Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 2, 2021 8:00pm-8:30pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at eight. people in england may not need to self—isolate, if they've been in close contact with someone with coronavirus. daily rapid tests will be offered as an alternative to ten days quarantine. if you want to get to a position at the end where we can get back is a close to normal as possible, but there will still need to be some safeguards in place. the foreign office plays down any suggestion aid worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is to be released, after iran's state tv claimed the uk had paid to secure it. manchester united's match against liverpool, which could have decided the premier league title, is postponed after fans, opposed to the club's oweners, invade the pitch at old trafford.
8:01 pm
in liverpool, after friday night's rave — now a concert in sefton park, as 5,000 people attend the latest large—scale event in the government's coronavirus pilot scheme. good evening. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has dismissed calls for a faster easing of lockdown rules in england. has dismissed calls for a faster he's urging caution, saying the country's entering the "last lap" of the race to beat coronavirus. he also suggests "some safeguards" may remain, even when all legal restrictions end next month. the government is considering a range of measures, including a vaccination programme
8:02 pm
for schools, although no final decision has been made. here's our political correspondent, ben wright. it has been a testing time and ensuring people do not have covid will continue to be crucial as the country reopens. the government is beginning a trial of daily lateral flow tests for the people in england who have come into contact with someone who has tested positive for the virus. it could eventually mean the end of self—isolation. ministers are also considering giving vaccines to secondary school children. we want to get to a position at the end ofjune where we can get life as close to normal as possible but there will still need to be some safeguards, that is one of the tools we will look at but no decision has been made. today dominic raab said the uk was in the last lap in its fight against covid but that does not mean the imminent end of facemasks. particularly it will be around distancing, maybe something around facemasks but i don't really want to prejudge, those arejust some options. lockdown rules have differed
8:03 pm
in different parts of the uk but are being eased everywhere. from may the 17th at the earliest, four people will be able to meet indoors in scotland, six in england. may the 17th is when some international travel will be able to resume. an update is expected at the end of the coming week on which countries will be placed on the green list allowing people to travel without the need for quarantine. but one labour frontbencher is not rushing to book a flight. the truth is it will be quite complicated for a long time. the government is saying the rules can change at short notice, you may be required to quarantine, you may need to shell out large sums for hotel bills. people need to be careful. for weeks the government has batted away calls from some tory mps to lift restrictions sooner, insisting this needs to be cautious and irreversible. for more than a year, unprecedented laws have restricted who we can meet, and where we can go.
8:04 pm
those laws look set to be lifted in england byjune the 21st if the data around vaccines and infection rates supports it, and life will begin to feel something like it did before the pandemic. but covid will not have gone away and at the moment the government is conducting four reviews into vaccine passports and social distancing, for instance, that could well shape our behaviour for a long time to come. already some snooker fans are back in their seats but with no vaccine 100% effective it could be a while before the cloud of covid has lifted altogether. ben wright, bbc news. the latest government figures show there were 1,671 new coronavirus infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period, with on average 2,188 new cases reported per day in the last week. 1a deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test ——
8:05 pm
which means on average in the past week, 16 deaths were announced every day, taking the overall total to 127,538. just over 34.5 milion people have now had their first dose of a covid vaccine. and more than 15 million people, have had both doses. hundreds of manchester united fans have invaded the pitch at old trafford, in a mass protest against the club's american owners. it's caused one of the biggest games of the season, against liverpool, to be postponed. the fans claim the glazer family have piled debt on the club —— and betrayed supporters by signing up to the now defunct, european super league. greater manchester police said, two officers were injured while responding to the protests, with one needing hospital treatment. our sports correspondent, joe wilson, has more
8:06 pm
from old trafford. protesters chanting. 1:30pm outside old trafford, the concourse where protesters were expected to congregate. the anger expressed here is a long—standing opposition to manchester united's ownership by the american glazer family. by 2pm, some protesters decided to go further. ultimately, on to the pitch itself. this was the scene at one of the most famous football grounds in the world, that revered manchester united pitch, the place of stirring feats of football, occupied. meanwhile, some of those who'd stayed peacefully outside were leaving. as we are speaking outside the ground there are lots of fans on the pitch. are there? they got through? what do you think about that? it's a frustrating thing because, obviously, as fans we want the best for our club. it has been from when we were young, watched it, it has been magical, the history we have had.
8:07 pm
and people get so annoyed with it. do you think the glazers will be watching? i hope they are, i hope they are. if they haven't, they should be watching it online. - they know supporters have been - here and put everything on the table for them so it is up to them now to decide, isn't it? _ as we are speaking outside the ground there are fans actually on the pitch, do you approve of that? no, i don't approve of that. protests had also taken place at the hotel where the manchester united team were staying. the players could not leave. there was a football match scheduled for a az30pm kick—off here against liverpool. a football match which was not happening. chanting. the initial announcement that kick—off had been delayed came with protesters still inside the stadium. outside the security in place for an event which had been well publicised in advance was very visibly outnumbered. joe wilson, bbc news, old trafford. speaking to us a little earlier
8:08 pm
from outside old trafford, joe wilson explained how the protests had unfolded across the day. what has evolved today has been publicised days in advance. calling for a demonstration outside the court of old trafford notes to be peaceful and it was supposed to be socially distant. at 130, there were about a thousand protesters in that position. we saw flares, placards, we heard chanting. libint later to its two a group from the body decided they wanted to take things further, that they wanted to get onto the pitch. security was potentially there to stop them but it was very small scale and they really managed to breach that easily. within a matter of minutes, they were on the pitch and around 200 demonstrators actually on the pitch. at the same time, the hotel of manchester united were of theoretically preparing and about to leave to get to the game, there were protests there. it became really
8:09 pm
clear that there wasn't any way this match could be played. there was no signs of the fancier dispersing and eventually that decision was made to postpone the game and it will be arranged and rearranged at some point, we do not know when. at two things that i think are important. i've spoken to fancier today, supporters, protesters who did not want to be associated with those people who actually got onto the pitch. at the same time, spoke to people who feel they've had 16 years of this football cloud being owned by the family in america. 16 years the perception is that family has taken money out of the cloud and not shown interest in it. to change the dynamic, to get some attention, they thought they had to do something dramatic and extreme. and that is all transpired. let's talk to neil atkinson from the liverpool podcast, the anfield wrap. thank you for speaking with us this evening. i'm really interested to hear your reaction and your thoughts
8:10 pm
towards what happened today stability manchester united supporters wanted their family out, the trust is been really active about it and also ultimately because they live a about it and also ultimately because the live ., ., ._ about it and also ultimately because the live ., ., ., ., ., they live a long way away and away from this desire. _ they live a long way away and away from this desire. to _ they live a long way away and away from this desire. to behave - they live a long way away and away from this desire. to behave in - they live a long way away and away from this desire. to behave in the l from this desire. to behave in the way they have of manchester united football cloud. what you have seen todayis football cloud. what you have seen today is people taking the extreme view, to get a game cancelled and i can understand it. i'm not at all put out or fronted. manchester united have had a long period of this, manchester united supporters section been very patient and they have not had very much support from the football family.— the football family. where these american owners _ the football family. where these american owners getting - the football family. where these american owners getting it - the football family. where these i american owners getting it wrong? just to go back to something you said a moment ago. they live very far, far away and they're owned by an american company and what is
8:11 pm
going on here? i an american company and what is going on here?— going on here? i think that the glazier family, _ going on here? i think that the glazier family, there's - going on here? i think that the i glazier family, there's differences between throwing people in the same basket. when they tried to form the super league, they're all different types of owners within there. but what i think happened is an unbelievable distance from the reality of football on the ground and when it happens with all of these men tend to they are making room for people like themselves are not people committed to football clubs and that does not work for football clubs is almost the people from manchester united will live around manchester and be committed to that and they find themselves on days like today, a difficult position as for people who work for liverpool, chelsea and etc. these are being made and boardrooms the united states that are very separate from the lived reality on the ground. 15 separate from the lived reality on the ground-— separate from the lived reality on the round. , , ., ~ the ground. is in the perimeter leak in football, — the ground. is in the perimeter leak in football, one _ the ground. is in the perimeter leak in football, one of— the ground. is in the perimeter leak in football, one of the _ the ground. is in the perimeter leak in football, one of the allegations . in football, one of the allegations that the fans had today in football,
8:12 pm
one of the allegations that the fans had to date or trafford was that the glazier family is all about the money and nothing else. the? glazier family is all about the money and nothing else. they get 9296 of all english — money and nothing else. they get 9296 of all english football _ money and nothing else. they get 9296 of all english football broadcasting - of all english football broadcasting income and to put that into perspective, at the bottom for premier league clubs because we have done this thing really split the top six in the bottom 16, the bottom 16 clubs get 11 times the income from television that all the championship clubs get in so there is massive issues here around reform and regulation, which does need to see more money go down the football pyramid away from the premier league no matter which cloud you support, thatis no matter which cloud you support, that is the case. further on this, bring me up taken over by american owners this number of issues around the way in which football clubs are being treated and we will not allow national trust properties to be managed or owned in this way in this country. you can even make renovations to building system and allowing all sorts of people, some from abroad, we have a recent issue
8:13 pm
with barry, and ourfootball clubs or cultural institutions, it does not need a grasp, need someone to get a grip of it. two tory manifestos and there've been no actions from the government to make some noise recently and people want to see that change and change quickly. the issue that we've got but that is all to me regulation is something that does not come naturally to this government. they viewed in the same way that a dog fuse a bicycle. they know it gets people where they need to be, but they don't know how to work it. it all needs to be sorted out. something that the government needs to step in and take part of because we have seen over the past few weeks is the absolute power of the british for all fans. is the absolute power of the british forall fans. how is the absolute power of the british for all fans. how is that converted to a successful model moving forward? i to a successful model moving forward? ~ ., ., forward? i think. foremost, what we want for the — forward? i think. foremost, what we want for the clubs, _ forward? i think. foremost, what we want for the clubs, i _ forward? i think. foremost, what we want for the clubs, i think _ forward? i think. foremost, what we want for the clubs, i think there - want for the clubs, i think there needs to be fan representation we can talk about 50 plus one and other fans on boards, there room for local authorities having a say around
8:14 pm
voices of the real complex issue, i do not think there is a 1—size—fits—all solution. i think they should be trialed. talk with they should be trialed. talk with the power of football supporters and that's true, but it's also exhausting. you can't go through what you go through over and over again in oppositional groups look for the protest against football clubs are still people are giving up the time and energy and effort and it takes its toll over a long period and i think the minute, that energy is present but it's not being capitalised on and what's going on in english football, for too long, has been too loose, too lackluster. the need to be greater regulation, greater generosity from the premier leaked all the clubs in the country. the fullbore pyramid needs to operate as a pyramid and the needs to be a greater sense of who should and should honour football clubs. there's one thing ijust want and should honour football clubs. there's one thing i just want to honein there's one thing i just want to hone in on. why is it in the governments interest to step in? it's in the government interest because one to take the government to do it. the peer leak assurance unable to regulate itself and that they should be able to do it but it's a dereliction of duty for god
8:15 pm
knows how long now. as of 20 or 30 years and they don't have the power to do it and support the authorities, we have no power whatsoever. it needs regulation at this point. because everybody has shown themselves unable to do it. don't you think that things like the nhs are higher priority? {iii don't you think that things like the nhs are higher priority? of course, es. but nhs are higher priority? of course, yes- iout there _ nhs are higher priority? of course, yes. but there is _ nhs are higher priority? of course, yes. but there is the _ nhs are higher priority? of course, yes. but there is the department . nhs are higher priority? of course, l yes. but there is the department for culture, media and sport. their sat around twiddling their thumbs and get the help of the health service. the civil service work that department, there's a culture secretary who enables us to take these things like the print really. there has got to be a change around us where for instance, yourjob now is to step in on this because there's a clear problem eve decided english football biggest game be disrupted and some had to take responsibility for stepped up really to do so if enough pontificating in the sky, how about we get somebody involved in this proper task force and there is support and i will come through for us but something does need to change.— through for us but something does need to change. thank you so much for our need to change. thank you so much foryourtime- _ need to change. thank you so much for your time. thank _ need to change. thank you so much
8:16 pm
for your time. thank you. _ i'm sure this story will be covered in tomorrow's front pages. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are broadcaster and psychotherapist, lucy beresford —— and bloomberg uk politics reporter, joe mayes. the government is suggesting the british iranian aid worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who's in prison in iran, is being held hostage by the regime —— and suffering treatment that amounts to torture. she's been detained for five years on spying charges, and was recently convicted of another offence and banned from leaving tehran. our world affairs correspondent, caroline hawley, told us that the foreign secretary's comments were very striking. in the strongest language that has been used to date, he said she was being unlawfully held and did not argue with the description of her as a hostage.
8:17 pm
all along, her husband richard has said she is being held hostage, a political pawn, the iranians want repayment of a £400 million debt that the uk has owed to iran since before nazanin was even born. a few hours after dominic raab spoke, came confirmation almost of this categorisation of her as a hostage. a statement on television in iran reported a deal had been done with the americans for a prisoner swap, the release of iranian money frozen under sanctions and also that nazanin would be freed if the uk debt was paid. now the us quickly denied it had done any deal and the uk government is playing down any suggestion that nazanin is about to be freed. the foreign office said they are continuing to explore options to resolve this 60—year—old case, that is the debt. and that they will not comment while the discussions are going on. we don't know what is going on behind—the—scenes but richard ratcliffe believes some
8:18 pm
negotiations are going on. we know negotiations are going on to try to revive the iran nuclear deal. iran wants sanctions to be lifted if it is to comply with that nuclear deal. but the iranians seem to be making it clear they want a clear and pretty naked transaction, it could be a negotiating tactic. richard ratcliffe told me that he thinks britain and iran are in the middle, not the end of any negotiations over the fate of his wife and he said he and his family are keeping their fingers crossed not only for themselves but for all the other dual nationals who are held in iran as part of what he and others call iran's hostage diplomacy. labour's tulip siddiq is the ratcliffe family's constituency mp. she told us that the foreign office had not been in contact
8:19 pm
with her or the family about today's reports concerning the historic debt. now, i have heard nothing of that from the minister and nor has the family heard anything. all we know is that the family feel very hopeful that dominic raab went on tv this morning and for the first time acknowledged the condition she has lived in and been going through amounts to torture. bear in mind, i have now dealt with three prime ministers and five foreign secretaries in the whole time she has been in prison. i have not heard the uk government speak so powerfully and forcibly about the imprisonment of my constituent which gives me hope that there is some progress being made to release her but we have not heard anything directly. i have not heard and nazanin's family has not heard from the foreign office or government implying that they have plans to release her soon. what i can tell you is that the ambassador to tehran, our ambassador, did visit nazanin
8:20 pm
at her parents' house where she is under house arrest at the moment, this morning. he did not mention anything about the debt or her being released. they had a general conversation about corona and about her getting the vaccine. so he clearly does not know anything either. meeting with senior officials to decide how to respond. britain sending a further 1,000 ventilators to india to help its struggling healthcare system deal with a surge in coronavirus infections. the country's prime minister narendra modi has been meeting with senior officials, to decide how to respond. a new single—day record for deaths was confirmed on sunday, and infections are continuing to rise.
8:21 pm
hospitals are struggling to cope, even with overseas help in the form of oxygen generators and ventilators. from delhi, here's our correspondent devina gupta: ashes and memories, that is all these family members have of their loved ones. the highest death toll so far in india. experts warn of harder weeks ahead. if everybody wears face max and everybody avoids big events, it may be a matter of weeks before we see the present wave waning and the come down. but to maintain that we have to continue to have the discipline for some months to come. hospitals continue to run out—of—hospital, oxygen and medicine, the disappointment of many of these families is directed at the ruling hindu nationalist party. its senior leaders, including the health minister have been denying shortages. but in the end it is india's prime minister, narendra modi, who is evading questions. he had earned trust last year by starting a lockdown.
8:22 pm
translation: from 12 o'clock today i there will be a national lockdown. l but this time he has been reluctant to take this decision. translation: we are making efforts not to disrupt economic _ activity and livelihoods. if recent polls are an indicator, he needs to reconnect fast. although he is reviewing resources and holding emergency meetings and even extending the vaccination programme to all adults over 18, it is not without glitches. many vaccine centres are short on stocks and turning people away. translation: the government rushed to increase inoculation _ after the recent surge of new cases. this led to a crushing burden on the vaccination system. . that is where experts feel india needs a national lockdown to help
8:23 pm
prepare better but the time is running out fast because now new cases are coming from rural india where over 60% of the country's population live without proper health care facilities and it is important to rid the cycle of the virus before it releases a catastrophe a national day of mourning in israel, after 45 men and boys were killed by a crush at a jewish festival early on friday in the north of the country. a mother mourns her son. yedidia went on a journey with his dad. it should have been a joyful pilgrimage. but the 13—year—old will never come home. his brother shmuel survived.
8:24 pm
his father avigdor was brought from the hospital. a final goodbye. "we didn't tell you enough we love you, yedidia," says avigdor. "god has taken you to your religious school, a class of 45," he says, referring to all the victims. they dug his grave in the middle of the night. jewish tradition calls for a quick burial of the dead. i met the family on friday when yedidia was still missing. their hopes quickly faded. theirs is the grief of so many. 45 people, all men and boys, 12 in their teens and younger. friday's crush developed as crowds of ultraorthodox pilgrims became packed in a narrow walkway down
8:25 pm
a slippery ramp. those at the front became trapped. people i spoke to caught up in the crash were angry at the police who they blamed. there is soul—searching going on in the country over the degree of autonomy the government gives to the religious and political leaders of the ultraorthodox and what part that had to play in poor planning and the lack of safety. israel's government started a formal inquiry. the search for answers will stretch into the months ahead but today is a time to pause and honour those they have lost. tom bateman, bbc news, jerusalem. in the space agency, they spent six
8:26 pm
months in space recovering ships and waiting in the gulf of mexico to reach the capsule and of course the crew on board. around 5,000 people have arrived for a music festival at sefton park in liverpool. they'll all have to show a negative covid test, and have follow up swabs in five days time. it's one of a number of pilot events, as lockdown restrictions ease. our correspondent, danjohnson is at sefton park and sent this report. they were ready for this, after life has been limited for so long. unmasked and ready to go! it is the first time we have been allowed out in so long. it is like they are lifting the restrictions now. and because we are going into it first and have gone out of it first. it is a good day to be a scouser. everyone is being tested and will be checked again next week but the
8:27 pm
question is, can people gather like this to enjoy themselves without masks, without social distancing but without the virus spreading? all your festival favourites are here, the bar is well stocked and after a silent summer last year they are looking forward to feeding the 5000. can't wait to have some money over—the—counter and get back to normal. hopefully busy as well. a busy day. better be a busy day. but scientists are here to see how this goes and what lessons can be learned. we have around 40 cameras set up around the site and we will be looking from that to observe how people move and behave whilst attending the festival. people choosing to wear masks, how they choose to greet each other. headlining act blossoms will get back on stage or tonight for the first time in more than a year. we did a first time in more than a year. - did a couple of online festivals but it's just not the same as being in a room with people and not having the connection. it's been tough and
8:28 pm
again, tough for everyone who works behind the scenes was that you don't see that it all. production managers, the sound guy, all that stuff managers, the sound guy, all that stu �* , ., , managers, the sound guy, all that stu�* , ., stuff this was their warehouse gig last niuht stuff this was their warehouse gig last night in _ stuff this was their warehouse gig last night in liverpool _ stuff this was their warehouse gig last night in liverpool and - stuff this was their warehouse gig last night in liverpool and then i last night in liverpool and then uniting force, that common shared language that connects so many people is helping us all get back to the things we enjoy. a little earlier dan spoke to us from inside the festival before the main event got underway. evenif even if this was not the type of thing you are looking forward to, if you have a bearing on what life events are possible. let's chat with some of the people who are here ready to enjoy this afternoon this evening in the entertainment. what a i°y evening in the entertainment. what a joy to be part of this? this evening in the entertainment. what a joy to be part of this?— joy to be part of this? this is really momentous, - joy to be part of this? this is really momentous, as - joy to be part of this? this is really momentous, as you i joy to be part of this? this is i really momentous, as you say. joy to be part of this? this is - really momentous, as you say. this is the _ really momentous, as you say. this is the first_ really momentous, as you say. this is the first gig for a year. we like blossoms — is the first gig for a year. we like blossoms. we have been living in the report— blossoms. we have been living in the report throughout the full pandemic the first— report throughout the full pandemic the first and tier 3, so it's great to he _
8:29 pm
the first and tier 3, so it's great to he the — the first and tier 3, so it's great to be the guinea pigs for this event — to be the guinea pigs for this event. ., ., ., ., , event. you are part of an experiment the our event. you are part of an experiment they your here _ event. you are part of an experiment they your here to _ event. you are part of an experiment they your here to have _ event. you are part of an experiment they your here to have fun _ event. you are part of an experiment they your here to have fun as - event. you are part of an experiment they your here to have fun as well. i they your here to have fun as well. yeah, definitely. i really like blossoms _ yeah, definitely. i really like blossoms as _ yeah, definitely. i really like blossoms as well— yeah, definitely. i really like blossoms as well and - yeah, definitely. i really like blossoms as well and so. . yeah, definitely. i really like blossoms as well and so. after so much time _ blossoms as well and so. after so much time of _ blossoms as well and so. after so much time of the _ blossoms as well and so. after so much time of the art _ blossoms as well and so. after so much time of the art being - blossoms as well and so. after so much time of the art being on - blossoms as well and so. after so l much time of the art being on hold. it's really nice to have this whole thing reopening and it's real nice to have a scientific overview of how this is going to work when it comes to reopening, right? it's really important. it to reopening, right? it's really important-— to reopening, right? it's really imortant. .~ , . ., ., important. it makes a big change to our important. it makes a big change to your mental— important. it makes a big change to your mental health _ important. it makes a big change to your mental health when _ important. it makes a big change to your mental health when you - important. it makes a big change to your mental health when you are i important. it makes a big change to l your mental health when you are able to get— your mental health when you are able to get out— your mental health when you are able to get out and go to a festival and you are _ to get out and go to a festival and you are not — to get out and go to a festival and you are not dealing with that idea that covid—19 is an existential threat — that covid—19 is an existential threat which kind of has been. and it's nice _ threat which kind of has been. and it's nice for— threat which kind of has been. and it's nice for the things to be normab _ it's nice for the things to be normal. it— it's nice for the things to be normal. . , ~ .., , ., , normal. it was like coming in please 's district of — normal. it was like coming in please 's district of the _ normal. it was like coming in please 's district of the checks _ normal. it was like coming in please 's district of the checks and - �*s district of the checks and testing and all of that? irate 's district of the checks and testing and all of that? we had to
8:30 pm
rovide testing and all of that? we had to provide in, _ testing and all of that? we had to provide id. we — testing and all of that? we had to provide id, we had _ testing and all of that? we had to provide id, we had to _ testing and all of that? we had to provide id, we had to have - testing and all of that? we had to provide id, we had to have testsl provide id, we had to have tests coming — provide id, we had to have tests coming in — provide id, we had to have tests coming in and no one has symptoms going _ coming in and no one has symptoms going in_ coming in and no one has symptoms going in that we have a negative lateral— going in that we have a negative lateral flow test which means the chances — lateral flow test which means the chances of you being effective you're — chances of you being effective you're coming in are quite low anyway — you're coming in are quite low anyway it— you're coming in are quite low an a . ., , you're coming in are quite low an a . . , ., anyway. it mitigates the risks and i would like to _ anyway. it mitigates the risks and i would like to see _ anyway. it mitigates the risks and i would like to see all _ anyway. it mitigates the risks and i would like to see all works - anyway. it mitigates the risks and i would like to see all works out - anyway. it mitigates the risks and i would like to see all works out in i would like to see all works out in the long term because we get more sensitive tests to do afterwards and we are looking forward to seeing how it works long term stability and feel safe being in a cloud again because it's been so long since we've seen anything like this? yes. we've seen anything like this? yes, not to many — we've seen anything like this? yes, not to many people _ we've seen anything like this? yes, not to many people in _ we've seen anything like this? yes, not to many people in comparison to the space _ not to many people in comparison to the space that — not to many people in comparison to the space that there _ not to many people in comparison to the space that there is. _ not to many people in comparison to the space that there is. a— not to many people in comparison to the space that there is. a solid - the space that there is. a solid full capacity _ the space that there is. a solid full capacity. so _ the space that there is. a solid full capacity. so you _ the space that there is. a solid full capacity. so you don't - the space that there is. a solid full capacity. so you don't feel| full capacity. so you don't feel like it's— full capacity. so you don't feel like it's overcrowded - full capacity. so you don't feel like it's overcrowded or- full capacity. so you don't feel i like it's overcrowded or anything. it's pretty— like it's overcrowded or anything. it's pretty good _ like it's overcrowded or anything. it's pretty good. we _ like it's overcrowded or anything. it's pretty good-— like it's overcrowded or anything. it's pretty good. we will let you go and en'o it's pretty good. we will let you go and enjoy it- _ it's pretty good. we will let you go and enjoy it. you _ it's pretty good. we will let you go and enjoy it. you know _ it's pretty good. we will let you go and enjoy it. you know the - it's pretty good. we will let you go and enjoy it. you know the bands i it's pretty good. we will let you go i and enjoy it. you know the bands are on and we don't watch you to miss that. such a long way and that is the point, is been such a tough year for everybody in life events and it's notjust about for everybody in life events and it's not just about the guys enjoying it or even the musicians getting back on stage. it is about the security and the catering and
8:31 pm
all the staff in that

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on