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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 14, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm kasia madera, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a fifth day of fighting — israel intensifies its attack on gaza, as palestinian militants continue their rocket assaults on israel a warning from the world health organisation that year two of the covid pandemic is on track to be far deadlier than the first. congressional republicans vote in an ardent trump supporter elyse stefanik to replace liz cheney as their third ranking party leader. we are fighting on behalf of hard—working americans. i also want to thank president trump for his support. he is a critical part of a republican team.
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and the meteorite that landed outside a family home in gloucestershire, about to go on public display at london's natural history museum. the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has warned that israel's biggest offensive against hamas in gaza in years is not over yet. palestinians in northern gaza have been fleeing the israeli bombardment. rockets were fired by militants towards israel from the territory for a fifth day. at least 122 people in gaza have been killed, and nine have died in israel since fighting began on monday. our middle east editor, jeremy bowen reports now from jerusalem. it's ugly and angry on the streets and towns shared byjews and arabs in israel.
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they have the same id papers and not much else in common. police broke down the door of a family in haifa. they deny accusations their sons were attacking jews. the police say their officers behaved correctly. the father, the imam of a mosque, and his two sons were arrested for attacking police officers. the woman who filmed this said they're scared not ofjews, but of racist police. a local rabbi visited, she said, to apologise. explosions. in gaza, a building housing the hamas bank was hit. families went back to check what was left after a big israeli operation to destroy a tunnel complex.
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this man's home was gone. he said there was no warning when the explosions began. both his father's feet were blown off, his aunt lost an eye. around 2 million people live in gaza. half of them are children. far inland on the west bank, it was a day of protests, and more palestinians were killed. in the occupied territories and in israel, events this week have exposed once again the mutual hatred and fear that are the essence of this conflict. duesin dues injerusalem fired live bullets or palestinians who is really reports they threw stones and fireworks. this was where attempts to evict palestinians from their homes help start the escalation to war. injordan, the country next door, security forces kept protesters back from the frontier.
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palestinians make up more than half thejordanian population, mostly refugees from past wars not permitted to return by israel. history never dies in this conflict. people do. jeremy bowen, bbc news, jerusalem. we spoke to the bbc�*s middle east editorjeremy bowen about his take on the situation and whether an escalation was likely. the operation overnight was an escalation and there were two question marks, sending missiles into israel and no one really knows what their stockpile is that they have used a lot and the way that they bypass when they can is is really antimissile system is sending a whole lot of them all at once. so, yeah, if ever there was a moment for
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diplomacy and they are attempting to start a process up, then it is now. because from here, the only way is down without it. the issues have been building up for a lot of years. israelis who are, israelis were arabs who have israeli documentations by palestinian origin have always felt like second—class citizens and as a result of that, there's a lot of, and at the same time, there are right wing, far right wing extreme nationalism and the jewish right wing extreme nationalism and thejewish community right wing extreme nationalism and the jewish community that is something that has been pushed more into the public eye and into the mainstream and maybe a little bit more respectable for some people because of the way the prime minister has been more than flirting with them for their support. the us envoy hady amr has
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arrived in israel for talks on de—escalation. the state department deputy assistant secretary for israeli and palestinian affairs touched down at ben gurion airport earlier. the biden administration on friday reiterated that it was working toward de—escalation of the israeli—palestinian conflict and a lasting peace in gaza. for more on the biden administration's response to this latest violence i've been speaking to martin indyk, a former us special envoy for middle east peace. ido i do think that they were surprised that the way things got out of hand injerusalem. but that the way things got out of hand in jerusalem. but then, that the way things got out of hand injerusalem. but then, everybody was. the events there took basically everybody by surprise i don't think it's commonly known that thejoe biden administration did weigh in with prime minister netanyahu and the march into the old city, stop the march into the old city, stop the evictions and essentially got
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the evictions and essentially got the police to back off. but it was too little too late. and now, i think with them on the ground there, they're in the position to get in with the egyptians flown in, to see whether or not it is possible now to get a cease—fire in place. i have the sense that hamas may be ready for that and i don't see that the israelis have objectives that they can achieve beyond what they've already done that make a lot of sense. to go in on the ground, gaza is a very complicated thing for prime minister netanyahu and it can only lead to more casualties on the palestinian side more criticism of israel, military casualties, and he is looking at a fifth election and so i don't think he is going to want to go into an election with that situation. i'm seeing both sides of this essentially trying to achieve
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their limited objectives and now, it is possible, possible to get them to back down and agreed to the cease—fire. back down and agreed to the cease-fire.— back down and agreed to the cease-fire. �* . ., ~ ., cease-fire. and we are talking about the usual scenario _ cease-fire. and we are talking about the usual scenario that _ cease-fire. and we are talking about the usual scenario that we _ cease-fire. and we are talking about the usual scenario that we have - cease-fire. and we are talking about the usual scenario that we have with | the usual scenario that we have with this, that this will be managed in the escalated, but the ultimate resolution of this is not achievable?— resolution of this is not achievable? , ., , resolution of this is not achievable? , . , ., , achievable? yes, that is the tragedy ofthe achievable? yes, that is the tragedy of the israeli-palestinian _ achievable? yes, that is the tragedy of the israeli-palestinian conflict. i of the israeli—palestinian conflict. it's not as if there have been many efforts under the last 35 years to try to resolve the conflict. i've been involved in some of those efforts myself. but they've all come up efforts myself. but they've all come up short in terms of ending the conflict. what has worked in the past and the reason why you have palestinian control that is not only controlling 90% of the palestinians in the west bank, but the palestinian authority, is because of
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an incremental approach and may not be possible to get back to that kind of incremental approach. where you don't raise expectations that the conflict is going to be ended because i think that is now a bridge way too far. because i think that is now a bridge way too far-— way too far. former us envoy for eace way too far. former us envoy for peace giving _ way too far. former us envoy for peace giving gives _ way too far. former us envoy for peace giving gives this _ way too far. former us envoy for i peace giving gives this perspective. more on that story. the head of the world health organization has urged rich countries to reconsider plans to vaccinate children and instead donate jabs to the covax scheme for poorer countries. ted also warned that the second year of the coronavirus pandemic is set to be far deadlier than the first. he spoke earlier in geneva. i understand why some countries want to vaccinate their children but right now, i urge them to reconsider
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at donate vaccines to covax. in poor countries there is not enough to immunise health workers. for more on the reasons behind the who warning here's martin mckee from the london school of hygiene & tropical medicine. if you look at what is been happening in india, you see why he is saying it in the same thing happening in nepal and neighbouring countries in asia. there's still a lot of potential for spread in africa that we have not seen yet. but there's a real risk there. as long as this virus continues to circulate, it will continue to mutate and that is the real worry. until we can get levels down everywhere, that means getting everyone vaccinated and as doctor ted ross said, such as the vaccination, it's a combination of the vaccination in the public health measures. then we can be more
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optimistic, but we're still far away from that. �* _, . , optimistic, but we're still far away from that. �* . , ., from that. and the concept that the coronavirus — from that. and the concept that the coronavirus is _ from that. and the concept that the coronavirus is somewhere, - from that. and the concept that the coronavirus is somewhere, it - from that. and the concept that the coronavirus is somewhere, it is - coronavirus is somewhere, it is everywhere. your priority in that case of the international community is to do what?— is to do what? priority is to get as many people _ is to do what? priority is to get as many people vaccinated _ is to do what? priority is to get as many people vaccinated as - is to do what? priority is to get as i many people vaccinated as possible while keeping it under control with the continuation of public health measures which we can do now and everywhere, of course.— measures which we can do now and everywhere, of course. when it comes to the countries _ everywhere, of course. when it comes to the countries that _ everywhere, of course. when it comes to the countries that the _ everywhere, of course. when it comes to the countries that the uk _ to the countries that the uk included, they're doing well there and keeping people vaccinated. what should they be doing with their doses and vaccines? should they be giving them two covax and should they be giving to those communities who perhaps do not have as much? with the new variants that are circulating, we have a number of about over three anyway. that means the proportion of the population that have to be immunised to suppress transmission need to be very high. preps 85%. in western
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countries at the minute, we are not largely vaccinating children who make up about 20% of the population, some were not going to get to that. that is one thing just to bear in mind. the real issue is that we just need an awful lot more vaccine and there are all sorts of issue around that. paying for it in production among other things. there are issues around intellectual property, not just the vaccines themselves, but due to the vexing capacity. we need to think very carefully and clearly about how we can strengthen health systems to make sure the vaccines can be distributed. i think if we look at what happened to hiv many years ago, there was a focus on making sure the drugs were affordable. so they could actually be obtained in the country that we overlooked the need for the strengthening of the health systems to make sure that people could get them. so, there are a lot of things that we need to take account of here. we also need to take account of some countries reports today like
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from new guinea for example, where the prime minister got vaccinated but even there, it was clearly a lot of vaccine hesitancy. things like that need to be overcome and so no single measure, no single magic bullet, we need to do a lot of things altogether. the bullet, we need to do a lot of things altogether.— bullet, we need to do a lot of things altogether. the school of h aiene things altogether. the school of hygiene and _ things altogether. the school of hygiene and medicine _ things altogether. the school of hygiene and medicine with - things altogether. the school of hygiene and medicine with his l hygiene and medicine with his perspective, the who has been saying. here in the uk, the prime minister borisjohnson has said that the new indian variant of coronavirus could pose a serious disruption, to the progress made in tackling the virus. cases of the indian variant have more than doubled in a week, with over 1300 cases, mostly in england. here's our medical editor fergus walsh. this is one way of trying to keep a lid on the indian variant — surge testing in formby, merseyside, one of 15 areas in england, including parts of the north west
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and london, where residents are being encouraged to come forward for a pcr test. and this is another — immunisation in bolton, which now has the highest rate of coronavirus in the uk and where there's a huge demand for vaccination. personally, the reason for me getting the vaccine is because i live with elderly people and i don't obviously want to have them have less worries. the prime minister said the rise in the indian variant meant there were no guarantees about the final lifting of restrictions in england. i have to level with you that this new variant could pose a serious disruption to our progress and could make it more difficult to move to step four injune. and i must stress that we will do whatever it takes to keep the public safe. the indian variant, b.i6i7.2, was first identified here less than a month ago, linked to travel from india before it was put on the red list for hotel quarantine. cases have more than doubled
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in a week to over 1300, but that will inevitably be out of date because it takes time to sequence samples. it now accounts for around 10% of coronavirus cases in the uk, but we're in a far better place than we were just a few months ago. back at the peak injanuary, there were 1.25 million people infected with coronavirus in the uk. that's one in 50 people. the latest survey from the office for national statistics suggests that's down to around 47,000, or one in around 11100 people. government scientists say the indian variant is definitely more traceable than other strains in the uk, but it's not clear by how much. crucially, though, it looks like vaccines are still effective against it. pubs, restaurants and museums
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will be welcoming people back indoors from monday, but questions remain about whether the indian variant could delay the final lifting of restrictions in england in latejune. the race between the vaccine and the virus continues. fergus walsh, bbc news. we will be stay with us on bbc world news, still to come: a meteorite which caused quite a commotion earlier this year, goes on display at london's natural history museum. the pope was shot, the pope will live. that's the essence of the appalling news from rome this afternoon that, as an italian television commentator put it, terrorism had come to the vatican. the man they call the butcher of lyon, klaus barbie, went on trial today in the french town where he was the gestapo chief
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in the second world war. winnie mandela never looked like a woman just sentenced to six years injail. the judge told mrs mandela there was no indication she felt even the slightest remorse. the chinese government has called for an all—out - effort to help the victimsl of a powerful earthquake. the worst to hit the i country for 30 years. the computer deep blue has tonight triumphed over the world chess champion garry kasparov. it's the first time a machine has defeated a reigning world champion in a classical chess match. america's first legal same—sex marriages have been taking place in massachusetts. god bless america! cheering. this is bbc news, our main headline this hour. as israeli strikes against targets in gaza continue, prime minister benjamin netanyahu warns the offensive against hamas is not over yet.
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house republicans in the us have chosen a successor to liz cheney — the daughter of a former vice president, who was unceremonoiusly dumped as party chair earlier this week. they've appointed representative elyse stefanik from new york, who has consistently backed the false claim by donald trump's supporters that the 2020 election was stolen. our washington correspondent gary 0 donoghue explained more about why she was elected. it is the choice of the leadership of the party in congress wanted. she had the backing of her other key members of that leadership team and she did face a challenge from much more conservative candidate, from the freedom caucus, people in congress, but that did not succeed. the irony of her appointment is that she's actually, she was considered a liberal. she comes from districts of
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the north of new york that voted twice for president obama and twice for donald trump. so, she is not flipping territory. in recent times, she has been very vocal about her opposition to the impeachment trials of donald trump has faced and she has endorsed his claims about the election, including one of those voting against the ratification of the pennsylvania's declarations in congress before the attacks on january six. in that sense, she is very much loyal to the whole donald trump project. in the us — there is a national conversation about the role of policing. this month will mark the one year anniversary of the death of george floyd. presidentjoe biden has called on congress to pass major police reform in his memory. one police department that has benefitted from federal oversight in newark, newjersey. but will the changes last? larry madowo has the story.
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stop police brutality in the black community. the stop police brutality in the black community-— community. the college is this monday and — community. the college is this monday and it _ community. the college is this monday and it has _ community. the college is this monday and it has been - community. the college is this monday and it has been here l community. the college is this - monday and it has been here every week for five years.— week for five years. black people are bein: week for five years. black people are being cured _ week for five years. black people are being cured like _ week for five years. black people are being cured like animals - week for five years. black people are being cured like animals in i week for five years. black people l are being cured like animals in the streets here in united states of america. . ., . america. the conflict with the olice america. the conflict with the police dates _ america. the conflict with the police dates back _ america. the conflict with the police dates back to _ america. the conflict with the police dates back to the - america. the conflict with the police dates back to the riots| america. the conflict with the i police dates back to the riots of 1967 and even before that. in 2010, policing was so broken, an investigation revealed many problematic patterns and practices. i feel like they've got a personal vendetta — i feel like they've got a personal vendetta against black people. the vendetta against black people. tue: department vendetta against black people. tte: department ofjustice enters what is known as the consent decree with newark. federal oversight of the police with an independent monitor to track progress. in 2020, newark police did not fire a single shot. people seem to trust the police a little more now.— people seem to trust the police a little more now. , ., ~ ., , little more now. everyone knows each other. the police _ little more now. everyone knows each other. the police live _ little more now. everyone knows each other. the police live there _ little more now. everyone knows each other. the police live there and - little more now. everyone knows each other. the police live there and we i other. the police live there and we know where the police live at and
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they're like i treat you badly. thea; they're like i treat you badly. they were elected _ they're like i treat you badly. they were elected on _ they're like i treat you badly. they were elected on the _ they're like i treat you badly. they were elected on the police reform platform and have supported the implementation of the consent decree over the last five years. dire implementation of the consent decree over the last five years.— over the last five years. are crimes the lowest — over the last five years. are crimes the lowest it's _ over the last five years. are crimes the lowest it's been _ over the last five years. are crimes the lowest it's been for— over the last five years. are crimes the lowest it's been for the - over the last five years. are crimes the lowest it's been for the past i over the last five years. are crimesj the lowest it's been for the past 50 years and the interesting thing about it is while crime is decreasing, so are arrests. which proves to me that there is no causal relationship between arresting people and reduction of crime. hoop people and reduction of crime. how exensive people and reduction of crime. how expensive is — people and reduction of crime. how expensive is expanding this? it's i expensive is expanding this? it's too expensive is expanding this? tt�*s too expensive. it's incredibly expensive. i mean, we pay may be over $2 million a year. tt’s expensive. i mean, we pay may be over $2 million a year.— over $2 million a year. it's about costs and _ over $2 million a year. it's about costs and it's — over $2 million a year. it's about costs and it's also _ over $2 million a year. it's about costs and it's also about - over $2 million a year. it's about costs and it's also about culture. part of the reason why it is so hard to reform policing in america is the so—called blue wall of silence. an unofficial code for law enforcement officers protect each other. it is no different here in newark. t5
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officers protect each other. it is no different here in newark. is like an hinu no different here in newark. is like anything else. _ no different here in newark. is like anything else. no _ no different here in newark. is like anything else, no one _ no different here in newark. is like anything else, no one likes - no different here in newark. is like anything else, no one likes to - no different here in newark. is like anything else, no one likes to be l anything else, no one likes to be looked _ anything else, no one likes to be looked at — anything else, no one likes to be looked at her watched or investigated.— looked at her watched or investigated. looked at her watched or investiuated. ~ ., ~' ._ ., investigated. working with the mayor investigated. working with the mayor in over hauling _ investigated. working with the mayor in over hauling police _ investigated. working with the mayor in over hauling police work _ investigated. working with the mayor in over hauling police work as - investigated. working with the mayor in over hauling police work as the - in over hauling police work as the safety director. he has just retired after 35 years as a policeman. t after 35 years as a policeman. i think our de—escalation in the use of force _ think our de—escalation in the use of force and — think our de—escalation in the use of force and our scrutiny that officers — of force and our scrutiny that officers have we look at body worn cameras _ officers have we look at body worn cameras every day. and i think it all helped — cameras every day. and i think it all helped and came together and it helped _ all helped and came together and it helped us — all helped and came together and it heled us. ., . helped us. police department across america are — helped us. police department across america are watching _ helped us. police department across america are watching federal- america are watching federal investigations in minneapolis and louisville, to see if they lead to dissent that will make them find a new way to protect and serve. earlier this year skywatchers were treated to an impromptu display as a meteorite lit up the night above the english town of winchcombe. well, now it's part of a different kind of display, this time at the natural history museum in london. as our science correspondent rebecca morelle explains — this could help reveal how life
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began on earth. blazing across the night sky at 50,000 kilometres an hour, the dramatic arrival of the uk space rock, and some of it ended up here, burnt into the wilcock family's driveway in winchcombe, gloucestershire. now, though, the family has a chance to see some of the meteorite again. one piece is on show alongside the natural history museum's most prized minerals. it's mind blowing! it's in the natural history museum in london! i can't describe it. can't describe it. and now, we've got lots of people who'll be able to come and see it, so it's just wonderful. why did it land on our drive, you know? it could have landed a few metres away and landed in the hedge and we would never have seen it. these two meteorites, in conjunction, allow us these two meteorites, i in conjunction, allow us to look inside a planet... the fragments of the winchcombe meteorite are exceptionally rare. they're from something called a carbonaceous chondrite. winchcombe is very special i because it is one of the most pristine materials that we have available on earth to study. -
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and the thing that's really good about this particular case - is that we saw it fall, i and so we can use that fireball to kind of track back the trajectory, . work out where in the solar system it came from. - this space rock could shed light on our very beginnings. it can be traced back to the asteroid belt — which sits between mars and jupiter — and it's like a 4.6 billion—year—old time capsule because it contains some of the oldest material in our solar system. the winchcombe meteorite could also tell us about the origins of life on earth. the rock contains water and organic molecules, which are biological building blocks. one idea is that an ancient impact delivered these essential ingredients, kick—starting life on our planet. pieces of the meteorite are being sent to scientists all around the world. x—ray studies here will reveal exactly what it's made of. it's a really important tool for understanding how we ended up on with an earth like we have,
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but it's also about preserving that materialfor the next ten, 20, 100 years when, you know, there's another generation of researchers who've got new scientific questions, or they've got better analytical techniques than we have. it was a flush of luck that brought this space rock down in the uk, giving us a chance to study a relic from the birth of the solar system. rebecca morelle, bbc news. black cats have long been associated as good and bad luck charms. well a black cat in chicago certainly tested its luck, when it came within a whisker of death. this scene in chicago, where firefighters tackled a blaze at a fifth floor apartment, could have been cat—astrophic. as this black feline appeared at a window and jumped for its life. using up one if its nine lives, the cat landed safely, on four legs, of course. let's see it again. you can see how it narrowly clears a wall, and then bounces once
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on a patch of grass, then just strolls away. thankfully the chicago fire department reported no one was injured in the apartment, while the cat made its purrr—fect escape. it gave me paws for thought. nothing new in the forecast that's going to surprise you. brollies at the ready this weekend. it's going to be very changeable, downpours expected, frequent in some parts of the country, and the possibility of hail and thunder as well, and gusty winds. low pressure will be drifting across the uk on friday night into saturday and will still be influencing our weather come tuesday. now, the jet stream is south of us. when the jet stream is south of us, that means that the cooler weather from the northern climes is in place, and you can see the air streams of cooler weather coming in straight out of the arctic. low pressures are spinning up here, then we have the jet stream, that dividing line, and all of the warmth which we want is deflected to the south.
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and this pattern is pretty much locked across the uk. now, here's the rainfall accumulation map, so it tells us how much rain we're going to get this weekend, and in some parts of the country a good 10, 20 millimetres of rain from those heavy showers we're going to be getting. so, the forecast, then, for friday night and into saturday shows the weather front spreading across the uk. you can see mostly dry weather there across scotland and the north east of england, as well as east anglia, but as far as central, southern england is concerned, wales and also the irish sea coasts, i think, rain first thing in the morning. but not cold, temperatures will be around 5—9 degrees early on saturday. so, tomorrow, then, the weather front makes its journey forwards. notice it's not raining everywhere, but once this weather front clears, the skies tend to clear as well. we'll see sunshine and then with this unstable air, which allows to grow those big shower clouds, we'll see downpours developing with the thunder and lightning. but the showers are very discreet,
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sometimes they're only 10, 20 miles across, and around it, there'll be plenty of sunshine around, so it really is a lottery where the showers will hit. now, sunday is going to be another very showery day. it looks as though most of them will be across england and wales, but certainly a scattering of them also across northern ireland and scotland. i'd say the showers on sunday are going to be even more heavy with more frequent downpours across england and wales, hail and thunder, too. and this weather will continue into next week.
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this is bbc world news, the headlines as israel's deadly bombardment of gaza continues, prime minister benjamin netanyahu has warned that its biggest offensive against hamas in years is not over yet. rockets are still being fired towards israel from the territory. the head of the world health organisation has warned that the second year of the coronavirus pandemic is on track to be far deadlier than the first. doctor tedros gabruhyesus said the situation in india was of grave concern. britain's prime minister boris johnson has announced surge testing in 15 areas across england — saying the rise in the indian variant could threaten plans to end all restrictions injune. republicans in the us house of representatives have elected trump supporter elise stefanik to replace liz cheney as their third most senior leader. in contrast to ms cheney, she backs the former president's lie that the election was stolen.
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at ten o'clock reeta will be here with a full

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