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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 30, 2021 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm... a deadly crush at a religious festival in israel leaves at least 45 people dead, and around 150 injured. all of a sudden we saw paramedics running by doing cpr on kids, and then went after another started coming out of ambulances. then we understood, like, going on here. the actor noel clarke has released a new statement saying he vehemently denies any sexual misconduct or criminal wrongdoing and recent reports make it clear to him that some of his actions have affected julia james, the community support officer whose body was found in woodland, died of serious head injuries, police say.
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the first british police officer convicted of belonging to a neo—nazi terrorist group has beenjailed for more than four years. a taste of last summer — covid19 infection levels are down to what they were back then, according to latest figures. and, liverpool parties — without social distancing. nightclub event is testing whether large crowds can gather without spreading covid. good evening. the first funerals have been held in israel for victims of a stampede at a religious festival. at least 45 people died and around 150 were injured in the crush last night. the country s prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, said it was one of the worst disasters in the country's history, and he
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promised an investigation. tens of thousands of orthodoxjews attended the larg bomer festival, which takes place at the foot of mount meron. it was the largest event in the country since the coronavirus pandemic began. our middle east correspondent tom bateman sent this report from the scene. and a warning, it contains distressing images. they came to celebrate and to be blessed — tens of thousands ofjewish pilgrims at the mountain tomb of an ancient rabbi. but instead, they were met with panic and a deadly crush. as crowds left the graveside, descending a narrow walkway, they surged. those at the front were trapped. people tried tearing away metal barricades to free them. all of a sudden, we saw paramedics running by, like, mid—cpr on kids, and then one after the other, started coming out in ambulances.
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then we understood, like, something's going on here. pilgrimsjoined paramedics in a desperate search. dozens had been suffocated or trampled on. children became separated from parents, and army helicopters evacuated the wounded. in the hospitals, there's been anguish as relatives wait for news. many of the dead still haven't been formally identified. this man took his two young sons to the festival. when it got crowded, he says, they tried to get out. we reached a ramp, he tells me, where there was a river of people. i fell on my back and others piled on top. i prayed. my ten—year—old son was screaming for help, shouting, "i'm dead!" and my 13—year—old son — he was gone.
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the teenager remains missing. the family has been scouring hospital wards for news. the annual festival sees ultraorthodox jews flock for the night of prayer. bonfires are lit, too. this was the country's biggest gathering since the pandemic. israel has lifted many covid restrictions after the world's fastest vaccination rate, and police had planned for crowds. so, what went wrong? this is where the surge took place. crowds were heading down this metal ramp here. eye witnesses have said it was slippery. people were then turning around this corner, heading down the steps, and some have said that a barrier was blocking the route, and that's where the crush took place. at the scene, prime minister benjamin netanyahu called it a national disaster and promised a full enquiry. this afternoon, they began burying the dead.
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amid the grief and the funerals, questions mount over whether it could have been prevented. after a night of ritual, this was the one no one wanted. tom bateman, bbc news. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are deputy political editor of the daily express, sam lister, and the times radio presenter, calum macdonald. broadcasters and leading figures in the film and television industry are distancing themselves from the actor and director, noel clarke — who is facing multiple claims of sexual harassment. itv has pulled its final episode tonight of the drama, viewpoint, while sky has halted work with mr clarke. tonight noel clarke issued a statement �*vehemently�* denying any sexual misconduct or criminal wrongdoing.
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but he apologised to anyone who'd been affected by his actions, and said he'd be seeking professional help to educate himself. here's chi chi izundu. her report contains some flashing images. stella 7 noel clarke, a british film success story, celebrated for his ability to bring diverse stories to the big and small screen. a star in itv�*s police drama, viewpoint, which will now not be shown on itv1. already a recipient of the bafta rising star award, back in 2009, just two weeks ago, he was receiving the bafta award for 0utstanding british contribution to cinema. i won something that, at the time, someone like me was never supposed to. but last night the guardian newspaper published allegations from 20 women who had worked with him. allegations about sexual harassment and bullying behaviour. one woman accusing him of pinning her against the wall of his dressing room.
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another saying he had sent her sexually explicit pictures. this is a really, really damning indictment of how intimidating some workplaces, some producers are, and for our members to raise concerns, because as you say, this highly informal, sensationalised way which many people feel is the only way that they can get their voice heard. in a statement, sky said it stands against all forms of sexual harassment and bullying, and takes any allegations of this nature extremely seriously. vertigo films and all three media, which backed his production company, have also confirmed they're no longer working with him. ashley walters, seen here with noel clarke in bullet—proof, made a statement on his instagram, saying...
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it's just reminding everyone that me too is not something that happened in 2017, it's something that continues to affect people within the film and television industry, affect people outside of that, across the world, and so we need to be more diligent and start taking some action, and doing things to stop allowing these things to go on for so long. noel clarke said in a statement that he vehemently denies any sexual misconduct or criminal wrongdoing. he says the recent reports have made him realise that his actions have affected people in ways he didn't intend, and says he is deeply sorry, and would be seeking professional help to educate himself and change for the better. there's growing anger among some of the bafta members about what the organisation knew and when. in a letter, bafta said back in march, when it announced that noel clarke was to receive
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the prestigious 0utstanding british contribution to cinema award, it wasn't aware of any allegation, but it did get some tip—offs afterwards, and, as an arts charity it's not in a position to properly investigate such matters, but if it did have the first—hand accounts, as reported by the guardian, it would never have given noel clarke the award. chi chi izundu, bbc news. coronavirus infections in the uk are back to levels seen at the end of last summer, with around one in 1,000 people infected, according to figures the office for national statistics. and bbc analysis shows about 22 million people are now living in areas where there were no covid deaths in april as our health editor, hugh pym reports. the spires of oxford, with the mood matching the weather. there's not been a single reported covid death in the city for 60 days. yeah, we're quite lucky. and local people i spoke to today said they were more
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encouraged about the way things were progressing. yeah, people seem a lot calmer in themselves. they're not so... yeah, i think when you're out in town it just feels a bit like, a bit more normal. i mean, i know i've been taking him to baby groups, and i wouldn't have dreamed of doing that a few months ago. we both stayed in for 14 months. we're glad to be out! it feels like we've got more freedom.- we can do more things and, yeah, we can socialise more because the vaccines and everything, so yeah. case rates continued falling last week in all the uk nations, according to the office for national statistics, and that's even with some restrictions being eased earlier this month. covid deaths and hospital admissions have fallen sharply. new bbc research shows there are around 22 million people in the uk living in areas where there've been no covid deaths so far this month. that's deaths reported within 28 days of a positive test. back injanuary, at the peak, there were more than 30,000 covid deaths.
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now, so far this month, it's fewer than 600. this map shows areas in orange where there've been no reported covid deaths so far in april. back in september, some intensive care units for covid patients were empty, like this one filmed at the time. then came a dramatic surge, and some hospitals were close to being overwhelmed, but now they're much quieter once again. we are hearing that some intensive care units, covid intensive care units, are empty or with very low numbers of patients. that's ok for now, but we are seeing the nhs getting back to normal, and we are expecting that, as normal service resumes, the workload will increase will need to be sustained at really high levels as time moves forward. the vaccination programme continues to roll out, with those aged a0 and over in england now being offered a jab. one of the key scientists involved in developing vaccines said, even with all the good news, there was a need for caution.
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i think it's extremely unlikely that we will have a resurgence of disease to the extent we've seen before, because we've got a large number of people vaccinated, but i think we can be certain of one thing — that this virus will continue to transmit and we're not safe here or around the world until everyone is protected from the virus. the official line is that even communities with no recent covid deaths need to continue observing social distancing rules. hugh pym, bbc news, 0xford. with me is professor deirdre hollingsworth, who's an infectious disease modeller at the university of oxford. she's also a member of the scientific pandemic influenza group on modelling, which advises the government. but she's speaking to us this afternoon in a personal capacity and i'm alsojoined by paul hunter, professor in medicine at the university of east anglia. welcome to both of you. first of all, are you surprised by the way
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the figures upon coming up that they have fallen from a given vaccination and all the rest of it, but the relative speed they appeared to be dropping by. relative speed they appeared to be dronping bur-— dropping by. yes, it has been satisfactory- _ dropping by. yes, it has been satisfactory. nothing - dropping by. yes, it has been i satisfactory. nothing particularly this last week or so and today's results were, the 12 of april had reversed a downward trend, we would've seen it today, so it has been very satisfactory. particularly i think for the hospitalisation rates which if anything happen faster than the decline in case number. �* , , ,., ., number. and its gives some relief to medical staff. _ number. and its gives some relief to medical staff, of _ number. and its gives some relief to medical staff, of course, _ number. and its gives some relief to medical staff, of course, but - number. and its gives some relief to medical staff, of course, but in - medical staff, of course, but in terms of the work you are doing, what do you read into the latest data when you look at the pattern? are there any useful lessons? we are not out of the pandemic yet.- not out of the pandemic yet. indeed. we have a way _ not out of the pandemic yet. indeed. we have a way to _ not out of the pandemic yet. indeed. we have a way to go, _ not out of the pandemic yet. indeed. we have a way to go, unfortunately. | we have a way to go, unfortunately. it's really _ we have a way to go, unfortunately. it's really fantastic news that these — it's really fantastic news that these numbers are falling and that
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is driven_ these numbers are falling and that is driven by our changes in behaviour_ is driven by our changes in behaviour and all the sacrifices that people have made. the really dramatic_ that people have made. the really dramatic drops in deaths and hospitalisations is really driven by the high _ hospitalisations is really driven by the high vaccine coverage which is again— the high vaccine coverage which is again another fantastic success. there _ again another fantastic success. there is— again another fantastic success. there is lots to be very grateful for, there is lots to be very grateful for. but — there is lots to be very grateful for, but the comparison of last summer— for, but the comparison of last summer is_ for, but the comparison of last summer is relevance, because as we start to _ summer is relevance, because as we start to relax — summer is relevance, because as we start to relax our behaviour, there is a risk— start to relax our behaviour, there is a risk of— start to relax our behaviour, there is a risk of transmission increasing and it— is a risk of transmission increasing and it wiii— is a risk of transmission increasing and it will take quite a while for us to— and it will take quite a while for us to see — and it will take quite a while for us to see it's because we've got the numbers— us to see it's because we've got the numbers down so low. the other thing to be cautious about is strains arriving — to be cautious about is strains arriving either in the uk or from elsewhere — arriving either in the uk or from elsewhere against which the vaccines may not _ elsewhere against which the vaccines may not be _ elsewhere against which the vaccines may not be effective, so we cannot stop keeping an eye out for what is comim} _ stop keeping an eye out for what is cominu. ., .., stop keeping an eye out for what is comin. ., ., , coming. paul, can we say with any decree of coming. paul, can we say with any degree of confidence _ coming. paul, can we say with any degree of confidence that - coming. paul, can we say with any degree of confidence that we - coming. paul, can we say with any degree of confidence that we have j degree of confidence that we have lived through the worse of this pandemic? i think we probably have, and although there are new variants that
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are potentially posing threats to us of the moments, i think the evidence is that even if vaccines are not as effective against them, they still provide a considerable protection, especially against severe disease, so i think although we may well see case numbers much higher than we have seen at the moment, hopefully that will be translated into the sort of hospitalisation rates and numbers of deaths that we saw over this last winter. but numbers of deaths that we saw over this last winter.— this last winter. but you do expect another wave? _ this last winter. but you do expect another wave? i _ this last winter. but you do expect another wave? i think _ this last winter. but you do expect another wave? i think most - this last winter. but you do expect i another wave? i think most modelers and epidemiologists _ another wave? i think most modelers and epidemiologists sadly _ another wave? i think most modelers and epidemiologists sadly expect - and epidemiologists sadly expect that we will see another wave. the issueis that we will see another wave. the issue is whether that wave well translate into as many hospitalisations and deaths as we saw this winter, and i think most of us think it's probably won't, which is clearly good news. what us think it's probably won't, which is clearly good news.— is clearly good news. what sort of nextwave. _ is clearly good news. what sort of nextwave. as _ is clearly good news. what sort of nextwave, as it _ is clearly good news. what sort of nextwave, as it were, _ is clearly good news. what sort of nextwave, as it were, are - is clearly good news. what sort of nextwave, as it were, are you - nextwave, as it were, are you modelling? i nextwave, as it were, are you modelling?—
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modelling? i think the model su: rests modelling? i think the model suggests that _ modelling? i think the model suggests that if _ modelling? i think the model suggests that if we _ modelling? i think the model suggests that if we have - modelling? i think the model suggests that if we have big l modelling? i think the model- suggests that if we have big changes in behaviour, then we are likely to see more — in behaviour, then we are likely to see more transmission, and hopefully, you know, with the curreht— hopefully, you know, with the current strains, that that won't translate — current strains, that that won't translate into the number of hospitalisations and deaths. but i do think— hospitalisations and deaths. but i do think there is enough evidence to suggest _ do think there is enough evidence to suggest that the protection against some _ suggest that the protection against some of— suggest that the protection against some of these other strains is not as good _ some of these other strains is not as good as — some of these other strains is not as good as we would like and we do have to _ as good as we would like and we do have to keep the surveillance up and we do _ have to keep the surveillance up and we do need — have to keep the surveillance up and we do need to do things like test, trace. _ we do need to do things like test, trace, isolates very effectively and take it _ trace, isolates very effectively and take it seriously. we cannot ignore the fact— take it seriously. we cannot ignore the fact that this virus has escaped our protection before and will do agaih _ our protection before and will do aaain. ., , , ., our protection before and will do aaain. ., ,, ., ., our protection before and will do aain. ., ,, . ., again. nonetheless, paul, do you reckon their _ again. nonetheless, paul, do you reckon their remarks _ again. nonetheless, paul, do you reckon their remarks by - again. nonetheless, paul, do you| reckon their remarks by professor jonathan van tam, the deputy chief medical officer who told the news briefing on wednesday that i senses are probably we are after close to the bottom at the moment in terms of the bottom at the moment in terms of the level of disease in the uk. i think the wasn't as big in terms
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of a big increase in transmission, because essentially, meeting out—of—doors is associated with a fairly low risk of transmission, the big challenge is going to be the next step which is currently scheduled for the 17th of may, and i can see no evidence that that will change of the moment, but certainly, i think that is going to be the big challenge, and how we manage that gentile that impacts the epidemic as it is. and we know that towards the end of next month. in it is. and we know that towards the end of next month.— it is. and we know that towards the end of next month. in terms of apps from that effectively _ end of next month. in terms of apps from that effectively allows - end of next month. in terms of apps from that effectively allows people | from that effectively allows people to meet indoors, again, the rule of six applies. what is it about human behaviour that we believe is different in gymnastic situations indoors than, say, if we meet in a pub or restaurants, or indeed, in other community facilities, like a community centre or a hall. it’s other community facilities, like a
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community centre or a hall. it's a combination _ community centre or a hall. it's a combination of— community centre or a hall. it's a combination of factors, _ community centre or a hall. it's a combination of factors, so - community centre or a hall. it's a| combination of factors, so airflow is really— combination of factors, so airflow is really important. so if you are in a larger— is really important. so if you are in a larger space, there may be —— there _ in a larger space, there may be —— there wiii— in a larger space, there may be —— there will be — in a larger space, there may be —— there will be more airflow, there may be _ there will be more airflow, there may be less. you may sit closer together— may be less. you may sit closer together if— may be less. you may sit closer together if you are in a domestic situation — together if you are in a domestic situation and you may stay together longer, _ situation and you may stay together longer, so _ situation and you may stay together longer, so the longer you are with someone — longer, so the longer you are with someone from greater the chance that they could _ someone from greater the chance that they could transmit to you if they have _ they could transmit to you if they have the — they could transmit to you if they have the infection. so the way we behave _ have the infection. so the way we behave with family and friends in our house — behave with family and friends in our house is not the same way we behave _ our house is not the same way we behave with — our house is not the same way we behave with somebody in a restaurant.— behave with somebody in a restaurant. ~ ., �* , ., restaurant. we don't understand some thins restaurant. we don't understand some things about — restaurant. we don't understand some things about transmission _ restaurant. we don't understand some things about transmission about - things about transmission about covid, can you give us an idea of the sorts of questions that people still don't feel they have enough data on to be able to confidently predict how the virus spreads and the impact it will have each time it flares up. i think the biggest area is whether or not how important airborne transmission is for covid, because even though you have very divergent views among the scientific community with many scientists saying it's airborne and that it will spread
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quite some distance, particularly indoors, a lot of the sciences really disagreeing with us, and i think that is one of big uncertainties of the moment is how much very small droplets that stay in the airfora much very small droplets that stay in the air for a long period much very small droplets that stay in the airfor a long period of much very small droplets that stay in the air for a long period of time contribute to the epidemic, and i don't think we are any closer to actually getting consensus on that opinion at the moment. professor, there are still _ opinion at the moment. professor, there are still things, _ opinion at the moment. professor, there are still things, am - opinion at the moment. professor, there are still things, am i - opinion at the moment. professor, there are still things, am i correctl there are still things, am i correct in saying that for example, social distancing, why it has been more effective in some countries than in others. , ., , , effective in some countries than in others. , , �*, , others. yes, absolutely, it's very difficult to _ others. yes, absolutely, it's very difficult to make _ others. yes, absolutely, it's very difficult to make exact _ others. yes, absolutely, it's very i difficult to make exact comparisons between _ difficult to make exact comparisons between different countries because behaviour— between different countries because behaviour is different in different countries, — behaviour is different in different countries, and also the guidance is may be _ countries, and also the guidance is may be different in different countries. for example, the test trace _ countries. for example, the test trace and — countries. for example, the test trace and isolate system in the uk we know— trace and isolate system in the uk we know is— trace and isolate system in the uk we know is a really important driver of how _ we know is a really important driver of how infective that is is whether or not— of how infective that is is whether or not people isolates when they are contacted _ or not people isolates when they are contacted by that system. you know,
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it's hard _ contacted by that system. you know, it's hard to _ contacted by that system. you know, it's hard to stay at home for 14 days, — it's hard to stay at home for 14 days, and _ it's hard to stay at home for 14 days, and people behave very differently when they are contacted by the _ differently when they are contacted by the system. so making direct comparisons within different communities, let alone between international situations is very challenging. its international situations is very challenging-— international situations is very challenging. as well as being a scientist, both _ challenging. as well as being a scientist, both of— challenging. as well as being a scientist, both of you, - challenging. as well as being a scientist, both of you, you - challenging. as well as being a scientist, both of you, you are | scientist, both of you, you are ordinary citizens. you have had to adapt your own lives to this pandemic. i suspect it's even worse for you if you are scientists and professors and you appear on television and so on and talk about this because people judge television and so on and talk about this because peoplejudge you perhaps to a very high standard. how are you changing your own behaviour? can you give us some insight into that based on your own experience, paul first. ., , that based on your own experience, paul first. . , ., , paulfirst. certainly. i have very rarely been _ paulfirst. certainly. i have very rarely been out _ paulfirst. certainly. i have very rarely been out of _ paulfirst. certainly. i have very rarely been out of the - paulfirst. certainly. i have very rarely been out of the house, . paulfirst. certainly. i have very| rarely been out of the house, or paulfirst. certainly. i have very i rarely been out of the house, or at least out of the immediate neighbourhood since march. in the last few weeks, we have certainly been able to visit one of my
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grandchildren in their garden, which has been a great pleasure, but we are still pretty much staying around the house and the local area for the time being. hopefully, later in the next few weeks, we will start tentatively going out to restaurants again, i'm really looking forward to that. yes, just that very small area in which we live now and we are fortunate that's, you know, we can walk around the local area and go to the local park and pick up takeaways and things from the local restaurants which is great, bouts, of course, we all want to see our friends and family, and it's hard, you know, but it's worth it. good note to and _ you know, but it's worth it. good note to and on. _ you know, but it's worth it. good note to and on. it's _ you know, but it's worth it. good note to and on. it's hard, - you know, but it's worth it. good note to and on. it's hard, but - you know, but it's worth it. good note to and on. it's hard, but it's worth it. i think that probably sums up worth it. i think that probably sums up the experience of many people in this country, professors, thank you as ever forjoining this country, professors, thank you as everforjoining us on bbc news. my as everforjoining us on bbc news. my pleasure. as ever forjoining us on bbc news. my pleasure-—
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the indian government will open vaccinations to all adults over eighteen from saturday, meaning around 600 million more people will be eligible. but several states have warned they do not have sufficient stocks. in mumbai — one of the major cities reeling from the new wave — says it will haltjabs from friday to sunday "owing to non—availability of vaccine stock". meanwhile, the first us consignment of emergency medical supplies has arrived, including hundreds of oxygen concentrators, ventilators and other equipment. india has reported another record daily increase in coronavirus cases, with almost 390,000 new infections. here, many british indians have pledged money and aid to the country. dr nilesh parmar, has been raising funds to be sent there and spoke to him earlier. i'm of indian ancestry,
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both my parents are indian. my sister lives in bombay, so not only have i been seeing the images on mainstream media, i have also been receiving daily updates from her as to what's really going on on the ground. and what is it you are trying to do? so, i think one of the issues we have is the british asians and especially the health care professionals, we really do want to help. i think one of the concerns is that if we donated money, where will that money go? and will it end up in the hands of the people who really need it? so, because i have a close family member in india, we have managed to identify some charities who we know are doing first—hand exceptional work. so i've opened up a go fund me page here aimed at uk health care providers and we aim to donate money to charities in india in a grassroots level to try to make a difference. and you are finding a good response so far? it's actually been quite incredible. i'm very proud of everyone who's contributed, actually. we started with a target of £5,000. we reached that in about 36 minutes, and then we then reached
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£10,000 within three hours. less than 24 hours later, we were approaching the third target of £15,000. but i mean, that's terrific, but i'm interested in the point you were making, you're concerned about where money goes, and therefore, you want to, you know, use your sister to identify charities and organisations in bombay, mumbai, which will then use the money, you can be confident where the money is going. i mean, that is difficult, isn't it, because a lot of money and a lot of help will be sent to the government by other governments, including the british government, the french come americans and so on, but you just worry a little bit about what, unless it's physical things, what may happen to some of that. correct, yeah. and that's also coming from residents in bombay as well. that's why the emphasis for us is to work with charities whom we know
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are doing exceptional work. there is a lot of transparency as to where and what is done with the money that we don't need to come in the think that's a concern for anybody who donates money to charity. what about, what sort of charities, then come in bombay and mumbai are you aiming to help? has your sister identified any particular ones get? yeah, so, there is one charity called the indian youth congress, there is also a well—known charity called kulzar aid, which also has representatives and offices here in the uk. just a brief question, this help could be required for quite a long time to come now, are you worried, and is your sister worried that maybe things will get worse before they get better? yes, definitely. i think this is going to be an ongoing thing. i don't think it's something which will be fixed overnight, and unfortunately, i think we haven't reached a peak in india as of yet. speaking with me a little earlier about his charitable efforts to try and help people in india.
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a police community support officer whose body was found in woodland in kent died from serious head injuries, police say. the body of 53—year—old julia james was found in a wood in snowdown near dover on tuesday. police say that so far no motive or suspects have been identified. helena wilkinson reports. the family ofjulia paid a moving tribute to her. they said that she was fiercely loyal, loved with her whole heart and nothing was too much trouble for the people she cared about. they talked about the fact that she had a beautiful smile and a wonderful sense of humour. they also say there are no words to adequately describe the void left in their lives. this normally quiet rural part of kent has become the focus of an extensive murder investigation. it was on the edge of this wood where julia james was found, just a few hundred yards from where she lived.
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the 53—year—old police community support officer had been working from home on tuesday. she'd taken her dog for a walk when she was attacked in the small village of snowdown in kent. kent police say she wasn't in police uniform when she was found. dozens of officers are continuing to search the area here. police say the body ofjulia james was found by a number of people close to the woods on tuesday afternoon. she died from significant head injuries. at this stage, they don't have any suspects, nor can they find a clear motive. what they aren't ruling out is that she was killed by a stranger. it's particularly challenging and poignant for some staff working on the case, who knew her professionally or potentially, of course, socially, so, i am working very carefully to ensure that all of my teams are fully supported. it's also been a difficult time for this small community.
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shocked. very shocked and a bit frightened, living here at my age, you know? we never locked the doors, but now... we're locking doors. today, julia james was described by the kent force as a hugely devoted and passionate individual, who was completely committed to serving the people of kent. helena wilkinson, bbc news, snowdown in kent. it isa it is a bank holiday weekend for much of the uk. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. good evening. it's a promising start to the bank holiday weekend. yes, some early frost out there, but it looks as though saturday and sunday will be a combination of sunny spells and scattered showers. but it's all change from bank holiday monday, turning increasingly wet and windy. but there will be some lovely sunshine first thing on saturday morning. as we go through the day, the showers will really develop, and with a light breeze,
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some of those could be slow—moving and quite intense with some hail, maybe some thunder. and those temperatures still a little disappointing for the time of year, 8—13 celsius the high. pretty much a repeat performance on sunday, dry with some sunny spells in the morning, plenty of showers into the afternoon. but by monday, here is that area of low pressure, it's going to move in from the atlantic. it will bring a spell of heavy rain and some gusty winds with it as well, moving its way steadily eastwards as we go through the day, perhaps staying driest for longest in the far north of scotland and the southeast corner. but disappointingly cool under the cloud, the wind and the rain.
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this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines... a deadly crash at a religious festival leaves at least 45 people dead and around 150 more injured. all of a sudden, we saw paramedics running by, like mid cpr on kids. 0ne after the other started coming out of ambulances. we understood something is going on here. noel clarke released a new statement saying he vehemently denies sexual
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misconduct or criminal wrongdoing. recent reports make it clear that some of his actions have affected people in ways he did not intend or realise. julia james's body... died of serious head industries. it is jailed for more than four years. —— a former officer. infection levels are down to what they were back then. and liverpool is partying this weekend without social distancing, a nightclub event testing whether large crowds can gather without necessarily spreading covid. let's continue one story we featured in the headlines. the convention of a former metropolitan police officer who has been jailed a former metropolitan police officer who has beenjailed for a former metropolitan police officer who has been jailed for belonging to a neo—nazi terrorist group is jailed forfour a neo—nazi terrorist group is jailed for four years and four months.
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daniel sandford has been following the case. he was convicted on the 4th of april for lying about. he was at the time released on bail, but today, he came back to some court for sentencing and hisjudge for sentencing and his judge sentenced for sentencing and hisjudge sentenced him to four years and four months in prison, a total of three months in prison, a total of three months for being a member of a band a terrorist organisation and also sentences for possessing of documents that might be useful for a terrorist. a consecutive sentence —— a concurrent sentence of one year for the fraud. that is essentially lying on his police application form or he was asked to take a box that
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he was not a member of the v and p or similar organisations, and he picked a similar box on his vetting form. he lied about it and became a police officer and served as a police officer and served as a police officer and served as a police officer for almost two years before the metropolitan police realised that they had a neo—nazi and a former member of a band group in their own ranks. daniel sandford there. i spoke to the former metropolitan police and she explained how he managed to sift through the net.— through the net. when anybody a- lies through the net. when anybody applies for— through the net. when anybody applies for a — through the net. when anybody applies for a process _ through the net. when anybody applies for a process or - through the net. when anybody applies for a process or a - through the net. when anybody applies for a process or a job, l through the net. when anybody i applies for a process or a job, they are expected to tell the truth. clearly, he didn't tell the truth when he picked to the box to say he wasn't a member of any described organisation. what does not surprise me is that there will be a certain
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amount of checking, but clearly, he's got through the net here for a number of two years, which was two years too long to serve the public. i suppose, i take the point you're making about there is a basic level that relies on basic on it and see. people unfortunately do life for various reasons, but in this case, national action was an organisation that received a lot of scrutiny by officers and others within the met family. it had relatively small membership. although he never been charged, nonetheless, it might surprise people that there is no systematic way of picking up individuals like this. if it systematic way of picking up individuals like this. if it didn't come u- individuals like this. if it didn't come up on — individuals like this. if it didn't come up on the _ individuals like this. if it didn't come up on the police - individuals like this. if it didn't| come up on the police national computer, that's one thing that
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doesn't come as a surprise, but if there had been any information or intelligence, then the checks that would have been made should have really identified him as being part of the organisation. now, that is something that may have been missed, and it's something that police need to look further into in terms of when somebody does submit an application. it's very difficult because somebody that has such extreme views or who is racist or sexist or misogynistic, doesn't necessarily have it written on their forum and it won't necessarily come to light even throughout their career. but it will certainly, if there is some evidence that has come to light in respect of this individual, which i think two years down the line, the met did a good job in terms of targeting him once they were aware of his affiliation. if somebody is going in a or progressing through the ranks, if
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you've been vetted when you pull apply to be an officer, is that it? do not get vetted again? it apply to be an officer, is that it? do not get vetted again? it depends on what 'ob do not get vetted again? it depends on what job you _ do not get vetted again? it depends on what job you do. _ do not get vetted again? it depends on what job you do. if _ do not get vetted again? it depends on what job you do. if you're - do not get vetted again? it depends on what job you do. if you're going i on whatjob you do. if you're going into safeguarding, going into the olympics, you go to the highest 0lympics, you go to the highest level. they will vent you in terms of your background, what may have changed in terms of your lifestyle and so on. 0therwise, changed in terms of your lifestyle and so on. otherwise, not really. you won't get further vetted unless you apply for particular roles. than you apply for particular roles. an officer has been sacked after hitting a vulnerable 17—year—old girl 34 times with a bat on. the incident took place with... misconduct panel heard pc benjamin kemp used his baton and spray at close range. arlene foster will quit the democratic unionist party when she stands down as northern ireland's first minister, the bbc understands.
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sources close to her said she thinks it is no longer the party shejoined and it is moving in a different direction. mrs foster is to resign as dup leader on 28th may and end her tenure as first minister at the end ofjune. sports bodies have become a boycott of social media. it's hoped the protest will encourage social media companies to do more to prevent harmful content from being posted, and punish those behind it. nestor mcgregor reports. taking the knee, slogans, banners, big campaigns — now football's latest attempt to stamp out racism is digital silence. do i think it will make a difference? probably not, but what it does do is it sends a warning to these companies to let these people know
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we are not going to take this abuse any more. led by the premier league, the efl and with support from the other major sports, a vow of silence on the platforms where the abuse takes place. if they still don't take action, i think you will see these clubs, players, staff, corporations, start to get together and think of more tough measures to finally force action. for some, the boycott doesn't go far enough or address why people behave like this in the first place. but, as seen recently, football does have the power to effect change, or prevent it. to affect change, or prevent it. even before the lockdown kicked in, we were seeing significant increases in reported incidents based on discrimination, so this isn'tjust online. the fact we have not been in grounds or had grassroots football is hiding the fact that this is a problem in society. there is no room for racism. with the spotlight on social media companies, facebook, which owns instagram,
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recently gave users more control over who can message them privately. this isn't about profit, this isn't about money, we have been working on some of these tools for a very long time, regardless of any calls for boycotts. how to handle being racially abused at work is a conversation andros had with his dad. the 29—year—old hopes it is not a lesson he will have to pass down. hopefully we will have eradicated the problem. i feel like it's all about education, like i've said before, and hopefully if we educate the kids now, then when they are in their 20s and 30s, we are not receiving the same racist abuse on a daily basis. so, hopefully i won't have to have these tough conversations with my son when he's older. nestor macgregor, bbc news. well, a little earlier, the former world cup winner and arsenal legend thierry henry told us why he was coming off social media. i came off it because enough is
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enough. i myself did not suffer recently of it as a player. i did in the past before, sometimes in social media. but as of right now, when i did it, i didn't suffer. ijust had enough of what was happening on this platform, whether it happened in sports or in life, as you mentioned just before. ijust said to myself, maybe that's going to create the wave if i come out and people are going to ask about it and want to know about it. and the strength of the pack, i always thought and still think, that is something powerful that you can see. and maybe we can ask those platforms and social media why are they not doing way more to stop what is happening on their platform and do way more to find out who are behind those accounts. borisjohnson has held a virtual meeting with a group of ex—postmasters, a week after a host of convictions were overturned.
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dozens of post 0fficer workers were wrongly convicted after due to a glitch in its defective accounting system. in one of the uk's biggest miscarriages ofjustice, those convictions were overturned by the high court last week. speaking during the meeting, the prime minister said he would ensure nothing like this happens again. clubbers are returning to the dance floor in the uk for the first time since the pandemic began, without facemasks or social distancing. it's part of the government's pilot programme to establish whether large crowds can safely gather without spreading covid. i bet you're wondering where is it and can i get in? it's not. 6000 people will attend a two—day event in liverpool today and tomorrow, as danjohnson reports. music plays the masks are off to embrace live music and each other.
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anywhere else, this would be illegal, but liverpool's leading the way, turning the volume back—up. the way, turning the volume back up. all of us are excited. we're all on the verge of tears, ready to go in. honestly, yeah, we're not even drunk yet, so we just... we're ready for it. i have literally spent about three weeks preparing for this outfit. oh, so long! genuinely, yeah. deciding what to drink, deciding what to wear, it's been, honestly — big up liverpool for having the first non—socially distanced event in the country. we love this city, we love this city. we love it, we love it. we have been waiting for a night out for so long, haven't we? yeah, true. we've had about a week to whip up an outfit. a little bit overwhelming _ because obviously we haven't been around this many people in so long. yeah, yeah. and it'sjust, it's weird to get back into it, but i'm excited. | a bit nervous but i'm excited. it's a huge dealfor the djs, who've had a quiet year, like everyone else in live events. i'll be looking at the data. i'm really keen on that stuff anyways, like, i'm a big nerd, so yeah. jayda g studied environmental
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toxicology before turning to music. it's so surreal, like, oh, my goodness, there's people, and they're together, and they're dancing, and this is exciting! it's kind of not allowed, isn't it? i know, it feels like, hey, we shouldn't be doing this, but, yeah, it's ok. like, everyone tested, and yeah, we're doing this. i am really pumped. i'm so excited. so, we've got perfect natural ventilation here. the key here are the sensors, monitoring ventilation and air flow. so, by measuring the amount of c02 in the space, we're able to estimate the ventilation flow rates, and, more importantly, we're able to investigate the fresh air distribution. how does that air moves around the space and around the people? and, on sunday, there's an even bigger gig — 5,000 people in sefton park who will also be tested before and after. we do follow—up surveys as well. we ask people to take a pcr test five days afterwards, _
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and that absolutely allows us i to understand the transmission. we want people to enjoy themselves. we want people to have a good time at what is the first _ events for over a year, so it's really importantj for individuals, but it's also part of a scientific experiment, i and it's essential we capture the learning from it. - this could be the way to bring back more fun for all of us, but some rules never change. you're first in the queue and... and i've left me id! it's a shame, it's a shame, but i'm going back to get it, but i'm very happy to be here. danjohnson, dan johnson, bbc news, danjohnson, bbc news, liverpool. the headlines on bbc news... a deadly crush at a religious festival in israel leaves at least 45 people dead, and around 150 injured the actor noel clarke has released a new statement saying he �*vehemently�* denies any sexual misconduct or criminal wrongdoing and recent reports make it clear to him that some of his actions have affected people in ways he did not intend or realise.
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julia james, the community support officer whose body was found in woodland, died of serious head injuries, police say. now on bbc news, it's time for newswatch. we'll have mormon news at the top of the hour. —— more news. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. a week of questions about how the refurbishment of borisjohnson's flat was paid for, but are viewers as interested as bbc news thinks they are? and was a downing street press briefing on covid the right place
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to ask about those redecorations?

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