over his future continues as a came midway through a six—year deal with the cloud and is yet to lift a trophy with them. the captain has
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gentlemen to agreement. and is formally asking them. speaking with gary neville on the former you manchester city defender ds is been named for the bother of the year by the association. the portugal centre bank receives the honour in his first season after signing last summer. he is the first and when it and steve nichol, 32 years ago. beat his team—mate and harry came. and bowlerjeffrey archer will have a bid to resolve an issue at his right elbow. artie being rolled out against new zealand. a medical
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consultant after suffering pain in his elbow against kent last week. and they have not said when they expect him to return. great britain when another goal that the european swimming championships in budapest and kathleen dors and anna hopped in one of the mixed four by 100 m relay and set a new record to. freire anderson is also taken bronze in the 20 metres freestyle and after suffering a rain haemorrhage three years ago, sir alex ferguson has been speaking about his current health and of the premier of a new documentary about his life and career. the four manchester united manager says he is on the mend and has revealed what is been his most challenging moments. fix, has revealed what is been his most challenging moments. pa. 11th has revealed what is been his most challenging moments.— challenging moments. a lot of restrictions _ challenging moments. a lot of restrictions contrive, - challenging moments. a lot of restrictions contrive, i - challenging moments. a lot of restrictions contrive, i cannotl restrictions contrive, i cannot drive motorways come i cannot drive at night. i think that is changed a bit now. i don't have any, there was
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a lot of restrictions, i can have a glass of wine for nine months. i was worried about that. christmas day with the glass of wine. it's done to make sure you make a full recovery. is to share a bottle of red wine with the managers whenever they came to old trafford. that is it for now. you'll have more of the bbc news channel. there's growing hope of an imminent ceasefire in the conflict between israel and hamas. the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has been meeting his security cabinet to talk about the possibility of a ceasefire in gaza. the bbc has also heard from a senior hamas official who expects a truce in the next 48 hours. however, the air strikes and the firing of rockets have continued. earlier, the un secretary general said a ceasefire was needed immediately. i urge the israeli authorities
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to abide by the laws governing armed conflicts, including the proportionality of force. and i call on them to exercise the maximum restraint in conducting military operations. i likewise urge others and other militant groups to stop the indiscriminate launching of rockets and mortars from highly populated civilian neighbourhoods into civilian population centres in israel, also in clear violation of international humanitarian law. densely populated civilian areas must not be used for military purposes. but above all, what we must — and i'm repeating my appeal — what we must achieve is an immediate cease—fire. our correspondent laura trevelyan is injerusalem. laura, first question really. there are reports, unconfirmed reports that the israeli cabinet has indeed approved a cease—fire.
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that the israeli cabinet has indeed approved a cease-fire.— that the israeli cabinet has indeed approved a cease-fire. certainly in the last few _ approved a cease-fire. certainly in the last few minutes, _ approved a cease-fire. certainly in the last few minutes, israeli - approved a cease-fire. certainly in | the last few minutes, israeli media are reporting that the security cabinet tonight did approve a unilateral truce. just the israeli side. no word on the timing when this would start but we are also hearing tonight from our own colleagues bbc arabic that now the egyptian mediators and it's the egyptians of the ability to speak to both the israelis and hamas, there the middlemen here, they will go and try to get some kind of agreement on timing. they too are prepared to call a cease—fire and they said they would do it from 12 o'clock on friday. and they would all be in place and is just a question of the timing but i will say that the fighting is continuing tonight. sirens of sounded in southern israel as hamas rockets have gone off, flights of been diverted in the airport in tel aviv because it's not
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safe for them to land because of the rockets and there was another israeli bombardment of the gaza strip earlier tonight. as with past conflicts, both sides are fighting up conflicts, both sides are fighting up until the last moment. how much ressure up until the last moment. how much pressure was — up until the last moment. how much pressure was there _ up until the last moment. how much pressure was there or _ up until the last moment. how much pressure was there or is _ up until the last moment. how much pressure was there or is there - up until the last moment. how much pressure was there or is there for - pressure was there or is there for both sites to get to this point? well, considerable pressure because both sides put out there read on the damage that has been done in this conflict. they said there were 2000 israeli air strikes on the gaza strip, but $300 million with of damage has been done and already impoverished areas. the israelis of the 4300 rockets have been fired by hamas. that is more and the entire seven week war in 2014. budget shows you how hamas severely stockpiled rockets. putting immense pressure on prime minister netanyahu. this is
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not the donald trump administration which was a staunch ally. president biden is getting pressure from his left flank of the democratic party that does not like to see suffering of the palestinians and so there's been a lot of diplomatic pressures in capitals around the world in fact in capitals around the world in fact in the question though is, is this just a cease—fire, what about a more substantial agreement and this current conflict began because the palestinians here injerusalem were furious about the possible affection of palestinian families in favour of jewish settlers.— jewish settlers. thank you very much. thousands of women who were victims of the pip breast implant scandal should receive compensation — that's the ruling from a french appeal court. the implants were manufactured in france. more than 500 british women are among thousands around the world who've mounted a ten year campaign forjustice. our health correspondent
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sophie hutchinson has the details. ladies! i've just received a message, and the message says "victory". finally, after a decade—long legal battle for compensation, what looks like a breakthrough for these women affected by faulty pip breast implants. that's fantastic. fresh out of court, a call from their lawyer, who's been fighting the case in paris. you are going to have to drink champagne early in the morning. so we did it! just elated and exhausted because it's been a very long, exhausting journey. you know, ten years. and in and out of courts. and that's been really difficult for women. jan is one of 2,700 women in the case who have been suing the german company tuv rheinland,
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which issued safety certificates for the pip breast implants. today, the court of appeal in paris ruled that the company was negligent and liable for compensation. i'm very happy for all the women i represent. they have been waiting some time for this decision, and have suffered for a long period since the beginning of the case. tuv rheinland says it disputes the liability and is stressing that some women have been struck out of the claim. this abandoned factory in france is where the substandard implants were made. the french manufacturer pip was liquidated in 2010 and its founder sent to prison when it emerged the implants had been filled with cheap silicon gel which was not cleared for human use. many ruptured inside women, causing chronic fatigue, pain and anxiety. pip implants from 20 years ago are still impacting on my life and my health
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and my wellbeing even today. it's estimated up to 400,000 women worldwide have received the illegal implants. colombia is the worst affected, followed by the uk, but the exact numbers may never be known. lawyers for the women believe the ruling today will have implications for hundreds of thousands worldwide who have suffered as a result of the faulty breast implants. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. we can speak now to parm sahota, a clinical negligence lawyer who is acting on behalf of british women involved in this case. thank you very much forjoining us here on bbc news. so, first off your reaction to the news today. we here on bbc news. so, first off your reaction to the news today.- reaction to the news today. we are leased reaction to the news today. we are pleased that _ reaction to the news today. we are pleased that the _ reaction to the news today. we are pleased that the court _ reaction to the news today. we are pleased that the court of _ reaction to the news today. we are pleased that the court of appeals l reaction to the news today. we are | pleased that the court of appeals in paris has handed down this ruling. we have many insipid courts and we are analysing the judgements to see
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how this will affect our cases. —— and —— many separate courts. calling for the system. and -- many separate courts. calling for the system-— for the system. that will only rolon: for the system. that will only prolong the _ for the system. that will only prolong the agony _ for the system. that will only prolong the agony that - for the system. that will only prolong the agony that some | for the system. that will only l prolong the agony that some of for the system. that will only - prolong the agony that some of these women have gone through. thea;r prolong the agony that some of these women have gone through. they have had over a decade _ women have gone through. they have had over a decade of— had over a decade of pain—and—suffering and it is unconscionable for people to keep pushing this matter on and not compensating these women for the faulty products that the put into them. if faulty products that the put into them. , ., .., faulty products that the put into them. i. _, , ., , faulty products that the put into them. , ., , ., them. if you could update us on terms of damages _ them. if you could update us on terms of damages and - them. if you could update us on terms of damages and financial| terms of damages and financial compensation, what sort of figures are we talking about? we compensation, what sort of figures are we talking about?— compensation, what sort of figures are we talking about? we could not rive are we talking about? we could not give specific — are we talking about? we could not give specific figures _ are we talking about? we could not give specific figures at _ are we talking about? we could not give specific figures at the - are we talking about? we could not| give specific figures at the moment, we're still assessing the damages that the ladies have suffered and the interest of their suffering and continue to suffer. many women are
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having to have multiple surgeries, implants removed and toxic chemicals have leaked into their bodies and cause them all sorts of illnesses. some have even had cancerous symptoms turn up. at the moment, it is still a bit too soon for us to give any sort of specific figures as to how much we need to be looking for. ~ ., to how much we need to be looking for. ~ . , ., to how much we need to be looking for. ~ . ,, ~' , to how much we need to be looking for. ~ ., ,, ~' , ., to how much we need to be looking for. ~ ., ~ , ., , for. when are you likely, or is the deadfine for. when are you likely, or is the deadline near _ for. when are you likely, or is the deadline near will _ for. when are you likely, or is the deadline near will it _ for. when are you likely, or is the deadline near will it be _ for. when are you likely, or is the deadline near will it be mounting| for. when are you likely, or is the i deadline near will it be mounting an appeal? we deadline near will it be mounting an a- eal? ~ ., deadline near will it be mounting an a. eal? . ., ., ., deadline near will it be mounting an a- eal? . . . ., . ., appeal? we are waiting to hear from our lawyers — appeal? we are waiting to hear from our lawyers as _ appeal? we are waiting to hear from our lawyers as to _ appeal? we are waiting to hear from our lawyers as to when _ appeal? we are waiting to hear from our lawyers as to when the - appeal? we are waiting to hear from our lawyers as to when the appeal. our lawyers as to when the appeal will be. we are expecting a trial date for our lady sometime later on this year. however, that date is still awaited.— this year. however, that date is still awaited. �* ., ., still awaited. are there more women out that the — still awaited. are there more women out that the troll _ still awaited. are there more women out that the troll aware _ still awaited. are there more women out that the troll aware of _ still awaited. are there more women out that the troll aware of for - out that the troll aware of for watching this very closely and could welcome forward? i’m watching this very closely and could welcome forward?— watching this very closely and could welcome forward? i'm sure there are. we represent — welcome forward? i'm sure there are. we represent over— welcome forward? i'm sure there are. we represent over 500 _
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welcome forward? i'm sure there are. we represent over 500 ladies - welcome forward? i'm sure there are. we represent over 500 ladies in - welcome forward? i'm sure there are. we represent over 500 ladies in the l we represent over 500 ladies in the court here. i believe over 400,000 world wide web suffered from these implants. i'm sure there are many more women out there who have had the implants and perhaps are unaware of what has been going on. thank the implants and perhaps are unaware of what has been going on.— of what has been going on. thank you very much- — let's catch up on the weather. here's louise lear. hello there. we've seen some wet and windy weather arrive from the west today. that's going to continue to be a feature to our weather through the night tonight and into tomorrow as well. this low pressure slowly drifting its way steadily eastwards. the strongest of the winds first thing tomorrow morning will be further south. unseasonably strong winds, with gusts across the channel coasts of 50—60 mph. similar value towards the bristol channel and still some strong winds once again bombarding west wales as well. that's going to drive in some wet weather as the low pressure continues to track slowly eastwards.
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we'll see an improving picture gradually across northern ireland, northwest england and western scotland into the afternoon. blustery winds for all, though, even away from the south, and that's going to make it feel cool and disappointing for this time of year, with top temperatures of 7 to 14 degrees. lighter winds for the start of the weekend, something a little drier and a little brighter. that's it. take care. hello, this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines. the famous diana panorama interview — report is highly critical about how the bbc obtained scooper. there were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded. it was explosive, but an inquiry says the bbc reporter was deceitful, and now earl spencer links his sister's death to that interview.
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the irony is that i met martin bashir on the 31st of august, 1995, because exactly two years later, he she died. and i do draw a line between the two of them. martin bashir became famous after the interview, but the bbc is accused of covering up what it knew about his methods. if you're an organisation that cares about truthful honestjournalism and proper practice, i think it is a very difficult read. the fighting must stop immediately. the fighting must stop immediately. the un _ the fighting must stop immediately. the un secretary—general calls to it and to the fighting in gaza. their reports the israeli cabinet has approved a cease—fire —— there are reports. i approved a cease-fire -- there are re orts. ., approved a cease-fire -- there are re orts. . , . ., reports. i have 'ust received a message _ reports. i have 'ust received a message and — reports. i have just received a message and the _ reports. i have just received a message and the message i reports. i have just received a i message and the message says victory. elation as hundreds of women are declared eligible for compensation after being given faulty breast implants. and proposals for the biggest
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shake—up of the rail network in 25 years, including a new state owned body to set timetables and ticket prices. let's return to our top story, the report into how bbc panorama reporter martin bashir obtained his 1995 interview with diana, princess of wales. the report found that mr bashir had shown fake bank statements to diana's brother, charles spencer, to try to secure an introduction to the princess. it accuses mr bashir of deceitful behaviour and says the bbc fell short of its own high standards for integrity. the bbc has written to prince charles, earl spencer and diana's sons, the duke of sussex and duke of cambridge, to apologise. we heard earlierfrom earl spencer, who's spoke to bbc panorama
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in an interview that was aired this evening. let's remind ourselves of what he had to say. well, the irony is that i met martin bashir on 31 august, 1995, because exactly two years later, she died. and i do draw a line between the two events. it's quite clear from the introduction that i sat in on on 19 september, 1995, everyone was going to be made untrustworthy. and i think that diana did lose trust in really key people. this is a young girl in her mid—30s who has lived this extraordinarily turbulent and difficult time in the public eye. she didn't know who to trust — and in the end, when she died two years later, she was without any form of real protection. that was earl spencer
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ending that clip there, saying that princess diana was left "without any form of real protection". well, our royal correspondent jonny dymond explained in more detail what he may have meant by that. from the meeting that he had with martin bashir, that leads to the interview. the interview leads to divorce. the divorce is really the end of her formal relationship with the royal family. it means the protection that you get by being part of the family, whether it's physical protection and bodyguards, which she herself said she no longer desired, or whether it's the sort of organisational protection you get as being part of the royalfamily, that is then stripped from her. but he's also saying that, essentially, she no longer trusts anybody because of the stories that he says martin bashir spun, and this leads her into a very different life with a very different set of people. it leads her into friendships and relationships — in the end, a relationship with dodi al fayed. she ends up spending the summer with him and she ends up in paris,
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in a speeding car, the car which led directly to her death, as a drunk driver sped away from pursuing photographers. that is the line that he draws between what he sees as a rather fateful meeting between him and martin bashir, where martin bashir gains his trust, an introduction to his sister, princess diana, the interview, and her eventual death. now, that will be disputed by many. and i should say lord dyson makes it very clear in his report that he believes princess diana was going to give an interview to someone at some stage. he goes out of his way to say that, at the same time as being very, very critical of martin bashir and the tactics that he employed. that was jonny dymond. west that wasjonny dymond. west midlands police has launched an investigation after a baby boy was found in a canal in walsall early this afternoon. the infant was spotted by afternoon. the infant was spotted by a passer—by in rough wood country
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park. at around 1pm and has been declared dead. anyone who has information is being urged to contact the force as soon as possible. failures in the national test and trace system are partly responsible for the surge in the indian variant in one of the worst affected parts of the country — that's according to a document seen by bbc news. it's understood a technical problem left several councils unable to identify cases of the variant for three weeks. the number of people who have tested postive for the variant has risen to just under 3,500 this week. our political editor laura kuenssberg has more. to track the disease, you need to test. to manage the spread, you need to monitor the map. as the virus has started to surge again, just yesterday, ministers sounded sure of that. this surveillance system
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spotted the cases in bolton and in blackburn early, and through surge testing and increased vaccinations, we're throwing everything at it there. how good has that surveillance really been? with cases spiking in some parts of the country, like blackburn with darwen in lancashire, there is evidence of a lapse in the system that's meant to defend us from the disease. but a document seen by the bbc prepared by officials in one of the affected areas says... the document then reveals risks were worse because of a sporadic failure in the national test and trace system that provided no details to some local councils from 21st april until 11th may. that's three weeks without an effective test and trace system. in total, 294 positive cases in blackburn alone were not passed on to the local contact tracers,
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nearly 800 across england. it's a failure right at the top, and ifind it astonishing when billions have been spent on this test and trace system, that the basics still aren't working and local areas are battling an increase in the virus. the department of health has admitted that in a small number of contacts, there was a temporary delay in the message being passed on, a technical glitch, if you like, but they say the problem was resolved quickly and everyone was contacted in the end. but the crux of the problem here is the link between the national database and local teams trying to grapple with coronavirus on the ground, and some of them were in the dark at a vital moment without the information they needed. the lesson here is, it's really important to have contact tracing capability at a local level. one of the things we need to think about forfuture pandemics is whether all local authorities should have the ability to
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stand up their own contact tracing capability really quickly so that you're not totally dependent on a national organisation that may be many hundreds of miles away. it's understood the problem this time was down to a software upgrade, now fixed, that shouldn't happen again. but any glitch is a gap in the defences against the disease that we can ill afford. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. ok, let's take a look at the latest government covid figures. there were 2,874 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means that on average, the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 2,301. the latest daily figure for the number of people across the uk in hospital with coronavirus is 894 — that's the lowest since september. seven deaths were reported in the latest 24—hour period —
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that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. and on average in the past week, seven deaths were announced every day. the total number of deaths so far across the uk is 127,701. as for the vaccination programme, the number of people who have had a firstjab is now over 37.2 million, and more than 21.2 million people have had both doses. prince william has received his first covid vaccination. the duke of cambridge, who's 38, revealed he was given his jab on tuesday at the science museum. kensington palace tweeted a picture of the masked duke with his sleeve
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rolled up and a needle in his arm. a message from prince william reads, "on tuesday i received my first dose of the covid—19 vaccine. to all those working on the vaccine roll—out — thank you for everything you've done and continue to do." 0k, ok, wejust ok, we just got some breaking ok, wejust got some breaking news coming in from the middle east, confirming the competent with israel and hamas in gaza, so as it stands, we are hearing, via the reuters news agency, that the israeli cabinet in agency, that the israeli cabinet in a statement has said that the gaza truce was proposed by egypt and will be neutral and unconditional. so we also know that there is no confirmation as yet of the hour, but as it stands, there has been a cease—fire negotiated by egypt that
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is set to come into place, and it's been described that it will be mutual and unconditional. this is a statement that has come into his by the israeli cabinet, in a statement released earlier. israeli media reports are also saying that hamas officials are saying that israel and hamas will enter the cease—fire that's been described as mutual and simultaneous at approximately 2am on friday, so we are waiting on confirmation on that, so that is one of the proposals we are hearing coming from this cease—fire agreement that was put on the table ijy agreement that was put on the table by egypt. agreement that was put on the table by egypt- egypt of agreement that was put on the table by egypt. egypt of course has been involved in negotiating cease—fires between the two parties for years, actually, but certainly this conflict, it has been thing to both israel and to hamas following the
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violence —— it has been speaking to. so what we do know is a cease—fire has been agreed. confirmation, we are awaiting confirmation of when it will be put into place, so that is one positive bit of news concerning the toll that has been taken for both israel and, of course, for those in the gaza strip. so for those in the gaza strip. so for those of you joining us here on bbc news, a reminder that, those of you joining us here on bbc news, a reminderthat, in a statement, the is -- is —— is really cabinet has said that a truce was proposed by egypt, it is agreed, and it will be mutual and unconditional —— the israeli cabinet. this is day 11 of the
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conflict. we are awaiting confirmation of when the cease—fire will be put into place, so hopefully that coming up shortly here on bbc news. stay with us. welcome to our viewers tuning us on the bbc news channel along with bbc produce. my colleague katie —— cat k is with me in washington. we bring with breaking news of a cease—fire which would bring to an end this fourth—round of conflict in the last few years between israel and hamas in gaza.— the last few years between israel and hamas in gaza. let's go straight to jerusalem- _ and hamas in gaza. let's go straight to jerusalem. laura _ and hamas in gaza. let's go straight to jerusalem. laura trevelyan - and hamas in gaza. let's go straight to jerusalem. laura trevelyan is - tojerusalem. laura trevelyan is still there for us. laura, we talking there about the israelis feel they have accomplished in terms of destroying military targets of those tunnels are key to hamas number for the those tunnels are key to hamas numberfor the smuggling those tunnels are key to hamas number for the smuggling of medicines, weapons, in and out of egypt and into the gaza strip. there's also been reports from the israeli side that a number of senior
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hamas leaders were killed during this bombardment. how good is our information on whether that is true and exactly what has been destroyed in terms of hamas's capacity? i in terms of hamas's capacity? i think that it's unclear at this point, — think that it's unclear at this point, to— think that it's unclear at this point, to be honest, but the israeli political— point, to be honest, but the israeli political secured cabinet said in their— political secured cabinet said in their statement tonight that they talked _ their statement tonight that they talked about israel's great achievements in the campaign, some of which _ achievements in the campaign, some of which were unprecedented, and that i_ of which were unprecedented, and that i think— of which were unprecedented, and that i think is a reference to what you're _ that i think is a reference to what you're talking about, the fact that a number— you're talking about, the fact that a number of senior hamas commanders were kitted _ a number of senior hamas commanders were kitted in _ a number of senior hamas commanders were killed in this. remember, the israetis _ were killed in this. remember, the israelis have the ability via the drones— israelis have the ability via the drones which fly above the gaza strip, _ drones which fly above the gaza strip, via — drones which fly above the gaza strip, via the fact that they have a lot strip, via the fact that they have a tot of— strip, via the fact that they have a lot of information under the oslo accords — lot of information under the oslo accords about who lives where in the occupied _ accords about who lives where in the occupied palestinian territories, to know_ occupied palestinian territories, to know where families are, to know where _ know where families are, to know where individuals are who may be linked _ where individuals are who may be linked to— where individuals are who may be linked to hamas, and it seems that they have _ linked to hamas, and it seems that
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they have been stockpiling this information since 2014, waiting for the opportunity to be able to put it into action — the opportunity to be able to put it into action what the israelis call targeted — into action what the israelis call targeted killings of hamas leaders, but of— targeted killings of hamas leaders, but of course one of the things which — but of course one of the things which put _ but of course one of the things which put great pressure on the israetis — which put great pressure on the israetis in — which put great pressure on the israelis in this is that 62 children were _ israelis in this is that 62 children were also— israelis in this is that 62 children were also killed in the gaza strip. that is— were also killed in the gaza strip. that is what the united nations is saying _ that is what the united nations is saying. and the israelis say they try to _ saying. and the israelis say they try to avoid civilian casualties but because — try to avoid civilian casualties but because it — try to avoid civilian casualties but because it is so densely populated, i because it is so densely populated, i know— because it is so densely populated, i know that — because it is so densely populated, i know that from having been there myself _ i know that from having been there myself into thousand nine, after that war— myself into thousand nine, after that war ended, you have over 2 million — that war ended, you have over 2 million people living cheek byjowl, and so _ million people living cheek byjowl, and so for— million people living cheek byjowl, and so for these released to carry out targeted killings, it is very difficult — out targeted killings, it is very difficult for them to avoid civilian casualties— difficult for them to avoid civilian casualties —— for the israelis to. and, _ casualties —— for the israelis to. and. laura, _ casualties —— for the israelis to. and, laura, you're injerusalem, but the reports coming out of gaza not just in from of lives lost but of buildings that have been damaged, roads that have been hit of the infrastructure just of the city itself seems to been taking a real pounding over the last 11 days.
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that's right. one senior un official was saying — that's right. one senior un official was saying to me it's all very want to have _ was saying to me it's all very want to have a — was saying to me it's all very want to have a cease—fire, but what about the rebuilding of gaza? and this is something — the rebuilding of gaza? and this is something the us envoy on the ground has been _ something the us envoy on the ground has been pushing in all of the discussions that he has been having and the _ discussions that he has been having and the americans have floated peopte — and the americans have floated people close to the idea of a marshall plan for gaza, — the idea of a marshall plan for gaza, because her member, there have been now— gaza, because her member, there have been now four four of these intense conflicts _ been now four four of these intense conflicts where rocket fire and air strikes _ conflicts where rocket fire and air strikes have been exchanged, and it is the _ strikes have been exchanged, and it is the gaza — strikes have been exchanged, and it is the gaza strip which is really bearing — is the gaza strip which is really bearing the brunt of that, so you have _ bearing the brunt of that, so you have sewage plants destroyed, you have sewage plants destroyed, you have homes destroyed, you have power plants— have homes destroyed, you have power plants destroyed, lecture 2 being rationed — plants destroyed, lecture 2 being rationed in the gaza strip at the moment, — rationed in the gaza strip at the moment, it is on for four hours and then— moment, it is on for four hours and then offer— moment, it is on for four hours and then offer four hours, so there's now— then offer four hours, so there's now a _ then offer four hours, so there's now a huge _ then offer four hours, so there's now a huge need for you rebuilding and that— now a huge need for you rebuilding and that is— now a huge need for you rebuilding and that is something the europeans and that is something the europeans and the _ and that is something the europeans and the americans are trying to focus _ and the americans are trying to focus on — and the americans are trying to focus on as— and the americans are trying to focus on as the next stage of this. and, _ focus on as the next stage of this. and. laura, — focus on as the next stage of this. and, laura, did bring a life out of gaza a few moments ago. it is difficult to see much there. i
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wonder if that is the point. you can see, this is a live shot into gaza. it is very difficult to tell there. part of that reason is that there is a limited electricity supply, and really i want to look at some of the israeli aims. there are two different things i wonder in gaza. there is the hamas infrastructure, which it dominated, but there is also hamas's domination of gaza itself. the support for hamas both as a political and militant movement - i as a political and militant movement — i wonder if israel has damaged its infrastructure but not at some of gaza. ., . ~' infrastructure but not at some of gaza. ., ., ,, ., , , gaza. you make a very interesting oint, gaza. you make a very interesting point. because — gaza. you make a very interesting point, because the _ gaza. you make a very interesting point, because the palestinians i gaza. you make a very interesting | point, because the palestinians do have rivat— point, because the palestinians do have rival leaders, as it were, in the west— have rival leaders, as it were, in the west bank, in the gaza strip, you have — the west bank, in the gaza strip, you have hamas, and interestingly etections _ you have hamas, and interestingly elections were cancelled in the west bank, _ elections were cancelled in the west bank. and _ elections were cancelled in the west bank, and there's some talk of the reason _ bank, and there's some talk of the reason they— bank, and there's some talk of the reason they were cancelled is
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perhaps — reason they were cancelled is perhaps because hamas were going to do rather— perhaps because hamas were going to do rather well and perhaps even outftank — do rather well and perhaps even outflank them, so there are some people _ outflank them, so there are some people you — outflank them, so there are some people you talk to here injerusalem who say— people you talk to here injerusalem who say that, really, what prime minister— who say that, really, what prime minister benjamin netanyahu wants to do is to— minister benjamin netanyahu wants to do is to deal with directly with hamas — do is to deal with directly with hamas if— do is to deal with directly with hamas. if hamas are going to ultimately win elections, in the west— ultimately win elections, in the west bank as well as ruling gaza, that they— west bank as well as ruling gaza, that they are the adversary, they are the _ that they are the adversary, they are the one to deal with, and so whether— are the one to deal with, and so whether this whole conflict has brought — whether this whole conflict has brought that a little closer is a good — brought that a little closer is a good question. also, has it strengthened the position of benjamin netanyahu? the opposition are supposed to be trying to form a coalition— are supposed to be trying to form a coalition to — are supposed to be trying to form a coalition to take, to see if they can form — coalition to take, to see if they can form a _ coalition to take, to see if they can form a government against him, because _ can form a government against him, because of— can form a government against him, because of yet more inconclusive is reatty _ because of yet more inconclusive is really elections, but it looks like his place — really elections, but it looks like his place has been helped by this campaign, he looks like the strong man: _ campaign, he looks like the strong man. so— campaign, he looks like the strong man. so he — campaign, he looks like the strong man, so he once again may emerge tooking _ man, so he once again may emerge looking stronger than when he went into it _ looking stronger than when he went into it. �* , looking stronger than when he went into it. 3 , looking stronger than when he went into it. �*, , ., ., ., ., into it. let's pause on that idea of the israeli —
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into it. let's pause on that idea of the israeli coalition _ into it. let's pause on that idea of the israeli coalition negotiations. | the israeli coalition negotiations. as you said they had been going ahead also fascinatingly, the opposition had been asked by the president to form a government. that process began, then this round of conflicts started, and now mr netanyahu comes out of it potentially being up to form a new government? has all that coalition arithmetic rearranged itself? it is arithmetic rearranged itself? it is ve hard arithmetic rearranged itself? it is very hard for the _ arithmetic rearranged itself? it is very hard for the opposition to try to carry— very hard for the opposition to try to carry out — very hard for the opposition to try to carry out this coalition negotiations during this 11 days in which _ negotiations during this 11 days in which israelis have found themselves to be under— which israelis have found themselves to be under siege as never before by hamas— to be under siege as never before by hamas rockets, and the fact that the israeti _ hamas rockets, and the fact that the israeli military are saying they are so successful in achieving some of their— so successful in achieving some of their objectives but that's certainly the spin the israelis are putting _ certainly the spin the israelis are putting on— certainly the spin the israelis are putting on it, all of that stands to make _ putting on it, all of that stands to make benjamin netanyahu look more powerful— make benjamin netanyahu look more powerful and so he has been the father— powerful and so he has been the father of— powerful and so he has been the father of israel and protected peopte — father of israel and protected people at this hour of need, so yes, the way— people at this hour of need, so yes, the way this— people at this hour of need, so yes, the way this has scrambled the blue co. calculations on both sides is very— co. calculations on both sides is very interesting. gk, co. calculations on both sides is very interesting.— co. calculations on both sides is ve interestine. ., .,
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very interesting. ok, for the moment of it there in — very interesting. ok, for the moment of it there in jerusalem, _ very interesting. ok, for the moment of it there in jerusalem, thank - very interesting. ok, for the moment of it there in jerusalem, thank you. i of it there injerusalem, thank you. joining us now is the senior consultant research fellow at chatham house. make you very much forjoining us. just a reaction to this cease—fire and how we got to it? this cease-fire and how we got to it? ,., ., , ., ., it? good evening. first of all, it is aood it? good evening. first of all, it is good news. _ it? good evening. first of all, it is good news, because - it? good evening. first of all, it is good news, because it - it? good evening. first of all, it is good news, because it is - it? good evening. first of all, it - is good news, because it is stopping the killing. — is good news, because it is stopping the killing, the fighting of 11 days — the killing, the fighting of11 days in— the killing, the fighting of 11 days. in 214, it was 50 days. and many— days. in 214, it was 50 days. and many more — days. in 214, it was 50 days. and many more casualties, so if in this sense _ many more casualties, so if in this sense it _ many more casualties, so if in this sense it stops that after a shorter time _ sense it stops that after a shorter time with— sense it stops that after a shorter time with less casualties. however, what we _ time with less casualties. however, what we need to think, how did we -et what we need to think, how did we get to— what we need to think, how did we get to the — what we need to think, how did we get to the situation of another round — get to the situation of another round of— get to the situation of another round of violence at this level? and how do— round of violence at this level? and how do we — round of violence at this level? and how do we take it from here that it will not _ how do we take it from here that it will not happen again? start dealing with the _ will not happen again? start dealing with the underlying issues that periodically both sides find themselves in exactly the same situation — themselves in exactly the same situation for sub it is like
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groundhog day. you can always predict — groundhog day. you can always predict it. — groundhog day. you can always predict it, including the cease—fire. predict it, including the cease-fire.— predict it, including the cease-fire. ~ . v ' cease-fire. what's different in the re . ion cease-fire. what's different in the region today _ cease-fire. what's different in the region today compared _ cease-fire. what's different in the region today compared to - cease-fire. what's different in the region today compared to 12 - cease-fire. what's different in the region today compared to 12 days| region today compared to 12 days ago, before the fighting started? in other words, what has this 11 day period of violence changed? if it has changed, it has changed to the west. — it has changed, it has changed to the west, because there is more anger. _ the west, because there is more anger, both sides expose their vulnerabilities, also their strengths and what they can conflict on one _ strengths and what they can conflict on one another. on one hamas, strengths and what they can conflict on one hamas, as faras strengths and what they can conflict on one hamas, as far as tel aviv, jerusalem. — on one hamas, as far as tel aviv, jerusalem, israel showed once again its superiority militarily, but at the end — its superiority militarily, but at the end of— its superiority militarily, but at the end of the day, both of them were _ the end of the day, both of them were so— the end of the day, both of them were so honourable to each other's military— were so honourable to each other's military capability, so tonight —— so vulnerable to each other. they
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achieve _ so vulnerable to each other. they achieve their objective, but what is the objective? people have learned that at— the objective? people have learned that at any— the objective? people have learned that at any given time, their life can be— that at any given time, their life can be disrupted or even lost. what's — can be disrupted or even lost. what's your take on the role played here as a mediator by the egyptian government? is here as a mediator by the egyptian government?— government? is almost could be expected- _ government? is almost could be expected. this _ government? is almost could be expected. this is _ government? is almost could be expected. this is what _ government? is almost could be| expected. this is what happened government? is almost could be i expected. this is what happened in the past _ expected. this is what happened in the past two for some egypt as —— for the _ the past two for some egypt as —— for the tast— the past two for some egypt as —— for the last two. israel come over than _ for the last two. israel come over than any— for the last two. israel come over than any other country... it has gaza _ than any other country... it has gaza on— than any other country... it has gaza on its— than any other country... it has gaza on its border, so what happened in gaza _ gaza on its border, so what happened in gaza was— gaza on its border, so what happened in gaza was affecting egypt, affecting sinai, even beyond, bearing — affecting sinai, even beyond, bearing in mind hamas is a offshoot of the _ bearing in mind hamas is a offshoot of the muslim brotherhood. so egypt has an— of the muslim brotherhood. so egypt has an interest. also has interest on the _ has an interest. also has interest on the site — has an interest. also has interest on the site more than others, and i think— on the site more than others, and i think in— on the site more than others, and i think in the — on the site more than others, and i think in the longer term, i think everyone — think in the longer term, i think everyone is— think in the longer term, i think everyone is looking for the united states— everyone is looking for the united states as — everyone is looking for the united states as the broker. maybe we should —
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states as the broker. maybe we should change the disk in this sense and start— should change the disk in this sense and start thinking, especially after the signing of the oslo accords, to look the signing of the oslo accords, to took at — the signing of the oslo accords, to took at as— the signing of the oslo accords, to look at... as brokers, not only in cease-fires — look at... as brokers, not only in cease—fires but also in all comprehensive agreements. and cease-fires but also in all comprehensive agreements. and your thou . hts on comprehensive agreements. and your thoughts on the _ comprehensive agreements. and your thoughts on the role _ comprehensive agreements. and your thoughts on the role played _ comprehensive agreements. and your thoughts on the role played by - comprehensive agreements. and your thoughts on the role played by the - thoughts on the role played by the biden administration? mr biden had said he expected a significant de—escalation for study has started. he got the de—escalation, but again if the _ he got the de—escalation, but again if the situation, to go back to blockades, that's not much of de—escalation. we have to look at what _ de—escalation. we have to look at what is _ de—escalation. we have to look at what is causing the radicalisation pub and — what is causing the radicalisation pub and only dealing with the blockade self and the palestinian society. — blockade self and the palestinian society, the election and to changem _ society, the election and to change... to reflect whether the direction — change... to reflect whether the direction the society is going helps
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the security or exactly the opposite. and the united states and europe _ opposite. and the united states and europe should play a more proactive role europe should play a more proactive rote in _ europe should play a more proactive rote in the _ europe should play a more proactive role in the positive role to de—escalate any sense of dealing with the — de—escalate any sense of dealing with the root causes, not only stopping — with the root causes, not only stopping the fighting. another thing that's has change _ stopping the fighting. another thing that's has change that _ stopping the fighting. another thing that's has change that has - stopping the fighting. another thing that's has change that has been - stopping the fighting. another thing that's has change that has been an. that's has change that has been an uptick in violence and tension between everett israelis and israeli jews and some parts of the country stopped —— arab israelis. does that persist, the tension, and doesn't hit at the cohesion of the country? no doubt about it for so this was bubbling — no doubt about it for so this was bubbling under the surface and reached — bubbling under the surface and reached a boiling point, nothing is a one _ reached a boiling point, nothing is a one of— reached a boiling point, nothing is a one of the so—called successes by hamas. _ a one of the so—called successes by hamas. to — a one of the so—called successes by hamas, to create this new equation between _ hamas, to create this new equation between what —— and i think this is. also with _ between what —— and i think this is. also with the — between what —— and i think this is. also with the palestinian israelis. citizens— also with the palestinian israelis. gitizens of— also with the palestinian israelis. citizens of israel, and this was bubbling — citizens of israel, and this was bubbling for a while. the disk of
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arabs— bubbling for a while. the disk of arabs in— bubbling for a while. the disk of arabs in israel, not including in the government, it is only recently different— the government, it is only recently different parties it is out of desperation, not ideology, to include — desperation, not ideology, to include these parties in this government, but this should be the norm _ government, but this should be the norm the — government, but this should be the norm. the 20% minority of israel are playing _ norm. the 20% minority of israel are playing their — norm. the 20% minority of israel are playing their part as equal citizens in any— playing their part as equal citizens in any watk— playing their part as equal citizens in any walk of life, and i think this— in any walk of life, and i think this is— in any walk of life, and i think this is a — in any walk of life, and i think this is a lesson for the jewish society— this is a lesson for the jewish society to _ this is a lesson for the jewish society to learn, that it will not bem _ society to learn, that it will not bem feel— society to learn, that it will not be... feel equaland part of society to learn, that it will not be... feel equal and part of the country— be... feel equal and part of the country come in might and in tensions— country come in might and in tensions and even worse. thank you ve much tensions and even worse. thank you very much for— tensions and even worse. thank you very much forjoining _ tensions and even worse. thank you very much forjoining us _ tensions and even worse. thank you very much forjoining us they're - very much forjoining us they're from chatham house in london. thank you so much. just to recap, an egyptian brokered cease—fire is
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going to come into effect between gaza and israel at 2am local time. that is in about two hours' time. we will have more coverage. iamjames i am james reynolds in i amjames reynolds in london. egypt has brokered a cease—fire between israel and hamas in gaza. in three hours' time. you're looking at a live shot of gaza city where for the last 11 days in a row, there has been fighting between hamas, which was the territory and neighbouring israel. professor. thank you so much for joining us. your reaction to the news of the cease—fire. i joining us. your reaction to the news of the cease-fire.- joining us. your reaction to the news of the cease-fire. i am very ha - news of the cease-fire. i am very happy about _ news of the cease-fire. i am very happy about the _ news of the cease-fire. i am very
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happy about the cease-fire. - news of the cease-fire. i am very happy about the cease-fire. i - news of the cease-fire. i am very i happy about the cease-fire. i think

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