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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 29, 2021 4:00am-4:31am BST

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this is bbc news, i'm kasia madera. "america is on the move again". president biden marks one hundred days in office in a speech to both houses of the us congress. madam of the us congress. speaker, the president of the madam speaker, the president of the united states. president biden received a warm reception from democrats and republicans, before laying out an ambitious spending plan, worth trillions of dollars. thanks to the american rescue plan we are on track to cut child poverty in america in half this year. republicans responded to mr biden�*s speech, saying the president had done little to heal the divide in america. we need policies and progress
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that brings us closer together. three months in, the actions of the president and his party are pulling us further and further apart. his supporters call his $6 trillion rescue plan a bold move — his opponents say its a risk that's too high a price to pay. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. in a speech to a joint session of congress, president biden has marked his one hundred days in office with the phrase "america is on the move again". mr biden hailed as a success the massive vaccination programme. he said his administration has created a record number ofjobs and the economic rescue programme would have a profound effect on child poverty.
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thanks to the american rescue plan we are on track to cut child poverty in america in half this year. (applause) in the process, while this is all going on the economy created more than 1,300,000 new jobs in 100 days. morejobs in the first... (applause) morejobs in the more jobs in the first 100 days than any president on record. (applause).
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the international monetary fund is now estimating our economy will grow at a rate of 1.6% this year. that will be the fastest pace of economic growth in this country in nearly four decades. america is moving, moving forward, but we can't stop now. we are in competition with china and other countries to win the 21st century, we are at a great inflection point in history. we have to do more than just build history. we have to do more thanjust build back, we have to build back better. we have to build back better. we have to compete more strenuously than we have. mr biden again stressed the importance of tackling climate change, and how this was could create opportunities for americans. there is no reason american workers can't lead the world the production of electric vehicles and battery. there is
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no reason! (applause). we are the brightest, best train people in the world. the americanjobs plan will create millions of good paying jobs, jobs americans can raise their families on. and all the investments in the americanjobs plan will be guided by one principle: "buy american." (applause). that does not violate any trade agreement. it's been the law since the 30s, by american. american tax dollars are going to be used to buy american products made in america that create american jobs. thats the way it should be and it will be in administration. mr biden called for us police
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reform by the first anniversary of george floyd's death. my my fellow americans. we have to come together to rebuild trust between law enforcement and the people they serve. to root out systemic racism in our criminaljustice system. and to enact police reform in george floyd's name that passed the house already. i know the republicans have their own ideas and are engaged in productive discussions with democrats. we need to work together to find a consensus. but let's get it done next month, by the first anniversary of george floyd's death. (applause). when mr biden delivered his debut speech, history was made behind him, with two powerful women taking powerful places on the rostrum behind. thank you
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all, the rostrum behind. thank you all. madam — the rostrum behind. thank you all, madam speaker, - the rostrum behind. thank you all, madam speaker, madam l the rostrum behind. thank you i all, madam speaker, madam vice president. no president has ever said those words from this podium, no president has ever said those words, and it's about time.— said those words, and it's about time. �* ,, . about time. after the speech the republican _ about time. after the speech the republican senator- about time. after the speech the republican senator tim i the republican senator tim scott gave his party's response. we also heard about a so—called family plan, even more taxing, even more spending, to put washington even more in the middle of your life from the cradle to college. the beauty of the american dream is that families get to define it for themselves. we should be expanding opportunities and options for all families, not throwing options forall families, not throwing money at certain
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issues because democrats think they know best. republican senator tim scott giving the rebuttal to the present�*s speech. the president announced the american families plan, he said the rival nations were catching up the rival nations were catching up with the us and investment in children was necessary for america to be well prepared for the future. let's look at what the future. let's look at what the investments include. four additional years of free public education, two years of preschool for three and four —year—olds, and two years of free community college. childcare costs for children up to five years old would be capped at 7%, and free for the lowest owners. parents would get 12 weeks of paid family leave and the tax credit system would be expanded so parents receive payments for every child that they have. 0ne
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receive payments for every child that they have. one of the most radical aspects ofjoe biden�*s first 100 days in office has been his child tax credit, and my colleague went to a childcare centre in connecticut to learn more. playtime in west haven, connecticut. for over a0 years, preschool children have learned now, these kids will qualify for president biden�*s child tax credit. this woman, whose grandchildren are thriving here, says the money will help with the cost of childhood. the families has been struggling for years, and it is finally about time somebody will help them out so they can provide an adequate future for their children. it would help with some out of poverty as well. on a day—to—day basis, take a look around you. what better investment do you have than to invest in the children? quinn's motherjulianna teaches here and her children love attending the preschool. they, too, will benefit from the child tax credit. the $300 a month will help with the expense of raising
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quinn. money has been tight since her husband lost hisjob during the pandemic. it would help out a lot. in clothes and everything. just having money for clothes. for the summer, i had to take out a credit card at carter's just to get him clothes for the summer. the vice president came here in march to highlight the impact of the child tax credit and the centre director believes the extra money will take the strain off the parents. families, in order for the children to survive, they need to be happy and calm and invested in their own children and they will be able to do that and from their own relationships with the children, trusting relationships, if they don't have that outside stress. america has some of the highest rates of child poverty in the industrialised world. president biden, with his ambitious tax credit, wants to lift millions of american children out of poverty. but right now, it's only a temporary measure, so what happens after a year?
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we're going to make it permanent. evicted from her new haven home as a kid, this congresswoman has fought for the child tax credit for years. it's not a hand—out, she tells me. it's historic. for me, it's like the fdr new deal, and thinking about social security in the united states lifted 90% of seniors out of poverty and the child tax credit is transformative and it will lift millions of children and their families out of poverty. 0n capitol hill, conservative thinkers like scott winchip are sceptical about making the child tax credit permanent, fearing it will discourage people from working, and then there's the cost. there is also risk to deficits which is a bigger story underlying all of this, we are spending like drunken sailors and nobody seems to care these days, and eventually that bill will come as well. the biden administration hopes that tackling child poverty will save money
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in the long run. this huge expansion in the safety net for families is an experiment for america, and democrats would have to fight to make it permanent. laura trevelyan, bbc news, connecticut. we plan to get more analysis on president biden�*s speech, his first address to a joint session to the congress with us here, there is a lot more to come. nothing, it seemed, was too big to withstand the force of the tornado. the extent of the devastation will lead to renewed calls for government help to build better housing. internationally, there have already been protests. sweden says it received no warning of the accident. indeed, the russians at first denied anything had gone wrong. only when radioactivity levels began to increase outside russia were they forced to admit the accident.
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for the mujahideen, the mood here is of great celebration. this is the end of a 12—year war for them. they have taken the capital which they have been fighting for for so long. it was 7 o'clock in _ the morning when power began to pass from the minority- to the majority, when africa, after 300 years, reclaimed its last white colony. - this is bbc world news, our main headline: president biden has marked his 100 days in office with an address to congress. he hailed the massive vaccination programme a success and said his administration has created a record number ofjobs and an economic rescue plan to tackle child poverty. we plan to get more analysis on president biden�*s speech,
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his first address to a joint session to the congress do stay with us here, there is a lot more to come. i'm joined now by amanda renteria, democratic strategist who worked on hillary clinton's presidential campaign, she's in california. good of you to stay on because i know you been talking to katty kay at length about what was in that speech, dominated very much byjobs and education. what really stood out for you?— out for you? yes, the entire american — out for you? yes, the entire american families _ out for you? yes, the entire american families act - out for you? yes, the entire american families act really| american families act really stood out and he really did make very stark contrast in terms of what he is trying, the vision he has for america and the really wants to take care of kids and families which is quite different to what we heard in the last administration in terms of really putting corporations or wealthy tax breaks at the centre of it. it was a bit different and he really took on this idea of trickle—down economics and rejected it and said we're going to build this economy from the bottom—up and the middle out and all of these policies really focused around
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that. so it was quite a joe biden working class kind of speech that i think people have come to expect from him but not quite as bold as he was tonight in terms of saying all the different proposals only compensated way of addressing this economy.— this economy. when we look at it bein: this economy. when we look at it being described _ this economy. when we look at it being described as _ this economy. when we look at it being described as bold, - this economy. when we look at it being described as bold, as l it being described as bold, as you said, progressive, generational but also let's face it, expensive and comments are already coming through from house republican leader kevin mccarthy has said this is the most radical socialist agenda in american history. joe biden has already been targeting those who will pay for this. that is right, he will now in the next coming days have to talk about what does it mean on the other side of the ledger in terms of how are you going to pay for it. his administration and his team had actually been setting out the plan. you had a little bit of a tonight when they talked about how do we make sure that we have a tax structure that is fair. i don't
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think what we heard tonight that he is actually afraid of taking on the argument of who should pay for a moment when we need to get people back to work and make sure women and families are ok, when we really need to reinvest in our kids, both in terms of childcare schools. so i think he is ready to take this on. of course he is coming of the momentum of really being able to address the vaccinations, really being able to address what america stands for around the world. and so you did really see the sense of an energised biden ready to take on these very big proposals. but then of the day he is a guy from the senate and he is a guy from the senate and he knows the way it works, he knows you have to get votes and so we will see the path now to how do you make sure that he can actually push this vision forward. ~' ., , . can actually push this vision forward. ~ ., , ., forward. he knows that he has not a forward. he knows that he has got a small— forward. he knows that he has got a small amount _ forward. he knows that he has got a small amount of - forward. he knows that he has got a small amount of time i forward. he knows that he has got a small amount of time to | got a small amount of time to get it through. what is your thinking behind this? that is 'ust it, thinking behind this? that is just it. he — thinking behind this? that is just it. he is _ thinking behind this? that is just it, he is on _
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thinking behind this? that is just it, he is on a _ thinking behind this? that is just it, he is on a high - thinking behind this? that is just it, he is on a high rightl just it, he is on a high right now. you're seeing his favourability, he is very high, even with republicans, not in congress but certainly republicans when they do their polling are showing up and saying thank you for the vaccine, we appreciate the $1400 and | vaccine, we appreciate the $1400 and 1 think vaccine, we appreciate the $1400 and i think what now going to see is biden really going to see is biden really going out to the american people and saying we do need to getjobs back. we do need to start building our roads and bridges and frankly what we are beginning to see in america as things start opening up, people are beginning to notice, hey, wait a second maybe i don't like this road so much. can we do more for schools? he's going to be having a conversation about getting folks back to workjust as people are opening up workjust as people are opening up and are beginning to see the things that can be better with an effective, productive, competent government partnering with them. find competent government partnering with them. �* ., with them. and we look at the ima . e with them. and we look at the imaue of with them. and we look at the image of president _ with them. and we look at the image of president biden - image of president biden speaking there, we have got these, this imagery, the women behind him, it is, i got to comment on it, itjust feels historic and even he himself said that this is a first. and finally, his comment at that
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time. the imagery is very powerful. . time. the imagery is very powerful-— time. the imagery is very owerful. ., , , powerful. , that is very right. it is really — powerful. , that is very right. it is really laid _ powerful. , that is very right. it is really laid the _ powerful. , that is very right. it is really laid the stage - powerful. , that is very right. it is really laid the stage for. it is really laid the stage for all of the rest of his speech in terms of him starting off and saying it is about time. we have women behind me, it's about time women of colour had about time women of colour had a place and about time people of colour had a voice in this country but he also said it is about time to finally invest in education and finally address this climate crisis. and he uniquely can say it because he has been in leadership for so long in this country. he has seen the road to trying to change these policies for a very long time now he is president and really sees this very short window to be able do it. you're right about this urgency and intensity that he has and his administration has because everybody knows he has been through this. you have certain windows and a close and it becomes very difficult but right now he is on a and really putting out quite old policies
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to see what he can get. we heard of— to see what he can get. we heard of course _ to see what he can get. we heard of course the rebuttal and it came from republican tim scott, tell us a little bit about us who are not so familiar with him. about us who are not so familiarwith him. he about us who are not so familiar with him. he has done a lot of work in terms of overhauling the policing in the united states but for those not familiar of the senator, tell us a little bit more about him. he is very respected on his role in criminaljustice reform was not his role on policing. he spoke very candidly about his experience in terms of being pulled over. he also, what you had in his speech, is quite religious and talks about really religion at the centre of the way he thinks about policy and the way he thinks about policing, the way he leaves in the hope for this country. he is the son of a single mum and gave a shout out to single moms save anybody had a good night it was women tonight. i think we saw both sides of the aisle speak to women and mums specifically. as a mum, that certainly felt different to me. i have to say
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a lot of what we also heard from him wasn't too different from him wasn't too different from what we have normally heard in a rebuttal. we normally have heard that there wasn't enough bipartisanship here, we heard, did he really keep his promise on covid. what you found was that it was really difficult for republicans to really find what they could be against right now in terms of what biden has done. we have had a national crisis. what you have seen is biden address that with vaccinations and getting people back to work, with a really strong relief wheel and so people went back or senator scott went back to some of the rhetoric and i don't believe it landed in the way that maybe they had hoped. but it is saying something that republicans chose to have an african—american senator who really talked openly about police reform, which i give credit to the republican party for doing that. but this speech was quite short and i think thatis was quite short and i think that is because it is hard to figure out what to say badly
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aboutjoe biden at the moment. and he touched upon, this was very much a domestic, targeted at the domestic people, the american people as an audience but he did touch on international affairs and spoke about china and russia. philistine on what he said in terms of the relationship and the competition between china and the us. the competition between china and the us-_ and the us. yes he actually took that — and the us. yes he actually took that on _ and the us. yes he actually took that on quite - and the us. yes he actually took that on quite directly. | took that on quite directly. democracy versus autocracy. autocrats around the world. and he actually addressed it direct only with china and directly with russia and as everybody knows, joe biden does have a wealth of knowledge in foreign affairs. it is something that he has always linked to in his career and you had tonight about his discussions with china, his discussions with vladimir putin and he laid those out quite stark. the other thing you saw quite different from the former
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administration is that you didn't hear america first and we're going to do this alone. in fact, joe biden said exactly the opposite which is we are now renewing relationships and we are going to lead in the global sphere with allies. that was a very big difference than what you heard in the trump administration. and it wasn't by accident that he got quiet and he got steady and very serious when he was talking about our foreign affairs issues about ourforeign affairs issues in this about our foreign affairs issues in this country. and so again, ithink issues in this country. and so again, i think he had a real grasp of that and a real direction and vision for this country. it is really tough for a senator tim scott or any rebuttal here because we all know is that prompted foreign affairs quite differently than any administration in the past, democrat or republican. so i'm interested to see in the coming days we do see out of the republican party as we talk about foreign policy. he also soke about foreign policy. he also sooke about— about foreign policy. he also spoke about climate, - about foreign policy. he also spoke about climate, let's i about foreign policy. he also i spoke about climate, let's have a little listen to what he said on that aspect.— on that aspect. the climate crisis is not _ on that aspect. the climate crisis is not our _ on that aspect. the climate crisis is not our fight - on that aspect. the climate crisis is not our fight alone | crisis is not our fight alone but — crisis is not our fight alone but a — crisis is not our fight alone but a global fight. united states_ but a global fight. united states accounts for less than
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50% — states accounts for less than 50% of — states accounts for less than 50% of carbon emissions. the rest _ 50% of carbon emissions. the rest of— 50% of carbon emissions. the rest of the _ 50% of carbon emissions. the rest of the world accounts for 85% — rest of the world accounts for 85% -- — rest of the world accounts for 85% —— less than 5% of carbon emissions _ 85% —— less than 5% of carbon emissions. that's why i kept our— emissions. that's why i kept our acute _ emissions. that's why i kept our acute measurements to rejoin— our acute measurements to rejoin the paris accord because even _ rejoin the paris accord because even if— rejoin the paris accord because even if we _ rejoin the paris accord because even if we do everything perfectly, is not going to matteh _ perfectly, is not going to matter. i may commit to convene a climate _ matter. i may commit to convene a climate summit right here in america _ a climate summit right here in america. of all the major economies of the world. china, russia, — economies of the world. china, russia, india, the european union _ russia, india, the european uniou i_ russia, india, the european union. i said i would do it in my first _ union. i said i would do it in my first hundred days also i want — my first hundred days also i want to _ my first hundred days also i want to be very blunt about it. i had, my attempt was to make sure _ i had, my attempt was to make sure that — i had, my attempt was to make sure that the world could see that — sure that the world could see that there was a consensus, that— that there was a consensus, that we _ that there was a consensus, that we are at inflection point in history _ that we are at inflection point in history. the consensus is if we act — in history. the consensus is if we act to— in history. the consensus is if we act to save the planet, we can create _ we act to save the planet, we can create millions ofjobs and economic— can create millions ofjobs and economic growth and opportunity to raise _ economic growth and opportunity to raise the standard of living of almost everyone around the world — of almost everyone around the world. so _ of almost everyone around the world. , . , world. so very much pulling when it comes _ world. so very much pulling when it comes to _ world. so very much pulling when it comes to climate, l when it comes to climate,
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talking aboutjobs but also, let's face it, a complete difference to the previous administration with its relationship to climate change. that is right and he has kept that from the very beginning. it is one of the things that he said very early on, i will get there, i will make sure that we are back in a leadership position working with allies again and we saw him do that. the most important thing he said here in america though was the wonder word we keep leaving out of climate which is jobs because that has always been the barrier moving forward on a climate deal and so i think is added three times to make the points and what you saw in the discussions thereafter was everybody really following suit and recognising that it really can create jobs. and recognising that it really can createjobs. i think and recognising that it really can create jobs. i think what has happened from the 0bama administration to now is that 0bama put a lot of effort into alternative energies. we have seen solar really expand on
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this country and people have seen jobs from its so he this country and people have seenjobs from its so he really does have some belief and truth and trust to lean into when he says those kinds of things today which is very different today which is very different to when we were in the 0bama administration and of course quite different to the trump administration. amanda - renteria, thank you so much for staying on and talking to us. really good to get your analysis as well. i know it has been a long evening. we are going to cross over to ron christie, republican political analyst and former adviser to president george w bush. your thoughts, let's get them. my your thoughts, let's get them. my thoughts are many here. i think the president had a very, very important task that he needed to do tonight which was to shore up his democratic base, to say we are going to go big. we want to go as big as fdr and try to find a way to p"°p up fdr and try to find a way to prop up the american economy and really get america back on track. he also had a very big task tonight of looking at the republicans, those who sit on the opposite side of the political aisle and saying i am
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with you, i hear you, i know that you don't always agree with what i have said and what i'm trying to do but i need you. and i think he struck a conciliatory tone but my question moving forward is this, for the next hundred days, will republicans and democrats agree to the high level of spending programs that he seeks to sign into law? and number two, he seeks to sign into law? and numbertwo, can he he seeks to sign into law? and number two, can he find a way ina very number two, can he find a way in a very bipartisan fashion in order to do so. very vexing and very important questions moving forward. ., , forward. ron christie, republican _ forward. ron christie, republican political. forward. ron christie, - republican political analyst and former advisor to president george w bush. always good to get your clarity and analysis on that speech. thank you for staying on as well. like i said, lots more on our website and a fuller analysis as well of the president's speech. that first historic speech, that imagery that will be repeated no doubt and shown across various broadcasts. thank you so much for being with me here on bbc world news.
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you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ bbckasiamadera. see you soon. hello there. it took till the end of the month before they started to make an appearance, but april showers feature quite heavily in the forecast through the rest of this week and into the weekend. and don't expect things to warm up as we see april out and go into may. it is going to be on the chilly side. area of low pressure with this weather front, which brought rain to end wednesday across southern counties. continues to push away eastwards, opening the door to north to north—easterly winds for all, all the way from the arctic. the blue colours indicating that cold air in place, and once again this morning, a fairly widespread frost away from the towns and city centres. that makes it every day in april so far, somewhere in the uk has seen a frost. lovely bright start, though, for many. 1—2 early showers, wales and the southwest, but the bulk of the showers will be north—east england, eastern scotland,
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northern ireland. some of these could be heavy with hail and thunder. just watch how they develop through the day — become a bit more widespread, pushing a bit further southwards. now, it is going to be a day where some of you stay completely dry. southern counties, maybe along some eastern coasts, too, but all will be in that north to northeasterly airflow for all. temperatures will be down on where we should be. should be around 12 in aberdeen, just eight. should be 15 in london, just 12, as we go through the second half of the day. now, into the evening and through thursday night into friday, we will see clear skies return once again. a few showers to continue through the night, but another frosty night to see the last morning of the month. just about anywhere again away from towns and city centres. could have a bit of ice, too. we've seen some overnight showers and, like thursday, showers will start to develop, becoming heavy with hail and thunder. more, though, compared with thursday across parts of wales, central and southern england, particularly southernmost counties, and it will still stay chilly even though the breeze is not desperately strong. and that breeze becomes even less of a feature as we go through friday night into saturday. notice how the isobars aligned, opening out, fairly light winds across the uk, and that does
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mean as the showers develop through the day after a sunny — in places, frosty — start, where you do catch some, they will be slow moving. most prone towards the south and southwest of the uk, western scotland and northern ireland. temperatures still down on where we should be for the time of year. fewer showers potentially on sunday, butjust watch what happens as we head into a bank holiday monday. deep area of low pressure pushes its way towards us, could be bringing, after a bright start, some heavy rain and strong winds. we'll keep you updated.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: in a speech to a joint session of congress, president biden has marked his one hundred days in office with the phrase "america is on the move again". mr biden hailed as a success the massive vaccination programme and said his administration has created a record number of jobs. just 200 people heard the president who remarked that he was the first to speak before a female vice president and speaker. he took time to woo the republicans in his audience, expressing the need to have bipartisan cooperation if the united states was able to compete with autocrats around the world. he said his administration had created a record number ofjobs. record number of jobs. republicans responded record number ofjobs. republicans responded to mr biden�*s speech saying the president had done little to heal the divide in america. to senator tim scott said he plans would hurt long—term economic growth. —— republican senator.

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