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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 29, 2021 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. i do not think there is anything to say here or to worry about. but what we are doing is focusing on the stuff that really matters. i think this is getting a bit farcical. i think the prime minister could actually deal with this very, very quickly. all he has got to do is answer a very simple question, which is who paid initially for the redecoration of your flat? leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy become law. burying more dead in india, as the rampant covid outbreak
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prompts further offers of help from the international community. after a police community support officer is murdered, detectives search woodland in kent. and the noxious, neighbourhood dump, kicking up a stink for thousands in staffordshire. good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson has sought to play down concerns about how the refurbishment of his downing street flat was paid for — saying he doesn't think there is anything to see or worry about. the prime minister has made clear the conservative party will comply with the outcome of an electoral commission investigation, but has refused to say whether he will abide by the recommendations of his
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newly—appointed standards adviser. labour have said it's a "ridiculous farce" that mrjohnson has failed to say who paid the initial cost of the refit. with more, here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. now haunting downing street and the prime minister, the question that borisjohnson still has not answered — who initially paid tens of thousands to renovate his pins flat? after six months leaving the post open, the prime minister has appointed an independent adviser on ministerial interests who is looking into things. but the labour leader in manchester today said it would be simple for the prime minister to put the whole matter to bed. i think this is getting a bit farcical. i think the prime minister could actually deal with this very, very quickly. all he's got to do is answer very simple question, which is who paid initially for the redecoration of your flat? now, i'm thinking of the people who are watching this, i think most people would say if i had my flat redecorated, i would be able to answer that question.
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in angry exchanges in parliament yesterday, the labour leader attempted several times to extract the information. mrjohnson said he had paid personally. borisjohnson�*s apartment is up there. down here in downing street they say he hasn't broken any regulations or any laws, but the question now is should the adviser�*s findings be binding on him, or would that be too much and potentially undermine the officer prime minister and parliament? lord geidt, seen here several years ago when he was working for the queen, will not have the power to open his own investigations or impose sanctions, those remain with the prime minister himself. labour and the man who heads the committee on standards in public life that he should have more powers. the adviser should have the right to initiate investigations and then to report the facts to the prime minister. the prime minister has not accepted that recommendation on this occasion, although he has said that the adviser can recommend to him.
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mrjohnson today declined to say whether he would follow any recommendations his new adviser makes, but that he would provide any information a second investigation by the electoral commission asks for. we will comply with whatever they want, and i don't think there's anything to see here or to worry about, but what we are doing is focusing on the stuff that really matters. so it's not clear borisjohnson will heed his adviser�*s findings, and the unanswered questions remain. damian grammaticas, bbc news. let's speak to our political correspondent ben wright now. this has been rumbling on for days. it is about truth and trust for many people, notjust wallpaper. so what is the next step in getting it resolved?— is the next step in getting it resolved? ~ ., ., ., ., resolved? we wait for one of the three enquiries _ resolved? we wait for one of the three enquiries up _ resolved? we wait for one of the three enquiries up and _ resolved? we wait for one of the three enquiries up and running i resolved? we wait for one of the | three enquiries up and running to report. i think that is really what needs to happen for this very simple
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question to be answered comprehensively. you paid and i wasn't paid for that redecoration of the flat? we know that boris johnson has paid the money, but was there a no loan, was there a donation, did come from the tory party, the cabinet office, who else may have been involved? we do not know. number ten have been evasive on this question for a long time. there are three investigations under way. the electoral commission, lord gate, the prime minister's on adviser on ministerial interests, the cabinet secretary are all charged with trying to get to the truth of this matter. , ., , matter. getting to the truth, but whether any _ matter. getting to the truth, but whether any recommendations l matter. getting to the truth, but. whether any recommendations have matter. getting to the truth, but - whether any recommendations have to be followed by the prime minister, thatis be followed by the prime minister, that is all up in the air as well. it is. the electoral commission will electoral commission to say something has gone wrong here and there are dilatory declarations that should be made that were not, they have the power to punish. they have the power to impose fines. there can
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be sanctions. the investigation being done by lord geidt is trickier because the adviser on ministerial interest is accountable to the prime minister. he ultimately is the judge and jury of the guidance on ministerial interests and behaviour. if lord geidt decide something has gone pretty wrong here, in the end, it is borisjohnson who will have to decide whether or not to pursue penalties. it was the issue that arose when sir alex allan, the former adviser on ministerial interest produced his report last year into the behaviour of priti patel. borisjohnson decided, in contrary to the conclusions of the report came up with, there should be no sanction against priti patel. bleeding to his resignation. it does really focus the spotlight on that particular part of how this whole rather fractured system works. whereas there is not at the moment some single entity charged with
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overseeing starters in public life and the ethics of how people behave in public life. this is over several different rule books, with several different rule books, with several different people policing it. thank ou ve different people policing it. thank you very much- — different people policing it. thank you very much. ben _ different people policing it. thank you very much. ben wright - different people policing it. thank you very much. ben wright in - you very much. ben wright in westminster. new fire safety legislation, drawn up in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster, has become law, but without the extra protections for leaseholders demanded by campaigners and some mps. it means the owners of buildings could pass on the extra cost of removing cladding. let's talk to our correspondent, victoria fritz, who has more. this is really not what the campaigners were expecting to be an outcome. it is campaigners were expecting to be an outcome. , ., ., outcome. it is not what the campaigners _ outcome. it is not what the campaigners want, - outcome. it is not what the campaigners want, it - outcome. it is not what the campaigners want, it is - outcome. it is not what the campaigners want, it is not outcome. it is not what the - campaigners want, it is not whether residents want, it is not what appears in the house of lords wanted either. certainly the latter. they have repeated interventions to try to prevent this happening. and shield leaseholders from the cost of compliance. i mean, these people living in these buildings, they did not build these buildings, they did
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not build these buildings, they did not certify them as safe, they do not certify them as safe, they do not own them, they are just renting them and yet they are the people who may end up paying for the price of failure. it should be straightforward, shouldn't it to mark 72 lives lost four years ago. it should have been the easiest bill to pass, but there was a bitter battle over who should foot the bill for this cladding crisis. residents are saying, look, we are already paying out money, for sprinkler systems, forfire doors, for balconies and the like. to increase the liability on us just is not fair. we are the people who are least able to afford it. mps, including the prime minister, pointed back in february to a fund that they were starting up that she would be able to apply for grants. £3.5 billion has gone into this fund, but the truth is we do not know what the true cost is of making homes in britain safe for all. we just do not know. some estimates are close to 15-16,000,000,000. just do not know. some estimates are close to is—i6,000,000,000. this is
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just one third, this part, if it covers it at all. there is a big question here as to whether or not, even though this law has been passed, whether naturaljustice has been served. campaigners are certainly vowing to fight on. how are they going — certainly vowing to fight on. how are they going to _ certainly vowing to fight on. how are they going to do _ certainly vowing to fight on. how are they going to do that if it has already become law? it is are they going to do that if it has already become law?— are they going to do that if it has already become law? it is a tricky one. already become law? it is a tricky one- what _ already become law? it is a tricky one- what is _ already become law? it is a tricky one. what is likely _ already become law? it is a tricky one. what is likely to _ already become law? it is a tricky one. what is likely to happen - already become law? it is a tricky one. what is likely to happen is i one. what is likely to happen is that we are going to see this end up in the courts. it will probably end “p in the courts. it will probably end up with the executive trying to make up up with the executive trying to make up with the executive trying to make up with perhaps some of the feelings that you have seen in the parliamentary system here. this ping—pong that we have seen for years and years. mpc to delay the legislation any further would have cost lives, but it remains pretty unclear as to how this law is going to work in practice. whether essential works will be carried out if the leaseholders are unwilling or unable to pay for the changes that are needed to be made. in the meantime, whether they have got enough money to even just keep the lights on and the lifts working in these high—rise buildings, which
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otherwise would render them completely uninhabitable. thank you ve much. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. more than 3,600 people have been reported dead in the last 2a hours alone and there were almost 380,000 new infections. the indian government has praised what it calls an �*an outpouring of solidarity,�* after more than forty countries pledged to send medical supplies. arunody mukherjee has more details. it was too late. this woman lost her mother while standing in a queue for hours waiting for medical oxygen. the only thing that could have given her a fighting chance to beat the virus. basic facilities like access to hospital beds and oxygen cylinders have now become a luxury in india's capital city. translation: we have been out of our house i since two o'clock last night. there is no oxygen
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available in all of delhi. and after a lot of running around, we finally got here at about four o'clock. delhi is in its second week of lockdown, but in the last ten days, the city of 20 million citizens has seen over 20,000 cases every day. more than 300 have died here daily for the last week. cases are surging in other parts of the country as well. it is notjust the hospitals which are inundated. so are burial grounds. this 52—year—old has been working around the clock for days, digging graves in mumbai. experts say the number of actual deaths are much higher than what is being reported. translation: it is ramadan, but i am not able to fast. - my work is really hard and we work 2a hours every day. how can i keep my fast? it is so hot. but i need to dig graves, i need to cover them with mud, and i need to carry dead bodies. how can i fast? contrast these images
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with election bound bengal, another state in the eastern part of india. citizens on thursday braved the virus to come out to vote. many have questioned why political rallies, led by leaders across party lines, were allowed to go on for the last months, even as cases in the country continued to spike. equally jarring is the fact that until one month ago india was projecting itself as the pharmacy of the world, sending millions of free vaccine doses to countries around the globe. it is hard to imagine that its citizens here are now struggling for something as basic as finding a hospital bed. it is india that now needs help. the us has promised to send covid—i9 supplies worth $100 million. countries like the uk, singapore and russia, too, have sent ventilators and oxygenators to support india's crumbling medical infrastructure. amidst the despair, there are also encouraging stories, like that of this ios—year—old man and his wife in maharashtra who successfully beat the virus. it is stories like these that help inspire an exhausted country
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fighting the disease hold onto hope and pray for better days ahead. police have been carrying out a forensic search of woodland in kent, after the body of a police community support officer, was found on tuesday. julia james was last seen walking her dog, and detectives are treating her death as murder. our reporter helena wilkinson is in snowdown in kent. this is an incredibly rural and very quiet part of kent, but you can see behind us a long line of police vehicles because this is now a murder investigation. just a little way from where we are is the woodland. and on the edge of that woodland. and on the edge of that woodland is wherejulia woodland. and on the edge of that woodland is where julia james's woodland. and on the edge of that woodland is wherejulia james's body was discovered just after four o'clock on tuesday afternoon. what we have seen are detectives carrying out fingertip searches in this area, trying to gather clues. we also
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heard from a neighbour who said that they last saw miss james some hours earlier in that afternoon. she had gone out to take her dog for a walk. detectives clearly, as well as this investigation here, they are trying to gather clues, but they want to speak to any members of the public who may have any information. a little bit of breaking news to bring you now before we look at the headlines. the head of nhs england, sir simon stevens, is to leave his post at the end ofjuly. we already know that this had been indicated. he had told the nhs england board last year that he wanted to leave this summer. he had intended to step down sooner. it is usually a seven—year term, down sooner. it is usually a seven—yearterm, but down sooner. it is usually a seven—year term, but he agreed to stay on through the winter and into this year so that he could see the vaccination roll—out through. and
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had the nhs response to the pandemic. obviously in charge of the national health service at a time of extraordinary pressure. he began the role in 2014, but now it is time to step down. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy become law. burying more dead in india, as the rampant covid outbreak prompts further offers of help, from the international community. a week today, voters go to the polls in wales, england and scotland, where the holyrood elections will be closely watched at westminster. if pro—independence parties win a majority, they could use it to demand another referendum. but the state of the scottish economy is also a key electoral issue, and nick eardley is live
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in aberdeen for us with more on that. nick. hi. it is really interesting because the north—east region where we are today could be one of the crucial ones for answering some of the big questions in this election. can the snp when the overall majority? they say that would give them a mandate for an independence referendum. can the conservatives hold onto second place? they are in a race with the labour party for that. and how will the smaller parties, like alex salmond's new album party, do? independence is obviously a really crucial part of the debate in the next week or so, but so is the economic recovery after the pandemic. as i have been finding out. a warm welcome back after a long winter lockdown. i hope you're hungry.
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hospitality on aberdeen's beach front is back up and running. enjoy your lunch. and despite a tough time recently, susie remains optimistic. we have to be positive going forward from as from now with the reopening of everything. but it has been a very scary time this last year for everybody in aberdeen and aberdeenshire. do you think it's important that politicians focus on getting the economy moving again? oh, first, yes. firstly and mostly, yes. there are green shoots here, shoppers back on union street. but aberdeen has been hit hard and local business groups want politicians to act. unemployment has been the highest in scotland. our number ofjob vacancies has fallen the most. this is a vital election, possibly the most important of our lifetimes, because i think the policy decisions that are determined now will see how we recover. we're asking for a business to be trusted by government, to be seen as part of the solution.
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after the challenges of the last year, economic recovery is playing a big role in the election debate. how to protectjobs and livelihoods when some of the emergency support schemes come to an end. but in scotland, it's also about independence. how strong is the economy here? would it suffer if scotland left the uk, or might the country be able to make different, perhaps better, economic decisions? aberdeen is no stranger to economic challenges. after the boom years of oil, it suffered when the price fell. that also had an impact on the economic debate around independence. and increasingly, scotland's energy sector is investing in renewables. sir ian wood made his money from the oil boom — more than £1 billion of it. he says it still has a role to play, but diversification will be key for the city's future. i think we're in better shape than we were. we were too dependent on oil and gas. frankly, the whole of the uk has
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been too dependent on oil and gas in our economy. so we're in a sufficient period. —— we are in a transition period. it's going to be challenging, but i'm reasonably confident that we'll work our way through that. but i can't think of anywhere else in the uk better to actually make a serious go at renewables. and if you had your time again or if you were starting off now, rather, would you invest all your money in renewables? yes, i would. scotland is hosting a major climate change conference in november. world leaders trying to figure out how to make the move to green energy. that's one of the questions aberdeen is trying to answer right now. but after the pandemic, it's not the only one for the city and its politicians. so, big questions about the economic recovery, but questions about independence, too. this afternoon we
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are going to speak to all the major parties to try and get some answers. this morning, nicola sturgeon was in this region. if you want a sign of how important it is with one week to 90, how important it is with one week to go, she was launching her plans for the first 100 days of the snp managed to retain power. i spoke to her about these issues and i started ijy her about these issues and i started by asking her if she was prepared to be honest with people about how difficult the economy is going to be in the next few months. i think the next few months are going to be tough, but if we keep the virus under control, if we continue to make huge progress with the vaccination programme and get businesses back to normal, that i think we can get a recovery under way. and therefore, everything we're doing to try and get on top of covid remains really important over the next few weeks. there is huge economic uncertainty. and it feels like the economic case for independence is as uncertain as it's ever been before. you can't really tell people what it would look like, can you? look, there is uncertainty almost regardless of what option we choose
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over the next few years. remaining part of the uk will bring, perhaps, another period of tory imposed austerity, which would be really damaging to our economy. independence in due course and the fullness of time is about scotland taking control of our resources and the levers of economic decision—making, but make no mistake about it, right now, we're still in the grip of a covid pandemic. things are getting better, but we have to focus on getting the country through this crisis. that remains my focus, and getting us into recovery. and after the crisis, giving scotland the ability to choose its future. in a week, you are also asking people to give you a mandate to hold another referendum. and we saw the weekend, for example, there are not answers on what it would mean for people's incomes, there are not answers on the border questions. there are quite a lot of holes in the case right now. look, just as in 2014, before people are asked to make a choice of independence, they get a detailed prospectus put before them, a detailed prospectus based on the up—to—date figures
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and economic information. you know, there is uncertainty for the uk in terms of the future. the debate about independence is about how we navigate that uncertainty with the greatest degree of control over our own destiny. and that decision will be, must be an informed one. before the last election, you told us the defining issue of the last parliament would be the attainment gap. five weeks ago, audit scotland said that you were not meeting your objectives, that the attainment gap was still far too big. why? audit scotland also pointed to the progress we have made, our manifesto... but they said there wasn't enough, you weren't meeting the ministerial names you had set. —— aims you had set. our manifesto five years ago said that we would make progress in closing the attainment gap. we have done that. not enough progress for me or anybody else's satisfaction, but if you take your national fives, level fives, in the scotland's exam system, we have close the attainment
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gap by a third at level six. the highers, we have closed it by a fifth. we have almost doubled early years provision and a record number of young people from our most deprived communities are now going into university, something that i said was really important. so we have made progress, but we've got more to do. and the question in the selection is who do people trust to continue to steer the country in the right direction? so that was the snp leader nicola sturgeon this morning. we are going to be here in aberdeen harbour this afternoon talking to all the parties. some of them are going to come and join us. we will be speaking to some of them on zoom and down the line. but i also want to talk this afternoon about the future of the economy in aberdeen. i am joined by the harbour�*s chief executive. thank you for coming. what do you think the future looks like? what is the next 20 years look like? what is the next 20 years look like for aberdeen?— like for aberdeen? incredibly excitina. like for aberdeen? incredibly exciting. we _ like for aberdeen? incredibly exciting. we are _ like for aberdeen? incredibly exciting. we are one - like for aberdeen? incredibly exciting. we are one of - like for aberdeen? incredibly exciting. we are one of the l like for aberdeen? incredibly - exciting. we are one of the major energy ports in the world. we ship
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to 40 international destinations. the size and scale of the renewables opportunity here in the north—east of scotland is phenomenal. we are part of a huge programme of work to create a central, global energy cluster of business easier. very exciting future. the cluster of business easier. very exciting future.— exciting future. the economic downturn _ exciting future. the economic downturn when _ exciting future. the economic downturn when the _ exciting future. the economic downturn when the price - exciting future. the economic downturn when the price of. exciting future. the economic| downturn when the price of oil exciting future. the economic- downturn when the price of oil went downturn when the price of oil went down was tough year. we know that oil and gas is going to be less of an important part for the economy over the next few decades. is aberdeen ready for that? absolutely. we have the — aberdeen ready for that? absolutely. we have the skills, _ aberdeen ready for that? absolutely. we have the skills, the _ aberdeen ready for that? absolutely. we have the skills, the technology, i we have the skills, the technology, over 50 years of professional energy businesses here. a fantastic supply chain. we work very, very closely, we are the eighth largest oil and gas port in the world and we are working very closely with the industry. with all of the oil and gas operators, oil and gas uk, opportunity north—east, to really transform the way the energy industry operates. so we can achieve
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a net zero ambitions very, very confident that we can do that here. appreciate you might want to get into party politics, but do you think the politicians understand the scale of the challenge over the next few years? i scale of the challenge over the next few ears? ~' , ,., , scale of the challenge over the next few ears? ~' , , , few years? i think everybody is t in: to few years? i think everybody is trying to understand _ few years? i think everybody is trying to understand the - few years? i think everybody is trying to understand the scale | few years? i think everybody is i trying to understand the scale of the challenge. from our perspective, we welcome whatever the outcome review of policy, how we work across the industry, investment and infrastructure. it is absolutely critical. and i think when the support of any new government for the future is going to be essential, notjust here in scotland, but nationally. it notjust here in scotland, but nationally-— notjust here in scotland, but nationall. , nationally. it is something both the uk and scottish _ nationally. it is something both the uk and scottish governments - nationally. it is something both the uk and scottish governments are i uk and scottish governments are involved in. finally, we have got the cop26 summit in november and glasgow, is this industry adapting enough to deal with climate change and to deal with some of the ambitious targets that have been set for net zero carbon? it is
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ambitious targets that have been set for net zero carbon?— for net zero carbon? it is a fantastic — for net zero carbon? it is a fantastic opportunity - for net zero carbon? it is a fantastic opportunity for i for net zero carbon? it is a l fantastic opportunity for us. absolutely, i think i have never seen such acceleration in invention, innovation and change. everybody recognises that we have to do this in order to deliver our ambitions for the future.— in order to deliver our ambitions for the future. ., ,, , ., , . for the future. thank you very much. we will be back _ for the future. thank you very much. we will be back here _ for the future. thank you very much. we will be back here quite _ for the future. thank you very much. we will be back here quite shortly i we will be back here quite shortly speaking to another one of the parties. there is a lot to weigh up, isn't there, head of the elections next week? we'll be trying to get some more answers about how to meet some more answers about how to meet some of big challenges. nick, for the moment, thank you very much. and for a round up of everything you need to know about the elections, there's a simple guide online, where you can find lots of useful information, including background on the parties and candidates. it's on our website, orjust go the bbc news app. president biden has announced huge spending plans, in a speech to a joint session of congress, saying america needs a �*once in a generation' investment in itself. delivered as he prepares to mark 100 days in office, he wants to spend trillions
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of dollars creating jobs, fixing infrastructure and improving education. but his plans face a battle in congress, with republicans opposed to higher taxes and greater state involvement in the economy. here's lebo diseko. it was an evening of historic firsts. president biden's first address to a joint session of congress, the first time two women flanked a president as he made that address. madam speaker, madam vice president... cheering no president has ever said those words from this podium, no president has ever said those words, and it's about time. in a chamber with numbers limited by covid, where just a few months ago, insurrectionists occupied the speaker's chair. afterjust100 days, i can report to the nation —
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america is on the move again. this was a bold speech, a statement of far—reaching, and, some might say, costly intent, a full—throttled endorsement of the idea of big government. two proposals which together will cost $4 trillion, taking in spending on education and paid family leave. my fellow americans, trickle down, trickle down economics has never worked. it's time to grow the economy from the bottom and the middle out. the president talked of prioritising climate change as a global ambition, of tackling the dual challenges of north korea and iran, and he had strong words for russia and for china. in my discussions with president xi, i told him we welcome the competition, we're not looking for conflict, but i made absolutely clear
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that we will defend america's interests across the board. america is on the move again was the theme of the speech, but this is a sharply divided congress and his agenda faces challenges from the right and from the left. joe biden was dismissed by his predecessor as sleepyjoe, but tonight, he set out an ambitious agenda. the big questions are, how much of this can he achieve? and how much of this can he afford? lebo diseko, bbc news, washington. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. today and indeed for the next two days, we are going to see a classic mixture of sunshine and april showers. and some of the showers will turn out to be heavy with some hail and some thunder in places also. other areas staying dry altogether. they will be hit and miss in nature. one thing we are also seeing is much colder arctic air spreading right across the country for the next few days. we will see a return to overnight frost in many rural areas.
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now, the showers will tend to fade away, a few continuing overnight for scotland, northeast england, that get wintry over that higher ground. but for many places, it will be dry with lengthy clear spells. these are the towns and cities' values, you can see the blue hue indicates that frost in rural areas. so, friday starts cold and frosty, but bright. a lot of sunshine around, but as that strong sunshine gets going, then showers will develop quite widely again. some of them will be heavy with some hail and thunder, a bit of wintriness over the higher ground of scotland. some areas staying dry altogether, but these temperatures are pretty disappointing for the time of year, ranging from around 7 to 12 or 13 degrees in the south. everything about the day was magicah _ everything about the day was magical. liam made a wonderfuljoke, he said _ magical. liam made a wonderfuljoke, he said it _ magical. liam made a wonderfuljoke, he said it was — magical. liam made a wonderfuljoke, he said it wasjust magical. liam made a wonderfuljoke, he said it was just a magical. liam made a wonderfuljoke, he said it wasjust a small royal wedding, tomorrow at 730.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations for his downing street flat, but dismisses concerns. leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules, after the grenfell tragedy, become law. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. police have been carrying out a forensic search of woodland in kent, after the body of a police community support officer was found on tuesday. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. good afternoon.
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we're down to just one table at the crucible. the semi—finals at the world snooker championship are under way. three—time champion mark selby is the favourite out of the last four and he's in action now. currently two frames to one up against the 2015 champion. it's the first to 16 frames played over three days. these are live pictures from sheffield. you can watch on bbc two or the bbc sport website. tonight sees kyren wilson against shaun murphy. i will be the early stages of the first semifinal on bbc two. executives at clubs involved in the failed european super league have been forced to resign from advisory roles at the premier league — after the other 14 premier league clubs felt betrayed by the move and demanded that the club's representatives step down. manchester united, liverpool, manchester city, arsenal and chelsea will now no longer have representatives on the club broadcast advisory board or in advisory roles concerning strategy and auditing. tottenham — which were also part
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of the breakaway group — didn't have any executives in such roles. the resignations won't affect the six club's voting rights within the premier league. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer admits it would be a dream come true to finally win his first trophy with the club he won so much for as a player. they're in europa league semifinal action tonight against the italian side roma. it will be a dream come true the day i can lift a trophy for this club as a manager, of course. and that's what we are building for. we have been close, we are building step—by—step to take the next step. and our ambition this season is to finish it with lifting a trophy and being able to celebrate. i know how much that can mean for a group moving forward. well, there is still a chance there could be an all—premier league tie in the final of the europa league — because arsenal play in the other last four match tonight against spanish side villareal. arsenal have pierre emerick aubameyang back in contention —
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he's missed the last month of action after contracting malaria while on international duty. scotland and england rugby willjoin football and other sports by boycotting social media this weekend. they say it is a unified stand against racism and discrimination. the "show of solidarity against online abuse" takes place between 3pm on friday and 11:59pm on monday night. in the past half hour, uefa have also announced they'll be taking part in the boycott. tyson fury has been vocal on social media and is promising to retire from boxing after his fight with anthonyjoshua if he fails to knock him out in the first three rounds. the fight is still being negotiated, with all four world heavyweight belts on the line. just been thinking, another message for aj. if you go past three rounds with me, i will quit in the corner because that is how confident i am taking you out within the first two, three rounds. out!
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maybe not retired from boxing, but retire from the fight, i mean. the number of inactive adults rose by 1.2 million, by the time the country locked down for a second time, in november. sport england has found over 12 million people did less than half an hour's physical activity a week compared to november the previous year. their chief executive tim hollingsworth says more must be done to help encourage people from all backgrounds to get active. the worst elements of this, in some ways, is the fact that it just confirms what we already knew, that this is not a level playing field for community sport and being active in people's lives. there are barriers to entry for certain parts of our community which the pandemic has made worse. definitely, social economic circumstance matters. young people particularly have suffered during the pandemic and i think we need to look very hard at that and why is it that our 16—24—year—old have actually been one of the least active groups over the past year.
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england's charlie hull is five shots off the lead after the opening round at the women's world championship in singapore. inbee park tops the leaderboard on 8—under par. but one of the shots of the day came from another south korean. this is hee young park's approach at the tenth — and it went in for an eagle! she's second on the leaderboard — a shot off the lead. that's all the sport for now. more for me and an hour. thank you very much. let's return to the elections in holyrood which will be closely watched in westminster. if pro—independence parties win a majority, they could use it to demand another referendum. nick eardley is at aberdeen harbour this afternoon. hi again. that issue of independence is obviously going to be key, but there's a lot coming up over the next year. there is a recovery from
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the pandemic and then in november, scotland is hosting cup 26, the massive climate change conference where world leaders will be in glasgow try to figure out solutions. let's look at some of the solutions what they may well be with maggie chapman from the scottish greens. thank you for coming out. in terms of the northeast, how quickly do you want to see the end of some of what we have seen over the last couple of days here with the oil and gas extractions as part of the economy? i think it's really important that we start— i think it's really important that we start planning for that transition and implementing those plans— transition and implementing those plans right now. we know that we are 'ust plans right now. we know that we are just nine _ plans right now. we know that we are just nine years to avert climate catastrophe, so it is really important that we do the right thing by those _ important that we do the right thing by those people still working in the oil and _ by those people still working in the oil and gas — by those people still working in the oil and gas industry when putting into action our plans forjust transition _ into action our plans forjust transition right now because we need to be retraining, rescaling people, securing _ to be retraining, rescaling people, securing those jobs for the future now and —
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securing those jobs for the future now and not wait until 2030. everyone _ now and not wait until 2030. everyone we've been speaking to agrees with the idea of the transition, but the question is how quickly. because a lot of the other parties are talking about 20, 30, 40 years, but you want it sooner. brute years, but you want it sooner. we don't have — years, but you want it sooner. we don't have 20 or 40 years, we know thatiobs_ don't have 20 or 40 years, we know thatiobs in— don't have 20 or 40 years, we know thatjobs in oil and gas are going to disappear, they are notjobs thatjobs in oil and gas are going to disappear, they are not jobs that are going _ to disappear, they are not jobs that are going to last very much longer, so we _ are going to last very much longer, so we need — are going to last very much longer, so we need to be putting those plans into place _ so we need to be putting those plans into place right now. it is an interesting story, number two on the scottish— interesting story, number two on the scottish greens less in the northeast, he was in the oil and gas industry— northeast, he was in the oil and gas industry and — northeast, he was in the oil and gas industry and he has left the industry _ industry and he has left the industry. you lost herjob a few years— industry. you lost herjob a few years ago— industry. you lost herjob a few years ago and is currently retraining. i think we owe it all oil and — retraining. i think we owe it all oil and gas _ retraining. i think we owe it all oil and gas workers right now to say this is— oil and gas workers right now to say this is a _ oil and gas workers right now to say this is a plan, this is how we are going _ this is a plan, this is how we are going to — this is a plan, this is how we are going to generate over 100,000 new 'obs going to generate over 100,000 new jobs and — going to generate over 100,000 new jobs and renewable energy, and public— jobs and renewable energy, and public transport, and warm homes, in industries _ public transport, and warm homes, in industries and inspectors and jobs that make — industries and inspectors and jobs that make the world a better place. that is _ that make the world a better place. that is what we need to be focusing on right— that is what we need to be focusing on right now.
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that is what we need to be focusing on right now-— on right now. there is a lot going on right now. there is a lot going on at the moment, _ on right now. there is a lot going on at the moment, not _ on right now. there is a lot going on at the moment, notjust - on right now. there is a lot going on at the moment, notjust a - on at the moment, notjust a transition appear in the northeast. there is a recovery from the pandemic that is going to be crucial. you guys agree with the snp that there should be another referendum in the next parliament. is there not enough to keep people busyjust now? won't that be a distraction given everything else is going on? i distraction given everything else is auoin on? ~ distraction given everything else is aoian on? ~ , distraction given everything else is aoain on? ~ , ~ , going on? i think it is key. the scottish greens _ going on? i think it is key. the scottish greens do _ going on? i think it is key. the scottish greens do not - going on? i think it is key. the scottish greens do not seek. going on? i think it is key. the scottish greens do not seek to going on? i think it is key. the - scottish greens do not seek to end independence with recovery, we see independence with recovery, we see independence for recovery. the uk government has made a mess of covid and deating _ government has made a mess of covid and dealing with the pandemic over the last— and dealing with the pandemic over the last 15_ and dealing with the pandemic over the last 15 months and we cannot afford _ the last15 months and we cannot afford to— the last 15 months and we cannot afford to carry on with the covid crisis _ afford to carry on with the covid crisis and — afford to carry on with the covid crisis and the uk psychodrama any ionger~ _ crisis and the uk psychodrama any ionger~ we — crisis and the uk psychodrama any longer. we have to look at boris johnson's — longer. we have to look at boris johnson's comments about letting bodies _ johnson's comments about letting bodies pile up. we know that the uk government spent more than the scottish— government spent more than the scottish annual budget on a failed track— scottish annual budget on a failed track and — scottish annual budget on a failed track and trace system. that is not the kind _ track and trace system. that is not the kind of— track and trace system. that is not the kind of future we want to see for scotland. the kind of future we want to see for scotland-—
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the kind of future we want to see for scotland. ~., . , ., ., ,, for scotland. maggie chapman, thank ou so for scotland. maggie chapman, thank you so much — for scotland. maggie chapman, thank you so much for— for scotland. maggie chapman, thank you so much for that. _ for scotland. maggie chapman, thank you so much for that. martin, - for scotland. maggie chapman, thank you so much for that. martin, you - you so much for that. martin, you probably cannot see just now, but a few dolphins have come into the harbour, so we are going to spend the next half—hour trying to get a picture of them to send you. there's a lot going on in aberdeen. we'll be speaking to some of the other parties just after three as well. and if you spot nessie i'm really interested. it’s and if you spot nessie i'm really interested-— and if you spot nessie i'm really interested._ don't i and if you spot nessie i'm really i interested._ don't say interested. it's not real! don't say that! don't _ interested. it's not real! don't say that! don't tell— interested. it's not real! don't say that! don't tell the _ interested. it's not real! don't say that! don't tell the people - interested. it's not real! don't say that! don't tell the people of - interested. it's not real! don't say that! don't tell the people of lochj that! don't tell the people of loch ness that, you will collapse the tourism industry. and i know aberdeen is not on loch ness, before you write to me. same with the elections... staying with next week's elections — tonight, leaders of the main parties in wales will be taking part in a bbc wales debate. 60 seats are up for grabs in the senedd — and across the day on bbc news we'll be taking a look at some of the key issues in wales ahead of tonight's debate. let's speak to professor laura mcallister from cardiff university. welcome. how much more significance is the debate this year ahead of
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these elections? i is the debate this year ahead of these elections?— is the debate this year ahead of these elections? i think it is very im -ortant these elections? i think it is very important because _ these elections? i think it is very important because it _ these elections? i think it is very important because it is - these elections? i think it is very important because it is clearly i these elections? i think it is very i important because it is clearly been a very difficult election campaign to get going here. pretty much the same is everywhere across the uk, of course, but there is a less developed media here in wales to offer a kind of independent take on how the election is progression. and clearly, candidates simply have not been able to guard and campaign in the way they normally would. so it has been a very much digital election and i think in that respect, the television debates between notjust the main party leaders, but the leaders of some of the minority party tonight, is particularly significant. obviously the first minister _ particularly significant. obviously the first minister mark— particularly significant. obviouslyj the first minister mark drakeford has been presiding over how the coronavirus pandemic has been dealt with. so for labor, how hard it is he going to have to battle in this debate, do you think? hot he going to have to battle in this debate, do you think?— he going to have to battle in this debate, do you think? not that hard in all honesty. _ debate, do you think? not that hard in all honesty, if _ debate, do you think? not that hard in all honesty, if you _ debate, do you think? not that hard in all honesty, if you take _ debate, do you think? not that hard
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in all honesty, if you take the - in all honesty, if you take the poles at face value. because mark drakeford is received very high, consistently high approval ratings for his handling of the pandemic, of lockdown and indeed of the very successful roll—out of the vaccine programme in wales. he has consistently gained twice as much approval, support as has the uk prime minister borisjohnson for his handling in england. so we would think that mark drakeford need to take the debate tonight from a common defensive position. it is very much labor's campaign to say trust us on our record, we have done really well for you during a period of covid and now trust us to get out of covid and now trust us to get out of the pandemic and rebuild the economy. the other parties have to be much more offensive in their stance, particularly plaid cymru, because that in voter's mines, the
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leader of that really need to make a mark in the debate this evening. stand mark in the debate this evening. and what about the conservatives, how are they likely to play out? the conservatives _ are they likely to play out? iie: conservatives have are they likely to play out? tie: conservatives have a very clear strategy throughout the election, which is to try and mobilise a vote that they very successfully getting in wales in the uk general election at the end of 2019. more than half a million welsh people voted for the conservatives, sometimes in the equivalent of the redwall seats in england and northeast wales in this case. but the problem with that is that that election was a brexit election and people voted for a new prime minister in order to get brexit done. the conservatives do not have quite the same traction here wales, but having said that, they have been pulling out some of they have been pulling out some of the highest levels i have ever had before and they will certainly look to be making a couple of gains in the election next week. the problem for the conservatives is they do not
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have a clear route to actually gain a foothold in government because they have ruled out coalitions with plaid cymru and a coalition with labour is unthinkable, so they will not be in government after next thursday no matter how they do. thank you very much for your time. and we'll bring you full coverage of that debate from eight o'clock tonight on the bbc news channel. and for a round up of everything you need to know about the elections, use our really simple guide, where you can find information on who is being elected and what the elections mean for you. find it on our website, or use the bbc news app. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy become law. burying more dead in india,
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as the rampant covid outbreak prompts further offers of help from the international community. in northern ireland, democratic unionists are beginning the process of choosing a new leader, after arlene foster announced her resignation. senior members of the dup are said to be worried that her departure could lead to early elections for the northern ireland assembly, as emma vardy explains. applause. arlene foster began her leadership with electoral success, but after a majority of the party moved against her, she conceded her time at the top was over. for me, the decision to enter politics was never about party or person, it was about speaking up for the voiceless and building a northern ireland which could prosper and be at peace within the united kingdom. but unionists have felt northern ireland's place
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in the uk has been undermined by the new brexit arrangements. a new trade border in the irish sea means there are new checks on goods arriving from the rest of the uk. and there's frustration in the dup that westminster intervened to legalise abortion, which the party opposed. mrs foster's critics felt she should have defended the dup�*s core ideals more strongly. whoever takes over can't just wave a wand and scrap the brexit protocol and certainly some of the issues that have caused problems for certain elements within the party around rights, around lgbt rights and women's reproductive rights. there is a sense that you can't really stop the tide coming in on that. an early favourite to replace her as first minister is edwin poots, who is currently in charge of agriculture in the devolved government. he's been prominent in the dup�*s opposition to the irish sea border. others being linked to the position of dup leader are two mps, sirjeffrey donaldson and gavin robinson.
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this is not a contest where hundreds of people make the decision. the choice of leader will be decided by 41 people, all the parties' mlas, the parties' mps and their five peers. that is the only group of people who will make this decision. the dup�*s main partner in the power—sharing stormont in the power—sharing stormont executive is the irish republican party sinn fein. it said the main priority should be making sure the coalition works. we all have a job here, politics must deliver for everybody and power—sharing must deliver for everybody. i will play my part in that. i hope that the dup find a partner that's also willing to do the same. no one has officially declared themselves as running just yet, but whoever takes over as the leader of unionism will have a defining role in shaping its future. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. a court in moscow has upheld the conviction of the jailed opposition activist alexei navalny for slandering a soviet world war ii veteran. appearing via video link, mr navalny looked thin after a recent hunger strike,
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but he struck a defiant tone. in a dig at president putin, he said the emperor had no clothes, and russians were being turned into slaves. boosterjabs against covid will be available from the autumn, after the government ordered a batch of 60—million more doses of the pfizer vaccine. ministers say the most vulnerable groups will be offered the 'top up' jab, but it's unclear when the roll—out will begin. and today, the health secretary, matt hancock, received his first vaccination, with the government saying it's 'on track�* with its road map out of lockdown. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has this report which contains some flash photography. anyone who is 42 or older... it's fair to say he was excited. in last night's press conference, matt hancock mentioned a few times that his turn had come for the vaccine. and i'm also delighted because it means i can get myjab too. and i'm looking forward to getting myjab first thing tomorrow morning. join me and get the jab. this is my firstjab, first one. this morning he found out who was going to bejoining him. i've got jvt vaccinating me.
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there may be some shivering, they're completely normal. professorjonathan van—tam, england's deputy chief medical officer, gave him the oxford astrazeneca injection, with photographers and camera crews watching the whole thing. it's 40—somethings now, but the government is on track to get all adults at least one injection by the end ofjuly. all done, fantastic! please remember to come back in 12 weeks. that one. almost 44 million people have had their first dose now and over 13.5 million have had both. and the government's ordered an extra 60 million doses of the pfizer biontech vaccine, not for now, but to stock up for a possible third booster dose. to future proof the vaccination programme, our task is to make sure we give as much optionality to the scientists, to the clinicians, to make the decision whether we boost
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in september or later this year or early next year, but we must have that ability to do that. part of that ability will be making sure we've got enough of the right vaccines, and that seems to be going well. the government's ordered more than 500 million doses in total now, but it will also come down to logistics. this is a major commitment for the nhs, coming alongside the challenges of dealing with the backlog of care that has arisen during the pandemic. waiting lists are over 4 million now. and also, the nhs is dealing with rising demand across all of its services. for now, though, the government says we are on track to keep opening up out of lockdown, but that it needs people to keep coming forwards when it's their turn. catherine burns, bbc news. broadcaster and journalist, jon snow has announced he'll step down from channel 4 news at the end of the year. he became the programme's main presenter in 1989 and is the longest—serving presenter
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in the programme's history. over that time, he was honoured with a bafta fellowshop to honour his outstanding and exceptional contribution to television. in a statement, channel 4 described him as 'a talismanic figure' who was 'the most trusted and well—loved news presenter of his generation.�* thousands of people who live near a landfill site in staffordshire, have complained that their physical and mental health are suffering because of its terrible smell. levels of hydrogen sulphide at the former quarry in newcastle—under—lyme have twice breached recommended standards. the operator, red industries, has promised to cap part of the area by the weekend. here's phil mackie. this is walley's quarry in silverdale. it is used as a landfill site, and here's the problem. it's right next door to hundreds of homes and is giving off a terrible smell. since it was allowed to increase the amount of waste it takes, the stink has got worse and, if you're downwind, it's horrible. we obviously knew there was
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a landfill there when we moved in. the smell gets trapped in the house and it gets trapped in your hair and your clothing, your carpets and your cars, and your children's toys and all that, you all smell of landfill and it ranges from a rotten eggs sort of smell to a chemically acrid smell as well, and that's quite foul. today shouldn't be so bad because it's sunny and warm and that should get rid of the hydrogen sulphide smell, that creates that rotten eggs—stink bomb odour that's really unpleasant, but, honestly, standing just across the road from it at the moment, oh, it's really unpleasant and, actually, it's making me feel quite ill. people say they can't sleep and are feeling ill. there were more than 5,000 complaints last month and over 2,000 just last week. its noxiousness is taking its toll. it can cause nausea and shortness of breath, but there's been a big impact on mental health. it distracts you, it depresses you. it's the day on day, week on week attrition of living with it randomly that's really getting people down. the site's being closely monitored.
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the latest air quality report is due out later and the environment agency has told the operator it must make improvements by the end of this week. in a statement, red industries said, "as a waste management company, we recognise that we are hosted by the local communities in which we operate. we are acutely aware of the community's concerns regarding our landfill operations. an accelerated engineering capping operation is under way which will seal an extensive area of the site." a few miles away, it's made learning very difficult for children like ruby, poppy and ben. it's the same here in the classroom. you can't work and your minds just a set onto the landfill. it makes me feel sick. i have headaches all the time, it puts me off my work, it puts me off my food. and then the smell will come in and, like, it won't go away. _ like, no matter how many air. fresheners you get, it won't go. it's horrible. chanting: stop the stink!
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hundreds joined another protest this week demanding that something's done to stop the silverdale stink from overpowering the whole area. phil mackie, bbc news, newcastle—under—lyme. the duke and duchess of cambridge are celebrating their 10th wedding anniversary today and to mark the occasion, they've released a new photograph. a decade ago, two—billion people around the world tuned in to watch william and catherine get married at westminster abbey. street parties and celebrations took place across the uk to mark the event. graham satchell has been talking to people about their memories of the big day. april 29, 2011, exactly ten years ago, and the marriage of prince william to kate middleton. the wedding watched by an estimated 2 billion people worldwide. across the country, in time—honoured fashion,
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the great british street party. you need to stop it! jack was just eight at the time. i was going to hyperventilate. he helped organise a street party doing his best to not get stressed. calm down, you are going to hyperventilate. it was such a good day. everyone was out on the street, we had auctions going on, raffles, cake going out to everyone. the royal wedding is all royal and everyone — the royal wedding is all royal and everyone wanted to get involved. and we all _ everyone wanted to get involved. and we all sat _ everyone wanted to get involved. and we all sat in— everyone wanted to get involved. and we all sat in the front room and the atmosphere — we all sat in the front room and the atmosphere wasjust so happy we all sat in the front room and the atmosphere was just so happy and everybody was happy from the wedding. it was literally like a fairy— wedding. it was literally like a fairy tale, honestly. so make what has it been like you today? a fantastic day. ll'm caroline and this is my husband, | trevor, and we got married ten years
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ago on the 29th of april. it was pretty magical, i think, i because there was all the hype of the royal wedding. there had been the big lead up to- the day and we watched the wedding. i am a royalist. trevor quite likes the royal family, too, but i am so picture. _ ——patriotic. and just loved the moment watching kate, her dress, i her hair, her make up, _ absolutely everything was flawless. she looked beautiful. and then we just had a wonderful day. - much has happened to the royal family in the last ten years, but in what was an age of austerity, the royal wedding a decade ago was a moment of escape and celebration. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. we are finally getting to see some classic april weather for the next few days. we are ending the month with april showers and sunny spells after cold and frosty starts.
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and we have seen those shower clouds bubbling up across the country through this morning. low pressure is clearing away into the near continent. it is allowing higher pressure to slowly build in, but there is still enough instability in the atmosphere to allow these showers to develop through the day, but what we are also pulling in is much colder air right across the board. so, we will see a return to widespread overnight frosts. so, it's been a chilly start this morning. through the day, it looks like it's going to stay bright, with sunny spells, but those shower clouds will continue to develop, with some of them turning out to be heavy with some hail and thunder, even some wintriness over the higher ground of scotland there. some areas staying dry altogether, but it will feel chilly, particularly when you factor in the breeze, which will be quite noticeable across northern and eastern areas. temperatures reaching highs of 11 and 12, maybe 13 celsius, which is pretty disappointing for the time of year. closer to single figures, though, across the north sea coast with that onshore breeze. as we head on into this evening and overnight, the showers begin to fade away. many places will turn drier, though.
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some showers are likely to continue on across parts of scotland, again wintry on the higher ground, but for many it is going to be a dry, clear night, winds falling light, so it is going to be chilly. these are the town and city values, but you can see the blue hue there in rural areas, where we will see a fairly widespread frost. so, for friday, then, it is a repeat performance with a chilly start, cold and frosty, with some sunshine, though, but then as the temperatures begin to rise, as that strong sunshine gets going, then we will see some showers developing into the afternoon. again, some of them will be heavy, perhaps the risk of hail and thunder, and some forming bands in areas. but some areas staying dry altogether. disappointing temperatures again for the time of year, ranging from around 8 to 12 or 13 celsius in the south. for much of this bank holiday weekend, it is pretty samey. it is going to start chilly with some frost around, and we will see sunshine and showers both saturday and sunday. but as we move out of sunday, into bank holiday monday, we will see a feature that we have not seen for quite a while moving off the atlantic, a deep low likely
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to bring some stronger winds and some wet weather across the country as we head through the course of bank holiday monday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. i do not think there is anything to see here or to worry about. but what we are doing is focusing on the stuff that really matters. i think this is getting a bit farcical. i think the prime minister could actually deal with this very, very quickly. all he has got to do is answer a very simple question, which is who paid initially for the redecoration of your flat? leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy become law. burying more dead in india, as the rampant covid outbreak
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prompts further offers of help from the international community. after a police community support officer is murdered, detectives search woodland in kent. with a week until the scottish parliament elections... talk economic recovery and independence. and the noxious neighbourhood dump kicking up a stink for thousands in staffordshire. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson has sought to play down concerns about how the refurbishment of his downing street flat was paid for — saying he doesn't think there is anything to see or worry about.
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the prime minister has made clear the conservative party will comply with the outcome of an electoral commission investigation, but has refused to say whether he will abide by the recommendations of his newly—appointed standards adviser. labour have said it's a "ridiculous farce" that mrjohnson has failed to say who paid the initial cost of the refit. with more, here's our political correspondent damian grammaticas. now haunting downing street and the prime minister, the question that borisjohnson still has not answered — who initially paid tens of thousands to renovate his flat? after six months leaving the post open, the prime minister has appointed an independent adviser on ministerial interests who is looking into things. but the labour leader in manchester today said it would be simple for the prime minister to put the whole matter to bed. i think this is getting a bit farcical. i think the prime minister could actually deal with this very, very quickly. all he's got to do is answer very simple question, which is who paid initially for the redecoration of your flat?
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now, i'm thinking of the people who are watching this, i think most people would say if i had my flat redecorated, i would be able to answer that question. in angry exchanges in parliament yesterday, the labour leader attempted several times to extract the information. mrjohnson said he had paid personally. borisjohnson's apartment is up there. down here in downing street they say he hasn't broken any regulations or any laws, but the question now is should the adviser�*s findings be binding on him, or would that be too much and potentially undermine the office of prime minister and parliament? lord geidt, seen here several years ago when he was working for the queen, will not have the power to open his own investigations or impose sanctions, those remain with the prime minister himself. labour and the man who heads the committee on standards in public life say that he should have more powers. the adviser should have the right to initiate investigations and then to report the facts to the prime minister.
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the prime minister has not accepted that recommendation on this occasion, although he has said that the adviser can recommend to him. mrjohnson today declined to say whether he would follow any recommendations his new adviser makes, but that he would provide any information a second investigation by the electoral commission asks for. we will comply with whatever they want, and i don't think there's anything to see here or to worry about, but what we are doing is focusing on the stuff that really matters. so it's not clear borisjohnson will heed his adviser�*s findings, and the unanswered questions remain. damian grammaticas, bbc news. so a number of inquiries are under way — i asked our political correspondent ben wright what might happen next. we wait for one of the three enquiries up and running to report. i think that is really what needs to happen for this very simple question
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to be answered comprehensively. who paid and how was it paid for that redecoration of the flat? we know that borisjohnson has since paid the money, but was there a loan, was there a donation, did come from the tory party, the cabinet office, who else may have been involved? we simply do not know. number 10 have been evasive on this question for a long time. there are three investigations under way. the electoral commission, lord geidt, the prime minister's own adviser on ministerial interests, and the cabinet secretary, simon case, are all charged with trying to get to the truth of this matter. getting to the truth, but whether any recommendations have to be followed by the prime minister, that is all up in the air as well. it is. if the electoral commission decide something has gone wrong here and there were declarations that should be made that were not, they have the power to punish. they have the power to impose fines. there can be sanctions.
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the investigation being done by lord geidt is trickier because the adviser on ministerial interest is accountable to the prime minister. he ultimately is the judge and jury of the guidance on ministerial interests and behaviour. if lord geidt decide something has gone pretty wrong here, in the end, it is borisjohnson who will have to decide whether or not to pursue penalties. it was the issue that arose when sir alex allan, the former adviser on ministerial interest, produced his report last year into the behaviour of priti patel. borisjohnson decided, in contrary to the conclusions of the report sir alex allan came up with, there should be no sanction against priti patel. leading of course to sir alex allan's resignation. it does really focus the spotlight on that particular part of how this whole rather fractured system works. whereas there is not at the moment some single entity charged
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with overseeing standards in public life and the ethics of how people behave in public life. this is diffuse over several different rule books, with several different people policing it. i'm joined now by tim durrant, of the institute for government. thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. how important for you is it that lord to make one, the new independent adviser, is given more powers than he currently seems to have? —— geidt. it is more powers than he currently seems to have? -- geidt.— to have? -- geidt. it is a bit of a mode for— to have? -- geidt. it is a bit of a mode for the _ to have? -- geidt. it is a bit of a mode for the government - to have? -- geidt. it is a bit of a mode for the government to - to have? -- geidt. it is a bit of a. mode for the government to show to have? -- geidt. it is a bit of a - mode for the government to show that it can improve standards, it wants to improve standards. giving lord geidt the power to start his own investigations rather than having to wait until the prime minister... would show that the government is taking this seriously. for would show that the government is taking this seriously.— taking this seriously. for many --eole, taking this seriously. for many people. this — taking this seriously. for many people. this is _ taking this seriously. for many people, this is about _ taking this seriously. for many people, this is about more -
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taking this seriously. for many| people, this is about more than taking this seriously. for many - people, this is about more than just this one particular issue of how the flat was refurbished and how it was paid for? it is about how the wider issues of truth and trust. how good, at the moment, is parliament at keeping itself in check? is at the moment, is parliament at keeping itself in check?- keeping itself in check? is your correspondent _ keeping itself in check? is your correspondent was _ keeping itself in check? is your correspondent was saying, - keeping itself in check? is your. correspondent was saying, there keeping itself in check? is your - correspondent was saying, there are so many different sets of rules and different investigations happening. it shows that things are complicated. if you think on this instance with the prime minister, he is being looked at by his adviser on ministerial standards. he is also obvious that a member of parliament, and so if there have been any donations, you should declare those as a member of parliament. there is also the question about the electoral commission's investigation and they are looking into the role of the conservative party in this. there are a lot of these different kind of sets of rules, different investigations going on, it does show how consecrated it is. i think
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ultimately most people in public life do want to do the right thing and do want to make sure that they are abiding by the rules, but the fact that they are so complicated and ultimately people often are responsible for enforcing the rules that apply to them. they point... this independent adviser is not really... it is ultimately the premise who enforces ministerial standards. it is members of parliament to enforce the standards of members of parliament. there is a question about do we have the right set up to have a independent enforcement?— set up to have a independent enforcement? ., ., ., ., enforcement? you wonder how often, as well, the — enforcement? you wonder how often, as well, the nolan _ enforcement? you wonder how often, as well, the nolan principles - enforcement? you wonder how often, as well, the nolan principles are - as well, the nolan principles are enforced. how can they be in force when the setup is the way it is? for a lot of people, it is notjust about this flat, it is also about how contracts are given out, it is also about statements that ministers and the prime minister make in the house of commons, which many people then realise later are not wholly
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true. i then realise later are not wholly true. ~' ., ., , . , , true. i think the nolan principles are having _ true. i think the nolan principles are having a _ true. i think the nolan principles are having a bit _ true. i think the nolan principles are having a bit of _ true. i think the nolan principles are having a bit of a... _ true. i think the nolan principles are having a bit of a... they - true. i think the nolan principles are having a bit of a... they are| are having a bit of a... they are having their time in the sun. these are importantand having their time in the sun. these are important and everyone who signs up are important and everyone who signs up to be a minister is expected to abide by them. but ultimately comes down to people's good behaviour. they have to choose whether they will stick to them and there are not any strict rules are strict ways of enforcing them. i think right now we are seeing there is appetite to clean this stuff up. the allegations and information about the prime minister's flat, questions about transparency over contracts during the pandemic, also thinks about david cameron's role in lobbying. it feels like now is the right time to make some changes. is it feels like now is the right time to make some changes. is it possible to stem the decline, _ make some changes. is it possible to stem the decline, stop _ make some changes. is it possible to stem the decline, stop that _ stem the decline, stop that corrosive effect? because it does not happen immediately, does it? it
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happens over time.— not happen immediately, does it? it happens over time. absolutely. each one on its own _ happens over time. absolutely. each one on its own is _ happens over time. absolutely. each one on its own is a _ happens over time. absolutely. each one on its own is a drip, _ happens over time. absolutely. each one on its own is a drip, drip, - happens over time. absolutely. each one on its own is a drip, drip, drip i one on its own is a drip, drip, drip of problems, but overall they are adding up to a decline. i think it is absolutely possible to stem it. i think it requires leadership. the final principles, the nolan principles is leadership. it has to come from the prime minister and yes to not only say that the rules have not been broken but show what he is going to do to ensure that they are not broken. tim going to do to ensure that they are not broken-— going to do to ensure that they are not broken. , . ., ,, , ., new fire safety legislation, drawn up in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster, has become law, but without the extra protections for leaseholders demanded by campaigners and some mps. it means the owners of buildings could pass on the extra cost of removing cladding. earlier i spoke to our correspondent victoria fritz who told us more about the fallout. it should be straightforward, shouldn't it? 72 lives lost four years ago. it should have been the easiest bill to pass, but there was a bitter battle over who should foot the bill for this cladding crisis.
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residents are saying, look, we are already paying out money for sprinkler systems, forfire doors, for balconies and the like. to increase the liability on us just is not fair. we are the people who are least able to afford it. mps, including the prime minister, pointed back in february to a fund that they were starting up that you would be able to apply for grants. £3.5 billion has gone into this fund, but the truth is we do not know what the true cost is of making homes in britain safe for all. we just do not know. some estimates are close to 15—16 billion. this isjust one third, this pot, if it covers it at all. there is a big question here as to whether or not, even though this law has been passed, whether natural justice has been served. campaigners are certainly vowing to fight on. how are they going to do that if it has already become law? it is a very tricky one. what is likely to happen is that we are going to see this
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end up in the courts. it will probably end up with the executive trying to make up with perhaps some of the failings that we have seen in the parliamentary system here. this ping—pong that we have seen for years and years. mps say to delay the legislation any further would have cost lives, but it remains pretty unclear as to how this law is going to work in practice. whether essential works will be carried out if the leaseholders are unwilling or unable to pay for the changes that are needed to be made. in the meantime, whether they have got enough money to even just keep the lights on and the lifts working in these high—rise buildings, which otherwise would render them completely uninhabitable. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. more than 3,600 people have been reported dead in the last 24 hours alone, and there were almost 380,000 new infections.
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the indian government has praised what it calls an "an outpouring of solidarity," after more than 40 countries pledged to send medical supplies. arunody mukherjee has more details. it was too late. this woman lost her mother while standing in a queue for hours waiting for medical oxygen. the only thing that could have given her a fighting chance to beat the virus. basic facilities like access to hospital beds and oxygen cylinders have now become a luxury in india's capital city. translation: we have been out of our house i since two o'clock last night. there is no oxygen available in all of delhi. and after a lot of running around, we finally got here at about four o'clock. delhi is in its second week of lockdown, but in the last ten days, the city of 20 million citizens has seen over 20,000 cases every day. more than 300 have died
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here daily for the last week. cases are surging in other parts of the country as well. it is notjust the hospitals which are inundated. so are burial grounds. this 52—year—old has been working around the clock for days, digging graves in mumbai. experts say the number of actual deaths are much higher than what is being reported. translation: it is ramadan, but i am not able to fast. - my work is really hard and we work 24 hours every day. how can i keep my fast? it is so hot. but i need to dig graves, i need to cover them with mud, and i need to carry dead bodies. how can i fast? contrast these images with election bound bengal, another state in the eastern part of india. citizens on thursday braved the virus to come out to vote. many have questioned why political rallies, led by leaders across party lines, were allowed to go on for the last months, even as cases in the country continued to spike. equally jarring is the fact that until one month ago india
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was projecting itself as the pharmacy of the world, sending millions of free vaccine doses to countries around the globe. it is hard to imagine that its citizens here are now struggling for something as basic as finding a hospital bed. it is india that now needs help. the us has promised to send covid—19 supplies worth $100 million. countries like the uk, singapore and russia, too, have sent ventilators and oxygenators to support india's crumbling medical infrastructure. amidst the despair, there are also encouraging stories, like that of this 105—year—old man and his wife in maharashtra who successfully beat the virus. it is stories like these that help inspire an exhausted country fighting the disease hold onto hope and pray for better days ahead. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns.
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leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy become law. burying more dead in india, as the rampant covid outbreak prompts further offers of help from the international community. police have been carrying out a forensic search of woodland in kent, after the body of a police community support officer was found on tuesday. julia james was last seen walking her dog, and detectives are treating her death as murder. our reporter helena wilkinson reports from snowdown in kent. this is an incredibly rural and very quiet part of kent, but you can see behind us a long line of police vehicles because this is now a murder investigation. just a little way from where we are is the woodland. and on the edge of that woodland is where julia james's body was discovered just after four
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o'clock on tuesday afternoon. what we have seen are detectives carrying out fingertip searches in this area, trying to gather clues. we also heard from a neighbour who said that they last saw miss james some hours earlier in that afternoon. she had gone out to take her dog for a walk. detectives clearly, as well as this investigation here, they are trying to gather clues, but they want to speak to any members of the public who may have any information. the head of nhs england is to step down at the end ofjuly, the government has confirmed. sir simon stevens is currently overseeing the coronavirus vaccination rollout for all adults in england. he had planned to leave sooner, but agreed to stay on through the winter and into this year to complete the vaccination programme. he is to be made a peer when he stands down, and he will sit as a crossbencher, according to an nhs england spokesman. a week today, voters go to the polls in wales,
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england and scotland, where the holyrood elections will be closely watched at westminster. if pro—independence parties win a majority, they could use it to demand another referendum. but the state of the scottish economy is also a key electoral issue, and nick eardley is live in aberdeen for us with more on that. he has also been trying to spot the odd dolphin. anyjoy? iho he has also been trying to spot the odd dolphin. anyjoy?— odd dolphin. any 'oy? no luck yet. you can — odd dolphin. any 'oy? no luck yet. you can see the _ odd dolphin. any joy? no luck yet. you can see the harbour _ odd dolphin. any joy? no luck yet. you can see the harbour is - odd dolphin. any joy? no luck yet. you can see the harbour is pretty i you can see the harbour is pretty choppy today, so we have been watching out for the dolphins. you see them every now and then. but they are not staying up for long. it is interesting because this is an area that, in many ways, epitomises some of the challenges that aberdeen has faced over the last few years. with the oil boom, but in the collapse and the price of oil meaning that the city has had some pretty tough times over the last you few years. that has only been exacerbated in the last few months,
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like so much of the country with the pandemic. the city, north—east region in general, is going to be really important to the election result next week. it could help determine whether the snp when an overall majority, whether the conservatives can stay in second place and beat labour again. independence is obvious that if really big part of the campaign here. it tends to find its way into every argument, no matter what issue you are talking about. but the economic recovery and preparing this region for the future is really important, too. as i have been finding out. a warm welcome back after a long winter lockdown. i hope you're hungry. hospitality on aberdeen's beach front is back up and running. enjoy your lunch. and despite a tough time recently, susie remains optimistic. we have to be positive going forward as from now
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with the reopening of everything. but it has been a very scary time this last year for everybody in aberdeen and aberdeenshire. do you think it's important that politicians focus on getting the economy moving again? oh, first, yes. firstly and mostly, yes. there are green shoots here, shoppers back on union street. but aberdeen has been hit hard and local business groups want politicians to act. unemployment has been the highest in scotland. our number ofjob vacancies has fallen the most. this is a vital election, possibly the most important of our lifetimes, because i think the policy decisions that are determined now will see how we recover. we're asking for business to be trusted by government, to be seen as part of the solution. after the challenges of the last year, economic recovery is playing a big role in the election debate. how to protectjobs and livelihoods when some of the emergency support schemes come to an end.
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but in scotland, it's also about independence. how strong is the economy here? would it suffer if scotland left the uk, or might the country be able to make different, perhaps better, economic decisions? aberdeen is no stranger to economic challenges. after the boom years of oil, it suffered when the price fell. that also had an impact on the economic debate around independence. and increasingly, scotland's energy sector is investing in renewables. sir ian wood made his money from the oil boom — more than £1 billion of it. he says it still has a role to play, but diversification will be key for the city's future. i think we're in better shape than we were. we were too dependent on oil and gas. frankly, the whole of the uk has been too dependent on oil and gas in our economy. so we're in a transition period. it's going to be challenging, but i'm reasonably confident that
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we'll work our way through that. but i can't think of anywhere else in the uk better to actually make a serious go at renewables. and if you had your time again or if you were starting off now, rather, would you invest all your money in renewables? yes, i would. scotland is hosting a major climate change conference in november. world leaders trying to figure out how to make the move to green energy. that's one of the questions aberdeen is trying to answer right now. but after the pandemic, it's not the only one for the city and its politicians. so we are speaking to the main parties this afternoon about what some of the answers might be. we have already heard from the pro—independence parties, the snp and the scottish greens. they think independence is an important part of how the country might recover from the pandemic. we are going to be hearing from the other side of the
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argument over the next couple of hours. we havejust had one of argument over the next couple of hours. we have just had one of the campaign buses roll up, scottish labour argue. we'll hearfrom their leader in the next few minutes about why he thinks staying in the uk could be the best answer. nick, for the moment, thank you very much. and for a round up of everything you need to know about the elections, there's a simple guide online, where you can find lots of useful information, including background on the parties and candidates. it's on our website, orjust go the bbc news app. president biden has announced huge spending plans, in a speech to a joint session of congress, saying america needs a 'once in a generation' investment in itself. delivered as he prepares to mark 100 days in office, he wants to spend trillions of dollars creating jobs, fixing infrastructure and improving education. but his plans face a battle in congress, with republicans opposed to higher taxes and greater state involvement in the economy. here's lebo diseko. applause it was an evening of historic firsts.
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president biden's first address to a joint session of congress, the first time two women flanked the president as he made that address. madam speaker, madam vice president... cheering no president has ever said those words from this podium, no president has ever said those words, and it's about time. in a chamber with numbers limited by covid, where just a few months ago insurrectionists occupied the speaker's chair. afterjust100 days i can report to the nation — america is on the move again. this was a bold speech, a statement of far—reaching, and, some might say, costly intent, a full—throttled endorsement of the idea of big government. two proposals which together will cost $4 trillion, taking in spending on education
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and paid family leave. my fellow americans, trickle down, trickle down economics has never worked. it's time to grow the economy from the bottom and the middle out. the president talked of prioritising climate change as a global ambition, of tackling the dual challenges of north korea and iran, and he had strong words for russia and for china. in my discussions with president xi i told him we welcome the competition, we're not looking for conflict, but i made absolutely clear that we will defend america's interests across the board. america is on the move again was the theme of the speech, but this is a sharply divided congress and his agenda faces challenges from the right and from the left. joe biden was dismissed by his predecessor as sleepyjoe,
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but tonight he set out an ambitious agenda. the big questions are, how much of this can he achieve? and how much of this can he afford? lebo diseko, bbc news, washington. broadcaster and journalistjon snow has announced he'll step down from channel 4 news at the end of the year. he became the programme's main presenter in 1989 and is the longest—serving presenter in the programme's history. over that time, he was honoured with a bafta fellowship in recognition of his outstanding and exceptional contribution to television. in a statement, channel 4 described him as "a talismanic figure" who was "the most trusted and well—loved news presenter of his generation." the united nations�* family planning programme, says it faces an 85% cut in the funds it receives from the uk, after the government reduced its international aid budget. the un population fund says the reduction is devastating for women and girls across the world. britain says cuts are necessary because of the severe impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the uk economy.
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the nspcc says calls and messages to its helpline have risen to record levels during the pandemic. in the year to march, the helpline was contacted almost 85,000 times, up 23% on the previous year. the charity says the figures amplify fears that children who couldn't go to school during the lockdowns were more vulnerable to abuse and neglect. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. today and indeed for the next few days, we are going to see a classic mixture of sunshine and april showers. and some of the showers will turn out to be heavy with some hail and some thunder in places also. other areas staying dry altogether. they will be hit and miss in nature. one thing we are also seeing is much colder arctic air spreading right across the country for the next few days. we will see a return to overnight frost in many rural areas. now, the showers will tend to fade away, a few continuing overnight for scotland, northeast england, that get wintry over that higher ground. but for many places, it will be dry with lengthy clear spells.
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these are the towns and city values, you can see the blue hue indicates that frost in rural areas. so, friday starts cold and frosty, but bright. a lot of sunshine around, but as that strong sunshine gets going, then showers will develop quite widely again. some of them will be heavy with some hail and thunder, a bit of wintriness over the higher ground of scotland. some areas staying dry altogether, but these temperatures are pretty disappointing for the time of year, ranging from around 7 to 12, or 13 degrees in the south. many sentiments are close again, but films are still being released to
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stream. i'll keep you up—to—date on what you can enjoy in the film review tomorrow evening at 5:45pm on bbc news channel and on bbc iplaye or. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy, become law. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. police have been carrying out a forensic search of woodland in kent, after the body of a police community support officer was found on tuesday. president biden has outlined a programme to transform
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the us economy and society after the pandemic, worth almost four trillion dollars. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. hi, yes, we are down tojust hi, yes, we are down to just one table at the crucible. the semi—finals at the world snooker championship are under way. three—time champion mark selby is the favourite out of the last four and he's in action now. he is currently 3 frames to 2 up against 2015 champion stuart bingham. it's the first to 16 frames played over three days. these are live pictures from sheffield. you can watch on bbc two or the bbc sport website. tonight sees kyren wilson against shaun murphy. uefa have become the latest organisation to join a social media boycott this weekend. uefa president alexander ceferin said he's been "impressed with the solidarity shown
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by the players, clubs and stakeholders. " scotland and england rugby, as well as rugby league, have also announced they would join english football and other sports in the boycott. they say it is a unified stand against racism and discrimination. the "show of solidarity against online abuse" takes place between 3pm on friday and 11:59pm on monday night. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer has admitted it would be a dream come true to finally win his first trophy with the club he won so much for as a player. they're in europa league semifinal action tonight against the italian side roma. it will be a dream come true the day i can lift a trophy for this club as a manager, of course. and that's what we are building for. we have been close, we are building step—by—step to take the next step. and our ambition this season is to finish it with lifting a trophy and being able to celebrate. i know how much that can mean for a group moving forward. well, there is still a chance
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there could be an all—premier league tie in the final of the europa league — because arsenal play in the other last four match tonight against spanish side villareal. arsenal have pierre emerick aubameyang back in contention — he's missed the last month of action after contracting malaria while on international duty. the number of inactive adults rose by 1.2 million, by the time the country locked down for a second time, in november. sport england has found over 12 million people did less than half an hour's physical activity a week compared to november the previous year. their chief executive tim hollingsworth says more must be done to help encourage people from all backgrounds to get active. the worst element of this, in some ways, is the fact that it just confirms what we already knew, that this is not a level playing field for community sport and being active in people's lives. there are barriers to entry for certain parts of our community which the pandemic has made worse. definitely, social economic circumstance matters.
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young people particularly have suffered during the pandemic and i think we need to look very hard at that and why is it that our 16—24—year—old have actually been one of the least active groups over the past year. if you've ever run a five—kilometre race you'll know that 25 minutes is a decent time, and anything under the 20—minute mark is really impressive. imagine 16 minutes and 40 seconds for a 12—year—old. emer mckee is world record holderfor her age. i was trying not to put any pressure myself and just go out there and run it. and i wasjust myself and just go out there and run it. and i was just so myself and just go out there and run it. and i wasjust so happy myself and just go out there and run it. and i was just so happy that i broke it, but ijust really wasn't expecting it. i was excited in that moment and i was just focusing on expecting it. i was excited in that moment and i wasjust focusing on my run and that is a really nice kind of way just to clear my run and that is a really nice kind of wayjust to clear my head and i really enjoy doing that.—
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really en'oy doing that. there's a name to really enjoy doing that. there's a name to watch _ really enjoy doing that. there's a name to watch for _ really enjoy doing that. there's a name to watch for the _ really enjoy doing that. there's a name to watch for the future. . that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. impressive staff, thank you very much. let's return to the elections in holyrood which will be closely watched in westminster. if pro—independence parties win a majority, they could use it to demand another referendum. nick eardley is at aberdeen harbour this afternoon. hi. yeah, there's a lot at stake in this debate. the scottish parliament has quite a lot of powers over things like health, justice, education, big elements of income tax as well. but to the things that have been dominating the debate are independents, that's always there when you talk about scottish politics, but also the recovery from the pandemic. let's talk some of that through with the scottish labor leader, thank you for coming and joining us. the first question i wanted to ask you is do you think the scottish parliament has enough
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powers to properly recover from the pandemic? i powers to properly recover from the -andemic? ~ . pandemic? i think we have significant _ pandemic? i think we have significant powers - pandemic? i think we have significant powers to - pandemic? i think we have i significant powers to recover pandemic? i think we have - significant powers to recover from the pandemic, but that is not to say that we _ the pandemic, but that is not to say that we cannot look at where we can io that we cannot look at where we can go further~ _ that we cannot look at where we can go further. so as we come through into the _ go further. so as we come through into the recovery phase, i think we have _ into the recovery phase, i think we have to _ into the recovery phase, i think we have to push power out from both of our presidents and do the nations or regions _ our presidents and do the nations or regions from westminster and to local— regions from westminster and to local communities across scotland. so if you _ local communities across scotland. so if you want to look with everyone comments _ so if you want to look with everyone comments about pushing economic levers _ comments about pushing economic levers and — comments about pushing economic levers and budgets into the local authority— levers and budgets into the local authority so they can support their own local— authority so they can support their own local economies and help create 'obs own local economies and help create jobs and _ own local economies and help create jobs and protect businesses. when own local economies and help create jobs and protect businesses.- jobs and protect businesses. when it comes to the — jobs and protect businesses. when it comes to the economic _ jobs and protect businesses. when it comes to the economic recovery, - comes to the economic recovery, scottish labour have plans to spend quite a lot of money. how is that going to feed into getting the country back on its feet financially.— country back on its feet financiall. �* ., , , financially. i'm not shy about the scale or the _ financially. i'm not shy about the scale or the price _ financially. i'm not shy about the scale or the price tag, _ financially. i'm not shy about the scale or the price tag, it - financially. i'm not shy about the scale or the price tag, it is - financially. i'm not shy about the scale or the price tag, it is the i scale or the price tag, it is the laraest, scale or the price tag, it is the largest, boldest _ scale or the price tag, it is the largest, boldest most - scale or the price tag, it is the i largest, boldest most ambitious scale or the price tag, it is the - largest, boldest most ambitious job largest, boldest most ambitiousjob coding _ largest, boldest most ambitiousjob coding scheme in history the scottish— coding scheme in history the scottish parliament. demonstrating that we _ scottish parliament. demonstrating that we have the ideas to match the
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seriousness — that we have the ideas to match the seriousness of the situation. currently— seriousness of the situation. currently three to 60,000 of our fellow— currently three to 60,000 of our fellow citizens in scotland arm perillo, — fellow citizens in scotland arm perillo, wondering if they will have a 'ob perillo, wondering if they will have a job to _ perillo, wondering if they will have a job to go — perillo, wondering if they will have a job to go back to. we are risk of an economic— a job to go back to. we are risk of an economic and jobs crisis coming to the _ an economic and jobs crisis coming to the pandemic, so we have to start i’ilht to the pandemic, so we have to start right now— to the pandemic, so we have to start right now on — to the pandemic, so we have to start right now on day one of the next parliament focus on the national recovery— parliament focus on the national recovery and that it shall guarantee and long _ recovery and that it shall guarantee and long term for young people, new skills benefits for people in parler to learn _ skills benefits for people in parler to learn new skills... —— for people. _ to learn new skills... —— for people, young people... | to learn new skills... -- for people, young people... i am so sor , people, young people... i am so sorry. we _ people, young people... i am so sorry. we have _ people, young people... i am so sorry, we have lost _ people, young people... i am so sorry, we have lost the - people, young people... i am so sorry, we have lost the sound i people, young people... i am so sorry, we have lost the sound to j sorry, we have lost the sound to aberdeen at the moment. studio: chatting away merrily to make early in aberdeen. i don't know whether we can get them back. not at the moment, i am so sorry for that. we willjoin them in a minute will be sort things out. in northern ireland, democratic unionists are beginning the process of choosing a new leader, after arlene foster announced her resignation. senior members of the dup are said to be worried that her departure
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could lead to early elections for the northern ireland assembly, as emma vardy explains. applause. arlene foster began her leadership with electoral success, but after a majority of the party moved against her, she conceded her time at the top was over. for me, the decision to enter politics was never about party or person, it was about speaking up for the voiceless and building a northern ireland which could prosper and be at peace within the united kingdom. but unionists have felt northern ireland's place in the uk has been undermined by the new brexit arrangements. a new trade border in the irish sea means there are new checks on goods arriving from the rest of the uk. and there's frustration in the dup that westminster intervened to legalise abortion, which the party opposed. mrs foster's critics felt she should have defended the dup�*s core
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ideals more strongly. whoever takes over can't just wave a wand and scrap the brexit protocol and certainly some of the issues that have caused problems for certain elements within the party around rights, around lgbt rights and women's reproductive rights. there is a sense that you can't really stop the tide coming in on that. an early favourite to replace her as first minister is edwin poots, who is currently in charge of agriculture in the devolved government. he's been prominent in the dup�*s opposition to the irish sea border. others being linked to the position of dup leader are two mps, sirjeffrey donaldson and gavin robinson. this is not a contest where hundreds of people make the decision. the choice of leader will be decided by 41 people, all the parties' mlas, the parties' mps and their five peers. that is the only group of people who will make this decision. the dup�*s main partner in the power—sharing stormont the dup�*s main partner in the power—sharing stormont executive is the irish republican party sinn fein.
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it said the main priority should be making sure the coalition works. we all have a job here, politics must deliver for everybody and power—sharing must deliver for everybody. i will play my part in that. i hope that the dup find a partner that's also willing to do the same. no one has officially declared themselves as running just yet, but whoever takes over as the leader of unionism will have a defining role in shaping its future. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. boosterjabs against covid will be available from the autumn, after the government ordered a batch of 60—million more doses of the pfizer vaccine. ministers say the most vulnerable groups will be offered the 'top up' jab, but it's unclear when the roll—out will begin. and today, the health secretary, matt hancock, received his first vaccination, with the government saying it's 'on track�* with its road map out of lockdown. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has this report which contains some flash photography. anyone who is 42 or older... it's fair to say he was excited. in last night's press conference,
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matt hancock mentioned a few times that his turn had come for the vaccine. and i'm also delighted because it means i can get myjab too. and i'm looking forward to getting myjab first thing tomorrow morning. join me and get the jab. this is my firstjab, first one. this morning he found out who was going to bejoining him. i've got jvt vaccinating me. there may be some shivering, they're completely normal. professorjonathan van—tam, england's deputy chief medical officer, gave him the oxford astrazeneca injection, with photographers and camera crews watching the whole thing. it's 40—somethings now, but the government is on track to get all adults at least one injection by the end ofjuly. all done, fantastic! please remember to come back in 12 weeks. that one. almost 44 million people have had their first dose now and over 13.5 million have had both. and the government's ordered an extra 60 million doses
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of the pfizer biontech vaccine, not for now, but to stock up for a possible third booster dose. to future proof the vaccination programme, our task is to make sure we give as much optionality to the scientists, to the clinicians, to make the decision whether we boost in september or later this year or early next year, but we must have that ability to do that. part of that ability will be making sure we've got enough of the right vaccines, and that seems to be going well. the government's ordered more than 500 million doses in total now, but it will also come down to logistics. this is a major commitment for the nhs, coming alongside the challenges of dealing with the backlog of care that has arisen during the pandemic. waiting lists are over 4 million now. and also, the nhs is dealing with rising demand across all of its services. for now, though, the government says
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we are on track to keep opening up out of lockdown, but that it needs people to keep coming forwards when it's their turn. catherine burns, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy become law. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. as india's covid crisis worsens, many in the british indian community are watching on helplessly, unable to assist friends and family. pria rai has been speaking to one man in leicester, who is thousands of miles away from his family, who are struggling in india. kalpesh is living in the heart
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of leicester's indian community. during the festival times, even this park is full of indian people. my brother and my mother is positive and they are in quarantine at the moment. i regularly touch base with them. immediate family members we've got from my in law's side as well and my brother's in—laws as well. which is sadly, they have passed away. one of the family members, they mentioned they had been carrying a lot of cash in their hand, that if someone can sell the oxygen... but unfortunately, we heard that his father passed away, just a lack of oxygen. like here in leicester, british indian communities across the country have strong family and cultural links to india. now, many can only watch helplessly as their loved ones face a crisis. i am very helpless. i can't do anything from here.
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the only thing i can do is to call them and ask them how they are and how they are coping. is there anything i can help from here? and they say, no, you can't do anything from there. so it is sad. he gives his brother a call. hello. hi, you ok? hi. how are you feeling? i am not so well. not so well, i can hear your voice, it's not normal. yeah, i have a sore throat, i have fever. i have lost, very close, my father—in—lawjust a few days before. he had a very bad situation. meanwhile, for kalpesh in the uk, lockdown restrictions are lifting, a world away from the reality in india. your life is now as if you are coming out ofjail and those people
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are now getting inside the jail. they are struggling and they are not having any help from anywhere. people want to help, but unfortunately, they are not able to. and you feel sad, you feel sad about it. pria rai, bbc news. we have re—established contact with nick early who was at the aberdeen harbour this afternoon. looking ahead to elections next week, cut off in your prime, but take it away. that is live tv for you, i still have the labour leader. ready for the abc technicalities. _ have the labour leader. ready for the abc technicalities. it - have the labour leader. ready for the abc technicalities. it is i the abc technicalities. it is freezina the abc technicalities. it is freezing out _ the abc technicalities. it is freezing out here. - the abc technicalities. it is freezing out here. you i the abc technicalities. it is i freezing out here. you never the abc technicalities. it is - freezing out here. you never offered me our freezing out here. you never offered me your coat- _ freezing out here. you never offered me your coat. let _ freezing out here. you never offered me your coat. let me _ freezing out here. you never offered me your coat. let me ask _ freezing out here. you never offered me your coat. let me ask you i freezing out here. you never offered me your coat. let me ask you about| me your coat. let me ask you about independents. _ me your coat. let me ask you about independents, because _ me your coat. let me ask you about independents, because you - me your coat. let me ask you about independents, because you don't i me your coat. let me ask you about. independents, because you don't like talking about it because labour wants to move on from it. there's a pretty important issue at stake here, if pro—independence parties win and want another referendum,
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will you back them back personable, i am happy to answer the question directly. i i am happy to answer the question directl . ., �* i am happy to answer the question directl. ., �* , , directly. i don't support independence - directly. i don't support independence or i directly. i don't support i independence or referendum, directly. i don't support - independence or referendum, but directly. i don't support _ independence or referendum, but i think— independence or referendum, but i think we _ independence or referendum, but i think we can choose something different. — think we can choose something different, recognise that we have come _ different, recognise that we have come from the most difficult years of our— come from the most difficult years of our lifetime, we've been asked to separate _ of our lifetime, we've been asked to separate from our loved ones like never _ separate from our loved ones like never before, but also come together as a country— never before, but also come together as a country and the idea that we come _ as a country and the idea that we come to— as a country and the idea that we come to the collective trauma of covid _ come to the collective trauma of covid and — come to the collective trauma of covid and go back to the old arguments and the divisions, ijust thinkm _ arguments and the divisions, ijust think i_ arguments and the divisions, ijust think... i don't care whether you are a _ think... i don't care whether you are a yes — think... idon't care whether you are a yes or— think... i don't care whether you are a yes or no, let's work together to rebuild _ are a yes or no, let's work together to rebuild a — are a yes or no, let's work together to rebuild a country that we love. there _ to rebuild a country that we love. there is— to rebuild a country that we love. there is a — to rebuild a country that we love. there is a question about scottish democracy. because it looks pretty likely if you believe the polls that most msps will want another referendum and then scottish agor why bleidlais, you have a question to answer, do you think the scottish parliament —— and then as scottish labour, do you think scottish parliament have the right? hater? labour, do you think scottish parliament have the right? very few a-eole parliament have the right? very few people believe _ parliament have the right? very few people believe we _
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parliament have the right? very few people believe we will _ parliament have the right? very few people believe we will have - parliament have the right? very few people believe we will have an i parliament have the right? very few people believe we will have an snp| people believe we will have an snp majority, _ people believe we will have an snp majority, a lot could change the next _ majority, a lot could change the next week— majority, a lot could change the next week ahead. do majority, a lot could change the next week ahead.— majority, a lot could change the next week ahead. do you think they miaht not next week ahead. do you think they might not win? _ next week ahead. do you think they might not win? let's _ next week ahead. do you think they might not win? let's find _ next week ahead. do you think they might not win? let's find out i next week ahead. do you think they might not win? let's find out the i might not win? let's find out the course of the _ might not win? let's find out the course of the next _ might not win? let's find out the course of the next week, - might not win? let's find out the course of the next week, i'm i might not win? let's find out the i course of the next week, i'm trying to persuade — course of the next week, i'm trying to persuade people different, i do want to— to persuade people different, i do want to go back to the division of the snp — want to go back to the division of the snp or— want to go back to the division of the snp or the tories. i think we need _ the snp or the tories. ! think we need to— the snp or the tories. i think we need to have a problem and acute societal _ need to have a problem and acute societal ball, focuses on the most difficult _ societal ball, focuses on the most difficult of — societal ball, focuses on the most difficult of years and takes on the challenges our country faces. 360,000 of our citizens on 700,000 -- 7000 _ 360,000 of our citizens on 700,000 —— 7000 undiagnosed cancer, let's make _ —— 7000 undiagnosed cancer, let's make all— —— 7000 undiagnosed cancer, let's make all of— —— 7000 undiagnosed cancer, let's make all of that the focus of the next _ make all of that the focus of the next parliament. to make all of that the focus of the next parliament.— make all of that the focus of the next parliament. to be confirmed, scottish labour _ next parliament. to be confirmed, scottish labour have _ next parliament. to be confirmed, scottish labour have taken - next parliament. to be confirmed, scottish labour have taken a i scottish labour have taken a battering over the last two years, parties and dominate this country, they don't any more. what are your chances of finishing second? i got to d and chances of finishing second? i got to dry and arrest _ chances of finishing second? i got to dry and arrest and _ chances of finishing second? i got to dry and arrest and reverse a 20 year— to dry and arrest and reverse a 20 year declined. i think already we have _ year declined. i think already we have demonstrated in a weeks and i've have demonstrated in a weeks and i've been— have demonstrated in a weeks and i've been in— have demonstrated in a weeks and i've been in the job that we are back— i've been in the job that we are back at— i've been in the job that we are back at the _ i've been in the job that we are back at the pitch, we're talking about — back at the pitch, we're talking about the — back at the pitch, we're talking about the issues that matter to people — about the issues that matter to
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people and i want to be able to talk about— people and i want to be able to talk about different kind of politics in about different kind of politics in a different colour country. a people agree _ a different colour country. a people agree with — a different colour country. a people agree with me, they like what i'm saying. _ agree with me, they like what i'm saying, they need to use their vote and lets— saying, they need to use their vote and let's rebuild the party and rebuild — and let's rebuild the party and rebuild the country.— rebuild the country. what has chanaed rebuild the country. what has changed the _ rebuild the country. what has changed the way _ rebuild the country. what has changed the way you've i rebuild the country. what has i changed the way you've messaged rebuild the country. what has - changed the way you've messaged to make people think about voting labour again, make people think about voting labouragain, because make people think about voting labour again, because it doesn't feel like much of the policy has changed. i feel like much of the policy has chanaed. ~ , .,, , changed. i think people will see that we are _ changed. i think people will see that we are leaning _ changed. i think people will see that we are leaning on - changed. i think people will see that we are leaning on the i changed. i think people will see that we are leaning on the big i changed. i think people will see i that we are leaning on the big ideas of this— that we are leaning on the big ideas of this campaign, leading on the energy— of this campaign, leading on the energy of— of this campaign, leading on the energy of this campaign. i think people — energy of this campaign. i think people can see confidence, a forward—looking labour party and wonder— forward—looking labour party and wonder the one simple our country together~ — wonder the one simple our country together. from other politicians what _ together. from other politicians what makes us different, i want to focus _ what makes us different, i want to focus on _ what makes us different, i want to focus on what unites us to not divide — focus on what unites us to not divide us~ _ focus on what unites us to not divide us— focus on what unites us to not divide us. ., ,, , ., , . divide us. thank you very much, get back on your — divide us. thank you very much, get back on your bus _ divide us. thank you very much, get back on your bus before _ divide us. thank you very much, get back on your bus before the - divide us. thank you very much, get back on your bus before the rain i back on your bus before the rain comes. scottish weather is often unpredictable, but never more so then on the north east coast. so we're going to grab some shelter for ten minutes and then we will be back with some other politicians in the
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next hours so. i with some other politicians in the next hours so-_ with some other politicians in the next hours so. i have noticed most of our next hours so. i have noticed most of your guests _ next hours so. i have noticed most of your guests have _ next hours so. i have noticed most of your guests have not _ next hours so. i have noticed most of your guests have not bothered i of your guests have not bothered with the code, but you have your zone. they are a hearty lot. i have come prepared- — zone. they are a hearty lot. i have come prepared. i'm _ zone. they are a hearty lot. i have come prepared. i'm not— zone. they are a hearty lot. i have come prepared. i'm not sure, i zone. they are a hearty lot. i have come prepared. i'm not sure, we. zone. they are a hearty lot. i have i come prepared. i'm not sure, we have had a couple of coats, but anna deems to be all right standing in the cold. but i could not do that. i think you've been down south too long, nick. nice to see you, in aberdeen. thousands of people who live near a landfill site in staffordshire have complained that their physical and mental health is suffering because of its terrible smell. levels of hydrogen sulphide at the former quarry in newcastle—under—lyme have twice breached recommended standards. the operator, red industries, has promised to cap part of the area by the weekend. here's phil mackie. this is walley's quarry in silverdale. it is used as a landfill site, and here's the problem. it's right next door to hundreds of homes and is giving off a terrible smell.
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since it was allowed to increase the amount of waste it takes, the stink has got worse and, if you're downwind, it's horrible. we obviously knew there was a landfill there when we moved in. the smell gets trapped in the house and it gets trapped in your hair and your clothing, your carpets and your cars, and your children's toys and all that, you all smell of landfill and it ranges from a rotten eggs sort of smell to a chemically acrid smell as well, and that's quite foul. today shouldn't be so bad because it's sunny and warm and that should get rid of the hydrogen sulphide smell, that creates that rotten eggs—stink bomb odour that's really unpleasant, but, honestly, standing just across the road from it at the moment, oh, it's really unpleasant and, actually, it's making me feel quite ill. people say they can't sleep and are feeling ill. there were more than 5,000 complaints last month and over 2,000 just last week. its noxiousness is taking its toll. it can cause nausea and shortness of breath, but there's been a big impact on mental health. it distracts you, it depresses you.
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it's the day on day, week on week attrition of living with it randomly that's really getting people down. the site's being closely monitored. the latest air quality report is due out later and the environment agency has told the operator it must make improvements by the end of this week. in a statement, red industries said, "as a waste management company, we recognise that we are hosted by the local communities in which we operate. we are acutely aware of the community's concerns regarding our landfill operations. an accelerated engineering capping operation is under way which will seal an extensive area of the site." a few miles away, it's made learning very difficult for children like ruby, poppy and ben. it's the same here in the classroom. you can't work and your minds just a set onto the landfill. it makes me feel sick. i have headaches all the time, it puts me off my work, it puts me off my food. and then the smell will come in and, like, it won't go away. _
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like, no matter how many air. fresheners you get, it won't go. it's horrible. chanting: stop the stink! hundreds joined another protest this week demanding that something's done to stop the silverdale stink from overpowering the whole area. phil mackie, bbc news, newcastle—under—lyme. the duke and duchess of cambridge are celebrating their 10th wedding anniversary today and to mark the occasion, they've released a new photograph. a decade ago two—billion people around the world tuned in to watch william and catherine get married at westminster abbey. street parties and celebrations took place across the uk to mark the event. graham satchell has been talking to people about their memories of the big day. april 29, 2011, exactly ten years ago, and the marriage of prince william to kate middleton.
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the wedding watched by an estimated 2 billion people worldwide. across the country, in time—honoured fashion, the great british street party. you need to stop it! jack was just eight at the time. i was going to hyperventilate. he helped organise his street party doing his best to not get too stressed. calm down, you're going to hyperventilate. it was such a good day. everyone was out on the street, we had auctions going on, raffles, cake going out to everyone. the royal wedding is all royal and everyone wanted to get involved. and we were all sat in the front room and the atmosphere was just so happy and everybody was happy for the wedding. it was literally like a fairy tale. it was, honestly. what has it been like you today? a fantastic day.
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ll'm caroline and this is my husband, | trevor, and we got married ten years ago on the 29th of april. it was pretty magical, i think, i because there was all the hype of the royal wedding. there had been the big lead up to- the day and we watched the wedding. i am a royalist. trevor quite likes the royal family, too, but i am so patriotic. - and just loved the moment watching kate, her dress, i her hair, her make—up, _ absolutely everything was flawless. she looked beautiful. and then we just had a wonderful day. i much has happened to the royal family in the last ten years, but in what was an age of austerity, the royal wedding a decade ago was a moment of escape and celebration. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. we are finally getting to see some
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classic april weather for the next few days. classic april weather we are ending the month with april showers and sunny spells after cold and frosty starts. and we have seen those shower clouds bubbling up across the country through this morning. low pressure is clearing away into the near continent. it is allowing higher pressure to slowly build in, but there is still enough instability in the atmosphere to allow these showers to develop through the day, but what we are also pulling in is much colder air right across the board. so, we will see a return to widespread overnight frosts. so, it's been a chilly start this morning. through the day, it looks like it's going to stay bright, with sunny spells, but those shower clouds will continue to develop, with some of them turning out to be heavy with some hail and thunder, even some wintriness over the higher ground of scotland there. some areas staying dry altogether, but it will feel chilly, particularly when you factor in the breeze, which will be quite noticeable across northern and eastern areas. temperatures reaching highs of 11 and 12, maybe 13 celsius, which is pretty disappointing for the time of year. closer to single figures, though, across the north sea coast
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with that onshore breeze. as we head on into this evening and overnight, the showers begin to fade away. many places will turn drier, though. some showers are likely to continue on across parts of scotland, again wintry on the higher ground, but for many it is going to be a dry, clear night, winds falling light, so it is going to be chilly. these are the town and city values, but you can see the blue hue there in rural areas, where we will see a fairly widespread frost. so, for friday, then, it is a repeat performance with a chilly start, cold and frosty, with some sunshine, though, but then as the temperatures begin to rise, as that strong sunshine gets going, then we will see some showers developing into the afternoon. again, some of them will be heavy, perhaps the risk of hail and thunder, and some forming bands in areas. but some areas staying dry altogether. disappointing temperatures again for the time of year, ranging from around 8 to 12 or 13 celsius in the south. for much of this bank holiday weekend, it is pretty samey. it is going to start chilly with some frost around, and we will see sunshine and showers
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both saturday and sunday. but as we move out of sunday into bank holiday monday, we will see a feature that we have not seen for quite a while moving off the atlantic, a deep low likely to bring some stronger winds and some wet weather across the country as we head through the course of bank holiday monday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. i don't think there's anything to see or to worry about, but what we are doing is focusing on the stuff that really matters. i think this is getting a bit farcical. i think the prime minister could actually deal with this very, very quickly. all he's got to do is answer a very simple question, which is who paid, initially, for the redecoration of your flat? leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy, become law. burying more dead in india, as the rampant covid outbreak
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prompts further offers of help, from the international community. after a police community support officer is murdered, detectives search woodland, in kent. with a week until the scottish parliament elections... we parliament elections... are in aberdeen talking abi independence we are in aberdeen talking about independence and the economy. and, the noxious neighbourhood dump kicking up a stink for thousands in staffordshire. borisjohnson has sought to play down concerns about how the refurbishment of his downing street flat was paid for — saying he doesn't think there is anything to see or worry about. the prime minister has made clear
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the conservative party will comply with the outcome of an electoral commission investigation, but has refused to say whether he will abide by the recommendations of his newly—appointed standards adviser. labour have said it's a "ridiculous farce" that mrjohnson has failed to say who paid the initial cost of the refit. with more, here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. now haunting downing street and the prime minister, the question that borisjohnson still has not answered — who initially paid tens of thousands to renovate his flat? after six months leaving the post open, the prime minister has appointed an independent adviser on ministerial interests who is looking into things. but the labour leader in manchester today said it would be simple for the prime minister to put the whole matter to bed. i think this is getting a bit farcical. i think the prime minister could actually deal with this very, very quickly. all he's got to do is answer very simple question, which is who paid initially for the redecoration of your flat?
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now, i'm thinking of the people who are watching this, i think most people would say if i had my flat redecorated, i would be able to answer that question. in angry exchanges in parliament yesterday, the labour leader attempted several times to extract the information. mrjohnson said he had paid personally. borisjohnson's apartment is up there. down here in downing street they say he hasn't broken any regulations or any laws, but the question now is should the adviser�*s findings be binding on him, or would that be too much and potentially undermine the office of prime minister and parliament? lord geidt, seen here several years ago when he was working for the queen, will not have the power to open his own investigations or impose sanctions, those remain with the prime minister himself. labour and the man who heads the committee on standards in public life say that he should have more powers. the adviser should have the right to initiate investigations and then to report the facts to the prime
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minister. the prime minister has not accepted that recommendation on this occasion, although he has said that the adviser can recommend to him. mrjohnson today declined to say whether he would follow any recommendations his new adviser makes, but that he would provide any information a second investigation by the electoral commission asks for. we will comply with whatever they want, and i don't think there's anything to see here or to worry about, but what we are doing is focusing on the stuff that really matters. so it's not clear borisjohnson will heed his adviser�*s findings, and the unanswered questions remain. damian grammaticas, bbc news. so a number of inquiries are under way — i asked our political correspondent ben wright what might happen next. we wait for one of the three enquiries up and running to report. i think that is really what needs to happen for this very simple question
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to be answered comprehensively. who paid and how was it paid for that redecoration of the flat? we know that borisjohnson has since paid the money, but was there a loan, was there a donation, did come from the tory party, the cabinet office, who else may have been involved ? we simply do not know. number 10 have been evasive on this question for a long time. there are three investigations under way. the electoral commission, lord geidt, the prime minister's own adviser on ministerial interests, and the cabinet secretary, simon case, are all charged with trying to get to the truth of this matter. getting to the truth, but whether any recommendations have to be followed by the prime minister, that is all up in the air as well. it is. if the electoral commission decide something has gone wrong here and there were declarations that should be made that were not, they have the power to punish. they have the power to impose fines. there can be sanctions.
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the investigation being done by lord geidt is trickier because the adviser on ministerial interest is accountable to the prime minister. he ultimately is the judge and jury of the guidance on ministerial interests and behaviour. if lord geidt decide something has gone pretty wrong here, in the end, it is borisjohnson who will have to decide whether or not to pursue penalties. it was the issue that arose when sir alex allan, the former adviser on ministerial interest, produced his report last year into the behaviour of priti patel. borisjohnson decided, in contrary to the conclusions of the report sir alex allan came up with, there should be no sanction against priti patel. leading of course to sir alex allan's resignation. it does really focus the spotlight on that particular part of how this whole rather fractured system works. whereas there is not at the moment some single entity charged with overseeing standards in public
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life and the ethics of how people behave in public life. this is diffuse over several different rule books, with several different people policing it. we can speak now to sir jonathanjones formerly head of government legal department. thank you very much forjoining us. how much damage has been caused by this row to public confidence, do you believe? i this row to public confidence, do you believe?— you believe? i think it's causing significant _ you believe? i think it's causing significant damage. _ you believe? i think it's causing significant damage. saying i you believe? i think it's causing | significant damage. saying that, you believe? i think it's causing i significant damage. saying that, i'm not expressing a view on the rights and wrongs of the various allegations which are being made about the downing street flat or lobbying over leaks and so on, i don't know the rights and wrongs of those things, but the fact is there are now a large number of allegations of serious misconduct, and i think that that is now causing
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significant concern, public concern, and the public is entitled to expect that those allegations will be dealt with robustly and independently, and there has been misconduct, that it will be dealt with properly. to what extent do you _ will be dealt with properly. to what extent do you believe _ will be dealt with properly. to what extent do you believe the - will be dealt with properly. to what extent do you believe the current i extent do you believe the current ministerial code is fit for purpose for dealing with the many issues that you have just outlined? i for dealing with the many issues that you have just outlined? that you have 'ust outlined? i don't think it is. r— that you have just outlined? i don't think it is. i think _ that you have just outlined? i don't think it is. i think it _ that you have just outlined? i don't think it is. i think it is _ that you have just outlined? i don't think it is. i think it is time - that you have just outlined? i don't think it is. i think it is time to i think it is. i think it is time to overhaul the ministerial code and put in place something with a stronger legal foundation that has within it clearer lines of independence and transparency, even if, as i believe, at the end of an investigation, it should be for the prime minister to decide what action is taken, i don't think that responsibility should be sub delegated to an independent investigator. nonetheless, the whole process by which these allegations are tested, i think, should be strengthened. for example, as has
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been said, i think that an independent investigator or overseer of the code should be able to initiate investigations, and secondly i think he should be able to publish its conclusions and make recommendations as to sanctions or remedies. then, if the prime minister decides to reject such recommendations, he should be required to explain that publicly. but then what happens? i mean, if it is the premise to him or herself who is the premise to him or herself who is under suspicion of breaking the code, and yet the ministers, the adviser, has no power over the prime minister, then it's a rather pointless process, isn't it? ithink it would be _ pointless process, isn't it? ithink it would be a _ pointless process, isn't it? ithink it would be a stronger _ pointless process, isn't it? ithink it would be a stronger process i pointless process, isn't it? i think. it would be a stronger process than we have now, and it is stronger than the rule which is being proposed for lord geidt, who in my view is an
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excellent appointment, but he has been appointed essentially as a confidential adviser to the prime minister, and i think something stronger as needed. at the end of this, i don't think you can give power to an independent advisor or commissioner or overseer to decide whether the prime minister should be sacked. or indeed whether the prime minister should sack other ministers. i think ultimately those are politicaljudgments, and the prime minister is accountable for them politically, but the process by which these are tested should could be strengthened, and the prime minister would be more accountable with she declines to accept the findings which are been published from the independent investigator. should the remit and the powers of the adviser extend to how contracts
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are awarded and transparency regarding that? that's another thing that has been levelled at the government, the contracts have been awarded to companies that belong to conservative donors, or to companies that have absolutely no experience at all and delivering things like ppe. i at all and delivering things like ppe. “ at all and delivering things like ppe. 4' , ,. ., , at all and delivering things like ppe. 4' , ., ppe. i think there is scope for tightening _ ppe. i think there is scope for tightening up _ ppe. i think there is scope for tightening up a _ ppe. i think there is scope for tightening up a number i ppe. i think there is scope for tightening up a number of i ppe. i think there is scope for i tightening up a number of aspects of the ministerial code, which does already cover issues such as conflicts of interest and avoidance of conflict between personal interest and political responsibility, but i think those things could be tightened up, and i think would make sense to give a new overseer or commissioner responsibility for looking at those things, as well.— responsibility for looking at those thinas, as well. . ~ ,. , . things, as well. thank you very much for our things, as well. thank you very much for yourtime- _ some breaking news now, we had the
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latest statistics regarding coded cases. we understand that 22 new covid—related deaths have been reported on thursday. that is the latest 24—hour period, someone who has died within 28 days of a positive covid test. there were 29 yesterday, so that has fallen by seven in the day. 2000 445 cases have been reported today, that is up from 2166 yesterday, and there have been 34 million first doses of coronavirus vaccine administered so far across the country, which is something we heard the health secretary tokyo yesterday, how happy he was with how the vaccine role that had progressed. new fire safety legislation, drawn up in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster, has become law, but without the extra protections for leaseholders demanded by campaigners and some mps.
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it means the owners of buildings could pass on the extra cost of removing cladding. earlier i spoke to our correspondent, victoria fritz who told us more about the fallout. it should be straightforward, shouldn't it? 72 lives lost four years ago. it should have been the easiest bill to pass, but there was a bitter battle over who should foot the bill for this cladding crisis. residents are saying, look, we are already paying out money for sprinkler systems, forfire doors, for balconies and the like. to increase the liability on us just is not fair. we are the people who are least able to afford it. mps, including the prime minister, pointed back in february to a fund that they were starting up that you would be able to apply for grants. £3.5 billion has gone into this fund, but the truth is we do not know what the true cost is of making homes in britain safe for all. we just do not know. some estimates are close to 15—16 billion.
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this isjust one third, this pot, if it covers it at all. there is a big question here as to whether or not, even though this law has been passed, whether natural justice has been served. campaigners are certainly vowing to fight on. how are they going to do that if it has already become law? it is a very tricky one. what is likely to happen is that we are going to see this end up in the courts. it will probably end up with the executive trying to make up with perhaps some of the failings that we have seen in the parliamentary system here. this ping—pong that we have seen for years and years. mps say to delay the legislation any further would have cost lives, but it remains pretty unclear as to how this law is going to work in practice. whether essential works will be carried out if the leaseholders are unwilling or unable to pay for the changes that are needed to be made. in the meantime, whether they have got enough money to even just keep the lights on and the lifts working
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in these high—rise buildings, which otherwise would render them completely uninhabitable. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. more than 3,600 people have been reported dead in the last 24 hours alone and there were almost 380,000 new infections. the indian government has praised what it calls an 'an outpouring of solidarity,�* after more than 40 countries pledged to send medical supplies. arunody mukharji has more details. it was too late. this woman lost her mother while standing in a queue for hours waiting for medical oxygen. the only thing that could have given her a fighting chance to beat the virus. basic facilities like access to hospital beds and oxygen cylinders have now become a luxury in india�*s capital city. translation: we have been out of our house i since two o�*clock last night.
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there is no oxygen available in all of delhi. and after a lot of running around, we finally got here at about four o�*clock. delhi is in its second week of lockdown, but in the last ten days, the city of 20 million citizens has seen over 20,000 cases every day. more than 300 have died here daily for the last week. cases are surging in other parts of the country as well. it is notjust the hospitals which are inundated. so are burial grounds. this 52—year—old has been working around the clock for days, digging graves in mumbai. experts say the number of actual deaths are much higher than what is being reported. translation: it is ramadan, but i am not able to fast. i my work is really hard and we work 24 hours every day. how can i keep my fast? it is so hot. but i need to dig graves, i need to cover them with mud, and i need to carry dead bodies. how can i fast?
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contrast these images with election bound bengal, another state in the eastern part of india. citizens on thursday braved the virus to come out to vote. many have questioned why political rallies, led by leaders across party lines, were allowed to go on for the last months, even as cases in the country continued to spike. equally jarring is the fact that until one month ago india was projecting itself as the pharmacy of the world, sending millions of free vaccine doses to countries around the globe. it is hard to imagine that its citizens here are now struggling for something as basic as finding a hospital bed. it is india that now needs help. the us has promised to send covid—19 supplies worth $100 million. countries like the uk, singapore and russia, too, have sent ventilators and oxygenators to support india�*s crumbling medical infrastructure. amidst the despair, there are also encouraging stories, like that of this 105—year—old man and his wife in maharashtra who successfully beat the virus. it is stories like these that help
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inspire an exhausted country fighting the disease hold onto hope and pray for better days ahead. police have been carrying out a forensic search of woodland in kent, after the body of a police community support officer, was found on tuesday. julia james was last seen walking her dog, and detectives are treating her death as murder. our reporter helena wilkinson is in snowdown in kent. this is an incredibly rural and very quiet part of kent, but you can see behind us a long line of police vehicles because this is now a murder investigation. just a little way from where we are is the woodland. and on the edge of that woodland is where julia james�*s body was discovered just after four o�*clock on tuesday afternoon. what we have seen are detectives carrying out fingertip searches in this area, trying to gather clues. we also heard from a neighbour who said that they last saw
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miss james some hours earlier in that afternoon. she had gone out to take her dog for a walk. detectives clearly, as well as this investigation here, they are trying to gather clues, but they want to speak to any members of the public who may have any information. the head of nhs england is to step down at the end ofjuly, the government has confirmed. sir simon stevens is currently overseeing the coronavirus vaccination roll—out for all adults in england. he had planned to leave sooner, but agreed to stay on through the winter and into this year to complete the vaccination programme. he is to be made a peer when he stands down, and he will sit as a crossbencher, according to an nhs england spokesman. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat — but dismisses concerns. leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings,
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as new fire safety rules after the grenfell tragedy, become law. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. president biden has announced huge spending plans in a speech to a joint session of congress, saying america needs a "once in a generation" investment in itself. delivered as he prepares to mark 100 days in office, he wants to spend trillions of dollars creating jobs, fixing infrastructure and improving education. but his plans face a battle in congress, with republicans opposed to higher taxes and greater state involvement in the economy. here�*s lebo diseko. applause it was an evening of historic firsts. president biden�*s first address to a joint session of congress, the first time two women flanked the president as he made that address. madam speaker, madam vice president...
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cheering no president has ever said those words from this podium, no president has ever said those words, and it�*s about time. in a chamber with numbers limited by covid, where just a few months ago insurrectionists occupied the speaker�*s chair. afterjust100 days i can report to the nation — america is on the move again. this was a bold speech, a statement of far—reaching, and, some might say, costly intent, a full—throttled endorsement of the idea of big government. two proposals which together will cost $4 trillion, taking in spending on education and paid family leave. my fellow americans, trickle down, trickle down
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economics has never worked. it�*s time to grow the economy from the bottom and the middle out. the president talked of prioritising climate change as a global ambition, of tackling the dual challenges of north korea and iran, and he had strong words for russia and for china. in my discussions with president xi i told him we welcome the competition, we�*re not looking for conflict, but i made absolutely clear that we will defend america�*s interests across the board. america is on the move again was the theme of the speech, but this is a sharply divided congress and his agenda faces challenges from the right and from the left. joe biden was dismissed by his predecessor as sleepyjoe, but tonight he set out an ambitious agenda. the big questions are, how much of this can he achieve? and how much of this can he afford?
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lebo diseko, bbc news, washington. the jailed russian opposition activist alexei navalny has made a defiant court appearance by videolink, accusing president putin of turning russians into slaves. it�*s the first time he�*s been seen since going on hunger strike. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg has more. it�*s understandable he looks gaunt and weak. i mean, he was on this hunger strike that lasted more than three weeks. the hunger strike is now over, but despite that, he was defiant in court today. he used the opportunity of appeal hearing to take a swipe at president putin. he described the kremlin leader as the emperor with no clothes. he said the crown is falling down over his ears. he claimed that president putin didn�*t care about russia and russians, and was trying to cling on to power, and he said russians were being turned into slaves. unsurprisingly, mr navalny lost his appeal.
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he had been appealing the conviction, recent conviction, for slandering a world war ii veteran. he lost that appeal, as he has lost all previous appeals in other cases. not a surprise, but, as i say, he sounded a defiant note in court today. a key court case opens next month, may the 17th. moscow prosecutors are pushing for mr navalny�*s network of regional offices and political movement to be outlawed as extremist, because they claim that it plans to upturn the constitutional order in russia through a coloured revolution. now, mr navalny�*s supporters say that is total rubbish, that this is all about stifling dissent, crushing dissent, and that the authorities are trying to gain revenge on mr navalny for his anti—corruption campaign. thousands of people who live near a landfill site in staffordshire, have complained that their physical and mental health is suffering
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because of its terrible smell. levels of hydrogen sulphide at the former quarry in newcastle—under—lyme, have twice breached recommended standards. the operator, red industries, has promised to cap part of the area by the weekend. here�*s phil mackie. this is walley�*s quarry in silverdale. it is used as a landfill site, and here�*s the problem. it�*s right next door to hundreds of homes and is giving off a terrible smell. since it was allowed to increase the amount of waste it takes, the stink has got worse and, if you�*re downwind, it�*s horrible. we obviously knew there was a landfill there when we moved in. the smell gets trapped in the house and it gets trapped in your hair and your clothing, your carpets and your cars, and your children�*s toys and all that, you all smell of landfill and it ranges from a rotten eggs sort of smell to a chemically acrid smell as well, and that�*s quite foul. today shouldn�*t be so bad because it�*s sunny and warm and that should get rid of the hydrogen sulphide smell, that creates that rotten eggs—stink bomb odour that�*s really unpleasant, but, honestly, standing
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just across the road from it at the moment, oh, it�*s really unpleasant and, actually, it�*s making me feel quite ill. people say they can�*t sleep and are feeling ill. there were more than 5,000 complaints last month and over 2,000 just last week. its noxiousness is taking its toll. it can cause nausea and shortness of breath, but there�*s been a big impact on mental health. it distracts you, it depresses you. it's the day on day, week on week attrition of living with it randomly that's really getting people down. the site�*s being closely monitored. the latest air quality report is due out later and the environment agency has told the operator it must make improvements by the end of this week. in a statement, red industries said, "as a waste management company, we recognise that we are hosted by the local communities in which we operate.
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a few miles away, it�*s made learning very difficult for children like ruby, poppy and ben. it�*s the same here in the classroom. you can�*t work and your mind�*s just a set onto the landfill. it makes me feel sick. i have headaches all the time, it puts me off my work, it puts me off my food. and then the smell will come in and, like, it won't go away. _ like, no matter how many air. fresheners you get, it won't go. it's horrible. chanting: stop the stink! hundreds joined another protest this week demanding that something�*s done to stop the silverdale stink from overpowering the whole area. phil mackie, bbc news, newcastle—under—lyme. the duke and duchess of cambridge have thanked the public for their well wishes and support on the tenth anniversary of their wedding.
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to mark the occasion, the pair have released a home video of them and their three children — george, charlotte and louis — relaxing in norfolk. a decade ago, two billion people around the world tuned in to watch prince william and catherine middleton get married at westminster abbey. releasing the family video on twitter today, the duke and duchess said "thank you to everyone for the kind messages on our wedding anniversary. we are enormously grateful for the 10 years of support we have received in our lives as a family." now it�*s time for a look at the weather with stav. hello there. today and indeed for the next two days, we are going to see a classic mixture of sunshine and april showers. and some of the showers will turn out to be heavy with some hail and some thunder in places also. other areas staying dry altogether. they will be hit and miss in nature. one thing we are also seeing is much colder arctic air spreading right across the country for the next few days. we will see a return to overnight frost in many rural areas. now, the showers will tend to fade away, a hello there.
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few continuing overnight for scotland, northeast england, that get wintry over that higher ground. but for many places, it will be dry with lengthy clear spells. these are the towns and cities�* values, you can see the blue hue indicates that frost in rural areas. so, friday starts cold and frosty, but bright. a lot of sunshine around, but as that strong sunshine gets going, then showers will develop quite widely again. some of them will be heavy with some hail and thunder, a bit of wintriness over the higher ground of scotland. some areas staying dry altogether, but these temperatures are pretty disappointing for the time of year, ranging from around 7—12 or 13 degrees in the south.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation into the funding of renovations, for his downing street flat, but dismisses concerns. leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after
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the grenfell tragedy become law. india has again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths, as it fights to contain a huge surge in the spread of coronavirus. police have been carrying out a forensic search of woodland in kent, after the body of a police community support officer, was found on tuesday. president biden has outlined a programme to transform the us economy and society after the pandemic, worth almost $4 trillion. coming up, politics from aberdeen. first the sport. good afternoon. uefa have become the latest organisation to join a social media boycott this weekend. uefa president alexander ceferin said he�*s been: "impressed with the solidarity shown by the players, clubs and stakeholders." scotland and england rugby, as well as rugby league,
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have also announced they willjoin football and other sports in the boycott. they say it is a unified stand against racism and discrimination. the "show of solidarity against online abuse" takes place between 3pm on friday and 11.59pm on monday night. ole gunnar solskjaer has admitted it would be a dream come true to finally win his first trophy as manchester united manager, having won so much as a player. they�*re in europa league semi—final action tonight against the italian side roma. it will be a dream come true the day i can lift a trophy for this club as a manager, of course. and that�*s what we are building for. we have been close, we are building step—by—step to take the next step. and our ambition this season is to finish it with lifting a trophy and being able to celebrate. i know how much that can mean for a group moving forward. well, there is still a chance there could be an all—premier league tie in the final of the europa league, because arsenal play in the other
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last four match tonight against spanish side villareal. arsenal have pierre emerick aubameyang back in contention — he�*s missed the last month of action after contracting malaria while on international duty. poppy cleall has been voted this year�*s women�*s six nations player of the championship. the england number eight is the first player to win the award voted for by the public. the red roses won the title for the third consecutive year. they face france in a friendly tomorrow. the number of adults in england classed as inactive had risen by 1.2 million, as the country was locked down for a second time in november. sport england has found that over 12 million people did less than half an hour�*s physical activity a week, compared to last year. their chief executive tim hollingsworth says more must be done to help encourage people from all backgrounds to get active. the worst element of this, in some ways, is the fact that it just confirms what we already knew, that this is not a level playing field for community sport
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and being active in people�*s lives. there are barriers to entry for certain parts of our community which the pandemic has made worse. definitely, social economic circumstance matters. young people particularly have suffered during the pandemic and i think we need to look very hard at that and why is it that our 16—24—year—old have actually been one of the least active groups over the past year. if you�*ve ever run a five—kilometre race you�*ll know that 25 minutes is a decent time and anything under the 20—minute mark is really impressive. imagine 16 minutes and 40 seconds for a 12—year—old. emer mckee is world record holderfor her age. i was trying not to put any pressure on myself and go out there and run it. and i wasjust on myself and go out there and run it. and i was just so on myself and go out there and run it. and i wasjust so happy on myself and go out there and run it. and i was just so happy that i broke it that you know ijust it. and i was just so happy that i broke it that you know i just wasn�*t expecting it. in that moment. i�*m
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not thinking about other things. that puts you in a nice kind of way just to clear my head and i really enjoy doing that.— we have into the semi—finals of the world snooker champ shin between stuart bingham and mark selby. the match is level at 4—4. it is the first to 16 team frames played over three days. that is all the sport for now. pack to you. boosterjabs against covid will be available from the autumn, after the government ordered a batch of 60 million more doses of the pfizer vaccine. ministers say the most vulnerable groups will be offered the top—up jab, but it�*s unclear when the rollout will begin.
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the health secretary, matt hancock, has received his first vaccination, with the government saying it�*s on track with its roadmap out of lockdown. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has this report which contains some flash photography. anyone who is 42 or older... it�*s fair to say he was excited. in last night�*s press conference, matt hancock mentioned a few times that his turn had come for the vaccine. and i�*m also delighted because it means i can get myjab too. and i�*m looking forward to getting myjab first thing tomorrow morning. join me and get the jab. this is my firstjab, first one. this morning he found out who was going to bejoining him. i�*ve got jvt vaccinating me. there may be some shivering, they're completely normal. professorjonathan van—tam, england�*s deputy chief medical officer, gave him the oxford astrazeneca injection, with photographers and camera crews watching the whole thing. it�*s 40—somethings now, but the government is on track to get all adults at least one injection by the end ofjuly. all done, fantastic! please remember to come back in 12 weeks. that one.
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almost 44 million people have had their first dose now and over 13.5 million have had both. and the government�*s ordered an extra 60 million doses of the pfizer biontech vaccine, not for now, but to stock up for a possible third booster dose. to future proof the vaccination programme, our task is to make sure we give as much optionality to the scientists, to the clinicians, to make the decision whether we boost in september or later this year or early next year, but we must have that ability to do that. part of that ability will be making sure we�*ve got enough of the right vaccines, and that seems to be going well. the government�*s ordered more than 500 million doses in total now, but it will also come down to logistics. this is a major commitment for the nhs, coming alongside the challenges of dealing with the backlog of care that has arisen during the pandemic. waiting lists are
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over 4 million now. and also the nhs is dealing with rising demand across all of its services. for now though, the government says we are on track to keep opening up out of lockdown, but that it needs people to keep coming forwards when it�*s their turn. catherine burns, bbc news. a week today, voters go to the polls in wales, england and scotland, where the holyrood elections will be closely watched at westminster. if pro—independence parties win a majority, they could use it to demand another referendum. but the state of the scottish economy is also a key electoral issue. let�*s go to nick eardley in aberdeen. who is going to talk politics, but you may mistake him for auditioning tojoin the natural you may mistake him for auditioning to join the natural history unit! brute to join the natural history unit! we will come to join the natural history unit! - will come back, because we have been trying to get pictures of dolphins.
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the north—east will be crucial to this scottish parliament election. it could answer some of the big questions that are being posed — can the snp win a majority which they say would give them a cast iron mandate for another independence referendum? can the conservatives beat labour into second place again? we heard from the scottish labour leader anas sarwar that he thinks his party has momentum. we will speak to the scottish tory leader in a minute. two big issues that we have been looking at up here though, independence and the covid recovery. have a listen. welcome to... a warm welcome back after a long winter lockdown. i hope you're hungry. hospitality on aberdeen�*s beach front is back up and running. enjoy your lunch. and despite a tough time recently, susie remains optimistic. we have to be positive going forward from as from now
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with the reopening of everything. but it has been a very scary time this last year for everybody in aberdeen and aberdeenshire. do you think it�*s important that politicians focus on getting the economy moving again? oh, first, yes. firstly and mostly, yes. there are green shoots here, shoppers back on union street. but aberdeen has been hit hard and local business groups want politicians to act. unemployment has been the highest in scotland. our number ofjob vacancies has fallen the most. this is a vital election, possibly the most important of our lifetimes, because i think the policy decisions that are determined now will see how we recover. we're asking for a business to be trusted by government, to be seen as part of the solution. after the challenges of the last year, economic recovery is playing a big role in the election debate. how to protectjobs and livelihoods when some of the emergency support
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schemes come to an end. but in scotland, it�*s also about independence. how strong is the economy here? would it suffer if scotland left the uk, or might the country be able to make different, perhaps better, economic decisions? aberdeen is no stranger to economic challenges. after the boom years of oil, it suffered when the price fell. that also had an impact on the economic debate around independence. and increasingly, scotland�*s energy sector is investing in renewables. sir ian wood made his money from the oil boom — more than £1 billion of it. he says it still has a role to play, but diversification will be key for the city�*s future. i think we�*re in better shape than we were. we were too dependent on oil and gas. frankly, the whole of the uk has been too dependent on oil and gas in our economy. so we�*re in a sufficient period. it�*s going to be challenging, but i�*m reasonably confident that
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we�*ll work our way through that. but i can�*t think of anywhere else in the uk better to actually make a serious go at renewables. and if you had your time again or if you were starting off now, rather, would you invest all your money in renewables? yes, i would. scotland is hosting a major climate change conference in november. world leaders trying to figure out how to make the move to green energy. that�*s one of the questions aberdeen is trying to answer right now. but after the pandemic, it�*s not the only one for the city and its politicians. so some of the questions there we have been trying to get some of the answers from the leaders this afternoon and we are joined now from the other side of scotland actually from dumfries in the south of the scotland, by the scottish tory leader, douglas ross. we heard in the piece there that aberdeen is
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moving quickly away from oil and gas towards renewables. you want to keep the oil and gas sector going, but you want to tackle climate change, which is the bigger priority? weill. which is the bigger priority? well, i launched the _ which is the bigger priority? well, i launched the scottish _ which is the bigger priority? -ii i launched the scottish conservative campaign at the start of the election in the north—east and we have had a fair dealfor election in the north—east and we have had a fair deal for the north—east manifesto launch scotland the north—east is crucial for the local and national economy. we can do both. we can have a just transition from oil and gas and the oil and gas transition deal signed by the uk deal is the first in the g7. so we can create and protect jobs and deal with the climate emergency. it is important that we do both. i emergency. it is important that we do both. ., ~' emergency. it is important that we do both. ., ~ ., ., ., do both. i would like to ask about independence. — do both. i would like to ask about independence, you _ do both. i would like to ask about independence, you have - do both. i would like to ask about independence, you have put- do both. i would like to ask about independence, you have put your| independence, you have put your opposition to a referendum front and centre and you�*re saying vote scottish conservative to stop
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another referendum. do you accept if people don�*t, if they vote for the snp, they�*re voting for another referendum and that should happen? well what people can see at this election is there a straight choice. the snp, if they were to get a majority, would take us through another independence refer referendum when we should be focussed on the recovery. or there is a try add tested method to stop that. that is to vob for the scottish conservatives, as more than half a million did five years ago. particularly on the peach ballot vote and we can stop an independence referendum and make sure our parliament focussed on jobs, supporting the nhs and rebuilding scotland. ., , ., . , ., scotland. people will notice you didn't answer _ scotland. people will notice you didn't answer the _ scotland. people will notice you didn't answer the question. i
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scotland. people will notice you didn't answer the question. the | didn�*t answer the question. the question is if people for the snp and other pro—independence party, it is not antidemocratic for boris johnson or your party to say that referendum shouldn�*t be held? iloathed referendum shouldn't be held? what we have seen — referendum shouldn't be held? what we have seen is _ referendum shouldn't be held? what we have seen is more _ referendum shouldn't be held? ii"isgt we have seen is more and referendum shouldn't be held? “iii"isgt we have seen is more and more opinion polls saying there is less support for independence and particularly people don�*t want independence and another referendum on nicola sturgeon�*s time scale. they can�*t leave that the snp would take us through the —— believe the snp would take us through that damaging argument again, when we should focus on recover y. i want to make sure the scottish parliament is creating jobs and investing in education, since our standards have dropped. i want to invest more into the nhs to support the services they provide during the pandemic and catch up with the delayed treatments. these are the priorities people want us to focus on, not
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another referendum. i people want us to focus on, not another referendum.— people want us to focus on, not another referendum. i want to ask ou a another referendum. i want to ask you a final — another referendum. i want to ask you a final question, _ another referendum. i want to ask you a final question, before i another referendum. i want to ask you a final question, before the i you a final question, before the election campaign, you said nicola sturgeon should have resigned, because you believed she had broken the rules that ministers have to follow. borisjohnson has been accused of breaking the rules he has to follow. do you accept if he has broken the rules, if one of the inquiries finds he has broken rules the prime minister should resign? well a parliamentary inquiry, a cross parliament and cross party inquiry found nicola sturgeon had misled mps and parliament and it is right there are investigations that we have to lack at the questions they�*re raising the answers that are given and the reports that come out. all right, douglas ross, thank you forjoining us. martine, i said to you earlier that we were going
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mrs foster�*s critics felt she could have defended the dup�*s core ideals more strongly. whoever takes over can't just wave a wand and you know scrap the brexit protocol and certainly some of the issues that have caused problems for certain elements within the party around
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rights around lgbt rights, around women's reproductive rights, there is a sense of the time coming in on that. an early favourite to replace her as first minister is edwin poots, who is currently in charge of agriculture in the devolved government. he has been prominent in the dup�*s opposition to the irish sea border. others being linked to the position of dup leader are two mps — sirjeffrey donaldson and gavin robinson. this is not a contest- where hundreds of people will make the decision. the choice of leader will be decided by 41 people, i all the party's mlas, - the mps and the five peers. that is the only group i of people who will make this decision. the dup�*s main partner in the power—sharing stormont executive is the irish republican party, sinn fein. it said the main priority should be making sure the coalition works. we all have a job here, politics must deliver for everybody and power—sharing must deliver for everybody. i will play my part in that, i hope that the dup
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find a partner that always willing to do the same. no one has officially declared themselves as running just yet, but whoever takes over as the leader of unionism will have a defining role in shaping its future. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. as india�*s covid crisis worsens, many in the british indian community watch helplessly, unable to help friends and family. pria rai has been speaking to one man in leicester, who is thousands of miles away from his family, who are struggling in india. kalpesh is living in the heart of leicester�*s indian community. during the festival times, even this park is full of indian people. he tells me how difficult it�*s been being away from his family in india. my brother and my mother is positive and they are in quarantine at the moment. i regularly touch base with them. immediate family members we�*ve got from my in law�*s side as well and my brother�*s in—laws as well. which is sadly, they have passed away. one of the family members, they mentioned they had been
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carrying a lot of cash in their hand, that if someone can sell the oxygen... but unfortunately, we heard that his father passed away, just a lack of oxygen. like here in leicester, british indian communities across the country have strong family and cultural links to india. now, many can only watch helplessly as their loved ones face a crisis. i am very helpless. i can�*t do anything from here. the only thing i can do is to call them and ask them how they are and how they are coping. is there anything i can help from here? and they say, no, you can�*t do anything from there. so it is sad. he gives his brother a call. hello. hi, you ok? hi. how are you feeling? i am not so well. not so well, i can hear your
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voice, it�*s not normal. yeah, i have a sore throat, i have fever. i have lost, very close, my father—in—lawjust a few days before. he had a very bad situation. meanwhile, for kalpesh in the uk, lockdown restrictions are lifting, a world away from the reality in india. your life is now as if you are coming out ofjail and those people are now getting inside the jail. they are struggling and they are not having any help from anywhere. people want to help, but unfortunately, they are not able to. and you feel sad, you feel sad about it. pria rai, bbc news. if you�*ve ever lost a pet, you�*ll knowjust how distressing that experience can be. sadly — as dog thefts have increased during the pandemic — some criminals are making it even worse for the owners by pretending to have found their missing animals, simply to extort money from them.
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one woman who fell victim to the scammers was sharon. she�*s been telling her story to ellie price. he went missing on the wednesday night and on the friday evening, two hours after i finished putting the posters up, i had a phone call from a gentleman. he said to me, i�*ve got your dog. and i�*m leaving the area tonight, so if you want him back, you�*ve got to give me £1000. if you don�*t give it to me, he�*ll go to the bait farm. when six—year—old ronnie went missing, sharon put up posters locally and online. she received around 50 calls over ten days from the same scammers, who claimed they had her dog.
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they kept demanding more. in the end she paid out almost £2,500. i would have given anything to have him back and i truly believed they had him. and although loads of people told me that they were scammers and they hadn�*t, ijust believed. and he kept promising sharon he would return ronnie. they phoned again and he just said, we haven�*t got your dog, we never had your dog, have a nice life and laughed and put the phone down. it was actually part of my pension i used. and i sort of think, well, there are times, i know it sounds really pathetic, but there are times when i think i don�*t want to carry on because i can�*t live waking up every single morning thinking about where he is. going to bed every night thinking about, is he cold, is he frightened? with people spending more time at home over several lockdowns,
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there�*s been a rise in demand for dogs. a rise in the cost of dogs, and therefore, a rise in dog thefts. we have heard from a number of people whose dogs have gone missing and a scammer calling them has used the same tactics and script as they did with sharon. talking to sharon today, her story was just unbelievable. wayne may from the dog loss website, which helps reunite owners with their lost dogs, told me he�*s in touch with 19 different police forces. as an organisation we've experienced one or two scam callers each month. over the last two weeks, we've experienced 117 calls to owners. they're thieves, they're stealing your money. they're capitalising on your grief. they're not taking into consideration at all how these people are feeling when their dogs and their pets are being stolen. and they haven�*t got the dog? they haven't got the dog, no. i'm not aware of any case at the moment where someone has paid a ransom, or they've done a direct transfer for their dogs, and the dogs have ever been returned.
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fraud specialists are looking into sharon�*s case. she says she�*s handed over the scammers�* bank details, and even a phone number. six weeks on, ronnie has still not come home. itjust made what was an awful, awfultime, losing him, just, it was like somebody had opened a wound and just kept on just digging and digging and digging. sorry. sharon talking to us. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. hello there. we are finally getting to see some classic april weather for the next few days. we are ending the month with april showers and sunny spells after cold and frosty starts. and we have seen those shower clouds bubbling up across the country through this morning. low pressure is clearing away into the near continent.
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it is allowing higher pressure to slowly build in, but there is still enough instability in the atmosphere to allow these showers to develop through the day, but what we are also pulling in is much colder air right across the board. so, we will see a return to widespread overnight frosts. so, it�*s been a chilly start this morning. through the day, it looks like it�*s going to stay bright, with sunny spells, but those shower clouds will continue to develop, with some of them turning out to be heavy with some hail and thunder, even some wintriness over the higher ground of scotland there. some areas staying dry altogether, but it will feel chilly, particularly when you factor in the breeze, which will be quite noticeable across northern and eastern areas. temperatures reaching highs of 11 and 12, maybe 13 celsius, which is pretty disappointing for the time of year. closer to single figures ,though, across the north sea coast with that onshore breeze. as we head on into this evening and overnight, the showers begin to fade away. many places will turn drier, though. some showers are likely to continue on across parts of scotland, again wintry on the higher ground, but for many it is going to be
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a dry, clear night, winds falling light, so it is going to be chilly. these are the town and city values, but you can see the blue hue there in rural areas, where we will see a fairly widespread frost. so, for friday, then, it is a repeat performance with a chilly start, cold and frosty, with some sunshine, though, but then as the temperatures begin to rise, as that strong sunshine gets going, then we will see some showers developing into the afternoon. again, some of them will be heavy, perhaps the risk of hail and thunder, and some forming bands in areas. but some areas staying dry altogether. disappointing temperatures again for the time of year, ranging from around eight to 12 or 13 celsius in the south. for much of this bank holiday weekend, it is pretty samey. it is going to start chilly with some frost around, and we will see sunshine and showers both saturday and sunday. but as we move out of sunday, into bank holiday monday, we will see a feature that we have not seen for quite a while moving off the atlantic, a deep low likely to bring some stronger winds and some wet weather across the country as we head through the course of bank holiday monday.
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this is bbc news, i�*m clive myrie. the headlines: borisjohnson insists he will comply with any investigation, into the funding of renovations for his downing street flat. but he dismisses concerns in the teeth of labour pressure. i don�*t think there�*s anything to see or to worry about, but what we are doing is focusing on the stuff that really matters. i think this is getting a bit farcical. i think the prime minister could actually deal with this very, very quickly. all he's got to do is answer a very simple question, which is who paid, initially, for the redecoration of your flat? leaseholders may still have to foot the bill to remove dangerous cladding from buildings, as new fire safety rules after
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the grenfell tragedy become law.

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