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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 30, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world... dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in the jewish world, attended by tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox jews. we've just finished treating one of israel's worst disasters. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate lag b'omer, and unfortunately, were literally crushed to death. actor and director noel clarke is suspended by bafta, after allegations of sexual harrassment which he denies. security worries over the prime minister's phone — after it's revealed his phone number's been freely available online, for the last 15 years.
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a vital consignment of american medical supplies has arrived in india, which hasjust recorded another global record for new coronavirus infections. sport goes silent. football, rugby, cricket and more will start a four day boycott of social media today, an attempt to tackle online abuse. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. it's been described as one of israel's worst disasters. at least 44 people have been killed in a stampede at a religious festival in the north of the country. more than a hundred others were injured when up to 80,000
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orthodox jews gathered at a festival at mount meron. prime minister benjamin netanyahu described it as a "heavy disaster" and said he was praying for the casualties. courtney bembridge has more. and a warning her report contains distressing images. videos uploaded to social media show the chaotic scenes. tens of thousands of people crushed together at the foot of mount meron. wejust finished reading one of israel's worst disasters. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate and unfortunately they were literally crushed to death. it was supposed to be a celebration, a night of prayer, singing and dancing. translation: iwas there, inside. it was crowded and there were around 60,000 to 70,000 people. no place to move.
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then people started to fall on the ground. they fell a lot on the ground. all of a sudden we saw paramedics, whatever, running by, like mid—cpr on kids. then, one after the other, there started coming ambulances. then we understood like something is going on here. many people had been watching the event live on television. emergency services struggled to reach those who were injured because of the crowds. the roads were also congested and military helicopters were brought in to take the injured to hospital. many of the first responders were volunteers, now being offered counselling. many many people were hurt and injured, and killed here. the volunteers behind us are being gathered together for an immediate debrief, to the fact that they were exposed to a very difficult site. the evening event is the start of the religious festival,
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but all future events have been cancelled because of the disaster. courtney bembridge, bbc news. another eyewitness gave us more details about the exact moment the stampede happened and the chaos that followed. translation: a terrible load started. _ and what happened was kind of a carousel. one person pushed another person, so everybody was pushed right and left. and after 20 minutes, i think, people started suffocating. so they wanted to get out. but no one was able to get out. there were people under me who were not breathing any more. there were horrible screams of "i can't breathe". and gradually, some of the screaming stopped. people started trying to pull people from underneath instead of the top. crazy chaos. our middle east correspondent has been given me this latest update. there is more graphic footage that has come out. a lot of witnesses
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have been telling us what happened from their perspective. it is clear that in one of the passageways that leads away from one of the main event areas at this location, it is one of the holiestjewish sites in israel. it is that aside for annual pilgrimages that before the pandemic would have attracted far more people then we even saw there overnight. there were tens of thousands of people there at the site. now it is a very gendered segregated area. many men and boys were making their way down this passage way. and we can see that some people fell or slipped, we were told. then there was this terrible crush that resulted and that left people being trampled on and being suffocated. the death toll is currently at 44, but a lot of people critically injured and there are fears that that death toll could rise.
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definitely. there are more than 100 people who are in hospitals, some of them critically, some of them seriously injured. mainly men and boys. in israel, really, the country is in a state of shock. a lot of questions being asked about how on earth this happen. the local police commissioner has said that he accepts responsibility, but a lot of experts have been coming out and saying that this was an event that took place with a lot of planning. it was actually the biggest gathering of people that israel had seen since the pandemic began. we know that senior police officers and also the public security minister had gone to to inspect the site in advance. very few changes were put at mount meron compared to previous years when the event takes place. there is usually a concert and dancing. big bonfires that take place there. one of the things that
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had been change was to stop large numbers of people gathering around the bonfires. there had been some corrugated iron fencing that was put up. in some of the quite upsetting footage, you can see people tearing down some of this fencing in order to make more space. she down some of this fencing in order to make more space.— to make more space. she was reporting _ to make more space. she was reporting from _ to make more space. she was reporting from jerusalem. - back to has suspended the actor and director noel clark at after allegations of sexual harassment and bullying. the actor has vehemently denied any misconduct or ms doing. as you will see in this report. viewpoint, itv�*s new police drama starring noel clarke. the actor made his first tv appearance more than 20 years ago. and there have been many more since then. but it is his work behind the camera that has won him huge critical acclaim with the likes of the hood trilogy of kidulthood, adulthood and brotherhood.
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earlier this month, he received an outstanding contribution award from bafta, one of the academy's highest accolades. last night, bafta issued a statement. it said that... it follows a range of allegations concerning the actor's behaviour, allegations which he vehemently denies. in a statement, noel clarke said...
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tim muffett, bbc news. it has emerged that the british prime minister's mobile phone number has been freely available online for the last 15 years. boris johnson's number was listed on a press release from 2006 when he was a junior shadow minister. it appears to have stayed the same ever since. the opposition labour party says it raises concerns about security and the risk of black male. mrjohnson�*s office has declined to comment. meanwhile an mp has as the parliamentarian standards commission to investigate whether the prime minister broke any rules. our political correspondent has been explaining more to me about how easily accessible the prime minister's phone number has been. this is still on the website, there is a link to the press release until very recently. it would have been
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available for a long time and it is the current number. if you bring that phone number, there is an automated message saying that it is switched off, surprise surprise. you are invited to send a text. the national security adviser lord ricketts, the former adviser, said that this is a elementary matter of security when boris johnson went from a backbench mp to a security when borisjohnson went from a backbench mp to a junior shadow minister when he went through the doors of number ten, they should have made sure that that number was changed. this posed a greater risk because some of those people who should not have that number are hostile states that could have sophisticated cyber activities. and it could be very easy for them to get that number. some other people would suggest that perhaps hostile states with intelligent services would have gotten hold of the number in any case. this follows on from
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concerns whether some people had privileged access to the prime minister by having his mobile phone number. nonetheless, it was seem that privileged access isn't quite, doesn't quite cover it. it is widespread access that people may have had. downing street is not confirming even now whether the number will be changed. it confirming even now whether the number will be changed.- confirming even now whether the number will be changed. it will be interestin: number will be changed. it will be interesting to _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see if _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see if he _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see if he does - number will be changed. it will be i interesting to see if he does change it. in the meantime, another twist, another development in the saga over the prime minister's downing street flat. . �* , ., , flat. that's right. earlier this week the — flat. that's right. earlier this week the electoral _ flat. that's right. earlier this i week the electoral commission decided it was going to launch a formal investigation. the political funding watchdog is going to be focused on the conservative party for example,. did they properly declare loans or donations? the conservatives insist that they absolutely follow the letter of the
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law. no codes of conduct breached. that is what they are saying, but thatis that is what they are saying, but that is what the commission will be looking at. what has happened today is that the labeller mp margaret hodge has written to the parliamentary standards commissioner and what herjob is is to look at the conduct of individual mps and whether borisjohnson would be making the correct declarations in terms of any benefits or conflicts of interest. we should stress that simply writing to the commissioner does not mean that she will launch an investigation. if she did, a committee of mps would have to approve any subsequent actions. she is making it clear that we will not know whether the investigation is launched before the local elections in england and scotland and wales. he mentioned lord ricketts at the
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former national security adviser. i am delighted to say that he joins me right now. very good to have you on the programme. how surprised argue that the prime minister's phone number has been so widely known available for years? i number has been so widely known available for years?— number has been so widely known available for years? i was surprised when i heard _ available for years? i was surprised when i heard that _ available for years? i was surprised when i heard that the _ available for years? i was surprised when i heard that the prime - available for years? i was surprised l when i heard that the prime minister had not changed his phone number in 15 years. and had not changed it when he came into downing street. of course everyone likes to have their mobile phone number, but when you become prime minister, you have to accept restrictions on some of your freedoms. you cannotjust have anybody drop into the office who wants to come in lobby you about something. if lots of people have your mobile phone number, that is the digital equivalent of being able to drop in on the prime minister. i think it should be basic security that when a prime minister comes in, they change their mobile phone number. they keep it only to talk to family and friends and close allies
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and for the rest, they filter people through the official channels of access. �* , , through the official channels of access. , access. i'm sure boris johnson will sa i access. i'm sure boris johnson will say i want — access. i'm sure boris johnson will say i want to _ access. i'm sure boris johnson will say i want to be — access. i'm sure boris johnson will say i want to be accessible. - access. i'm sure boris johnson will say i want to be accessible. i - access. i'm sure boris johnson will say i want to be accessible. i want| say i want to be accessible. i want people to call me i want people to know my phone number.— people to call me i want people to know my phone number. well... at the extreme there — know my phone number. well... at the extreme there is _ know my phone number. well... at the extreme there is a _ know my phone number. well... at the extreme there is a possibility _ know my phone number. well... at the extreme there is a possibility that - extreme there is a possibility that hostile states could have the phone number. but also it means that the prime minister can have discussions with people completely off—line. it might involve contracts or tax affairs as we have seen. or foreign affairs. it is much better if people who have gotten business to do with the pm go through the official switchboard. the callers identity can be checked. the whole thing is above board and everyone is protected. this is for pm's own protection. if protected. this is for pm's own protection-— protected. this is for pm's own rotection. ., ., , protection. if you are advising him now, ou protection. if you are advising him now. you need — protection. if you are advising him now, you need to _ protection. if you are advising him now, you need to have _ protection. if you are advising him now, you need to have some -
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protection. if you are advising him now, you need to have some sort| protection. if you are advising him i now, you need to have some sort of prime ministerial phone and then perhaps your own personal mobile phone. perhaps your own personal mobile hone. , ., �* phone. yes indeed. i wouldn't couraue phone. yes indeed. i wouldn't courage business _ phone. yes indeed. i wouldn't courage business that - phone. yes indeed. i wouldn't courage business that has - phone. yes indeed. i wouldn't courage business that has to l phone. yes indeed. i wouldn't i courage business that has to do phone. yes indeed. i wouldn't - courage business that has to do with the pm to go through the number ten switchboard. if you have to have mobile phone calls do them on a different phone from your personal phone, keep it carefully protected because there are lots of people out there for home access to the prime minister is a really valuable asset. and that needs to be restricted. it is just one of the things that should go with being a pm. lots isjust one of the things that should go with being a pm. lots of --eole should go with being a pm. lots of people saying _ should go with being a pm. lots of people saying he _ should go with being a pm. lots of people saying he should _ should go with being a pm. lots of people saying he should change i should go with being a pm. lots of| people saying he should change his number now. knowing the prime minister as you do, do you think he well? i minister as you do, do you think he well? ., �* ~' minister as you do, do you think he well? ., �* ~ ., , ., , well? i don't think he has any 0 tion well? i don't think he has any option now- _ well? i don't think he has any option now. if— well? i don't think he has any option now. if it— well? i don't think he has any option now. if it turns - well? i don't think he has any option now. if it turns out - well? i don't think he has any option now. if it turns out he | well? i don't think he has any - option now. if it turns out he was freely available on the internet, that it freely available on the internet, thatitis freely available on the internet, that it is essential that he changes it now. it should have been done when he became prime minister. i think it is all about and attitude towards your digital security, which has to be taken as seriously as your
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physical safety. i don't think any prime minister has done that up to now. i don't think borisjohnson is a loan with not wanting to be separated from his mobile phone. there are real risks if you keep the same number. reputational risks and security risk potentially.— security risk potentially. surely the security — security risk potentially. surely the security services _ security risk potentially. surely the security services have - security risk potentially. surely| the security services have some security risk potentially. surely - the security services have some way of protecting the prime minister's phone number digitally. i am of protecting the prime minister's phone number digitally.— of protecting the prime minister's phone number digitally. i am not a ber phone number digitally. i am not a cyber expert. _ phone number digitally. i am not a cyber expert. but _ phone number digitally. i am not a cyber expert, but i _ phone number digitally. i am not a cyber expert, but i would - phone number digitally. i am not a cyber expert, but i would think- phone number digitally. i am not a cyber expert, but i would think if. cyber expert, but i would think if you are a sophisticated state would cyber capabilities and you had the pm's phone number, that would give you a head start being able to access to it and listening to calls or text that were being sent on it. it is a risk that need not be had. and can be turned off by changing the phone number and keeping his personal phone number on a tight, limited network of people. we personal phone number on a tight, limited network of people.- limited network of people. we will see if he changes _ limited network of people. we will see if he changes his _ limited network of people. we will see if he changes his number. - limited network of people. we will see if he changes his number. i i see if he changes his number. i don't personally have it. and nor do
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you. thank you so much for being here. good to talk to you. the headlines on bbc news... dozens of people are killed in israel at one of the holiest sites. tens of thousand of orthodox due max attended. noel clark has been suspended by bath to after allegations of sexual harassment which he denies. and security worries over the british prime minister's mobile phone after it was revealed his phone number has been freely available online for the last 15 years. the first us consignment of emergency medical supplies has arrived in india, including hundreds of oxygen concentrators, ventilators and other items to tackle covid—nineteen. two more similarflights are expected to reach india in the next few days.
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india reported almost 300 thousand infection and another 3500 deaths. our correspondent is in new delhi with the latest. the our correspondent is in new delhi with the latest.— with the latest. the rise in coronavirus _ with the latest. the rise in coronavirus infections - with the latest. the rise in - coronavirus infections continue unabated. more than 390,000 fresh cases in the last 2a hours and nearly 3500 deaths. the situation in delhi is of particular concern which saw nearly 400 deaths within the last 24 hours. the positivity rate is at 33% of 20 million people. hospitals continue to run out of space. the administration is trying to battle the rising number of casualties. they are converting parks and parking lots in makeshift crematorium is because the casualty figures are rising exponentially. this morning on an encouraging side,
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the first consignment of covid—19 support arrived from america. india is also receiving foreign aid from other countries, but many experts are pointing out, the fact that this is such an aggressive coronavirus wave and the rate at which the infections are rising this aid may fall short. infections are rising this aid may fallshort. one infections are rising this aid may fall short. one ways... tomorrow onwards all adults would be eligible from vaccines, but many individual states are saying they simply do not have enough vaccine on the ground. so that is a huge concern. scientists are making projection saying that more vaccine could arrive by mid may, but we could still be seeing a lot of cases and casualties. mukti mulligan from london
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was in goa when the uk effectively banned travel from india. he missed the flight he was planning to return on as he contracted covid. he then managed to fly to france, where he is now quarantining. hejoins me now. thank you very much for being with us. tell us your story. iii. thank you very much for being with us. tell us your story.— us. tell us your story. hi. thank ou. i us. tell us your story. hi. thank you- i am _ us. tell us your story. hi. thank you. i am actually _ us. tell us your story. hi. thank you. i am actually incredibly - you. i am actually incredibly relieved to be back. i've spent a week and a half looking at flights and policies and pcr testing and in the end, i managed to get a flight to france through delhi. but it was very tight because i had to get a test within 36 hours of getting my flight and it came back negative. i had to go to delhi and take the risk of not getting the testing time or testing positive which would have made me have to be there for more time. ~ , .,
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made me have to be there for more time. ~ i. , time. when you were in goa, tell me about the situation _ time. when you were in goa, tell me about the situation there. _ time. when you were in goa, tell me about the situation there. tell - time. when you were in goa, tell me about the situation there. tell me i about the situation there. tell me about the situation there. tell me about what you saw in terms of the terrible, terrifying spread of coronavirus there.— terrible, terrifying spread of coronavirus there. yes, it is a very stran . e coronavirus there. yes, it is a very strange situation _ coronavirus there. yes, it is a very strange situation because - coronavirus there. yes, it is a very strange situation because for- coronavirus there. yes, it is a very strange situation because for me, | strange situation because for me, particularly looking at the news and the sort of stories and festivals and rallies going on, ifound that i had been there for a little while and life in india particularly in goa was going incredibly normally until the numbers started exploding. as soon that happened, everybody started to get sick. everyone around me and people under 40 and that is the general population of go up because of a lot of tourism. very few people got tested. i did get tested and i tested positive. i'm pretty certain that the vast majority of people would have tested positive. but for many reasons don't want to get tested. and then within a week, the system started to
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buckle. ile a week, the system started to buckle. ., , , , , a week, the system started to buckle. . , , , , ., buckle. he was surprised with how many young _ buckle. he was surprised with how many young people _ buckle. he was surprised with how many young people you _ buckle. he was surprised with how many young people you saw- buckle. he was surprised with how many young people you saw with i many young people you saw with coronavirus?— coronavirus? incredibly. a lot of the people _ coronavirus? incredibly. a lot of the people would _ coronavirus? incredibly. a lot of the people would not _ coronavirus? incredibly. a lot of the people would not have - coronavirus? incredibly. a lot of the people would not have had l coronavirus? incredibly. a lot of i the people would not have had the virus before and suddenly found that they were ill as well. and some of them have had it recently. the fact that so many people fell ill in a space of four or five days was surprising. i have had about two or three... i've got a third friend who has gone to hospital. these are people in their late 20s. you are now quarantining _ people in their late 20s. you are now quarantining and _ people in their late 20s. you are now quarantining and as - people in their late 20s. you are now quarantining and as you - people in their late 20s. you are i now quarantining and as you watch the situation in india, you must be relieved in a sense that you have managed to leave and get on the flight. managed to leave and get on the fliuht. , managed to leave and get on the fliiht. , ., managed to leave and get on the fliiht. , . , flight. yes. i mean, right up until i went through — flight. yes. i mean, right up until i went through the _ flight. yes. i mean, right up until i went through the border - flight. yes. i mean, right up until i went through the border and - flight. yes. i mean, right up until. i went through the border and then had to do another test it builds very difficult. it was changing by the minute for every country. even
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getting through border force, the minute for every country. even getting through borderforce, there is a lot of confusion about the situation in india and a person travelling with a british passport. i got stopped and asked for a visa at many times which are not actually in place yet. their scepticism around british passports right now. i am incredibly relieved to be here, but also concerned and worried for the people i've left back there. it is notjust the people i've left back there. it is not just a the people i've left back there. it is notjust a coronavirus. this feeling of a system imploding around you. it feels like anything else that could happen is a risk. a monsoon is about to come in goa for example and that is a time for other diseases to appear and that is another factor that is coming up diseases to appear and that is anotherfactor that is coming up in the next few weeks for people out there. that makes me worry. it is a terri ini there. that makes me worry. it is a terrifying situation _ there. that makes me worry. it is a terrifying situation there. _ there. that makes me worry. it is a terrifying situation there. thank- terrifying situation there. thank you very much for talking to us. good to talk to you. goodbye now. around a third of all
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the people in the uk are living in areas that have not reported any covid deaths in april, according to bbc news analysis. health experts welcomed the progress but said we should remain cautious to avoid another wave of cases. naomi grimley has been looking at the numbers. getting back to normal is something we all want to do. and some areas of the country already seem in a good place. take plymouth, for example. home to more than a quarter of million people, it's not seen a covid death in the last 58 days. oxford has not reported a covid death occurring in the last 60 days. in fact, as this map by the bbc�*s data unit shows, more than four out of ten uk councils have not reported any covid deaths in the past month. it's a large drop compared with january, when the uk was at the peak of its second wave. then only two councils in the uk
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reported no covid deaths. but experts are still urging caution. it's a really good sign and we are seeing several parts of the country where prevalence is really, really low. so i think it gives us confidence. we do need to of course be a little bit cautious, because with the road map, we have had significant reopening of society on 12th april. there's another one coming up on 17th may. it's great news but of course we do need to monitor those changes. so this is why it's really important that we have these five—week intervals between these relaxations, just so we can monitor the impact on r, on hospital admissions, and on deaths and safely proceed to the next step in the road map. hi, would you like to come through? across the uk, coronavirus deaths are falling faster for vaccinated groups rather than unvaccinated ones. over the past month, for example, deaths of over—50s have dropped by nearly 80%.
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but with most under—40s still unvaccinated, ministers insist we must still follow the rules so that the road map out of lockdown is irreversible. naomi grimley, bbc news. i'v e i've been talking about this analysis with head of statistics and he said the fall of this number of debt since the start of the year is actually astonishing. i debt since the start of the year is actually astonishing.— actually astonishing. i think we have seen _ actually astonishing. i think we have seen about _ actually astonishing. i think we have seen about 600 - actually astonishing. i think we have seen about 600 deaths . actually astonishing. i think we i have seen about 600 deaths that actually astonishing. i think we - have seen about 600 deaths that have happened in april. that might go up a little bit as deaths come in. but backin a little bit as deaths come in. but back injanuary in the first four weeks, it was 30,000! so it is a huge fall, almost inconceivable since the start of the year. and as naomi was just reporting a third of councils have not seen any deaths in a month. and two thirds who have seen none or one. so combine that with a story from the times it's
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showing that a lot of people aren't having a lot of cases. the immediate effects of covid were not very visible. ii effects of covid were not very visible. , ., .,, ., ., , visible. if you live in those areas where you _ visible. if you live in those areas where you have _ visible. if you live in those areas where you have not _ visible. if you live in those areas where you have not seen - visible. if you live in those areas where you have not seen deathsj visible. if you live in those areas i where you have not seen deaths for weeks or cases, there must be huge pressure and out saying, government, you've got to unlock now or sooner. yes, if you are in plymouth who has not seen a death in two months. if you work in a pub and the furlough is not covering the tips, the argument becomes harder. but it is still the same. you are to— one up with those minutes to go, don't let up with those minutes to go, don't let up yet. this data shows how difficult it is to make that argument or the communication is challenging when people are feeling the immediate effects of the restrictions, but are not seeing the immediate effects of coronavirus. liverpool is hosting testing events.
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there will be no social distancing. or masks. if you have not had a negative covid test, then you are not getting in. the show is back on the road and rolling into town for a big weekend that has been a long time coming. 3,000 people congregating together in one place. hopefully, all relaxed and a few drinks in them and they will be cool and looking forward to the excitement of the whole night. and this draughty warehouse turned nightclub is the perfect place to get people back together. i've done a couple of social distancing gigs, over the summer. how were they? they were ok. i mean, it was nice to see people, but you are told to sit down and don't dance. keep your voice down. all the opposite of what i've been
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trying to do for years. going back to the authentic rave, if you like. that is supremely exciting for us all. and it's going to be a step to the future, hopefully. across the city, there's an even bigger gig on sunday. here, too, no masks, no social distancing. though all 5,000 will be tested before and after. i can assure you it will feel like the real thing. i suspect i will have a tear in my eye, quite frankly. i can only imagine what it is going to be like for the bands. headlining are blossoms, all the way from stockport, after a year of playing at home, stuck like everyone else in this business. i still can't actually imagine it.
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it's been such a while. to see people together. we could be a bit taken back by it. but we'll probablyjust be focusing on not messing up. we haven't played for that long. remembering the words and stuff. i'll probably be able to enjoy it like two songs from the end. at first, i'lljust be like, "play it right, play it right." and it's no surprise in this city, the fans are keen. i'm excited for the event. just the idea of being in a crowd and feeling normal again. that's what i'm really looking forward to. i wouldn't say i've got concerns. the other half's a bit concerned. she's a primary school teacher. she's a little bit worried, _ you know, if any one tests positive. more worried about work. but i've been saying all week the show's got to go on. - back at the warehouse, they're almost ready. we've got perfect natural ventilation here. large openings all down one side of the building. the sensors will detect carbon
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dioxide levels to work out if the airflow is good enough to stop the virus spreading. so, by measuring the amount of co2 in the space, we're able to estimate the ventilation flow rate. but, more importantly, we're able to investigate the fresh air distribution. how does that air move around the space and around the people? and with music finally starting to get back to full volume, these will be gigs nobody wants to end. we'll probably be at the front of the stage, looking out. it'll be encore after encore. i've never done an encore. it's probably the time to do it, isn't it, this gig? of course you've done an encore. not like a proper encore, unplanned. play charlemagne again. three times. i'll do that. danjohnson, bbc news, liverpool.
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overlook our latest headlines now. dozens of people have been killed in israel at a stampede at one of the holiest sites in the orthodox world. it is thought people slept in an overcrowded walkway, causing dozens more to fall. the actor and director noel clarke has been suspended by bafta after allegations of sexual harassment he denies. she could security worries over the british prime ministers's mobile phone after it was revealed his phone number has been freely available online for the last 15 years. a vital consignment on the american medical supplies has arrived in india, which hasjust recorded another global record for new coronavirus infections. a social media boycott begins today across the world of sport, from players and organisations, to broadcasters and newspapers. it's hoped the protest will put pressure on the likes of facebook, instagram and twitter to do more
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to end abuse and to punish those who do it. nesta mcgregor reports. taking the knee, slogans, banners, big campaigns. now, football's latest attempt to stamp out racism is digital silence. do i think it will make a difference? probably not. but what it does do, it sends a warning to these companies to let these people know that we're not going to take this abuse any more. led by the premier league, efl and with support from the other major sports, a vow of silence on the platforms where the abuse takes place. if they still don't take action, then i think you'll see these clubs, players, staff, corporations, start to get together and think of more tough measures to take to finally force action.
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for some, the boycott doesn't go far enough, though, or address why people behave like this in the first place. but as seen recently, football does have the power to affect change — or prevent it. even before the lockdown kicked in, we were seeing significant increases in reported incidents based on discrimination. so this isn'tjust online. the fact that we've not been in grounds and we haven't had grassroots football, i think is hiding the fact that this is a problem in society. there's no room for racism. with the spotlight on social media companies, facebook, which owns instagram, recently gave users more control over who can message them privately. this isn't about profit and it's not about money. we've been working on some of these tools for a very long time. regardless of any calls for boycotts. how to handle being racially abused at work is a conversation andros had with his dad. the 29—year—old hopes it's not a lesson he'll have to pass down. hopefully we will have eradicated the problem.
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i feel like it is all about education, like i've said before. and hopefully, if we educate the kids now, when they are in their 20s and in their 30s, we're not receiving the same racist abuse on daily basis. hopefully i won't have to have these tough conversations with my son when he's older. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. we nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or in nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or in that nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or in that report, nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or in that report, ceo nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or in that report, ceo of nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or in that report, ceo of kick nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt we or in that report, ceo of kick it nesta mcgregor, bbc news. can talk to tony byrnt or in that report, ceo of kick it out, nesta mcgregor, bbc news. or in that report, ceo of kick it out, nesta mcgregor, bbc news. the or in that report, ceo of kick it out, nesta mcgregor, bbc news. the organisation or in that report, ceo of kick it out, the organisation dedicated to eradicating racism and discrimination in football. thanks so much forjoining us. we heard andros townsend in that report saying it may not make a difference but at least it is a warning shot, is that how you see it? absolutely, we've iot is that how you see it? absolutely, we've got to _ is that how you see it? absolutely, we've got to send _ is that how you see it? absolutely, we've got to send a _ is that how you see it? absolutely, we've got to send a message - is that how you see it? absolutely, we've got to send a message out i is that how you see it? absolutely, i we've got to send a message out and this is about supporting the victims, because enough is enough, and as part of this campaign we are asking forfour really and as part of this campaign we are asking for four really simple things. the first one is around prevention, we want the social media
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companies to do more to stop this kind of thing getting through and then to take it down faster if and when it does get through. the second one is about verification, which is an ongoing argument, we want people to have to identify themselves so that we can find perpetrators and deal with them. the third one is about consequences, and this is part of the reason for identification, we want people to be identified and punished, because the punishments aren't strong enough. and the fourth one is about accountability. we want the online organisations to be held accountable. part of that is legislation and part of it is the ongoing governance and things like regular reporting around incidents and discrimination online and what they are doing and evidencing the fact that they are driving change. it is horrific, some of the abuse that we have seen online, but do you think, are you convinced, that the social media companies have the technology and the manpower to deal with it in the way that you're suggesting?— with it in the way that you're suggesting? we're absolutely
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convinced they _ suggesting? we're absolutely convinced they have - suggesting? we're absolutely convinced they have the - suggesting? we're absolutely - convinced they have the technology. the manpower is an issue for social media companies, and that is a question of intent, that is a question of intent, that is a question of, are you prepared to invest in resources to protect people, essentially? they can invest resources in other areas when it comes to selling us products and services, they can apply the technology when it comes to selling us products and services, we are asking them to use that technology to stop people getting hurt online. and if that takes investment in resources, in other words, and if that takes investment in resources, in otherwords, more people... were talking about some of the richest organisations on the planet so, a lack of resources is not an excuse for not doing the right thing. not an excuse for not doing the right thing-— not an excuse for not doing the right thing. not an excuse for not doing the riihitthin. , right thing. some people might say, wh are all right thing. some people might say, why are all these _ right thing. some people might say, why are all these famous _ right thing. some people might say, why are all these famous sporting i why are all these famous sporting stars having a four—day boycott, why not have a permanent boycott if they feel that strongly about it, just abandon twitter, facebook and instagram? i abandon twitter, facebook and instagram?— abandon twitter, facebook and instagram? i think it is always a balance and _ instagram? i think it is always a balance and what _ instagram? i think it is always a balance and what we _ instagram? i think it is always a balance and what we are - instagram? i think it is always a balance and what we are not. instagram? i think it is always a . balance and what we are not saying here actually is that the whole social media empire is wrong, because we acknowledge the fact that there are a lot of good aspects
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about social media which we all want to see flourish. but in this instance, the social media organisations have got it wrong. there are victims who have suffered for long enough and we are saying enough is enough and this boycott is just that message, please stop this, you have got the power to do it, so please do it now. find you have got the power to do it, so please do it now.— please do it now. and it is a bo cott please do it now. and it is a boycott that _ please do it now. and it is a boycott that is _ please do it now. and it is a boycott that is actually - please do it now. and it is a - boycott that is actually spreading, isn't it? since it was first announced, more and more stars and sports have got involved and it has spread around the world? it is. sports have got involved and it has spread around the world? it is, and i think it is — spread around the world? it is, and i think it isjust _ spread around the world? it is, and i think it isjust showing _ spread around the world? it is, and i think it isjust showing the - spread around the world? it is, and i think it isjust showing the huge i i think it is just showing the huge sentiment around good people saying, look, this has got to stop. it's not just sport, we've seen it in lots of other walks of life where anyone can be subject to this, kids in school, bullying, we've seen a number of awful scenarios where people have committed suicide on the back of online harm, so it is a huge issue in society. and the social media organisations have the power to create change, and we are using our
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voice in sport to say, enough is enough. {lii voice in sport to say, enough is enouih. .., , , voice in sport to say, enough is enouih. , , , enough. of course there is racist abuse that _ enough. of course there is racist abuse that you — enough. of course there is racist abuse that you are _ enough. of course there is racist abuse that you are trying - enough. of course there is racist abuse that you are trying to - enough. of course there is racist i abuse that you are trying to tackle, not just online abuse that you are trying to tackle, notjust online but for example on the pitch, we had the rangers player glen kamara racially abused, so, this is a fight that is much wider, isn't it, than the online world alone? {lii isn't it, than the online world alone? . ., , , isn't it, than the online world alone? , , �* alone? of course it is. and when it comes to online, _ alone? of course it is. and when it comes to online, this _ alone? of course it is. and when it comes to online, this isn't - alone? of course it is. and when it comes to online, this isn't just - comes to online, this isn'tjust about racism online, some of the misogynistic comments that we see online are just appalling, and some of the threats and some of the violent threats around misogyny are awful. on the broader subject of society, you're absolutely right, someone pushes the keys, so, there has to be some responsibility on individuals. and we need a separate conversation about what is it in society which allows people to think that behaving in a way like that and having opinions which we thought had pretty much gone by the wayside are now ok again? and that is a separate conversation. the climate in the uk around discussions of race is quite toxic and that needs to be addressed
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as well. fist toxic and that needs to be addressed as well. �* ., , , toxic and that needs to be addressed aswell.�* , ,, , toxic and that needs to be addressed aswell.�* , ,, as well. at least these issues are beini as well. at least these issues are being discussed, _ as well. at least these issues are being discussed, what _ as well. at least these issues are being discussed, what about - as well. at least these issues are being discussed, what about the | being discussed, what about the question of taking the knee before games, which some people are saying, has it actually made that much difference, where do you stand on that? , ., . ., ., , difference, where do you stand on that? ., ., , that? our stance on that is really straightforward. _ that? our stance on that is really straightforward. we _ that? our stance on that is really straightforward. we are - that? our stance on that is really straightforward. we are not - that? our stance on that is really straightforward. we are not four| that? our stance on that is really i straightforward. we are not four or against taking the knee or any other gesture, if people are against discrimination, we will support whatever they do, if that is taking the knee, fantastic, if it is another form of protest, the knee, fantastic, if it is anotherform of protest, that the knee, fantastic, if it is another form of protest, that is also brilliant, there is not one form of protest that is acceptable and the rest are unacceptable. oppose discrimination in whatever way you see fit and we will support you. way you see fit and we will support ou. , ., ., ., way you see fit and we will support ou. ,., ., ., ., " way you see fit and we will support ou. , ., ., ~ ., way you see fit and we will support ou. ., . ~ ., i. way you see fit and we will support ou. ., ., ~ ., you. good to talk to you as ever, ton , you. good to talk to you as ever, tony. ceo _ you. good to talk to you as ever, tony. ceo of— you. good to talk to you as ever, tony, ceo of kick _ you. good to talk to you as ever, tony, ceo of kick it _ you. good to talk to you as ever, tony, ceo of kick it out. -
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president biden has addressed a rally in the us state of georgia to mark his one hundredth day in office. he said that he wanted the very wealthy and corporations to pay their share of tax. georgia — a formerly republican state is the first stop on a tour by mr biden to urge americans to support his plans to spend trillions of dollars rebuilding the economy. here's larry madowo. joe biden is back on the road — part victory lap, part sales pitch. americans use the first 100 days of a president to compare their campaign promises against their early achievements. for biden, it might have been a tougher battle without georgia's two democratic senators who handed him control of the senate. if you ever wonder if elections make a difference, just remember what you did here in georgia when you elected ossoff and warnock. you began to change the environment. biden already passed a $2 trillion coronavirus relief package that sent money directly to most americans. he thinks his multi—trillion dollar families and infrastructure plan will be just as popular with ordinary citizens. republicans say it will kill jobs and raise taxes, but he promises that only the wealthiest americans will pay for it.
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it is a once—in—a—generation investment in america. it's the biggestjobs plan in this country since world war ii. and here's what it does — it createsjobs, rebuilding and modernising our roads, highways, our bridges, our ports, our airports. biden will travel to other parts of the country to sell what he calls a blue—collar blueprint for america. it includes proposals like paid family leave, child tax credits, and two years of free community college. i've never been more optimistic about the future of america, america is on the move again. we're choosing hope over fear. president biden is not only bypassing republicans in washington to pitch directly to the american people, he's also trying to appeal to a group that believes in what is now called the "big lie". this conspiracy theory that donald trump is the legitimate president because the election was fraudulent. larry madowo, bbc news, in there, georgia.
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a global coalition of more than 60 leaders from technology companies and law enforcement is calling for "aggressive and urgent" action against ransomware. ransomware gangs are routinely targeting schools, local government and hospitals. our cyber reporterjoe tidy has been speaking with two victims of recent attacks. we are a normal swiss office supply company. why the hell are you hacking us? everything was gone, there is no communication anymore. and they were the worst three weeks in my life. when martin kelterborn's company was hacked, it very nearly destroyed his business. we could really watch live the pictures being encrypted one after the other, and losing your pictures, you don't run an online store, you don't run anything anymore.
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warehouses and delivery processes plunged into chaos, and this was the message that appeared on screens, the hackers' ransom, half a million dollars in bitcoin. they do not cooperate, they want your money, or they want you dead. martin didn't pay, but recovering the business cost more than half a million dollars, and many months. during the pandemic, ransomware gangs have become bolder and crueller. they're now routinely attacking notjust private companies but schools, local governance, police forces and even hospitals. and now a coalition of more than 60 organisations including microsoft, amazon, the fbi and the uk's national crime agency, have formed a ransomware task force calling on governments to take urgent, aggressive action against these criminal gangs. their citizens, our citizens, are being impacted every day by this issue. and not only that, but really distressingly, i think, and it is not talked about enough, the funds that come in from ransom,
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they fund other organised criminal activities. so, you're talking about things like human trafficking. one of the things the task force wants to do is make reporting ransomware attacks compulsory, especially if victims pay the hackers. a lack of transparency means we only know about a fraction of the true cost of ransomware. one estimate for 2020 puts the real figure of ransom is paid plus business disruption at potentially $170 billion, or £122 billion. and increasingly, this is public money. hackney council in east london is still recovering after a devastating attack in october that is likely to cost more than £10 million to overcome. that october, we were seven months into a pandemic, where people are suffering enormous hardship, and to sit there and imagine that anyone could think it was ok to cause such damage to those services at a time like that is just hard to comprehend. even now, many vital services are still disrupted. investigators here are still trying to work out who attacked the council and why. but even if they can find the cyber criminals,
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the chances are, they will never be brought to justice. the ransomware task force report and recommendations is being delivered to the us president. it comes a week after the us department ofjustice reportedly set up an internal team focused on combating ransomware. some ransomware gangs like evil corp live millionaire lifestyles in russia, safe from international prosecution. the newly formed ransomware task force is urging governments to aggressively target these alleged criminals and increase the pressure on the countries that harbour them. joe tidy, bbc news. frank van weert, founder of whale alert, a company which tracks cryptocurrency transactions, joins me. so, frank, what can be done to stop these ransomware attacks, they are for the victim is absolutely terrifying?— for the victim is absolutely terri ini? ., , for the victim is absolutely terri ini? ~ ., , ., , terrifying? well, to be honest, good mornini , terrifying? well, to be honest, good morning. to — terrifying? well, to be honest, good morning. to be _ terrifying? well, to be honest, good morning, to be honest, _ terrifying? well, to be honest, good morning, to be honest, there - terrifying? well, to be honest, good morning, to be honest, there is - terrifying? well, to be honest, good morning, to be honest, there is not| morning, to be honest, there is not much we can do to stop the attacks themselves. the criminals are a...
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it's very difficult, in terms of tracking the bitcoins, sorry... yeah, the...— tracking the bitcoins, sorry... yeah, the... tracking the bitcoins, sorry... yeah,the... . ., . ., yeah, the... what is your advice to somebody — yeah, the... what is your advice to somebody who _ yeah, the... what is your advice to somebody who is _ yeah, the... what is your advice to somebody who is facing _ yeah, the... what is your advice to somebody who is facing this - yeah, the... what is your advice to somebody who is facing this sort i yeah, the... what is your advice to j somebody who is facing this sort of attack, what should they do if they do get a demand for payment? weill. do get a demand for payment? well, if ou've do get a demand for payment? well, if you've exhausted _ do get a demand for payment? well, if you've exhausted all _ do get a demand for payment? well, if you've exhausted all the _ do get a demand for payment? -ii if you've exhausted all the other options you have, like contacting the authorities and trying to remove the authorities and trying to remove the viruses from your computer, there is basically not much you can do, otherthan there is basically not much you can do, other than paying the ransom itself. and that is what has been happening a lot with these ransomware is, is that they've actually been paid by a lot of these victims. �* , , , .,, victims. and i suppose the problem is, the more _ victims. and i suppose the problem is, the more that _ victims. and i suppose the problem is, the more that people _ victims. and i suppose the problem is, the more that people pay - victims. and i suppose the problem is, the more that people pay the i is, the more that people pay the money, the more that encourages the
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criminals to carry out more attacks? yeah, that's definitely true. but that's... that is one of the problem is that were facing. but the good thing about these attacks is the fact that they are using bitcoin. bitcoin is not as problematic to trace where it is going and where it is coming from, so, in theory, we should be able to stop these attacks from happening, at least stop them from happening, at least stop them from using bitcoin, to make their life a lot more difficult. 50. from using bitcoin, to make their life a lot more difficult.— life a lot more difficult. so, is there a way — life a lot more difficult. so, is there a way of— life a lot more difficult. so, is there a way of tracing - life a lot more difficult. so, is there a way of tracing where l life a lot more difficult. so, is i there a way of tracing where the payment goes, and is there a way of catching these criminals, are these criminal is ever caught? i’m catching these criminals, are these criminal is ever caught?— criminal is ever caught? i'm not sure if these — criminal is ever caught? i'm not sure if these criminals - criminal is ever caught? i'm not sure if these criminals are - criminal is ever caught? i'm not i sure if these criminals are caught, we do not have that information, but there is a common misconception on bitcoin that it is hard to trace, or
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it is very private. bitcoin is actually the opposite of private, it's really easy to trace, we know exactly where it's going, we can also really well see which companies are actually actively laundering these bitcoins, either willingly or unwillingly. so, theoretically, it's really easy to find where these coins are going and how they are being used. coins are going and how they are being used-— coins are going and how they are beini used. . ,, ., ., ,, ., being used. frank, good to talk to ou, being used. frank, good to talk to you, thank— being used. frank, good to talk to you. thank you — being used. frank, good to talk to you, thank you very _ being used. frank, good to talk to you, thank you very much - being used. frank, good to talk to you, thank you very much indeed. j it's been three weeks since a volcano erupted on the caribbean island of st vincent causing a huge amount of damage to both tourist and residential areas which were covered in a thick blanket of ash. thousands of people were forced to flee their homes. many remain in emergency shelters or temporary accommodation and hurricane season is only a few weeks away. our latin america and caribbean correspondent will grant went to st vincent to see how the clean—up
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operation is going. the aftermath of the eruption of la soufriere is hauntingly beautiful and destructive. the explosion left hillsides denuded of their tree cover and a ghostly coating of white ash over every inch of st vincent's northern coastline. the pyroclastic lava flows brought tens of thousands of tonnes of material down the mountainside, and a hail of dust and stones showered over the villages below. one of them was sandy bay, a picturesque fishing village reduced to a dust bowl overnight. located in the worst affected red zone, evacuated villagers now risk fresh emissions and mudslides to clear the debris. we have 295 students... the local primary school teacher is annel francois. her pupils had been preparing to return to class after months of home—schooling during the pandemic. the volcano ended that plan
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when the school roof came down under the weight of the ash fall. i was really distressed, knowing that so many students would be out of an education for a while. now is the time that they should rebuild the proper structure that they had said they are going to build. there isn't a home, a vehicle or a surface in st vincent that isn't covered by a thick layer of this very fine volcanic dust. with hurricane season approaching, it is going to take this community and st vincent as a whole many months to recover from this. it's a multidimensional challenge of immense proportions. st vincent's prime minister says the eruption has compounded the problems created by coronavirus. plus, of course, the desolation in the northern third of the country. the complete decimation of agriculture and animal husbandry in that one third. the infrastructure has
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been shot through. the island has recently held a national day of prayer, thankful it wasn't a national day of mourning. but the evacuees at this shelter are still victims, of an act of god which put their families at risk. around 15% of st vincent's population was forced from their homes, many sleeping in converted classrooms, eating donated meals, relying on charity. yet nelsia says it wasn't hard to drop everything and run. because of fright, i didn't even think about leaving everything behind. she lost her teenage daughter in a bus crash a few years ago and says leaving material things was easy in comparison. it was just, get out of here, be safe. that is the only saving grace of this huge disruption to st vincent, that no—one died. but the volcano is still active and the scale of the tragedy for a small island is vast.
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homes, crops, animals, entire livelihoods buried beneath the ash. will grant, bbc news, st vincent. members of the british asian community are sending urgently needed medical supplies and facilities for those suffering with covid in india. as the situation worsens, many here have started fundraising, as rahila bano reports from bolton. how is your health? how is everyone? how is the family? for ansh, this is a desperately worrying time. make sure you take care of uncle, auntie and everyone. nine members of ansh's family in delhi had the virus in november, but have all recovered. since then, india's health crisis has got far worse. i call my friends or talk to my mum, there is someone who has got it and someone we know has died of it, so... it is heartbreaking. there are approximately 21,000 people of indian origin in bolton.
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they've been fundraising at temples, gurdwaras and mosques like this one to send money home for medical equipment. we've collected more than £5,000, £6,000 current and it's still ongoing. what happens is where the hospital can't provide them oxygen, they are buying them privately and using them in cricket fields, setting up beds wherever they possibly can. this is just one of the oxygen bottles that have been paid for by worshippers in bolton. the committee has taken this great initiative by the support of bolton, uk. fundraising efforts are also taking place across the region. we've just celebrated lord hanuman's birthday yesterday so we felt that it was appropriate that we do something where people can come and also realise, do some devotional singing and also
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pray at the same time for people who are losing their loved ones. one, it's a prayer meeting but secondly we are also raising funds. as the struggle continues, indian communities here hope their efforts will go a long way in helping india's fight against covid. rahila bano, bbc news, bolton. lawyers for the british socialite ghislaine maxwell have released a photo of her face which appears to show bruising under her left eye. she told her lawyers the bruise might be from shielding her eyes from the light, as she says the guards come to check her condition every 15 minutes. ms maxwell is accused of helping convicted paedophilejeffrey epstein recruit and sexually abuse girls. she has denied all the charges and allegations against her. five people have been arrested over the theft of lady gaga's dogs in los angeles. the singer's french bulldogs were returned two days after being stolen at gunpoint in february.
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the woman who said she'd found the dogs was one of those detained. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather, with matt. hello. big changes at the start of may, courtesy of this weather which is coming from the west and will bring us a massive change on bank holiday monday. at the moment we have got shower clouds, hit and miss, monday. at the moment we have got shower clouds, hitand miss, many places staying largely dry this afternoon, the showers will become larger in numberand afternoon, the showers will become larger in number and some of the heaviest this afternoon, in a line from south—west england, and across parts of the higher ground of wales, the pennines, towards lincolnshire. chilly the eastern coast. and where
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the showers come through, temperatures will drop even further. most of the showers fade tonight, some will continue around the coast, and that means, inland, the nighttime frost record continues, we had one every day through april and we start off may with a frost away from towns and cities on saturday morning, and we will have the same on sunday. the weekend will be similar to today and yesterday, sunshine and showers. starting off with the bulk of the sunshine, cloud building up, and the showers getting going. showers initially round the coast, inland into the afternoon, some of the heaviest likely to be across the hills of wales and just inland from the southern coast of england. temperatures may be up a degree or so on today, but because the winds are light, there could be a shower, and it could remain for quite some time. on sunday morning, another bright start, another frost. may be fewer showers in the west, the heaviest and most potent showers
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being to the east and the south. temperatures here continue to rise, up temperatures here continue to rise, up to 14 or 15. the big change, as i mentioned, on monday, this area of low pressure, we have not seen one on the chart like this for some time, wet and windy weather, the track of it will be crucial as to who sees the wettest and windiest weather. it looks like some of it will be across parts of ireland and wales. the heaviest of the rain at the moment looks to be through central parts. perhaps further north we will see some snow over the hills and it will be crucial as to how exactly how much rainfall we eventually see in the south and east, according to the track.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. we are in fact going to go straight to a police news conference. this is a news conference by police investigating the death of police community support officerjulia james whose body was found on tuesday near dover. she james whose body was found on tuesday near dover. she started on a crime reduction _ tuesday near dover. she started on a crime reduction role _ tuesday near dover. she started on a crime reduction role and _ tuesday near dover. she started on a crime reduction role and recently - crime reduction role and recently worked with victims of domestic abuse in canterbury. she was a hugely devoted, passionate individual who was completely committed to serving the people of kent. she will be hugely missed and lost by her colleagues. my heartfelt thoughts go out to her family, lost by her colleagues. my heartfelt thoughts go out to herfamily, her friends and of course her
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colleagues. in terms of the investigation, kent police were called shortly after 4pm on tuesday this week to the edge of a cult would, on the out skirts of snowdon village. that is where we found julia. she was deceased. the serious crime directorate have commenced the murder investigation. we do not come at this stage, have any identified suspects. we are keeping all options open to us while we fully investigate the circumstances of this matter and try to understand exactly what happened. we do not at this stage understand the motive for this stage understand the motive for this attack. i would like to appeal
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pleas for witnesses. many local and wider members of the community have come forward with incredibly useful important information that is helping us piece together what happened on tuesday. if anybody else saw anything, suspicious or strange, on tuesday or wednesday of this week we are very, very anxious to speak to them. we are very, very grateful for the support we have received from the local community. they have been incredibly patient. we have a lot of police officers in the local area and that will continue into the weekend while we continue our investigations and we continue our searches, seeking evidence. i do understand local residents are concerned. that's completely natural. as stated, i do not come at this stage, have an identified suspect. we do not know what the motive for this attack is. i would urge people if they have any
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concerns to report it to kent police immediately. people should be cautious and aware of their surroundings, their circumstances, and situation. julia was not on duty at the time of this incident. she was not in uniform. with many people in the current climate, she was working from home that day. she was walking her dog out of uniform and we are still seeking to establish exactly what happened. a postmortem took place on thursday of this week and i can confirm that she died as a result of serious head injuries. thank you. result of serious head in'uries. thank you-* result of serious head in'uries. thank ou. ,, , ., , , result of serious head in'uries. thank ou. ,, , ., , m thank you. questions, everybody. are ou lookini thank you. questions, everybody. are you looking into _ thank you. questions, everybody. are you looking into whether _ thank you. questions, everybody. are you looking into whether the - thank you. questions, everybody. are you looking into whether the person i you looking into whether the person who attacked julia james may have been someone who she came across in her line of work? it
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been someone who she came across in her line of work?— her line of work? it is, of course, possibility, _ her line of work? it is, of course, possibility, but — her line of work? it is, of course, possibility, but we _ her line of work? it is, of course, possibility, but we are _ her line of work? it is, of course, | possibility, but we are considering all options. are remaining completely un—blinkered. we are considering all possible motivations and all possible options. so we certainly have not established that at this stage. you certainly have not established that at this stage-— at this stage. you said she died of siinificant at this stage. you said she died of significant head _ at this stage. you said she died of significant head injuries. - at this stage. you said she died of significant head injuries. any - at this stage. you said she died of| significant head injuries. any signs she faced a robbery? what more can you tell us about the circumstances in which she found her?— you tell us about the circumstances in which she found her? there is no evidence that _ in which she found her? there is no evidence that any _ in which she found her? there is no evidence that any of _ in which she found her? there is no evidence that any of her _ in which she found her? there is no| evidence that any of her possessions were missing. she was walking her dog at the time. her dog was at the scene unharmed when police arrived. are you investigating whether this attack was sexually motivated? brute attack was sexually motivated? we are attack was sexually motivated? - are keeping our options completely openin are keeping our options completely open in terms of motivation. that is of course a consideration but it's much too early at the stage where we are still trying to piece together exactly what happened to establish the motive. you
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exactly what happened to establish the motive. ., , ., , exactly what happened to establish themotive. ., the motive. you said people should be aware of — the motive. you said people should be aware of their _ the motive. you said people should be aware of their surroundings. - be aware of their surroundings. would you categorically say to women in particular do not go out of night at the moment? ida. in particular do not go out of night at the moment?— in particular do not go out of night at the moment? no, i would not say that. i at the moment? no, i would not say that- i would — at the moment? no, i would not say that. i would encourage _ at the moment? no, i would not say that. i would encourage people - at the moment? no, i would not say that. i would encourage people to i at the moment? no, i would not say| that. i would encourage people to be cautious, to be vigilant, to be aware of their surroundings, to report anything of concern to kent police. we are very, very interested in that, but no, i'm not specifically advising women or anyone for that matter, to stay at home or avoid any particular locations. untilwe home or avoid any particular locations. until we understand exactly what has happened and why it happened, of course i understand why people will be concerned. can happened, of course i understand why people will be concerned.— people will be concerned. can you tell us anything — people will be concerned. can you tell us anything about _ people will be concerned. can you tell us anything about the - people will be concerned. can you tell us anything about the weapon j tell us anything about the weapon used? ,, . , tell us anything about the weapon used? ,, ., , ., tell us anything about the weapon used? ,, . , ., ., ., used? she has died from lung trauma to the head- — used? she has died from lung trauma to the head. i'm _ used? she has died from lung trauma to the head. i'm not _ used? she has died from lung trauma to the head. i'm not in _ used? she has died from lung trauma to the head. i'm not in a _ used? she has died from lung trauma to the head. i'm not in a position, - to the head. i'm not in a position, it would be appropriate for me to speak about the weapons while we examine the circumstances.
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inaudible yes, i've had to consider the welfare of staff. has inaudible yes, i've had to consider the welfare of staff.— the welfare of staff. as we do with all traumatic _ the welfare of staff. as we do with all traumatic incidents. _ the welfare of staff. as we do with all traumatic incidents. it's - all traumatic incidents. it's particularly challenging and poignant for some staff working on the case who knew her professionally or potentially of course socially. i am working very carefully to ensure that all of my team is fully supported throughout this investigation in terms of the psychological impact, the circumstances and of course if they attended the scene itself. m65 circumstances and of course if they attended the scene itself.- attended the scene itself. was this an attempted _ attended the scene itself. was this an attempted dog _ attended the scene itself. was this an attempted dog napping - attended the scene itself. was this an attempted dog napping that - attended the scene itself. was this i an attempted dog napping that went wrong? there was also a raid on a nearby travelling camp. inaudible. as i have said a number of times we are keeping our options
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completely open in terms of motive. we do not come at this stage know what the motive was. the dog was unharmed, still at the scene, when we arrived. i genuinely am considering all possibilities at this stage. our business as usual policing continues in this area and throughout the county, so to important people don't leap to too many conclusions when they see our routing police activity. which of course must continue. inaudible.— course must continue. inaudible. ., �* are you looking at the of indecent exposure? i are you looking at the of indecent ex-osure? . , are you looking at the of indecent eonsure? . , ., ., exposure? i am hugely gratefulfor all of the information _ exposure? i am hugely gratefulfor all of the information provided - exposure? i am hugely gratefulfor all of the information provided by i all of the information provided by the public and as many of you will be aware, we are receiving a huge
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amount of information. it's massively important for us piecing together what may have happened. probably not appropriate for me to provide a running commentary in response to each of those many matters, but, yes, they are absolutely logged within our system and being assessed for relevance in relation to this enquiry and of course will be pursued whether relevant to this enquiry or during normal policing duties. inaudible. pie. normal policing duties. inaudible.— normal policing duties. inaudible. m ., �* inaudible. as i say, we don't understand — inaudible. as i say, we don't understand the _ inaudible. as i say, we don't understand the motive - inaudible. as i say, we don't understand the motive at - inaudible. as i say, we don't understand the motive at this| inaudible. as | say, we don't- understand the motive at this case, which is a challenge for the investigation. i have course acknowledge that it will have an impact on local communities. that famous case you reference is quite close to here. but, you know, for clarity, that's the case with an
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individual convicted person serving a prison sentence. that's been contested by the courts of appeal, but as i've said a number of times, we are keeping our assessment, for the motive, completely open at this stage. we will not be blinkered in any way. stage. we will not be blinkered in an wa . ~ . stage. we will not be blinkered in an wa . . . ., ., stage. we will not be blinkered in an wa . i . ., ., , any way. what level of threat is there and _ any way. what level of threat is there and what _ any way. what level of threat is there and what needed - any way. what level of threat is there and what needed to - any way. what level of threat is i there and what needed to reassure people out there going about their daily lives? people out there going about their dail lives? i . . people out there going about their dail lives? i , , ., people out there going about their dail lives?i , ., , daily lives? well, this is an awful incident, but _ daily lives? well, this is an awful incident, but it's _ daily lives? well, this is an awful incident, but it's an _ daily lives? well, this is an awful incident, but it's an incredibly - incident, but it's an incredibly rare and isolated incident, not linked at this stage to any other offences. of course, it's natural that people will be concerned. i would encourage people to be aware of their environment around them, to be vigilant and report any concerns to the police. we will continue to investigate, but i think until we understand the circumstances and the motive of this attack, it's
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difficult to be more precise than that at this stage. ihi, difficult to be more precise than that at this stage.— difficult to be more precise than that at this stage. a lot of people walk on their _ that at this stage. a lot of people walk on their own _ that at this stage. a lot of people walk on their own around - that at this stage. a lot of people walk on their own around here. i walk on their own around here. should they continue to go out on their own? �*i. . should they continue to go out on their own?— should they continue to go out on their own? 1, , ., ., ., their own? based on where we are at this staie, their own? based on where we are at this stage, a — their own? based on where we are at this stage, a single _ their own? based on where we are at this stage, a single incredibly - their own? based on where we are at this stage, a single incredibly rare i this stage, a single incredibly rare isolated event, people should be cautious, people should be aware but i think people should continue with their lives. flan i think people should continue with their lives. i. , ., i think people should continue with their lives. ., , ., , their lives. can you tell us if the wea ion their lives. can you tell us if the weapon has _ their lives. can you tell us if the weapon has been _ their lives. can you tell us if the weapon has been found - their lives. can you tell us if the weapon has been found and - their lives. can you tell us if the l weapon has been found and what their lives. can you tell us if the - weapon has been found and what time she left a house on tuesday? it’s she left a house on tuesday? it's not she left a house on tuesday? it�*s not appropriate for me to get into too much fine grain detail of the investigation. we are of course investigating those issues. there is a large search strategy ongoing, looking to try to recover weapons which we are trying to establish her precise movements, but i don't think it appropriate for me to get into that level of detail today.- that level of detail today. could there be a _ that level of detail today. could there be a sexual _ that level of detail today. could there be a sexual motive - that level of detail today. could | there be a sexual motive behind
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that level of detail today. could there be a sexual motive behind this attack? b5 there be a sexual motive behind this attack? �* . . i. . there be a sexual motive behind this attack? ~ , , . , ., , attack? as stated, there is a number of potential — attack? as stated, there is a number of potential motives. _ attack? as stated, there is a number of potential motives. we _ attack? as stated, there is a number of potential motives. we do - attack? as stated, there is a number of potential motives. we do not - attack? as stated, there is a number| of potential motives. we do not come at this stage, understand what that motive is. i would be lying if i so i don't consider that as one of the many possibilities, but as i stress, and keeping an open mind. we don't wish to be blinkered at this stage. how otherfamily coping? wish to be blinkered at this stage. how other family coping? incredibly difficult and challenging _ how other family coping? incredibly difficult and challenging for- how other family coping? incredibly difficult and challenging for the - difficult and challenging for the family, as previously stated. my huge sympathy is extended to the family. and, of course, it had a massive impact on her colleagues as well. yes, we are absolutely supporting the family with specialist officers who are trained. we considerable amount of time with the family and extended family yesterday providing every support that we possibly can. they are fully
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sighted on our activities but, of course, it's hugely difficult time for them. i, course, it's hugely difficult time for them. ., p, course, it's hugely difficult time for them. ., i. , for them. could you tell us the circumstances _ for them. could you tell us the circumstances of _ for them. could you tell us the circumstances of who - for them. could you tell us the circumstances of who found i for them. could you tell us the i circumstances of who found her? for them. could you tell us the - circumstances of who found her? we have circumstances of who found her? - have witnesses who found julia and have witnesses who found julia and have provided an incredibly important, useful evidence to us. there were more than one individual, which is really helpful to us. but it wouldn't be appropriate for me to name witnesses in this case at this stage. name witnesses in this case at this sta i e. ., name witnesses in this case at this staie. ., ., ,~'~ , name witnesses in this case at this staie. ., ., stage. how many officers are involved in — stage. how many officers are involved in the _ stage. how many officers are | involved in the investigation? stage. how many officers are - involved in the investigation? there are many elements _ involved in the investigation? there are many elements to _ involved in the investigation? there are many elements to the _ are many elements to the investigation as you can imagine. i have a large team of dedicated detectives from the serious crime directorate specialist detectives and they are investigating murders, supported by a wider pool of detectives from the force but, as you would have seen, we have a significant number of specialist search resources, local officers in the area seeking to provide some
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reassurance to the public and then a whole range of specialist officers for example in relation to forensic evidence recovering. do for example in relation to forensic evidence recovering.— evidence recovering. do you know when the attack _ evidence recovering. do you know when the attack might _ evidence recovering. do you know when the attack might have - evidence recovering. do you know when the attack might have taken place? we when the attack might have taken laice? i i. when the attack might have taken ilace? i ., ., when the attack might have taken lace? i ., ., , ., place? we are of course looking at that precise _ place? we are of course looking at that precise timeline. _ place? we are of course looking at that precise timeline. we - place? we are of course looking at that precise timeline. we received | place? we are of course looking at. that precise timeline. we received a call shortly after 4pm in the afternoon. we were seeking to establish her precise movements to try to narrow that down. is it establish her precise movements to try to narrow that down.— try to narrow that down. is it fair to say she _ try to narrow that down. is it fair to say she could _ try to narrow that down. is it fair to say she could have _ try to narrow that down. is it fair to say she could have been - try to narrow that down. is it fair| to say she could have been killed try to narrow that down. is it fair i to say she could have been killed by a total stranger? i to say she could have been killed by a total stranger?— a total stranger? i could not rule that out. that _ a total stranger? i could not rule that out. that would _ a total stranger? i could not rule that out. that would be - a total stranger? i could not rule | that out. that would be incredibly rare, but i have to concede that is a possibility. i5 rare, but i have to concede that is a possibility-— rare, but i have to concede that is a possibility. is there a connection with their previous _ a possibility. is there a connection with their previous policing - a possibility. is there a connection with their previous policing work? | with their previous policing work? as i said, i'm keeping my options completely open. it's very dangerous in the early stages to get blinkered into a particular motive and
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possibility. i'm not ruling that out, but as i say, i'm looking at all possibilities at this stage. oncejulia working from home on that day? once julia working from home on that da ?, i. once julia working from home on that da ? . . . , once julia working from home on that da 7�* . ., 4' once julia working from home on that da i . .,~ ., once julia working from home on that day? julia was working from home that da , day? julia was working from home that day, as _ day? julia was working from home that day, as many _ day? julia was working from home that day, as many people - day? julia was working from home that day, as many people have - day? julia was working from home i that day, as many people have during the covid period, she was off duty walking her dog, not in uniform at the time of this incident. inaudible.— the time of this incident. inaudible. ,, ., ., , inaudible. she was not on shift? potentially, _ inaudible. she was not on shift? potentially, but _ inaudible. she was not on shift? potentially, but we _ inaudible. she was not on shift? potentially, but we are _ inaudible. she was not on shift? potentially, but we are offering i potentially, but we are offering agile working. it's perfectly acceptable for people to have a screen break during the course of the day so long as they complete their hours, as many employers are allowing at the moment. it was a working day forjulia, yes. you said she's based — working day forjulia, yes. you said she's based in _ working day forjulia, yes. you said she's based in canterbury -
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working day forjulia, yes. you said i she's based in canterbury supporting victims of domestic violence. how are her colleagues there coping? yes, at this stage of her career she was specialising in supporting and safeguarding victims of domestic abuse. she was based in canterbury. clearly less so in recent times because of covid restrictions. her colleagues are very shocked, very upset, but as previously stated, we are supplying considerable enhanced support to those staff just to ensure their welfare but it had a significant impact.— ensure their welfare but it had a significant impact. when you change how iolice significant impact. when you change how police officers _ significant impact. when you change how police officers working - significant impact. when you change how police officers working as - significant impact. when you change how police officers working as part i how police officers working as part of the world? ida. how police officers working as part of the world?— how police officers working as part of the world? ., ,., . ., , of the world? no, policing and times can be dangerous. _ of the world? no, policing and times can be dangerous. you _ of the world? no, policing and times can be dangerous. you can't - of the world? no, policing and times can be dangerous. you can't remove| can be dangerous. you can't remove all risk from policing, but we are carrying on in this part of the county and the rest of the county in the normal way. d0
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county and the rest of the county in the normal way.— the normal way. do you fear this individual might _ the normal way. do you fear this individual might carry _ the normal way. do you fear this individual might carry out - the normal way. do you fear this| individual might carry out another attack? fits individual might carry out another attack? �* . individual might carry out another attack? �* , ., individual might carry out another attack? a ., ., , individual might carry out another attack? a ., ., attack? as i said, all options are beini attack? as i said, all options are being kept _ attack? as i said, all options are being kept open- _ attack? as i said, all options are being kept open. i _ attack? as i said, all options are being kept open. i have - attack? as i said, all options are being kept open. i have no - being kept open. i have no information to suggest that is the case. i'm not linking this to any previous offences, so there is no indication of that. being likely. but, of course, we are keeping all options open to us and working very hard to identify the person responsible for this offence and, again, please, if that members of the public of any information at all, however minor, please report it. it could be incredibly important to the investigation. haifa it. it could be incredibly important to the investigation. how confident are ou of to the investigation. how confident are you of apprehending _ to the investigation. how confident are you of apprehending the - to the investigation. how confident i are you of apprehending the suspect? it's impossible for me to say at this stage. murder is a crime with a high rate of being solved but of course, at such an early stage in such unusual circumstances, it's impossible for me to be drawn at this stage.
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impossible for me to be drawn at this staie. i . , . ., this stage. once she fully clothed when found? _ this stage. once she fully clothed when found? if _ this stage. once she fully clothed when found? if not _ this stage. once she fully clothed when found? if not appropriate i this stage. once she fully clothed | when found? if not appropriate for me to iet when found? if not appropriate for me to get into _ when found? if not appropriate for me to get into details _ when found? if not appropriate for me to get into details of— when found? if not appropriate for me to get into details of the - when found? if not appropriate for me to get into details of the crimej me to get into details of the crime scene. it's very, very important that hopefully, when we get to a point of a jury hearing the circumstances of case, their knowledge is not undermined before the trial. you knowledge is not undermined before the trial. ., ., , ., , , ., the trial. you are still appealing for witnesses. _ the trial. you are still appealing for witnesses. what _ the trial. you are still appealing for witnesses. what julia - the trial. you are still appealing for witnesses. what julia was i for witnesses. what julia was wearing for witnesses. whatjulia was wearing a tan jog somebody�*s memory. i think we are just interested in anything from particularly a local resident that seemed out of the ordinary, that seemed unusual, that seemed different, seemed suspicious. we've already had a lot of calls from the public, some really, really useful information, as i said, some may be relevant, some may not be relevant, but i really encourage people to tell us everything because
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it helps us peace the whole story together. we can make that assessment on whether it's relevant or not, but it hugely useful but, as previously stated, probably not appropriate for me to give a running commentary on each of those different strands, but please, rest assured, we are taking it really, really seriously. inaudible. they are conducting a meticulous search of the area looking for physical evidence, looking for physical evidence, looking for physical evidence, looking forforensic looking for physical evidence, looking for forensic evidence as you would expect in a case like this. that could prove incredibly important. that could prove incredibly important-— that could prove incredibly imiortant. . ., that could prove incredibly imiortant. i. ., . i, , important. have you found any signs of a struggle? _ important. have you found any signs of a struggle? once _ important. have you found any signs of a struggle? once again _ important. have you found any signs of a struggle? once again is - important. have you found any signs of a struggle? once again is not - of a struggle? once again is not appropriate _ of a struggle? once again is not appropriate for _ of a struggle? once again is not appropriate for me _ of a struggle? once again is not appropriate for me to _ of a struggle? once again is not appropriate for me to get - of a struggle? once again is not appropriate for me to get into i of a struggle? once again is not i appropriate for me to get into that level of detail. what i can say is we are exploiting the crime seems to the absolute maximum with specialists in many fields and i am confident that we will extract every evidential opportunity from that seen but i'm not going to go into
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detail of what we have or haven't found at this stage.— found at this stage. what if a sin i le found at this stage. what if a single blow? _ found at this stage. what if a single blow? at _ found at this stage. what if a single blow? at this - found at this stage. what if a single blow? at this stage, i found at this stage. what if a i single blow? at this stage, i'm sa ini single blow? at this stage, i'm saying she _ single blow? at this stage, i'm saying she died _ single blow? at this stage, i'm saying she died from _ single blow? at this stage, i'm| saying she died from significant head injuries. that is plural. bre head in'uries. that is plural. are ou head injuries. that is plural. are you stymied _ head injuries. that is plural. are you stymied by _ head injuries. that is plural. are you stymied by lack of cctv and other things we come to rely on? the crime scene. — other things we come to rely on? iie: crime scene, as other things we come to rely on? "iie: crime scene, as people other things we come to rely on? ii2 crime scene, as people know, is in a rural location, so that does mean some lines of enquiry are less available to us. but, of course, we will still consider close circuit television. there are opportunities in the surrounding areas, but certainly not in immediate vicinity the attack. in certainly not in immediate vicinity the attack. . certainly not in immediate vicinity the attack. , ., the attack. in terms of the distance, _ the attack. in terms of the distance, from _ the attack. in terms of the distance, from her - the attack. in terms of the distance, from her house | the attack. in terms of the | distance, from her house to the attack. in terms of the - distance, from her house to where her body was found, how long was it? it relatively close proximity. a few hundred yards from her house on the
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edge of the fields where they meet the word. i. .. edge of the fields where they meet the word. ., ,, i. edge of the fields where they meet the word. i. «' m g, edge of the fields where they meet the word. ., «i i. i. ., the word. thank you, everyone, for our the word. thank you, everyone, for your time- — the word. thank you, everyone, for your time. thank _ the word. thank you, everyone, for your time. thank you. _ studio: assistant chief constable tom richards of kent police they are paying tribute to police community support officerjulia james whose body was found as he described in a rural location on the outskirts of a word near dover on tuesday. the 53—year—old had suffered serious head injuries. being asked about a possible motive but not wanting at this stage to narrow down what might be behind this crime. he was asked at that news conference whether it was possible that someone she had come across in her line of work was responsible. he was asked about a motive of robbery, someone trying to
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steal her dog, whether a stranger could have been responsible, but he kept saying he was keeping all options open at this stage and paying tribute of course tojulia james, he described her as a hugely devoted individual serving the people of kent most recently working with victims of domestic violence. he said it was dangerous to get blinkered at this stage to try to narrow down the possibilities too much but clearly looking for help from the public asking members of the public who saw anything strange, anything suspicious out of the ordinary, on tuesday or wednesday, who may have seenjulia james at some point on tuesday, to get in touch with kent police. helena wilkinson asking some of the questions at that news conference.
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helena, does genuinely seem, though, at the moment, that police investigating the killing ofjulia james are really not clear as to what the possible motive might be. it does, doesn't it? that's the first time we have really heard on camera from kent police in terms of what is a huge murder investigation afterjulia james' body was found not too far away from where we are on the edge of woodland but you heard there from assistant chief constable tom richards giving an update on the investigation and i felt that there was quite a lot he wasn't able to tell us. i think the headlines from that is that there are no identifiable suspects at the moment in this case and also, crucially, they haven't established what the motive might�*ve been. now, we had a bit more detail aboutjulia james herself. she was a police
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community support officer and from that news conference we heard that she had served with the kent force from 2008. she did some work with the crime reduction team, but she also did some work following that support team, supporting victims of domestic abuse, and we heard they are from the assistant chief constable saying she was hugely devoted. she was passionate in terms of her work, completely committed, he said, to serving the people of kent. but the investigation here, and we are entering its third day now, her body was found just after 4pm on tuesday afternoon, as i say, at the edge of woodland not far from where we are. she was on a shift that day but was out walking her dog in an area that is popular with people who walk their dogs. what we had confirmed, as well, during that news conference was that she had
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died from serious head injuries. that's how the assistant chief constable described it, but again, in terms of motive, they are looking at various possibilities and they are not ruling anything out at this stage. i ask that question as to whether they are looking at whether somebody, whoever carried out the attack on her, may have been someone who she came across in her line of work. again, that was something that has not been ruled out at this stage, but hundreds of officers involved in this murder investigation and they are desperate, as well, as the investigation continued, the police are clearly desperate for any members of the public who may have seen anything unusual or suspicious on monday or tuesday this week, and in particular anyone who may have —— cam footage, they are very, very keen to speak to those people because where julia james was found it was in a very remote area. yes,
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there were dog walkers around, but it was an area where perhaps there weren't many people around at that time of day and so they are very keen at this stage for support from members of the public.— keen at this stage for support from members of the public. helena, the assistant chief _ members of the public. helena, the assistant chief constable _ members of the public. helena, the assistant chief constable said - members of the public. helena, the assistant chief constable said he i assistant chief constable said he had to concede it was a possibility but he couldn't do it out at this stage that this attack was carried out by a stranger although he did say that is incredibly rare. but clearly, people in the area are very concerned that's a possibility? yes. concerned that's a possibility? yes, absolutely, — concerned that's a possibility? yes, absolutely, and _ concerned that's a possibility? yes, absolutely, and we _ concerned that's a possibility? yes, absolutely, and we have _ concerned that's a possibility? i2: absolutely, and we have spoken to concerned that's a possibility? 122 absolutely, and we have spoken to a neighbour ofjulia james yesterday. neighbour of julia james yesterday. she neighbour ofjulia james yesterday. she said again this is a very small community. it's a rural area. a very quiet area. she said they were absolutely shocked. she said she would be locking all her doors and they were very worried. i think that will cause some concern in this community that, yes, as we heard there from the assistant chief constable, they are not ruling out
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that it could have been someone who attacked julia james. somebody she didn't know. and no doubt that will cause worry within this community but we have seen over the past couple of days there are lots of officers dotted around this area, lots of community support officers, on hand to reassure members of the public. the assistant chief constable tom richards was also asked whether his advice would be for women in particular not to go out at night? he said he would not be advising that. he would say that people should carry on as they are, but clearly, kent police are very aware that, with them not ruling out this could have been a stranger attack, people here in this area will no doubt be concerned. helena, thank ou will no doubt be concerned. helena, thank you very _ will no doubt be concerned. helena, thank you very much. _ will no doubt be concerned. helena, thank you very much. helena - thank you very much. helena wilkinson reporting. some newsjust coming into us in the last few moments and this is from the vertigo films production company. this is in
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relation to the actor noel clarke, suspended by bafta over allegations of sexual harassment weeks after he received one of bath's top awards, vertigo film productions is the company he worked with on the bullet—proof series. vertigo films production is saying we are devastated to hear about these allegations and have launched an urgent investigation to find out if any of the allegations apply to any vertigo films productions. our immediate concern is for any cast or crew who may have had a negative experience onset, we have robust procedures in place for reporting incidents, including the ability to raise issues anonymously. and, while noissues raise issues anonymously. and, while no issues have been flagged to us, we stand ready to support anyone who's had a negative experience on the show and encourage you to come forward with confidence. effective immediately noel clarke is removed from any vertigo films productions. the actor is vehemently denying any
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sexual misconduct or wrongdoing. a warehouse in liverpool will welcome 3000 people today, as part of the government's pilot programme to establish whether large crowds can safely gather at events. there'll be no facemasks or social distancing but as danjohnson has been finding out if you haven't had a negative covid test, you're not getting in. the show is back on the road and rolling into town for a big weekend that has been a long time coming. 3,000 people congregating together in one place. hopefully, all relaxed and a few drinks in them and they will be cool and looking forward to the excitement of the whole night. and this draughty warehouse turned nightclub is the perfect place to get people back together. i've done a couple of social distancing gigs, over the summer.
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how were they? they were ok. i mean, it was nice to see people, but you are told to sit down and don't dance. keep your voice down. all the opposite of what i've been trying to do for years. going back to the authentic rave, if you like. that is supremely exciting for us all. and it's going to be a step to the future, hopefully. across the city, there's an even bigger gig on sunday. here, too, no masks, no social distancing. though all 5,000 will be tested before and after. i can assure you it will feel like the real thing. i suspect i will have a tear in my eye, quite frankly. i can only imagine what it is going to be like for the bands.
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headlining are blossoms, all the way from stockport, after a year of playing at home, stuck like everyone else in this business. i still can't actually imagine it. it's been such a while. to see people together. we could be a bit taken back by it. but we'll probablyjust be focusing on not messing up. we haven't played for that long. remembering the words and stuff. i'll probably be able to enjoy it like two songs from the end. at first, i'lljust be like, "play it right, play it right." and it's no surprise in this city, the fans are keen. i'm excited for the event. just the idea of being in a crowd and feeling normal again. that's what i'm really looking forward to. | i wouldn't say i've got concerns. j the other half's a bit concerned. she's a primary school teacher. she's a little bit worried, _ you know, if any one tests positive.
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more worried about work. but i've been saying all week the show's got to go on. - back at the warehouse, they're almost ready. we've got perfect natural ventilation here. large openings all down one side of the building. the sensors will detect carbon dioxide levels to work out if the airflow is good enough to stop the virus spreading. so, by measuring the amount of co2 in the space, we're able to estimate the ventilation flow rate. but, more importantly, we're able to investigate the fresh air distribution. how does that air move around the space and around the people? and with music finally starting to get back to full volume, these will be gigs nobody wants to end. we'll probably be at the front of the stage, looking out. it'll be encore after encore. i've never done an encore. it's probably the time to do it, isn't it, this gig? of course you've done an encore. not like a proper encore, unplanned.
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play charlemagne again. three times. i'll do that. danjohnson, bbc news, liverpool. lets speak now to gemma krysko, director and founder, of we are indigo — which promotes events. and which promotes events. which is looking after this event and which is looking after this event today. lovely to have you it is today. so much riding on this, for the hope of the opening up of the night—time economy, the events industry, both for liverpool and the rest of the uk. are you ready? yes and real rest of the uk. are you ready? 122 and real excitement on site. i arrived 20 minutes ago, have been waiting to have a chat with you in here. the music is starting behind me, really loud amplified music, which i haven't heard in such a long time, so there is a real excitement on site right now. i time, so there is a real excitement on site right now.— on site right now. i can 'ust imagine i on site right now. i can 'ust imagine that, i on site right now. i can 'ust imagine that, as i on site right now. i can 'ust imagine that, as you b on site right now. i can just imagine that, as you listen | on site right now. i can just l imagine that, as you listen to on site right now. i can just - imagine that, as you listen to the music... just remind us all of the
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covid safety protocols around this. for the ravers, our guests coming today and tomorrow, they have to have a test that one of the community test benches, and only negative test result, along with their ticket, they are allowed to come on site. what we are asking is that everybody who is at the event will follow up with their pct test after the event so that we can sort of see what the outcome of that is, but everyone here on site today has had a negative lateral flow test, so when the rave is in full flow, they will be no masks or social distancing, they will be hugging, laughing, crying, dancing, all happening behind me from two o'clock today. find happening behind me from two o'clock toda . �* ., , happening behind me from two o'clock toda .�* happening behind me from two o'clock toda. , . today. and as you say, testing after and before the _ today. and as you say, testing after and before the event, _ today. and as you say, testing after and before the event, everything i and before the event, everything will hopefully work with no
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transmission of the virus, that is the ideal outcome. you want people to be in the moment, once they've got into the event, you want them to be in the moment and forget for a while, at least, that they are part of a pilots, and experiment. yes. while, at least, that they are part of a pilots, and experiment. yes, a rave is like — of a pilots, and experiment. yes, a rave is like riding _ of a pilots, and experiment. yes, a rave is like riding a _ of a pilots, and experiment. yes, a rave is like riding a bike, _ of a pilots, and experiment. yes, a rave is like riding a bike, i'm - of a pilots, and experiment. yes, a rave is like riding a bike, i'm sure l rave is like riding a bike, i'm sure they will get back into it after a couple of drinks and some good music. i think people will naturally go back to how they know to enjoy themselves, before all the distancing and restrictions have come into place, sol distancing and restrictions have come into place, so i am confident that quite quickly there will be a great atmosphere and everyone is going to have a really wonderful time. , ., , , , going to have a really wonderful time. ,., _ ., going to have a really wonderful time. ,., _ . time. obviously this affects your work, time. obviously this affects your work. djs. _ time. obviously this affects your work, djs, everyone _ time. obviously this affects your work, djs, everyone involved . time. obviously this affects your work, djs, everyone involved in| time. obviously this affects your i work, djs, everyone involved in the music industry, in liverpool, in bars, so many people impacted by the pandemic and lock downs, give some sense of what it means to you if this works? i sense of what it means to you if this works?—
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sense of what it means to you if this works? . ., ~ ., this works? i have worked in pr for nearl 20 this works? i have worked in pr for nearly 20 years _ this works? i have worked in pr for nearly 20 years and _ this works? i have worked in pr for nearly 20 years and done _ this works? i have worked in pr for nearly 20 years and done some - this works? i have worked in pr for i nearly 20 years and done some pretty big things in my career, but i have never known global interest on the scale for this event. i am constantly getting contacted from people injapan and china, australia, germany... the world is literally watching, because i think this is the first point of a hopeful return, notjust for the uk and liverpool, but for the entire sector. wejust liverpool, but for the entire sector. we just want everything to go as well as we can, and just get back to it as quickly as we can. will you have time to get on the dance floor yourself? l will you have time to get on the dance floor yourself?— will you have time to get on the dance floor yourself? i might sneak on there, dance floor yourself? i might sneak on there. yes- _ dance floor yourself? i might sneak on there, yes. i'm _ dance floor yourself? i might sneak on there, yes. i'm sure _ dance floor yourself? i might sneak on there, yes. i'm sure i— dance floor yourself? i might sneak on there, yes. i'm sure i will- dance floor yourself? i might sneak on there, yes. i'm sure i will find i on there, yes. i'm sure i will find five minutes. i would hope so. i will hopefully get that time today. you deserve it. lots of hard work gone into this. we wish everyone involved with the event all the best. really excited to see how this goes. the nonsocial distance rave in
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liverpool today plans by we are indigo, a big test. manchester united have sanctioned six people over alleged abuse of tottenham striker heung—min son. it follows their premier league game earlier this month. the club has also published statistics which highlight the growing scale of the online abuse directed at their own players. in 18 months from september 2019, there were 3,300 abusive posts towards their players. that's a 350% increase on the prior similar period. and 86% of these posts were racist. the club are joining a boycott of social media from three o'clock this afternoon. watford captain and striker troy deeney says he hopes the sporting social media boycott pushes platforms to do more to combat online abuse. the striker is subjected to daily racial abuse and even threats to his young family. you get racial abuse aimed not only
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myself and my partner, my children, i have had death threats put at my six—year—old girls who have to do with anything. it is constant. to put it this way, you're talking daily now. not every time you have a bad game or there is an emotional uproar, it is daily, and itjust because people are genuinely bored. hopefully you can get some analytics back to me to the impact this for days out to the market, and hope to see today's social media people, if this continues we will branch off and make our own social media accounts. what if there is a platform everyone has to be verified by their drivers license, national insurance number... that then will really make people stand up and take note. last night's game in the super league between wigan and hull was overshadowed by an allegation of racist abuse. the hull player andre savelio, made the accusation against a wigan player, during the first half.
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the referee placed the incident on report, which means it will now be investigated. wigan went on to win the game 16—14 to maintain their 100% start to the season. rugby�*s european champions and challenge cup finals will take place at twickenham instead of in marseille. the games have been moved because of the impact of covid—i9 in france. up to 10,000 fans will be allowed to attend both showpiece games, in line with the uk government's road map out of lockdown. the challenge cup final is on friday 21 may and the champions cup a day later. marseille will host both finals in 2022 instead. jodi ewart shadoff and bronte law arwe the highest placed brits after round 2 of the women's world championship in singapore. they are tied for 12th on 6 under. south korean pair hee young park and inbee park are currently tied in the lead on 11 under, with hee young park carding five birdies during round 2. the world snooker championship semifinals are continuing this morning with mark selby and stuart bingham currently at the table. the pair were tied at four frames a piece overnight, and it's still very tight. no one has opened up a lead.
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it's 6-6. all the action is on bbc two and the bbc sport website. selby is looking for a fourth world title. bingham is looking to add to the one he won in 2015. this afternoon's session sees last year's finallist kyren wilson and shaun murphy in the other semifinal. wilson leads 6—2. to the nfl draft and the jacksonville jaguars selected clemson university quarterback trevor lawrence. the 21—year—old lawrence, finished as runner—up in voting for the heisman trophy, awarded to college football's most outstanding player. the draft is being held in cleveland, ohio. as fans were welcomed back to the event a year after covid—19 forced it to go to a virtual format. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. and there's been more reaction to the allegations of sexual harrassment about the actor noel clarke.
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more than 20 women who have worked with him on a professional basis have made allegations of sexual harassment. he environmentally denies any sexual misconduct or wrongdoing. —— he vehemently denies. statement from sky regarding bulletproof series four, starring noel clarke, which was commissioned injanuary. a spokesperson for sky said: "sky stands against all forms of sexual harassment and bullying and takes any allegations of this nature extremely seriously. effective immediately, we have halted noel clarke's involvement in any future sky we have halted noel clarke's sky goes on to say it has a dedicated confidential whistle—blowing service and says it has not received any reports are allegations of sexual misconduct are harassment either during or since production of the bullet—proof series.
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prime minister benjamin netanyahu has said a stampede that killed at least 44 people at a jewish pilgrimage site on friday was one of the "worst" disasters in israel's history. he has just tweeted. he called it one of the worst disasters to befall the state of israel, declaring that sunday will be a national day of mourning. more than 100 others were injured when up to 80,000 orthodoxjews gathered at a festival at mount meron. paramedics say the crush happened after people slipped in an overcrowded walkway, causing dozens more to fall. courtney bembridge has more. and a warning — her report contains distressing images. videos uploaded to social media show the chaotic scenes. tens of thousands of people crushed together at the foot of mount meron.
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wejust finished reading one of israel's worst disasters. ——treating. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate and unfortunately they were literally crushed to death. it was supposed to be a celebration, a night of prayer, singing and dancing. translation: iwas there, inside. it was crowded and there were around 60,000 to 70,000 people. no place to move. then people started to fall on the ground. they fell a lot on the ground. all of a sudden we saw paramedics, whatever, running by, like mid—cpr on kids. then, one after the other, there started coming ambulances. then we understood like something is going on here. many people had been watching the event live on television. emergency services struggled to reach those who were injured because of the crowds.
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the roads were also congested and military helicopters were brought in to take the injured to hospital. many of the first responders were volunteers, now being offered counselling. many many people were hurt and injured, and killed here. the volunteers behind us are being gathered together for an immediate debrief, with a trauma unit, to the fact that they were exposed to a very difficult site. the evening event is the start of the religious festival, but all future events have been cancelled because of the disaster. this eyewitness gave us more detail about the exact moment the stampede happened and the ensuing chaos. translation: a terrible load started. _ and what happened was kind of a carousel. one person pushed another person, so everybody was pushed right and left. and after 20 minutes, i think, people started suffocating. so they wanted to get out.
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but no one was able to get out. there were people under me who were not breathing any more. there were horrible screams of "i can't breathe". and gradually, some of the screaming stopped. people started trying to pull people from underneath instead of the top. crazy chaos. earlier our middle east correspondent, yolande knell, gave us this update. there is more graphic footage that has come out from the site, a lot of witnesses have been telling us what happened from their perspective. it is clear that in one of the passage wage that leads away from one of the main event areas at this location, one of the holiestjewish sites in israel, a site for annual pilgrimages, especially in pre—down pandemic times, would have attracted more people than we saw there
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overnight, tens of thousands of people at the site. it is a mainly gender segregated area, so mainly men and boys from the ultraorthodox jewish ceremony were making their way down this passageway. we can see that some people fail, they slept, we were told, and then there was this terrible crash that resulted, and that resulted in people being trampled on and suffocated. the death though currently standing at 44 but a lot of people critically injured and fears the death toll could rise. injured and fears the death toll could rise-_ injured and fears the death toll could rise. , , ., . could rise. definitely, more than 100 peeple _ could rise. definitely, more than 100 peeple are _ could rise. definitely, more than 100 people are in _ could rise. definitely, more than 100 people are in hospitals, - could rise. definitely, more than i 100 people are in hospitals, some could rise. definitely, more than - 100 people are in hospitals, some of them critically injured, some of them critically injured, some of them seriously injured. mainly men and boys. in israel, really the country is in a state of shock. a lot of questions being asked about how on earth this happens. the local police commissioner has said that he accepts responsibility, but a lot of experts have been coming out saying
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this was an event that took place with a little planning, it was actually the biggest gather of people israel has seen since the pandemic began, so we know senior police officers and also the public security minister had gone to inspect the site in advance, but they were very few changes that were put there compared to previous years when the event takes place. there is usually a concert and dancing, big bonfire that take place there. one of the things that had been changed was to stop large numbers of people gathering around bonfires, there had been some corrugated iron fencing put up, and some of the really quite upsetting footage you can see is people tearing down some of this fencing in order to make more space. it's emerged that the uk prime minister's mobile phone number has been freely available online — for the last 15 years. borisjohnson's number was listed
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on a press release from 2006 — when he was a junior shadow minister — and it appears to have stayed the same since. the opposition labour party says it raises concerns about security and the risk of blackmail. mrjohnson's office has declined to comment. meanwhile an mp has asked the parliamentary standards commissioner to investigate whether the prime minister broke any rules about declaring donations. the labour leader sir keir starmer has been visiting hull and was asked about the pm's for number being publicly available. it is about the pm's for number being publicly available.— publicly available. it is of a ccd situation and _ publicly available. it is of a ccd situation and carries _ publicly available. it is of a ccd situation and carries a - publicly available. it is of a ccd situation and carries a security| situation and carries a security risk and he was warned about it. that tells its own story. i think it lot of people will be concerned not just about who has got the number, but who has been using it, because what has come out in recent weeks is privileged access. those that can message the prime minister for favours. this is further evidence that there is essentially one rule for them and another rule for
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everybody else. is for them and another rule for everybody else.— everybody else. is it really a security risk? _ everybody else. is it really a security risk? it _ everybody else. is it really a security risk? it is _ everybody else. is it really a security risk? it is a - everybody else. is it really a security risk? it is a securityi everybody else. is it really a - security risk? it is a security risk and i think _ security risk? it is a security risk and i think that _ security risk? it is a security risk and i think that has _ security risk? it is a security risk and i think that has been - security risk? it is a security risk and i think that has been clear. security risk? it is a security risk i and i think that has been clear from this morning. that is why the prime minister was warned about it. he has a number, was told per security numbers you should change it and he doesn't do it. as i say, that tells its own story. the real question is, who has been using that number? because we know there has been privileged access to the prime minister, and there are lots of the people who have struggled through this pandemic, many people who have lost theirjobs or are struggling, who would have loved to be able to get that privileged access to the perimeter and haven't had it. if you perimeter and haven't had it. if you are prime minister, _ perimeter and haven't had it. if you are prime minister, would - perimeter and haven't had it. if you are prime minister, would you i are prime minister, would you continue to use your personal number? i continue to use your personal number?— continue to use your personal number? . . , , number? i change my number when i became director— number? i change my number when i became director of— number? i change my number when i became director of public _ became director of public prosecutions, i have kept it secure since then. what is important is that we think that security seriously and we don't let people lobby us privately. he
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seriously and we don't let people lobby us privately.— lobby us privately. he was also asked about — lobby us privately. he was also asked about the _ lobby us privately. he was also asked about the controversy i lobby us privately. he was also i asked about the controversy over who paid for the prime minister's downing street flat. we paid for the prime minister's downing street flat. we need to get to the bottom _ downing street flat. we need to get to the bottom of _ downing street flat. we need to get to the bottom of this. _ downing street flat. we need to get to the bottom of this. the _ downing street flat. we need to get to the bottom of this. the question| to the bottom of this. the question is who initially paid for the refurbishment of the prime minister's fat. the prime minister knows the answer to that question, but he won't answer it —— prime minister's flat. he could end all of this, we can move on and investigations will be closed down investigations will be closed down in five minutes of the prime minister this morning got a camera and microphone and answered the question, who paid for the refurbishment of your initially? i think most people would say, if i'd had my flat or house refurbished, i would be able to tell you who paid for it. the prime minister knows the answer to that question. the real issue is, why is he not telling us? we know labour have asked the parliamentary commissioner for standards to investigate. if she
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does this will be the first investigation. have you had any indication from as to whether she will go ahead? l indication from as to whether she will go ahead?— indication from as to whether she will go ahead? i have not had any indication from _ will go ahead? i have not had any indication from her. _ will go ahead? i have not had any indication from her. she - will go ahead? i have not had any indication from her. she will- will go ahead? i have not had any indication from her. she will act l indication from her. she will act independently, as you would expect. frankly, it is getting ridiculous that the prime minister won't simply answer the question. it is not a difficult question. who initially paid for the refurbishment of your flat? answer, prime minister. and then we can all move on to the things that really matter. my strong senseis things that really matter. my strong sense is that people are really concerned about their jobs sense is that people are really concerned about theirjobs and what is going to happen in the autumn in particular, in relation to the economy. they are worried about the front line of the nhs, which has done so much during this pandemic, they are very worried that crime is going through the roof on rates are falling, and really prime minister who spends time looking at wallpaper. research from the british retail consortium has highlighted that1 in 7 shops are now empty
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and there are 5,000 fewer shops since the start of the pandemic. in the first quarter of 2021, the overall vacancy rate in britain increased to 14.1%, compared with 13.7% in 2020. this marks three years of increasing vacancy rates, with the north of england being one of the worst hit areas. let's speak now to bill grimsey, a former executive at iceland, wickes and tesco, who has backed three reports into the future of the high street. the shops that have been lost, have they been lost permanently? or is there a prospect of some of those reopening? l there a prospect of some of those reopening?— there a prospect of some of those reopening? i think they have been lost permanently. _ reopening? i think they have been lost permanently. because - reopening? i think they have been lost permanently. because it i reopening? i think they have been lost permanently. because it is i lost permanently. because it is clear that our habits have changed and we are shopping more online. that was predicted seven or eight years ago, so it is not new, it is just that this pandemic has accelerated it, and it is the big brands, like from arcadia going
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bust, debenham going, which have had big shock waves, but underneath it are a set of independent retailers who are very important to our economy, who frankly have had a raw deal throughout this pandemic. we are about to do a fourth review into researching that area, so if anyone wants to contact me with details of how they have survived this, they can get me on social media, but the point is, this government needs to wake up, the independents need support, it is not the big companies that need support, and with regards to the biggest because they are facing, if they go back to work having been closed for much of the year, the business rates issue. the government should waver for this financial year until april of next yearfor financial year until april of next year for all financial year until april of next yearfor all independent financial year until april of next year for all independent and nonessential retailers who got a raw deal throughout this process. hasn’t deal throughout this process. hasn't there been a — deal throughout this process. hasn't there been a rise _ deal throughout this process. hasn't there been a rise in _ deal throughout this process. hasn't there been a rise in localism? i there been a rise in localism? people really discovering, if they
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haven't already, the shops in their area? working from home, perhaps going to a local coffee shop, for example, are deciding to really support those local businesses in their immediate community? absolutely they have. those central independent retailers have enjoyed a very good time. bike shops particularly were considered essential, coffee shops were able to serve outdoors, or take a ways, or convenience and food shops, delicatessens, have all done very well out of this. that has been great. we have all discovered our local community. the 21st century is about reinventing our towns, not around the big brands, but around experiences and curating the place around the heritage, that has got fantastic local independent shops that make that tout unique. we spent
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the last century cloning every town with big brands, obsessed with all these big brands being in our town, and now we have seen we don't need them. ,.,, , and now we have seen we don't need them. _,, , ., and now we have seen we don't need them. the boss of barclays has talked about _ them. the boss of barclays has talked about today _ them. the boss of barclays has talked about today the - them. the boss of barclays has talked about today the biggest | talked about today the biggest economic boom since 1948 for the uk, do you share his confidence? and if so, how can the sorts of businesses you are talking about benefit from that? ~ you are talking about benefit from that? . . ., , you are talking about benefit from that? . . . , ~ that? well i certainly think there is auoin that? well i certainly think there is going to _ that? well i certainly think there is going to be — that? well i certainly think there is going to be a _ that? well i certainly think there is going to be a huge _ that? well i certainly think there is going to be a huge bounce i that? well i certainly think there l is going to be a huge bounce from the pandemic, a lot of demand out there and a loss of money being saved during this time. it will be spent. do i think that is a long—term economic recovery? i am not so sure about that. i am sure of one thing, an exciting future for our town centres, providing our local authorities get good plans together and get the uniqueness about our towns, and invest in our small businesses, because that is what is the heartbeat of the uk.
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now we're less than a week away from may's elections, with different contests depending on where you live. our correspondent lewis goodall has been taking a look at what's happening — and where. there is a bumper crop of elections coming up in england and scotland and wales in may, the biggest set of elections, the biggest democratic test for the three major parties this side of the next general election. so let's have a look at some of the contests that are taking place across the country. for a start, we've got 143 different english councils up for election, 5000 seats, in some places, a third of the chamber, in some places, half the chamber, because some of those seats are held overfrom councils which should have been elected in 20202 but won't because of the pandemic. msps in holyrood up for election, 129 of them. all members of the welsh assembly. we have seen what huge powers those bodies have in scotland and wales
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during the pandemic. in england as well, police and crime commissioners. 25 seats for the london assembly, as well as a whole sweet of other directly elected mayors, 13 of them. how are these elections conducted? it might be a bit more complicated than you think, it depends where you live and what you are voting in. in scotland and wales you get two votes, one for your local constituency member, and another for the regional list. this vote effectively helps parties which do not do so well in the local constituencies but do still do well overall in the election, it tops up their representation and gives them extra seats and makes the overall system more proportional. but that is different of course if you are living in england. in english local councils, it is our old friend, first—past—the—post. one voter, one candidate, one vote, whichever candidate gets one more vote than all of the other
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candidates, they are elected, whichever party controls more than 50% of the seats in a local chamber, they control the local council, and if they are not able to get more than 50% of the seats, then they have to form a coalition with another party. and that is different again if you are voting in the english mayoral elections or the police and crime commissioners. there, there is something called a supplementary vote system, voters get two preferences, if no—one gets over 50%, then the other candidates are eliminated one by one, and the preferences of those voters are readers to beat it until you get over 50% for one candidate and hey presto, you've got a mayor or you've got an english local police and crime commissioner. but one thing that unites all of these elections is the fact that they are taking place in very different circumstances than we might have expected, certainly different from back in the 1950s. this one is taking place in a global pandemic. covid—secure local voting stations,
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voters being asked to bring their own pencil, shielders being asked to vote by post, we can't know what effect all of that is going to have on turnout. could be much lower, could be much higher, if lots of people choose to vote by post. and there for this is a very unpredictable set of elections and we can't know what power they are going to have in order to give us wider insight into trends in our politics more generally. lewis goodall reporting there. afairfear a fairfear they will a fair fear they will stay dry to the rest of the day with a view comes of sunshine. we have seen showers built up sunshine. we have seen showers built up and become more widespread through the afternoon. some of the heaviest across the high ground of northern england, wales and also a zone from devon and cornwall towards other parts of south—west england. a chilly day, especially where showers are and down the eastern coast, 8-13 , are and down the eastern coast, 8—13 , temperatures dropping in the showers. a higher potentially 13. tonight the showers fade, clear
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skies from some of the showers on the coast, and a run of night—time frost continues. a widespread frost away from towns and city centres tomorrow morning. like tomorrow, if you coastal showers, as temperatures rise throughout the day after a sunny start, more cloud into the afternoon, more in the way of showers, heavy as tomorrow on the hills of wales and just inland from the south coast of england. temperatures up a little bit but overall it will be a cool weekend with a mixture of sunshine and showers. but changes on the way for monday with some very wet and windy weather. i will update you on that later.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in thejewish world. the prime minister netanyahu says it's one of the "worst" disasters in israel's history. it's thought people slipped in an overcrowded walkway, causing dozens more to fall at an event attended by tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox jews. we've just finished treating one of israel's worst disasters. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate lag b'omer, and unfortunately, were literally crushed to death. security worries over the prime minister's phone after it's revealed his phone number's been freely available online, for the last 15 years.
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it carries a security risk and he was mourned about it. that tells its own story. i think a lot of people will be concerned notjust about who has got the number, but who has been using it. detectives?investigating the murder of a police community support officer, in kent, say they still haven't identified a suspect or a motive. julia james's body was discovered in woodland near dover on tuesday. actor and director noel clarke has been suspended from vertigo film productions, and sky also say they won't work with him anymore — after allegations of sexual harrassment — which he denies. bbc news analysis shows around a the people in the uk are living in areas that have not reported any covid deaths in april. and sport goes silent. football, rugby, cricket and more will start a four day boycott of social media today, in an attempt to tackle online abuse.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. emergency workers in israel say at least 44 people are dead and more than 100 injured — many critically — in a crush at a religious festival. it's one of the country's worst peacetime disasters. tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox hassidicjews had gathered at the foot of mount meron in the north of israel, for lag b'omer, a religious holiday marked with all—night bonfires, prayer and dancing. paramedics say the crush happened after people slipped in an overcrowded walkway, causing dozens more to fall. this was the largest event in israel since the coronavirus pandemic began. the country's successful vaccination programme has allowed it to lift many restrictions. prime minister benjamin netanyahu
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has described it as a "heavy disaster" and said he was praying for the casualties. videos uploaded to social media show the chaotic scenes. tens of thousands of people were crushed together at the foot of mount meron. we've just finished treating one of israel's worst disasters. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate lag b'omer and, unfortunately, work literally crushed to death. it unfortunately, work literally crushed to death.— unfortunately, work literally crushed to death. . , , , unfortunately, work literally crushed to death. , , ., crushed to death. it was supposed to be a celebration, _ crushed to death. it was supposed to be a celebration, night _ crushed to death. it was supposed to be a celebration, night of _ crushed to death. it was supposed to be a celebration, night of prayer, i be a celebration, night of prayer, singing and dancing. translation: i singing and dancing. translation: ., , , translation: iwas there, inside. it was crowded — translation: iwas there, inside. it was crowded and _ translation: iwas there, inside. it was crowded and there _ translation: i was there, inside. it was crowded and there were - translation: iwas there, inside. it was crowded and there were around | was crowded and there were around 60,000 - 70,000 was crowded and there were around 60,000 — 70,000 people. no place to move and people started to fall on the ground. they fell a lot on the ground. fill
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the ground. they fell a lot on the round. �* ., . , ground. all of a sudden we saw paramedics _ ground. all of a sudden we saw paramedics running _ ground. all of a sudden we saw paramedics running by, - ground. all of a sudden we saw paramedics running by, mid i ground. all of a sudden we sawl paramedics running by, mid cpr ground. all of a sudden we saw- paramedics running by, mid cpr on young _ paramedics running by, mid cpr on young kids. — paramedics running by, mid cpr on young kids, and then one after another— young kids, and then one after another started coming out into ambulances and then we understood something _ ambulances and then we understood something was going on here. many --eole something was going on here. many people have — something was going on here. many people have been _ something was going on here. many people have been watching the something was going on here. lilariy people have been watching the event live on television. emergency services struggled to reach those who were injured because of the crowds. the roads are also congested and military helicopters were brought in to take the injured to hospital. many of the first responders were volunteers. now being offered counselling.- being offered counselling. many, many people _ being offered counselling. many, many people were _ being offered counselling. many, many people were hurt, - being offered counselling. many, many people were hurt, injured i being offered counselling. many, i many people were hurt, injured and killed here. and the volunteers behind us right now have gathered together for an behind us right now have gathered togetherfor an immediate behind us right now have gathered together for an immediate debrief on the trauma unit, it's a very difficult site.— the trauma unit, it's a very difficult site. , difficult site. the evening event is the start of _ difficult site. the evening event is the start of the _ difficult site. the evening event is the start of the religious - difficult site. the evening event is the start of the religious festival. the start of the religious festival but all future events have been cancelled because of the disaster. this eyewitness gave us more detail about the exact moment the stampede happened and the ensuing chaos.
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translation: a terrible load started. _ and what happened was kind of a carousel. one person pushed another person, so everybody was pushed right and left. and after 20 minutes, i think, people started suffocating. so they wanted to get out. but no one was able to get out. there were people under me who were not breathing any more. there were horrible screams of "i can't breathe". and gradually, some of the screaming stopped. people started trying to pull people from underneath instead of the top. crazy chaos. our correspondent in jerusalem is yolande knell. there is more graphic footage that has come out from the site, a lot of witnesses have been telling us what happened from their perspective. it's clear that in one of the passageways that leads away from one
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of the main event areas, at this location, it's one of the holiest jewish sites in israel. it's a site for annual pilgrimages that, especially in pre—pandemic times, would have attracted far more people than we even saw their overnight. there were tens of thousands of people there at the site. now, it's a mainly gender segregated area so as they are mainly men and boys from the ultraorthodoxjewish community were making their way down this passageway, we can see that some people fell, they slept. we were told there was then a terrible crash which resulted and that left people being trampled on and being suffocated. it's emerged that the uk prime minister's mobile phone number has been freely available online for the last 15 years. borisjohnson's number was listed on a press release from 2006 when he was a junior shadow minister and it appears to have stayed the same since. the opposition labour party says it raises concerns about security and the risk of blackmail.
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mrjohnson's office has declined to comment. meanwhile an mp has asked the parliamentary standards commissioner to investigate whether the prime minister broke any rules about declaring donations. lord ricketts is a former national security adviser and is currently a cross—bench peer. he explained that while mrjohnson's phone number being openly available posed a security risk, it also left him too accessible to people wanting to speak to him off—record. there is, at the extreme, the possibility that hostile states may have had access to his phone number and we certainly don't want them listening in to the pm's phone calls but also it means that the pm can have discussions with people completely off—line that might involve contracts or tax affairs, as we've seen, or they might involve foreign affairs. it's much better if people have got business to do with the pm that they go through the number ten switchboard, that a private secretary can listen in and check the caller's identity so he doesn't get impersonators ringing him up and the whole thing is above board
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and everybody is protected. this is for the pm's own protection i'm suggesting this. the labour leader, keir starmer, has been visiting hull. he was asked about the pm s mobile phone number being publically available. well, it's obviously a serious situation _ well, it's obviously a serious situation. it carries a security risk_ situation. it carries a security risk and _ situation. it carries a security risk and he _ situation. it carries a security risk and he was mourned about it. that— risk and he was mourned about it. that tells— risk and he was mourned about it. that tells its own story. i think a lot of— that tells its own story. i think a lot of people will be concerned, not 'ust lot of people will be concerned, not just about _ lot of people will be concerned, not just about who has got the number, but who— just about who has got the number, but who has— just about who has got the number, but who has been using it because what _ but who has been using it because what has _ but who has been using it because what has come out in recent weeks is privileged _ what has come out in recent weeks is privileged access, those that can whatsapp the prime minister for favours. — whatsapp the prime minister for favours, and this is further evidence _ favours, and this is further evidence that there is essentially one rule — evidence that there is essentially one rule for them and another rule for everybody else. is one rule for them and another rule for everybody else. is it one rule for them and another rule for everybody else.— for everybody else. is it really a security risk? _ for everybody else. is it really a security risk? it _ for everybody else. is it really a security risk? it is _ for everybody else. is it really a security risk? it is a _ for everybody else. is it really a security risk? it is a security i for everybody else. is it really a | security risk? it is a security risk and i think _ security risk? it is a security risk and i think that's _ security risk? it is a security risk and i think that's been _ security risk? it is a security risk and i think that's been clear i security risk? it is a security risk| and i think that's been clear from this morning. that's why the prime minister— this morning. that's why the prime minister was mourned about it. so,
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you know. — minister was mourned about it. so, you know, the prime minister has his number, _ you know, the prime minister has his number, he's— you know, the prime minister has his number, he's told that for security reasons— number, he's told that for security reasons he — number, he's told that for security reasons he should change it and he doesn't _ reasons he should change it and he doesn't do — reasons he should change it and he doesn't do it —— warned. that tells its own— doesn't do it —— warned. that tells its own storv _ doesn't do it —— warned. that tells its own story. the real question is who has— its own story. the real question is who has been using that number? we know there's been privileged access to the _ know there's been privileged access to the prime minister and there are lots and _ to the prime minister and there are lots and lots of people who have struggled through this pandemic, many— struggled through this pandemic, many people who have lost their jobs. _ many people who have lost their jobs, struggling, who would have loved _ jobs, struggling, who would have loved to— jobs, struggling, who would have loved to have been able to get that privileged — loved to have been able to get that privileged access to the prime minister— privileged access to the prime minister and have not had it. if you are prime minister— minister and have not had it. if you are prime minister would _ minister and have not had it. if you are prime minister would you i minister and have not had it. if you are prime minister would you use | are prime minister would you use your personal number? i are prime minister would you use your personal number? i changed my number when — your personal number? i changed my number when i _ your personal number? i changed my number when i became _ your personal number? i changed my number when i became director- your personal number? i changed my number when i became director of i number when i became director of public— number when i became director of public prosecutions and i kept it secure _ public prosecutions and i kept it secure since then. what is important is that— secure since then. what is important is that we _ secure since then. what is important is that we take that security seriously— is that we take that security seriously and we don't let people lobby— seriously and we don't let people lobbv us — seriously and we don't let people lobby us privately. keir seriously and we don't let people lobby us privately.— lobby us privately. keir starmer. the prime _ lobby us privately. keir starmer. the prime minister _ lobby us privately. keir starmer. the prime minister is _ lobby us privately. keir starmer. the prime minister is of - lobby us privately. keir starmer. the prime minister is of course i lobby us privately. keir starmer. i the prime minister is of course more than anyone else aware of his responsibilities and his duties in
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that context of national security. l that context of national security. i have complete and utter confidence that he and his advisers are aware of his responsibilities and i don't feel i can comment more. you are watchin: feel i can comment more. you are watching bbc— feel i can comment more. you are watching bbc news. _ welcoming viewers on bbc two joining us now. kent police have spoken for the first time about the murder of a serving police community support officer who was found murdered in woodland on tuesday. deputy chief constable tim smith said thatjulia james died of �*significant head injuries' and said investigators couldn't rule out that she had been attacked by a stranger. a little while earlier, assistant chief constable tom richards spoke to reporters. kent police were called shortly after 4pm on tuesday of this week to the edge of the woodland on the outskirts of snowdon village. that is where we found julia. she was
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deceased. the serious crime directorate have commenced a murder investigation. we do not, at this stage, have any identified suspects. we are keeping all options open to us while we fully investigate the circumstances of this matter and try to understand exactly what happened. we do not come at this stage, understand the motive for this attack. i would like to appeal please for witnesses, many local and wider members of the community have come forward with incredibly useful, important information that is helping us piece together what happened on tuesday. if anybody else saw anything suspicious or strange on tuesday or wednesday of this week we are very, very anxious to speak to them. we are very, very grateful
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for the support we have received from the local community. they have been incredibly patient. we have a lot of police officers in a location. that will continue into the weekend while we continue our investigations and we continue our searches, seeking evidence. our correspondent helena wilkinson was at that news conference in aylesham in kent. she gave me this update. i think the headlines from that is that there — i think the headlines from that is that there are no identifiable suspects at the moment in this case. and also, _ suspects at the moment in this case. and also, crucially, that they haven't — and also, crucially, that they haven't established what the motive might— haven't established what the motive might have been. now, we had a bit more _ might have been. now, we had a bit more detail— might have been. now, we had a bit more detail aboutjulia james more detail about julia james herself — more detail about julia james herself. she more detail aboutjulia james herself. she was a police community support— herself. she was a police community support officer and from that news conference we heard that she had served _ conference we heard that she had served with the kent force from 2008~ — served with the kent force from 2008. she did some work with the crime _ 2008. she did some work with the crime reduction team but she also did some — crime reduction team but she also did some work following that supporting victims of domestic abuse and we _
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supporting victims of domestic abuse and we heard they are from the assistant — and we heard they are from the assistant chief constable saying she was hugely devoted. she was passionate in terms of her work, completely committed, he said, to serving _ completely committed, he said, to serving the people of kent but the investigation here and we are entering _ investigation here and we are entering its third day now, her body was found _ entering its third day now, her body was found just after 4pm on tuesday afternoon. _ was found just after 4pm on tuesday afternoon, as i say, at the edge of woodland — afternoon, as i say, at the edge of woodland not far from where we are. she was— woodland not far from where we are. she was on— woodland not far from where we are. she was on shift that day but was out walking her dog in an area that is popular— out walking her dog in an area that is popular with people who walk their— is popular with people who walk their dogs. what we had confirmed as well during _ their dogs. what we had confirmed as well during that news conference was that she _ well during that news conference was that she had died from serious head injuries— that she had died from serious head injuries is— that she had died from serious head injuries is how the assistant chief constable — injuries is how the assistant chief constable described it, but again, in terms _ constable described it, but again, in terms of— constable described it, but again, in terms of motive, they are looking at various— in terms of motive, they are looking at various possibilities and they are not— at various possibilities and they are not ruling anything out at this stage _ are not ruling anything out at this stage i_ are not ruling anything out at this stage iask— are not ruling anything out at this stage. i ask that question as to whether— stage. i ask that question as to whether they are looking at whether
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somebody, whoever carried out the attack _ somebody, whoever carried out the attack on _ somebody, whoever carried out the attack on her, may have been someone who she _ attack on her, may have been someone who she came _ attack on her, may have been someone who she came across in her line of work _ who she came across in her line of work again, — who she came across in her line of work. again, that was something that has not _ work. again, that was something that has not been ruled out at this stage. — has not been ruled out at this stage, but hundreds of officers involved — stage, but hundreds of officers involved in this murder investigation are desperate as well as that _ investigation are desperate as well as that investigation continuing, the police — as that investigation continuing, the police are clearly desperate for any members of the public who may have seen— any members of the public who may have seen anything unusual or are suspicious— have seen anything unusual or are suspicious on monday or tuesday this week, _ suspicious on monday or tuesday this week, in— suspicious on monday or tuesday this week, in particularanyone suspicious on monday or tuesday this week, in particular anyone who may have footage, they are keen to speak to those _ have footage, they are keen to speak to those people because julia james was found _ to those people because julia james was found in a very remote area. yes, _ was found in a very remote area. yes. there — was found in a very remote area. yes, there were dog walkers around, but it— yes, there were dog walkers around, but it was— yes, there were dog walkers around, but it was an — yes, there were dog walkers around, but it was an area where perhaps there _ but it was an area where perhaps there weren't many people around that time — there weren't many people around that time of day and so they are very— that time of day and so they are very keen — that time of day and so they are very keen at this stage for support from _ very keen at this stage for support from members of the public. and the assistant chief _ from members of the public. and the assistant chief constable _ from members of the public. and the assistant chief constable said - from members of the public. and the assistant chief constable said he i assistant chief constable said he had to concede it was a possibility
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but he can do it out at this stage that this attack was carried out by a strange or we said it was incredibly rare. but clearly people incredibly rare. but clearly people in the area are very concerned that thatis in the area are very concerned that that is a possibility?— that is a possibility? yes, absolutely, _ that is a possibility? yes, absolutely, and _ that is a possibility? yes, absolutely, and we i that is a possibility? yes, absolutely, and we spoke that is a possibility? yes, i absolutely, and we spoke to a neighbour ofjulia james' yesterday. neighbour of julia james' yesterday. she said _ neighbour ofjulia james' yesterday. she said this is a small community, a rural_ she said this is a small community, a rural area, — she said this is a small community, a ruralarea, a _ she said this is a small community, a ruralarea, a very she said this is a small community, a rural area, a very quiet area and she said_ a rural area, a very quiet area and she said they— a rural area, a very quiet area and she said they were absolutely shocked. she said she would be locking — shocked. she said she would be locking all her doors and they were very worried and i think that will cause _ very worried and i think that will cause some concern in this community that, yes, _ cause some concern in this community that, yes, as— cause some concern in this community that, yes, as we heard there from the assistant chief constable, they are not_ the assistant chief constable, they are not ruling out it could have been _ are not ruling out it could have been someone who attacked julia james. _ been someone who attacked julia james, somebody she didn't know, and no doubt _ james, somebody she didn't know, and no doubt that will cause worry within— no doubt that will cause worry within this community. we have seen over the _ within this community. we have seen over the past couple of days, there are lots _ over the past couple of days, there are lots of— over the past couple of days, there are lots of officers dotted around this area, — are lots of officers dotted around this area, lots of community support officers _ this area, lots of community support officers on _ this area, lots of community support officers on hand to reassure members
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officers on hand to reassure members of the _ officers on hand to reassure members of the public. the assistant chief constable — of the public. the assistant chief constable tom richards was also asked _ constable tom richards was also asked whether he would advise women in particular— asked whether he would advise women in particular not to go out at night — in particular not to go out at night he _ in particular not to go out at night. he said that he would not be advising _ night. he said that he would not be advising that. he would say that people — advising that. he would say that people should carry on as they are, but clearly, — people should carry on as they are, but clearly, kent police are very aware _ but clearly, kent police are very aware that — but clearly, kent police are very aware that with them not ruling out that this _ aware that with them not ruling out that this could have been a stranger attack, _ that this could have been a stranger attack, people here in this area will no — attack, people here in this area will no doubt be concerned. helena wilkinson reporting. _ the headlines on bbc news. dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in thejewish world. the prime minister netanyahu says it's one of the "worst" disasters in israel's history. security worries over the prime minister's phone — after it's revealed his phone number's been freely available online, for the last 15 years detectives?investigating the murder of a police community support officer, in kent, say they still haven't identified a suspect or a motive. julia james's body was discovered
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in woodland near dover on tuesday. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's g?vin it follows their premier league game earlier this month. the club has also published statistics which highlight the growing scale of the online abuse directed at their own players. in 18 months from september 2019 there were 3300 abusive posts to their players. and 50% on the previous period. they arejoining a boycott of social media from three o'clock this afternoon. a watford captain troy deeney says he hopes the sporting social media boycott put platforms to do more to combat on line abuse. the striker was subjected to daily racial abuse and threats to his young family.
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hopefully you can get some analytics back to show the impact this for days actually impacted the market. and hope to say today to be social media groups if this continues we will make our own social media accounts. what is there is a platform where everybody has to be verified by their drivers license, by their national insurance number. that then will really make people stand up and take note. rugby�*s european champions and challenge cup finals will take place at twickenham. the games have been moved from marseille because of the impact of covid—19 in france. up to ten thousand fans will be allowed to attend both showpiece games, in line with the uk government's roadmap out of lockdown. the challenge cup final is on friday 21 may and the champions cup a day later. marseille will host both finals in 2022 instead. the world snooker championship semi—finals
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are continuing this afternoon. mark selby and stuart bingham were tied at four frames a piece overnight, and it's still very tight. all the action is live on the red button and the bbc sport website. the latest score is 8—6 to selby who is looking for a fourth world title. bingham is looking to add to the one he won in 2015. this afternoon's session sees last year's finallist — kyren wilson — and shaun murphy in the other semi—final. wilson leads 6—2. to the nfl draft and the jacksonville jaguars selected clemson university quarterback trevor lawrence. the 21—year—old lawrence, finished as runner—up in voting for the heisman trophy, awarded to college football's most outstanding player. the draft is being held in in cleveland, ohio as fans were welcomed back to the event a year after covid—19 forced it to go to a virtual format. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. bafta has suspended the actor and director noel clarke just weeks after he received one of its top awards — following allegations of sexual harassment and bullying. sky television also says the actor will not be involved in any of their future productions, as well as vertigo films.
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the actor — who appeared in films including "kidulthood" and tv shows like "doctor who" — vehemently denies any misconduct or wrongdoing. tim muffett reports. viewpoint, itv�*s new police drama starring noel clarke. the actor made his first tv appearance more than 20 years ago. and there have been many more since then. but it's his work behind the camera that has won him huge critical acclaim with the likes of the hood trilogy of kidulthood, adulthood and brotherhood. earlier this month, he received an outstanding contribution award from bafta, one of the academy's highest accolades. last night, bafta issued a statement. it said that... it follows a range of allegations concerning the actor's
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behaviour, allegations which he vehemently denies. in a statement, noel clarke said... tim muffett, bbc news. around a third of the people in the uk are living in areas that have not reported any covid deaths in april, according to bbc news analysis. health experts welcomed the progress but said we should remain cautious to avoid another wave of cases. naomi grimley has been looking at the numbers. getting back to normal is something we all want to do. and some areas of the country
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already seem in a good place. take plymouth, for example. home to more than a quarter of million people, it's not seen a covid death in the last 58 days. oxford has not reported a covid death occurring in the last 60 days. as this map by the bbc�*s data unit shows, more than four out of ten uk councils have not reported any covid deaths in the past month. it's a large drop compared with january, when the uk was at the peak of its second wave. then only two councils in the uk reported no covid deaths. but experts are still urging caution. it's a really good sign and we are seeing several parts of the country where prevalence is really, really low. so i think it gives us confidence. we do need to of course be a little bit cautious, because with the road map, we have had significant reopening of society on 12th april.
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there's another one coming up on 17th may. it's great news but of course we do need to monitor those changes. so this is why it's really important that we have these five—week intervals between these relaxations, just so we can monitor the impact on r, on hospital admissions, and on deaths and safely proceed to the next step in the road map. hi, would you like to come through? across the uk, coronavirus deaths are falling faster for vaccinated groups rather than unvaccinated ones. over the past month, for example, deaths of over—50s have dropped by nearly 80%. but with most under—40s still unvaccinated, ministers insist we must still follow the rules so that the road map out of lockdown is irreversible. naomi grimley, bbc news. we can also speak to professor deenan pillay, from the division of infection & immunity at ucl.
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professor, very good to have you with us. thanks for your time today. what do you say to the argument, what we've heard is good news, so the argument that things are going really well in tackling covid, let's bring the easing of restrictions forward a little bit? i bring the easing of restrictions forward a little bit?— forward a little bit? i can fully understand — forward a little bit? i can fully understand why _ forward a little bit? i can fully understand why there - forward a little bit? i can fully understand why there is - forward a little bit? i can fully understand why there is a - forward a little bit? i can fully - understand why there is a demand for that. we have all suffered over the last three or four months in particular. but the result of that lockdown over four months since early january, lockdown over four months since earlyjanuary, together lockdown over four months since early january, together with immunisations have led us to this great position, great news, where hospitals are emptying of patients. itus many of them don't have many patients with covid at the moment. but we are at a critical position. as we open up, there's both meeting within the uk but of course we are opening up borders, there is more and more talk about holidays, travelling and so forth. one just needs to look around the world and
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see what's happening in india as well in other parts of the world, to see that we are certainly not out of this pandemic. and therefore, i would suggest wejust this pandemic. and therefore, i would suggest we just need to go slowly and in particular, he would suggest we just need to go slowly and in particular, be careful about indoor meeting and not forget the fact we need to continue testing for symptoms, those individuals who have symptoms, and contact tracing and so forth as critical components to keep these levels down as we of course increase our vaccination. but scotland and wales, they have eased some restrictions a little earlier than planned and somebody who runs a pub in plymouth which we saw in that report, in a city of more than 250,000 people, hasn't reported a covid death in the last 58 days, someone who runs a pub in that city which doesn't have an outside space, might look at other landlords and landladies welcoming back customers into their pub gardens and say,
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look, my business is on the brink, why can't i have people inside my pub? if why can't i have people inside my ub? ., , why can't i have people inside my ub? . , ., why can't i have people inside my ub? ., , ,, .,, pub? if i was in that persons shoes i can imagine _ pub? if i was in that persons shoes i can imagine saying _ pub? if i was in that persons shoes i can imagine saying exactly - pub? if i was in that persons shoes i can imagine saying exactly the . i can imagine saying exactly the same thing and of course the lockdown has impacted adversely on large swathes of people both in terms of their businesses and also mental health. but we've also got to remember, there's is new reports and data to show is that countries that have done best economically out of this pandemic are those that have actually maintained the control on the infections, because the last thing we want is to have do go through another lockdown and so we are opening up. i think it was sensible for government to give this five—week gap between opening up, and i still think we need to monitor things as i mentioned as immunisations go up. in effect, what we want to do is maximise the chance
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that vaccinating the population will actually work before of course we get boosters further down the line but i should warn that, yes, there are lower number of cases at the moment in the uk but of those cases there is a dramatic increase in the number of viruses that seem to be emanating from the indian pandemic at the moment. and some evidence these are also being transmitted within the uk. that is a warning sign that we are not out of things yet. sign that we are not out of things et. ~ . sign that we are not out of things et. . ., ., ~' sign that we are not out of things et. ~ . . ,, ., sign that we are not out of things et. . . . ,, . , yet. we have talked a little bit about the devolved _ yet. we have talked a little bit - about the devolved administrations in england, the next state for easing, 17th of may and 21st of june, people looking to that date when all legal limits its hopes on social interactions can be lifted. beyond that date, i don't want to get too far ahead of ourselves, but beyond that date, how do you see cases of the virus being managed?
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well, there's two things. first i want to mention first of all, i think we must be humbled by this pandemic. i don't think we need to necessarily go back to where we were before. we need to be thinking about how we live our lives, how we work indoors and so forth in a way that maintains the safety, but secondly, my fear is that we will continue to have waves and infections, they may not be generalised across the whole population, i suspect they will be localised in pockets of areas where people are for instance... flan localised in pockets of areas where people are for instance. . .- people are for instance... can you hear me? — people are for instance... can you hear me? sorry. _ people are for instance... can you hear me? sorry, professor, - people are for instance... can you hear me? sorry, professor, we i people are for instance... can you | hear me? sorry, professor, we can hear me? sorry, professor, we can hear a voice _ hear me? sorry, professor, we can hear a voice from _ hear me? sorry, professor, we can hear a voice from somewhere - hear me? sorry, professor, we canj hear a voice from somewhere else. hear me? sorry, professor, we can i hear a voice from somewhere else. it interrupted your train of thought. i do apologise. you were talking about in the future we may see localised outbreaks of infection, so would we be talking about very local measures
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to try to stop spreading? fries. to try to stop spreading? yes, exactly right. _ to try to stop spreading? yes, exactly right, pockets - to try to stop spreading? yes, exactly right, pockets of - exactly right, pockets of environments where overcrowding, vaccination rates may not be as high as the general population dotted up just one second... so they can test quickly and follow up and we are not out of the woods and even with local outbreaks, that will still need to lead to hospitalisation so it's a concern. ., , . ~ i. lead to hospitalisation so it's a concern. ., . ~ ., concern. professor, thank you for our concern. professor, thank you for your thoughts _ concern. professor, thank you for your thoughts on _ concern. professor, thank you for your thoughts on of _ concern. professor, thank you for your thoughts on of that - concern. professor, thank you for your thoughts on of that today . concern. professor, thank you for | your thoughts on of that today and apologies once again for that interruption. we are trying to figure out exactly where we were hearing those voices but thank you for coping with that. apologies for not interruption to the interview. i hope you could hear everything you need to hear. time now for a look at the weather. here is louise. good
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afternoon. we are closing out april with traditional april showers and so far they have been pretty hit and miss but as we go through the afternoon they are likely to become afternoon they are likely to become a little bit more widespread and with just a little bit more widespread and withjust a light a little bit more widespread and with just a light breeze coming from a cool north—easterly direction, some of them could be slow—moving. temperatures are still subdued for this time of year, 8—13. those showers should start to fade away through the evening and overnight once again we will see clearing skies which will allow those temperatures to fall away into low single figures. can't rule out a frosty start for the first morning of may, but it will be a sparkling one once again. lots of sunshine from the word go but as we go through the day, yes, we will have showers developing and some of these could be heavy with hail and the odd rumble of thunder as well. top temperatures still disappointing, 7-13. temperatures still disappointing, 7—13. sunny spells and scattered showers for saturday and sunday but look at the bank holiday monday. wet and windy weather will arrive.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in thejewish world. the prime minister netanyahu says it's one of the "worst" disasters in israel's history. it's thought people slipped in an overcrowded walkway, causing dozens more to fall — at an event attended by tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox jews. we've just finished treating one of israel's worst disasters. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate lag b'omer, and unfortunately, were literally crushed to death. security worries over the prime minister's phone — after it's revealed his phone number's been freely available online, for the last 15 years it carries a security risk
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and he was warned about it. that tells its own story. i think a lot of people will be concerned notjust about who has got the number, but who has been using it. detectives?investigating the murder of a police community support officer, in kent, say they still haven't identified a suspect or a motive. julia james's body was discovered in woodland near dover on tuesday. actor and director noel clarke has been suspended from vertigo film productions, and sky also say they won't work with him any more — after allegations of sexual harrassment — which he denies. bbc news analysis shows around a third of all the people in the uk are living in areas that have not reported any covid deaths in april. and sport goes silent. football, rugby, cricket and more will start a four day boycott of social media today, in an attempt to tackle online abuse.
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figures just released by the office for national statistics a former metropolitan police officer has been jailed for being a a former metropolitan police officer has beenjailed for being a member of a banned neo—nazi terrorist organisation. the 22—year—old from enfield in north london was sentenced to four years and four months in prison. he was convicted this month by a jury at the old bailey of membership of national action, two counts of possessing documents to a terrorist, and two counts of fraud. the judge said the were so serious that only a custodial term was appropriate. he said the nature of the anti—semitic material held by the offender was deeply troubling. the former metropolitan peace officerjailed metropolitan peace officer jailed forfour
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metropolitan peace officer jailed for four years metropolitan peace officerjailed for four years and four months for being a member of the terrorist neo—nazi organisation. figures just released by the office for national statistics suggest coronavirus infections have fallen in every region of the uk in the past week. huge fall compared to january. these are the best figures we have since september. we don't have data that goes back that far for scotland and northern ireland. we can see that very clearly here. the chart you can see virus levels falling. so far down from where they were in january. and getting close to the levels that we saw towards the back end of last summer over on the very far in sight. and england and wales we know that it is backed into
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really low levels again. when you combine it with the story of a couple of seconds ago, very many places in england haven't seen a covid death reported so far since april, it means the direct obvious i know somebody who is touched by this at the moment picture from many people in the uk isn't there. the immediate effects of cover aren't as obvious as they were a while ago. if obvious as they were a while ago. if we look at more recent months, we are looking at the impact of the vaccination programme. and the impact of lockdown is as well? it is impact of lockdown is as well? it is a combination _ impact of lockdown is as well? it is a combination of— impact of lockdown is as well? it 3 a combination of the two working together. you will see, if you compare back to the case numbers, and compare them back to about december orjanuary, they are december or january, they are probably december orjanuary, they are probably about eight times higher back then and they are now. but the number of deaths back then in january was a0 or 50 times higher. it's notjust a case of striving the rest are in, it is that the vaccination is doing some of the other thing there. we have seen recent evidence from studies that show is the vaccination isn'tjust breaking the link between infection and death, it is also reducing the number of infections. people who get
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vaccinated are less likely to catch and pass on if they do catch it. thank you very much. so does the good news about falling numbers of coronavirus deaths mean we should be looking to ease restrictions earlier than planned? sunetra gupta is professor of theoretical epidemiology at oxford university. she was a leading proponent of the "herd immunity" strategy for tackling the virus, and has been a prominent critic throughout the pandemic of the use of lockdowns and travel bans. shejoins me now. really good news on those figures that we were just hearing a moment ago. do you think there is a strong case for bringing the easing of restrictions forward, the 17th of may and the 21st ofjune are the two key dates have been set over england at least? an argument for bringing them forward miss ages. at least? an argument for bringing them forward mis— at least? an argument for bringing them forward miss yes. those date cut we should _ them forward miss yes. those date cut we should have _ them forward miss yes. those date cut we should have been _ them forward miss yes. those date cut we should have been thinking l cut we should have been thinking about lifting restrictions probably
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in mid february when we vaccinated everyone who might be vulnerable to death from this virus. you described what i have been advocating as a herd immunity strategy. that is not strictly true. herd immunity isjust something that happens is the virus spreads through natural infection, but the strategy we have been advocating is called focused protection, which means trying to protection, which means trying to protect those who are at risk of disease while the virus spreads naturally, which will do anyway. one thing that is missing from everyone because my thinking at the moment i was, what has been the role of naturally acquired immunity in the decrease we are seeing? i think it is fallacious, it is wrong, we don't know... we can't really say that it is just lock downs, and the vaccine,
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that they're bringing infection levels down. i think any rational investigation would say there is a role here for naturally acquired immunity. role here for naturally acquired immunity-— role here for naturally acquired immuni . �* �*, . . immunity. but let's look at india... the vaccination _ immunity. but let's look at india... the vaccination programme - immunity. but let's look at india... the vaccination programme there l immunity. but let's look at india... | the vaccination programme there is in its infancy. lockdown is haven't happened in the way they have happened in the way they have happened in the way they have happened in countries like israel, like the uk, which have been much more successful in encouraging transmission, cutting deaths. so how can you... how can you say that lockdown is don't have a part to play? lockdown is don't have a part to .la ? ., lockdown is don't have a part to .la 7 ., . ., lockdown is don't have a part to -la ? ., . lockdown is don't have a part to play? how can i say that lectins have not play? how can i say that lectins have rrot had — play? how can i say that lectins have not had a _ play? how can i say that lectins have not had a part _ play? how can i say that lectins have not had a part to - play? how can i say that lectins have not had a part to play? - play? how can i say that lectins have not had a part to play? i. play? how can i say that lectins l have not had a part to play? i can go have not had a part to play? i can 9° " have not had a part to play? i can go —— lock downs. i can go down to a model where there is no effect at all of lockdown is, that would easily mirror what we have seen in many countries in many parts of the world. abs. many countries in many parts of the world. . ., , ., many countries in many parts of the world. . ., i. many countries in many parts of the world. �* ., i. , world. a model, you say, but in the first month — world. a model, you say, but in the first month of _ world. a model, you say, but in the first month of the _ world. a model, you say, but in the first month of the uk's _ world. a model, you say, but in the first month of the uk's second - first month of the uk's second lockdown, coronavirus infections
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fell by a third. that was before the vaccination round started. truth? fell by a third. that was before the vaccination round started.- vaccination round started. why do ou think vaccination round started. why do you think there _ vaccination round started. why do you think there was _ vaccination round started. why do you think there was no _ vaccination round started. why do you think there was no role - you think there was no role therefore a natural immunity? riff therefore a natural immunity? of course, some people, as we know, will have had this virus a symptomatically and will have acquired antibodies and the well and will have known that they had the virus, not list themselves, but critically lots of people did have the virus and suffer, people died, people have long covid. i am not quite sure what the point is you are trying to make with regards to the role of lockdown is an vaccination being effective? the role of lockdown is an vaccination being effective?— being effective? the point i'm t in: to being effective? the point i'm trying to make _ being effective? the point i'm trying to make is _ being effective? the point i'm trying to make is we - being effective? the point i'm trying to make is we do - being effective? the point i'm trying to make is we do not i being effective? the point i'm i trying to make is we do not know that lockdown downs are effective. there is plenty of evidence that is mounting to suggest... but there is plenty of evidence that is mounting to suggest. . ._ there is plenty of evidence that is mounting to suggest... but i'm sorry to interrupt _ mounting to suggest... but i'm sorry to interrupt you. — mounting to suggest... but i'm sorry to interrupt you, professor, - to interrupt you, professor, multiple scientists say lock downs have worked. the government says lockdown is have worked out mac that
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doesnt lockdown is have worked out mac jf�*ué�*jf doesn't mean it is true. lockdown is have worked out mac that doesn't mean it is true. you _ lockdown is have worked out mac that doesn't mean it is true. you advise i doesn't mean it is true. you advise the perimeter— doesn't mean it is true. you advise the perimeter last _ doesn't mean it is true. you advise the perimeter last year _ doesn't mean it is true. you advise the perimeter last year against - doesn't mean it is true. you advise the perimeter last year against a i the perimeter last year against a circuit breaker lockdown, and it was reported, and you may well this dispute this, there were 1.3 immediate million —— 1.3 million additional infections as a result of not having that circuit breaker lockdown. i not having that circuit breaker lockdown-— not having that circuit breaker lockdown. ., �* . ,, ., not having that circuit breaker lockdown. . ., , lockdown. idon't agree. lockdown is rotect the lockdown. idon't agree. lockdown is protect the affluent, _ lockdown. idon't agree. lockdown is protect the affluent, they _ lockdown. i don't agree. lockdown is protect the affluent, they do - lockdown. idon't agree. lockdown is protect the affluent, they do not - protect the affluent, they do not protect the affluent, they do not protect the affluent, they do not protect the pier. a leaky lockdown is closer to a different strategy than what we are dedicated, focused protection. the key is that you need to break the link between infection and disease, and what we have now is and disease, and what we have now is a wonderful vaccine, we should be congratulating ourselves with having rolled it out in such a way that we have broken that link, and the it so
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successfully, what we should do now is pride ourselves on what we have achieved. and move out of lockdown. why? because lockdown is cause harm. the cause harm, they are causing death, there are lots of problems associated with these mitigations. i associated with these mitigations. i don't think anyone would disagree with the point that lockdown is have other impacts on people's mental health, the economy and so on, but with regards to the virus... things can go wrong quickly. the plan has also been slowly lift the restrictions in place, to measure the impact at each stage of lifting restrictions. why when we are six or seven weeks away in england, at least, the 21st ofjune date, with so many people have done so much —— when someone who bought in so much for so long, why would we risk the strategy by lifting the restriction is even a couple of weeks early now?
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i don't think we would risk anything by lifting restrictions right now. we have vaccinated the vulnerable, achieved focused protection, all we are doing is perpetuating the harm thatis are doing is perpetuating the harm that is caused by these lock downs. the previous guess i spoke to a few moments ago so we were now in a critical position. what about the impact of radiance? aren't you concerned we need to allow time to measure what impact they may be from variants? i measure what impact they may be from variants? ~ . , variants? i think there is every indication _ variants? i think there is every indication the _ variants? i think there is every indication the vaccines - variants? i think there is every indication the vaccines will - variants? i think there is every - indication the vaccines will provide anti disease immunity against the variants. . ~ anti disease immunity against the variants. . ,, , ., anti disease immunity against the variants. . ,, ., anti disease immunity against the variants. . ., ben hannam, the first british police officer to be convicted
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for four years and four let's get more on this from our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. tell us more. a former pc, mac to was convicted _ tell us more. a former pc, mac to was convicted on _ tell us more. a former pc, mac to was convicted on the _ tell us more. a former pc, mac to was convicted on the 1st _ tell us more. a former pc, mac to was convicted on the 1st of - tell us more. a former pc, mac to was convicted on the 1st of april. was convicted on the 1st of april being a member of a banned neo—nazi terrorist group —— ben hannam. and of lying about that on his application form for the police. at the time he was released on bail but today came back to court for sentencing and thejudge today came back to court for sentencing and the judge has sentenced them to four years and four months in prison, a total of four months in prison, a total of four years and four months in prison. that is three years and four months for being a member of a banned terrorist organisation, and also included in that, a concurrent sentence for possessing of documents that might be useful to a terrorist, and a consecutive sentence, sorry, a concurrent sentence of one year for the fraud. that is essentially lying
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on his police application form but he was asked to take a box saying he had never been a member of the bnp orany similar had never been a member of the bnp or any similar type of organisation. not only had he been involved with national action, not only had he been involved with nationalaction, originally not only had he been involved with national action, originally banned for celebrating the murder ofjo cox mp, he lied about and served as a police officer for nearly two years before the metropolitan police realised they had a neo—nazi and a former member of the banned group in their own ranks. coronavirus restrictions are being relaxed further today for people in northern ireland. non essential shops can reopen, as can gyms and swimming pools, and people can once again stay overnight in self—contained holiday accomodation. so let's hear from our ireland correspondent, chris page, who's in county down. well, people in northern ireland have had this day circled in their calendar for a few weeks because this is probably the biggest day we are going to have in terms of easing restrictions
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in ourjourney out of lockdown. tourism is one of the sectors which is starting to reopen, so this is a spectacular location. cranfield caravan park on the south coast of county down. we are between two mountain ranges. you have this lighthouse, one of only two offshore light houses, i'm told, in the whole of the uk. this caravan park will be starting to welcome back visitors in the coming hours. i am with sam who works for a local tourism agency. sam, what kind of a day are you expecting to have here? today is the day, chris. this is the day we have been waiting for. the adventure starts again. and we have been talking for the longest time for better days coming, well, day one of better days starts today. so there is a real buzz and a positivity about what is going to happen next. what has the last few months, the last year been
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like for people working in the tourism industry here? because it is usually a very, very popular part of the world for visitors. there is no doubt it has been a very challenging time for a lot of people and a lot of the sector here. the temptation is to go negative, but i want to go positive. a lot of those businesses that we would work with have taken the opportunity to revamp, adapt, expand, enrich and deepen their tourism offering. so it has not been a wasted season for those businesses and they are ready and waiting to get that out there to the general public. the devolved governments here in northern ireland later in the year they are going to launch a holiday voucher scheme. you can claim back some of the cost of some of overnight stays in tourist accommodation and some of the cost of entry fees at visitor attractions. so what are you doing here to get the sector back going again, trying to get people going here? because clearly with the international travel potentially being restricted over the summer, staycationing will be major. oh, staycation is the buzzword and what we're doing for the industry here is flying a flag saying, come. we are ready and we are waiting for you.
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when people come to northern ireland when they often arrive in belfast, they turn right to the coast, and we are saying turn left. come down into us. this is a spectacular area of national beauty. and we are ready and waiting to welcome you into this fantastic piece of the country. here is hoping for plenty of visitors indeed. starting today. sam, thank you very much indeed for talking to us. otherwise, in northern ireland, well, pubs and restaurants from today can serve customers outdoors. shops are reopening for the first time since christmas eve. nonessential shops have been closed for more than four months. gyms, swimming pools, they are back open again and also the number of people who can socialise in gardens is going up. now you can have 15 people from three households around to your garden if you have one. so, it is certainly a big day in this part of the uk. the last of the uk's four nations to lift restrictions in this way, but people certainly feel they are going to make the most of it. research from the british retail consortium has highlighted that one
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in seven shops are now empty and there are 5,000 fewer shops since the start of the pandemic. this marks three years of increasing retail vacancy rates since 2018. the north of england has been particularly badly hit. let's speak now to ian watson, ceo of skelmersdale—based hotter shoes, a firm that sells over 1.3 million pairs a year, and last year closed the majority of its physical stores during the pandemic. thank you forjoining us. let's talk about those physical stores, how many of them have reopened? irate about those physical stores, how many of them have reopened? we have o-ened many of them have reopened? we have 0 ened 23 many of them have reopened? we have opened 23 of — many of them have reopened? we have opened 23 of our _ many of them have reopened? we have opened 23 of our stores, _ many of them have reopened? we have opened 23 of our stores, 17 _ many of them have reopened? we have opened 23 of our stores, 17 of _ many of them have reopened? we have opened 23 of our stores, 17 of our - opened 23 of our stores, 17 of our stand—alone and sex within garden centres. stand-alone and sex within garden centres. ., . , . we centres. how many remain close? we close over 50 — centres. how many remain close? we close over 50 in _ centres. how many remain close? we close over 50 in august _ centres. how many remain close? we close over 50 in august last _ centres. how many remain close? we close over 50 in august last year -- i close over 50 in august last year —— and six within garden centres. we will not be reopening those 50 stores, we relinquished the leases last year. the key factor was
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changing consumer buying behaviour, so what we have seen over what is now three lockdown is, the consumer transition to buying products that are traditionally brought on the high street through digital channels, and therefore we assessed the number of stores we had, we looked at the business rate situation and the ongoing rent situation, and we decided that online was the right transition for us, as we move forward. that online was the right transition for us, as we move forward.- us, as we move forward. that is interesting. _ us, as we move forward. that is interesting, because _ us, as we move forward. that is interesting, because when - us, as we move forward. that is interesting, because when you i us, as we move forward. that is - interesting, because when you think of your products, shoes, the sort of thing people like to go into a store and try on before they buy, rather than have them delivered to your home. they perhaps don't fight and they have to send them back again. well, i think that is the perception, but that perception has been changing over the last year. we serve a target audience of young people in 50s and older, and their usage of the internet has grown
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substantially. during this period. people have gotten used to using swim and face them to talk to their family. they have got used to buying groceries online and use to buying shoes online. we have seen a huge transition from people who wanted to go into a physical store to buying their products online. today our business is 75% digital. for the stores that you are keeping open, what would you like to see the government doing to help support the return to the high street? it is early days yet, isn't it? people are wanting to get back out and go to shops, but presumably you're looking for more support in the space? yeah, i think if you look at the reopening of the last couple of weeks, we have seen significantly lower footfalls. weeks, we have seen significantly lowerfootfalls. so, circa 50—60% fewer people on the high street than we saw pre—covert. i think the government needs to look at what they're going to do to support
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retail —— pre—covert. i think an overall review of business rates and how this works in the uk is desperately needed. how this works in the uk is deseratel needed. . . desperately needed. otherwise, this is very much — desperately needed. otherwise, this is very much the _ desperately needed. otherwise, this is very much the message _ desperately needed. otherwise, this is very much the message i'm - desperately needed. otherwise, this. is very much the message i'm hearing from people in business, otherwise you are concerned, looking to the future of the high street, of which you're stores remain a part, what that future is going to look like, how successful it can be.- that future is going to look like, how successful it can be. there a coule of how successful it can be. there a couple of elements _ how successful it can be. there a couple of elements to _ how successful it can be. there a couple of elements to it. - how successful it can be. there a - couple of elements to it. government policy around the high street, but secondly, how the consumer wants to shop. we have seen a reduction in the high street over many years, and covid has done isjust the high street over many years, and covid has done is just accelerate that shift to digital. our vision is a business is to make sure we are enabling consumers to shop wherever they like. enabling consumers to shop wherever the like. . ~ enabling consumers to shop wherever the like. . ,, i. enabling consumers to shop wherever the like. . ,, ., enabling consumers to shop wherever the like. . ., . ,, ., they like. thank you for talking to us toda .
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the first us consignment of emergency medical supplies has arrived in india, including hundreds of oxygen concentrators, ventilators and other items to tackle covid—19. two more similarflights are expected to reach india in the next few days. the us supply is the latest to reach the country which has reported another record daily increase in coronavirus cases, with almost 390,000 new infections. our correspondent is in new delhi with the latest. the rising coronavirus infections in india continues unabated. the country recording nearly 390,000 fresh covid cases in the last 2a hours and registering nearly 3500 deaths. the situation in delhi is of particular concern. it's nearly a00 deaths in the last 2a hours. the positivity rate here in the city, which is population of 20 million, is at 33%. the city is seeing unprecedented scenes, hospitals contains one space, the administration to try and battle the
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rising number of casualties is also converting parks and parking lots into makeshift crematoriums, because the casualty figures are rising exponentially. this morning, on an encouraging site, the first consignment of us covid support to derive in a military plane. $100 million the us has pledged to send to india in the next couple of weeks. india also receiving aid from otherforeign weeks. india also receiving aid from other foreign countries, weeks. india also receiving aid from otherforeign countries, but weeks. india also receiving aid from other foreign countries, but many experts pointing out the fact this is such an aggressive coronavirus wave and the rate at which the infections are rising, this kind of aid may also fall short. one way that the indian government is trying to battle the rising number of cases is to open up its vaccination programme. initially the plan was that tomorrow onwards all adults will be eligible for vaccines, but many individual states are coming out and making a statement saying they simply don't have enough vaccines on the ground. so that remains a huge concern as well. scientists are making projections, saying that the peak could be saying that the peak could he arrived at some time in mid—may are
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in the third week of may, by the concern is that by then india could still see a very high number of coronavirus cases and casualties as well. the boss of barclays bank says the uk is about to experience its biggest economic boom since the aftermath of world war two. jes staley�*s upbeat assessment came as barclays revealed its profits for the first three months of this year had more than doubled from a year earlier, to nearly £2.5 billion. we think the economy will grow in this year at the highest rated has since 19a8. that is a pretty spectacular number, so that is helping the performance of the bank, clearly. credit losses are much lower, revenues are much higher insurgent businesses like the investment bank, but overall, we are coming out of this pandemic in a reasonably good place. we have to recognise how the vaccination programme has been so successful in
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the uk, so hopefully 2021 turns out to be a pretty good year for all of us. we calculated there are some 200 billion pounds in deposits with banks that is in excess of what consumers normally have. ie, pent—up demand that is spent once the economy begins to reopen. i think the second half of 2021 will be quite something, actually. people aged a0 or over in england will be invited to book their first dose of a covid vaccine from today. text messages are going out to people in that age group, inviting them to arrange a jab through the nhs online booking service. it is the third time this week that the vaccine programme has been extended. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. it will may well have been quite a quiet month with a good deal of dry weather any forecast, but the story been the overnight frost. as we close out april 2021, there has been a grass frost recorded somewhere in the uk for the whole of the month.
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we close out the month perhaps on a little bit more of a tradition with sunny spells and april showers. the shower so far have been pretty hit and mist, rolling in of the north sea. through the afternoon, further showers developing in mind. the showers developing in mind. the showers could be heavy, with a little bit of thunder mixed in there, even some hail as well. if you dodge the showers and keep the sunshine, temperatures a little subdued for this time of year. a maximum of 7—13. subdued for this time of year. a maximum of 7—13 . though showers continue to the early evening, but then they will start to fade away, and under clearing skies, we do it all again, temperatures are likely to fall away, so for the first morning of may we could start again with a touch of frost, particularly in scotland, northern ireland and northern england. low single figures perhaps below freezing here. as you go into the weekend, despite frosty mornings, in case of sunny spells and dodging some showers. the rest of the century and first thing, showers developing through the day
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and there could be some heavy ones and there could be some heavy ones and a little more widespread. can drill out the odd rumble of thunder and some hail, temperatures still struggling, 7—13. and some hail, temperatures still struggling, 7—13 . almost a repeat performance as we go into sunday. a lovely start, something coming through, more cloud developing across the far north and west and some heavier showers across england and wales into the afternoon, with a high of 1a degrees. so real change arrives for a bank holiday monday. what a surprise. yes, it will turn increasingly wet and windy, with this area of low pressure. something we have not seen for quite some time. just wear that there was going to be sitting, still subject to change, but at the moment it looks like the heaviest of the rain is going to push its way out of northern ireland across england and wales. on the leading edge we can see some snow to higher ground in scotland, and we could see some welcome rain into eastern and south east england, with a high of 12
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degrees.
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aa people are killed in a crush at a religous festival in israel — the country's prime minister calls it one of the worst disasters in the nation's history. people reported a stampede as worshippers tried to escape. more than 150 were injured. we have just finished treating one of israel's worst disasters. the terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate lag b'omer. unfortunately, they were literally crushed to death. we'll have the latest live from jerusalem. also this lunchtime... police investigating the murder of community support officer julia james in kent say they've found no motive or suspect.
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the actor and writer noel clarke is suspended by bafta weeks

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