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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 30, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. tragedy in israel, as a deadly crush at a religious festival leaves 45 people dead. many of the victims found themselves trapped in a narrow passageway as they tried to escape. all of a sudden, we saw paramedics running by, like, mid—cpr on kids, and then one after the other, started coming out in ambulances. then we understood, like, something's going on here. hundreds of mourners have been attending the first funerals, as the israeli prime minister promises an inquiry to ensure such a tragedy never happens again. also ahead — in india several states say they've run out of coronavirus vaccines, as the second wave of the pandemic rages out of control.
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tv networks in britain drop shows featuring the actor noel clarke after accusations of sexual harassment — claims he vehemently denies. a four day boycott of social media by sports bodies and stars in protest at online racist abuse. funerals have been held in israel for the victims of a deadly crush at religious festival. at least 45 people are known to have died, and more than 150 were injured at meron, the site of the tomb of a revered second—century rabbi. almost all of those affected were ultra—orthodoxjews, in attendance to mark the lag ba—omer holiday.
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tens of thousands pilgrims had gathered at the foot of mount meron in the north of israel, to celebrate the event with all—night bonfires, prayer and dancing. paramedics say the crush happened after people slipped in an overcrowded walkway, causing dozens more to fall. this was the largest public event in israel since the coronavirus pandemic began. the country's successful vaccination programme has allowed it to lift many restrictions. prime minister benjamin netanyahu has described it as a "heavy disaster" and said he was praying for the casualties. our middle east correspondent tom bateman sent this report from the scene. and a warning, it contains distressing images. they sing. they came to celebrate and to be blessed — tens of thousands ofjewish pilgrims at the mountain tomb of an ancient rabbi. but instead, they were met with panic and a deadly crush. as crowds left the gravesite,
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descending a narrow walkway, they surged. those at the front were trapped. people tried tearing away metal barricades to free them. all of a sudden, we saw paramedics running by, like, mid—cpr on kids, and then one after the other, started coming out in ambulances. then we understood, like, something's going on here. pilgrimsjoined paramedics in a desperate search. dozens had been suffocated or trampled on. children became separated from parents, and army helicopters evacuated the wounded. in the hospitals, there's been anguish as relatives wait for news. many of the dead still haven't been formally identified. this man took his two young sons to the festival. when it got crowded, he says,
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they tried to get out. we reached a ramp, he tells me, where there was a river of people. i fell on my back and others piled on top. i prayed. my ten—year—old son was screaming for help, shouting, "i'm dead!" and my 13—year—old son — he was gone. the annual festival sees ultraorthodox jews flock for the night of prayer. bonfires are lit, too. this was the country's biggest gathering since the pandemic. israel has lifted many covid restrictions after the world's fastest vaccination rate, and police had planned for crowds. so, what went wrong? this is where the surge took place. crowds were heading down this metal ramp here. eye witnesses have said it was slippery. people were then turning around this corner, heading down the steps, and some have said that a barrier
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was blocking the route, and that's where the crush took place. at the scene, prime minister benjamin netanyahu called it a national disaster and promised a full enquiry. this afternoon, they began burying the dead. amid the grief and the funerals, questions mount over whether it could have been prevented. after a night of ritual, this was the one no one wanted. emergency medical responders were on the scene as the disaster onfolded, many of them volunteers from the united hatzalah of israel. a warning — some viewers may find these scenes upsetting. this footage was filmed by one of their volunteers, some viewers may find these scenes upsetting. this footage was filmed by one of their volunteers, showing people desperately trying to help those in the crowd trapped at the bottom of the passageway.
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presidentjoe biden is marking his first 100 days in office travelling the country to press his case for a sweeping infrastructure and jobs plan. his proposals forfamilies and infrastructure total around $4 trillion, but critics say they include too many social service programmes and not enough spending on traditional infrastructure. but on friday, he was guest of honour at the 50th birthday celebration of the us rail service, amtrak — where he outlined plans for more investment. here's a little of what he had to say. it is an honour to celebrate amtrak�*s 50th anniversary. i look forward to a bright future for all—american rail. you know, back in 2016, i announced a federal loan that allowed amtrak to purchase the new trains that you see behind me, and they look great, i can hardly wait to ride. they are made in america, and i want to see more of
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that. that's why the investment in my american jobs plan are guided that. that's why the investment in my americanjobs plan are guided by one principle, by american, by—products made in america. the american tax dollars are going to be used to buy american products and create americanjobs. for more on the significance of mr biden�*s visit to philadelphia here's our washington correspondent gary 0'donoghue. this is part of selling the message to the _ this is part of selling the message to the american people, persuading, if you _ to the american people, persuading, if you like. _ to the american people, persuading, if you like, that this money as well worth_ if you like, that this money as well worth spending, going over heads, in some _ worth spending, going over heads, in some cases. — worth spending, going over heads, in some cases, of republicans in congress _ some cases, of republicans in congress. but this is also a bit of a personal— congress. but this is also a bit of a personal voyage for him, if you like him — a personal voyage for him, if you like him amtrak is something that is pretty— like him amtrak is something that is pretty close tojoe like him amtrak is something that is pretty close to joe biden's like him amtrak is something that is pretty close tojoe biden's heart. he travelled on what's called the train _ he travelled on what's called the train that— he travelled on what's called the train that goes up and down the northeast— train that goes up and down the northeast corridor of the united states— northeast corridor of the united states from delaware to washington when he _ states from delaware to washington when he was a senator. he used to call him _ when he was a senator. he used to call him amtrakjoe, in fact. so this is— call him amtrakjoe, in fact. so this is him _ call him amtrakjoe, in fact. so this is him sort of paying tribute to that —
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this is him sort of paying tribute to that service which he used on a regular— to that service which he used on a regular basis to travel millions of mites _ regular basis to travel millions of mites it — regular basis to travel millions of miles. it you are right, this is a much _ miles. it you are right, this is a much wider— miles. it you are right, this is a much wider campaign he is waging here _ much wider campaign he is waging here he _ much wider campaign he is waging here. he was in georgia yesterday, of course, — here. he was in georgia yesterday, of course, a — here. he was in georgia yesterday, of course, a state he won, including two senate — of course, a state he won, including two senate seats for the democrats that were _ two senate seats for the democrats that were one there. and he is going to do— that were one there. and he is going to do the _ that were one there. and he is going to do the same in virginia on monday _ to do the same in virginia on monday. so, again, taking the message — monday. so, again, taking the message to the people. lots monday. 50, again, taking the message to the people. monday. so, again, taking the message to the people. lots more to watch there- — message to the people. lots more to watch there. but _ message to the people. lots more to watch there. but if _ message to the people. lots more to watch there. but if i _ message to the people. lots more to watch there. but if i can _ message to the people. lots more to watch there. but if i can ask - message to the people. lots more to watch there. but if i can ask you - message to the people. lots more to watch there. but if i can ask you to i watch there. but if i can ask you to change tact just watch there. but if i can ask you to change tactjust a little now. talk about some of these travel restrictions that we heard have been put on travellers coming from india into the united states.— put on travellers coming from india into the united states. yeah, so the white house — into the united states. yeah, so the white house has _ into the united states. yeah, so the white house hasjust_ into the united states. yeah, so the white house hasjust said _ into the united states. yeah, so the white house hasjust said that - into the united states. yeah, so the white house hasjust said that it's i white house hasjust said that it's going _ white house hasjust said that it's going to _ white house hasjust said that it's going to restrict travel from india as of— going to restrict travel from india as of may— going to restrict travel from india as of may the 4th, so that's next week, _ as of may the 4th, so that's next week, tuesday of next week, that is because _ week, tuesday of next week, that is because of— week, tuesday of next week, that is because of the numbers, behind numbers— because of the numbers, behind numbers of cases, they say, and the multiple _ numbers of cases, they say, and the multiple variants that are spreading ihside _ multiple variants that are spreading inside india. of course, america is doing _ inside india. of course, america is doing pretty— inside india. of course, america is doing pretty well with its vaccination programme, but they realty—
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vaccination programme, but they really are — vaccination programme, but they really are only dealing with a couple — really are only dealing with a couple of variance here, particularly the uk variant of vaccihes_ particularly the uk variant of vaccines that seem to be pretty effective — vaccines that seem to be pretty effective against that variance, so they are _ effective against that variance, so they are concerned about introducing new variants into the united states before _ new variants into the united states before they get many more people vaccinated. they are also allowing government, the family of government employees— government, the family of government employees to return home from india if they— employees to return home from india if they want— employees to return home from india if they want to do that voluntarily because — if they want to do that voluntarily because of the situation, the huge cases— because of the situation, the huge cases that — because of the situation, the huge cases that are happening there. so assigned, — cases that are happening there. so assigned, i— cases that are happening there. so assigned, i think, cases that are happening there. so assigned, ithink, that cases that are happening there. so assigned, i think, that while america _ assigned, i think, that while america is sending a lot of equipment and supplies to india, in particular— equipment and supplies to india, in particular making these tens of mittiohs— particular making these tens of millions of doses of the astrazeneca vaccine _ millions of doses of the astrazeneca vaccine available to india, they are also concerned about people coming to the _ also concerned about people coming to the united states from there, so these _ to the united states from there, so these restrictions will be put in place _ these restrictions will be put in place next week.— these restrictions will be put in place next week. speaking there to our washington _ place next week. speaking there to our washington correspondent, - place next week. speaking there to | our washington correspondent, gary 0'donoghue.
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here in britain, broadcasters and leading figures in the film and television industry are distancing themselves from the actor and director, noel clarke — who is facing multiple claims of sexual harassment. itv has pulled its final episode of the drama, viewpoint, while sky has halted work with mr clarke. tonight noel clarke issued a statement vehemently denying any sexual misconduct or criminal wrongdoing. but he apologised to anyone who'd been affected by his actions, and said he'd be seeking professional help to educate himself. here's chi chi izundu. her report contains some flashing images. stella 7 noel clarke, a british film success story, celebrated for his ability to bring diverse stories to the big and small screen. a star in itv�*s police drama, viewpoint, which will now not be shown on itv1. already a recipient of the bafta rising star award, back in 2009, just two weeks ago, he was receiving the bafta award for 0utstanding british contribution to cinema. i won something that,
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at the time, someone like me was never supposed to. but last night the guardian newspaper published allegations from 20 women who had worked with him. allegations about sexual harassment and bullying behaviour. one woman accusing him of pinning her against the wall of his dressing room. another saying he had sent her sexually explicit pictures. this is a really, really damning indictment of how intimidating some workplaces, some producers are, and for our members to raise concerns, because as you say, this highly informal, sensationalised way which many people feel is the only way that they can get their voice heard. in a statement, sky said it stands against all forms of sexual harassment and bullying, and takes any allegations of this nature extremely seriously. vertigo films and all three media, which backed his production company, have also confirmed they're no
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longer working with him. ashley walters, seen here with noel clarke in bullet—proof, made a statement on his instagram, saying... it's just reminding everyone that me too is not something that happened in 2017, it's something that continues to affect people within the film and television industry, affect people outside of that, across the world, and so we need to be more diligent and start taking some action, and doing things to stop allowing these things to go on for so long. noel clarke said in a statement that he vehemently denies any sexual misconduct or criminal wrongdoing. he says the recent reports have made him realise that his actions have affected people in ways he didn't intend, and says he is deeply sorry, and would be
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seeking professional help to educate himself and change for the better. there's growing anger among some of the bafta members about what the organisation knew and when. in a letter, bafta said back in march, when it announced that noel clarke was to receive the prestigious 0utstanding british contribution to cinema award, it wasn't aware of any allegation, but it did get some tip—offs afterwards, and, as an arts charity it's not in a position to properly investigate such matters, but if it did have the first—hand accounts, as reported by the guardian, it would never have given noel clarke the award. chi chi izundu, bbc news. stay with us on news, still to come... a four—day boycott of social media by sports bodies and stars in protest at online racist abuse. ben hannam,
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the first british police officer to be convicted of belonging to a neo—nazi terrorist group, has been jailed for four years and four months at the old bailey. 0ur correspondent daniel sandford explained the nature of the sentence. three years and four months of being a member of a banned terrorist organisation and also included in that concurrent sentence of possessing documents that might be useful to a terrorist and a concurrent sentence of one year for the fraud. that is essentially lying on his police application form when he was asked to tick a box saying he never been a member of the bnp or any other similar organisation. and he ticked a similar box on his vetting form, so not only had he been involved with national action, which was originally band for celebrating the murder ofjo cox mp, but he also lied about it and successfully became a police officer and served as a police officer for almost two years before the metropolitan police realised that they had a neo—nazi
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and a former member of a banned group in their own ranks. this is news, our main headline. tragedy in israel — at least 45 people are killed in a crush at a religous festival officials in delhi have been urged to find more sites for cremations as the city's morgues and crematoriums are overwhelmed by a surge of covid deaths. a second wave of the virus is ravaging parts of india, with more than 386,000 new cases reported on friday — the biggest one—day increase on record for any country. there were another 3,500 deaths nationwide. the indian government is to open vaccinations to all adults from saturday. but several states have warned they do not have sufficient stocks. 0ur correspondent arunoday mukharji— is in new delhi. the rising coronavirus infections in india continues unabated.
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the country recording nearly 390,000 fresh covid cases in the last 2a hours and registering nearly 3500 deaths. the situation in delhi is of particular concern. it's nearly 400 deaths in the last 2a hours. the positivity rate here in the city, which is population of 20 million, is at 33%. the city is seeing unprecedented scenes, hospitals contains one space, the administration to try and battle the rising number of casualties is also converting parks and parking lots into makeshift crematoriums, because the casualty figures are rising exponentially. this morning, on an encouraging site, the first consignment of us covid support to derive in a military plane. $100 million the us has pledged to send to india in the next couple of weeks. india also receiving aid from other foreign countries, but many experts pointing out the fact this is such an aggressive coronavirus wave and the rate at which the infections are rising, this kind of aid may
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also fall short. one way that the indian government is trying to battle the rising number of cases is to open up its vaccination programme. initially the plan was that tomorrow onwards all adults will be eligible for vaccines, but many individual states are coming out and making a statement saying they simply don't have enough vaccines on the ground. so that remains a huge concern as well. scientists are making projections, saying that the peak could be arrived at some time in mid—may are in the third week of may, by the concern is that by then india could still see a very high number of coronavirus cases and casualties as well. let's look at some of the day's other news. turkey has approved the emergency use of russia s sputnik v covid—i9 vaccine, after signing an agreement to purchase a total of 50m doses of the vaccine. turkey is currently under new lockdown restrictions for 2 weeks following a surge in cases. russia has recorded more than 400,000 excess deaths from last
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april to march this year during the covid—i9 pandemic, according to state statistics. epidemiologists say excess death figures are the best way to measure the true toll from covid—i9. some of the biggest names in the english premier league are taking part in a social media boycott, in protest at ongoing abuse directed at players. the four—day blackout is designed to put pressure on the likes of facebook and twitter to stop the abuse. nesta mcgregor reports. football has tried several different tasks to defeat racism. taking the knee now adopted by other sports as one of them. today, the game hoped to make another loud statement by staying silent on the platforms where the abuse takes place. do i think it will make a difference? probably not. but what it does do, it sends a warning to these companies, to let these people know
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that we are not going to take this abuse any more. if they still don't take action, then i think you'll see clubs, players, staff, corporations, start to get together and think of more tough measures to take to finally force action. there is no room for racism anywhere. at 3pm this afternoon, led by the premier league and with support from rugby, cricket, cycling and many more, a four day social media boycott began. even before the lockdown kicked in, we are seeing significant increases in reported incidents based on discrimination, so this isn'tjust online, the fact that we haven't been on grounds and haven't had grassroots football, isn't hiding the fact that this is a problem in society. huge amounts of traffic is diverted to sport to sites like instagram and twitter, and arrangement which benefits them out, but nothing this weekend from f1 champion lewis hamilton, the huge game, man united versus liverpool, nothing, the result of that fixture could see manchester city crowned champions but nothing in the form of celebration from the players on
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social media. facebook, instagram and twitter will miss out on billions of views with the major clubs not participating on their platforms. the traffic is not going to be there. the spotlight seems to be firmly on social media companies and their message remains the same. they are committed to making platforms a safe space for everyone. this is not about profits, it's not about money. we have been working on some of these tools were a very long time, regardless of any calls for a boycott. time, regardless of any calls for a bo cott. , ., ., ., boycott. generation after generation, _ boycott. generation after generation, athletes - boycott. generation after| generation, athletes have boycott. generation after - generation, athletes have shared stories of being racially abused at work. yet, with each storyteller, the hope they will be the last to tell it. nestor mcgregor, bbc news. joining me now is leigh nicol. she's a footballer for
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crystal palace fc women. thank you very much for talking to us. good to see you. now, this is something that you have very personal experience with, and we will get to that. first, just your thoughts on this boycott. i will get to that. first, just your thoughts on this boycott. i think it's very much — thoughts on this boycott. i think it's very much necessary, - thoughts on this boycott. i think- it's very much necessary, especially for the sporting world to come together to show their support for each other. now, do i think it's going to be effective? i'm not sure. i don't have those answers. but i think it's very important that we all stand by each other, because we are all going through it in some form, no matter how big or how little it is. form, no matter how big or how little it is— little it is. and when you say we all no little it is. and when you say we all go through — little it is. and when you say we all go through it, _ little it is. and when you say we all go through it, just _ little it is. and when you say we all go through it, just tell - little it is. and when you say we all go through it, just tell us - little it is. and when you say we all go through it, just tell us a l all go through it, just tell us a bit about what that is exactly. 50 bit about what that is exactly. so i've bit about what that is exactly. sr i've got bit about what that is exactly. 5r i've got black friends that her constantly racially abused. i've got team—mates who are discriminated against. we play female football, so, again, we are always subject to abuse because we are females and we
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play football. so all around us of the minutes, it's not a very nice place to be as social media because we're just subject to its, whether you are male orfemale, black or white. you are male or female, black or white. , ., ., ., white. this got so bad for you at one oint white. this got so bad for you at one point from _ white. this got so bad for you at one point from a _ white. this got so bad for you at one point from a thicket - white. this got so bad for you at one point from a thicket was - white. this got so bad for you at. one point from a thicket was 2019 you actually went off social media. i came off it for a short period of time and stepped away from football because the abuse just got to be too much and i started believing what people were writing. i’m much and i started believing what people were writing. i'm interested, what made you _ people were writing. i'm interested, what made you come _ people were writing. i'm interested, what made you come back? - people were writing. i'm interested, what made you come back? it's - people were writing. i'm interested, what made you come back? it's the | what made you come back? it's the wa that i what made you come back? it's the way that i stay _ what made you come back? it's the way that i stay connected _ what made you come back? it's the way that i stay connected with - what made you come back? it's the way that i stay connected with my l way that i stay connected with my family and friends. i live in london and all my friends and family are backin and all my friends and family are back in scotland. so that's a big thing. secondly, when i got my strength back, ijust thought, it's not right that i have to come away from these platforms, why should i have to do that? essentially, it's running away from a problem. it's not going away, really, so i'm so glad that now everyone is starting to fight back a little bit. you
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touch on _ to fight back a little bit. you touch on important - to fight back a little bit. you touch on important points there. even though there are these problems with the abuse on these platforms, these platforms for many players are such an important way to connect with their fans, as you say, to connect with other people. so, what do you think are some of the solutions that could make this just a nicer place to be? i solutions that could make this 'ust a nicer place to be?i a nicer place to be? i think a lot of people _ a nicer place to be? i think a lot of people already _ a nicer place to be? i think a lot of people already say _ a nicer place to be? i think a lot of people already say this, - a nicer place to be? i think a lot of people already say this, but i of people already say this, but there definitely needs to be identification. we see it on lots of other apps, whether that's a out, we see that that worked with them. there is no reason why we cannot just implement that. i think that's the simple answer. i don't see why that can't be done. it should've been done yesterday. so if they come out and announce on tuesday that they are going to make some change, whether it's not going to be until august or not cry think that's all we ask for, that we see them making a change to make it a safer place for us all and more positive place for us all and more positive place for us all and more positive place for us all, because right now, it's a really negative place to be. this a really negative place to be. as ou a really negative place to be. as you say, at least the conversation
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has begun. thank you very much for joining us today. thank you. a team of polish scientists say they've discovered the only known example of a pregnant egyptian mummy. the mummy was previously thought to be a male priest but x—rays and scans revealed it was a woman in the latter stages of pregnancy. experts from the project believe the remains are most likely of a high—status woman from the ancient egyptian city of thebes, aged between 20 and 30, who died 2000 years ago. this is their first radiological research of a pregnant mummy. maybe some scholars came across such mummified bodies, but they were not sufficiently recorded and they are not preserved in such very good state of preservation. we know very little about the mummy. it most probably came from thebes. at least the coffin came from themes, but how did this female mummy end up in the male
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sarcophagus is still a mystery. that's why we are calling this mummy the mysterious lady. now, before we go, if you have got a head for heights, then you will enjoy these pictures. if not, then this might make you slightly uncomfortable. at 516 metres long and 175 metres high, this bridge in portugal is the longest pedestrian suspension bridge in the world. those who are brave enough to walk across the slightly wobbly bridge will have an impressive view of waterfalls. the bridge is secured by steel cables above the riverbed. apparently, it's a very safe and secure bridge, but i have to say can i will take their word for it. i'm not sure i will be trying that in time soon. think of her being with us on bbc news. —— thank you for
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being with us on bbc news. don't forget you can get in touch with me and some of the team on twitter — i'm @kacungira bye for now. good evening. the weather for the month of april has been pretty quiet, hasn't it? with high pressure dominating, that's led for some chilly nights and i can confirm now that april 2021 was the frostiest on record. those clear skies also lead to plenty of sunshine and it could be one of the sunniest along with the driest on record as well. one of the reasons we can't firm up on that — well, that's because we've seen some april showers in the last few days, so those rainfall totals need totting up. and, as you can see quite clearly earlier on today there was a real rash of showers across the country. so, it has been a case of sunny spells and scattered showers to close out our final day of april. but those showers will fade away and, actually, as we go through the night, once again those skies stay clear
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and those temperatures are likely to fall away. so, there could be an early morning frost for the first morning of may, as temperatures in scotland, northern england and northern ireland sit close to freezing. that cooler air sitting right across the country. the wind direction coming from the north — it is going to remain disappointingly cool for the early half of may, but the winds will be light on saturday and sunday. that means plenty of sunshine first thing. the showers start to develop through the course of the afternoon and we see sunshine and showers as we go through the rest of the day, some of them heavy with some hail and thunder, and temperatures once again disappointing, 8—13 degrees as a day time maximum, way down on where they should be for the first few days of may. similar story for sunday — starting off with some sunshine after an early frost but then showers develop, and some of the showers across england and wales really could be heavy, with the odd rumble of thunder and lightning mixed in there as well. but the change will come on bank holiday monday. we're likely to see significant area
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of low pressure moving in from the atlantic, and the winds will strengthen — we haven't seen that for quite some time. so, yes it will be wet and windy. what a surprise for a bank holiday monday! that rain pushing into northern ireland, through northern england and wales. 0n the leading edge, as it bumps into the colder air in scotland, there could be some further snow to higher ground. wind gusting widely to 30 miles an hour but perhaps as much as 55 to 60 mph in the exposed coast down into to the southwest. now, under the cloud, the wind and the rain, those temperatures really down for monday.
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this is bbc world news. these are the headlines. the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, has described thursday night's crush that killed at least 45 people at a crowded religious festival as one of the country's worst disasters. several states in india say they've run out of coronavirus vaccines, as the second wave of the pandemic runs out of control. police in the capital delhi have asked local authorities to identify more sites for covid—19 cremations. brazil has become the second country in the world to record more than 400,000 covid deaths after the united states. the world health organization says countries should share vaccines with brazil to help the global fight against the pandemic. leading british teams and players from sports including football, cricket and rugby have begun a four—day boycott of social media. they want facebook, instagram and twitter to take stronger action against people who post racist and sexist comments. at ten o'clock, reeta chakrabarti will be here with a full round up
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of the day's news.

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