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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  April 28, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — biden goes big. the president will address a joint session of congress tonight, laying out an ambitious plan forfamilies which could reshape america's economy. the ideas are bold — and very expensive, more childcare, more free education — republicans say it's government overreach. president biden will call for universal pre school education and paid family leave, which the wealthiest americans will pay for in higher taxes... the republican response comes right after. federal investigators have raided the home of former trump lawyer rudy giuliani. they're looking into his dealings in ukraine. also in the programme...
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counting the cost of coronavirus, more than 200 thousand people have died from covid—19 in india — but experts say the real total is much higher. and, if a picture is worth a thousand words, what's a smirk like that worth? more than you might think, in this nft world of ours. hello i'm laura trevelyan in washington, christian fraser is in london. presidentjoe biden wants to dramatically expand the role of the government in the us economy, and tonight he'll present to congress his american families plan. it will be a muted affair due to coronavirus, with only 200 people actually in the chamber. aides to mr biden say he's rising to the challenge of this moment, when the pandemic has laid bare how families are struggling with child care and the lack of paid family leave.
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if passed by congress — the proposal would represent the single biggest attempt since the 1960s to expand government support for working families in the united states. the american families plan would cost taxpayers $1.8 trillion — although the white house says it will eventually pay for itself by boosting the economy and tax receipts, it's split in two basic parts. more than half of it will go to financing brand new federal programmes, and the remaining 800 billion would go towards tax credits for the middle class. the new provisions include subsidised nursery care, two free years of community college, child care costs for working parents and the introduction of a national paid leave programme — equivalent to parental leave here in the uk. if you add this $1.8 trillion plan to the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill which congress already passed — and then tack
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on the the 2.3 trillion dollar americanjobs plan — that's a staggering six trillion dollars that president biden wants to spend. republicans are asking how america can possibly justify spending this much. jon sopel is our north america editor and joins us now. is editor and joins us now. this president biden trying the is this president biden trying to be the president roosevelt of the 21st—century with this massive expansion of the government safety net? is expansion of the government safety net? , , . ., , , expansion of the government safety net? , ., , , 1 net? is this a new deal, is this lbj is war on poverty? _ net? is this a new deal, is this lbj is war on poverty? what _ net? is this a new deal, is this lbj is war on poverty? what it - net? is this a new deal, is this lbj is war on poverty? what it is - net? is this a new deal, is this lbj is war on poverty? what it is is - net? is this a new deal, is this lbj is war on poverty? what it is is it | is war on poverty? what it is is it looks_ is war on poverty? what it is is it looks more — is war on poverty? what it is is it looks more european than anything we've _ looks more european than anything we've been— looks more european than anything we've been used to. from an american president _ we've been used to. from an american president. these past few decades the dominant economic idea in politics— the dominant economic idea in politics for the past for two years has been — politics for the past for two years has been monetarism. reaganomics in the us, _ has been monetarism. reaganomics in the us, thatcherism in the uk that you've _ the us, thatcherism in the uk that you've got — the us, thatcherism in the uk that you've got to balance the budget, you've got to balance the budget, you can't— you've got to balance the budget, you can't tax you highly, you've got to deregulate the economy. here you've _ to deregulate the economy. here you've got — to deregulate the economy. here you've got to abide going in the
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opposite — you've got to abide going in the opposite direction. and so how can i put this_ opposite direction. and so how can i put this delicately? joe biden may be a bit _ put this delicately? joe biden may be a bit boring but the presidency is not _ be a bit boring but the presidency is not uninteresting. and i think that there — is not uninteresting. and i think that there are some real serious ambition— that there are some real serious ambition here at i think it's a really— ambition here at i think it's a really interesting battle that's gonna — really interesting battle that's gonna take place. an ideological battle _ gonna take place. an ideological battle of— gonna take place. an ideological battle of a big tax, big government, bil battle of a big tax, big government, big welfare spending which is america _ big welfare spending which is america has sought to avoid over the past 40 _ america has sought to avoid over the past 40 years. which republicans who will no _ past 40 years. which republicans who will no doubt say this is government overreach _ will no doubt say this is government overreach. and this isn't so much civil engineering when you're looking — civil engineering when you're looking at the roads and bridges, it's more — looking at the roads and bridges, it's more social engineering and this inequality agenda and giving people _ this inequality agenda and giving people far greater welfare handouts. let's people far greater welfare handouts. let'sjust_ people far greater welfare handouts. let's just show people the numbers. we are at 100 days. so 100 days by the numbers. just comparing with some of his predecessors. here is the number of executive orders 41 versus 30 that truck past this mark. will change to formal press conferences. he is only given to which he has been criticised for. donald trump i give a nine by this
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point in his presidency. press interviews again, he's only done six compared to the 35 donald trump gave it up but this is a really important one, that's his approval rating. 58%. this is the new cbs poll out today. 58% approval rating. we said this week is one of the lowest at this week is one of the lowest at this stage for the only gerald ford and donald trump or lower. but when you split that down, you look across party lines, barely10% you split that down, you look across party lines, barely 10% of republicans think he's doing a good job. and that in a way demonstrates the sort of polarised politics we have in the united states at the moment. with the family plan is not can help. moment. with the family plan is not can hel. ., ., ., , can help. yeah. the polarisation is very much — can help. yeah. the polarisation is very much there. _ can help. yeah. the polarisation is very much there. so _ can help. yeah. the polarisation is very much there. so you _ can help. yeah. the polarisation is very much there. so you ask- very much there. so you ask americahs_ very much there. so you ask americans do you like getting a $1400 — americans do you like getting a $1400 check into your bank account from the _ $1400 check into your bank account from the government? and they say yes. from the government? and they say yes and _ from the government? and they say yes. and they and they also say do you think— yes. and they and they also say do you think the government waste of money? _ you think the government waste of money? they say yes. so that's kind
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of one _ money? they say yes. so that's kind of one of— money? they say yes. so that's kind of one of the — money? they say yes. so that's kind of one of the complicated things attout— of one of the complicated things about polling in the details you -ot. about polling in the details you got i_ about polling in the details you got iwas_ about polling in the details you got. i was also struck by the numbers _ got. i was also struck by the numbers. the huge approval numbers from democrats and the appalling approval— from democrats and the appalling approval numbers from republicans show how— approval numbers from republicans show how split it is. but quite good approval— show how split it is. but quite good approval numbers if you look at independence. and that is where elections — independence. and that is where elections are won. it's not the diehards — elections are won. it's not the diehards on one side of the other, they're _ diehards on one side of the other, they're not— diehards on one side of the other, they're not going to switch sides. it is they're not going to switch sides. it is in _ they're not going to switch sides. it is in the — they're not going to switch sides. it is in the middle that elections are won — it is in the middle that elections are won. and biden is still reaching out are _ are won. and biden is still reaching out are trying to reach out to that grouo _ out are trying to reach out to that grouo i_ out are trying to reach out to that group. i think we all may be, we are under— group. i think we all may be, we are under misapprehension that joe group. i think we all may be, we are under misapprehension thatjoe biden would _ under misapprehension thatjoe biden would be _ under misapprehension thatjoe biden would be there keeping the seat warm for whoever _ would be there keeping the seat warm for whoever runs in 2024. whether it be a republican or another democrat and wouldn't do much in the interim apart— and wouldn't do much in the interim apart from _ and wouldn't do much in the interim apart from lower the political temperature. but he is using that pandemic— temperature. but he is using that pandemic and the crisis of the pandemic— pandemic and the crisis of the pandemic as the kind of opportunity
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for him _ pandemic as the kind of opportunity for him to— pandemic as the kind of opportunity for him to do some pretty radical things— for him to do some pretty radical things that i think even the progressives in the democratic party are going _ progressives in the democratic party are going "wow, i hadn't expected that" _ are going "wow, i hadn't expected that" not"~ — are going "wow, i hadn't expected that" not'-— that." not". john, if we turn to the revious that." not". john, if we turn to the previous president _ that." not". john, if we turn to the previous president pretty - previous president pretty spectacular scenes today for the apartment and the office of rudy giuliani, president terms personal attorney was searched by federal investigators today for top here in the united states to get a search where you need to persuade a judge that you have reason to want to search someone's apartment for what is behind this startling development?- is behind this startling development? is behind this startling develoment? �* , ., , development? it's not the first time that it's happened _ development? it's not the first time that it's happened to _ development? it's not the first time that it's happened to donald - development? it's not the first time that it's happened to donald trumps personal— that it's happened to donald trumps personal lawyer. it happened michael cowan— personal lawyer. it happened michael cowan early on in the trunk presidency. so in that sense we've been _ presidency. so in that sense we've been here — presidency. so in that sense we've been here before. what i think is so intriguing _ been here before. what i think is so intriguing about this is that it all relates— intriguing about this is that it all relates to — intriguing about this is that it all relates to the whole ukraine investigation. where donald trump was seeking to get dirt on hunter biden— was seeking to get dirt on hunter biden then a director of the gas company— biden then a director of the gas company in ukraine. and what they
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are doing _ company in ukraine. and what they are doing is — company in ukraine. and what they are doing is they've confiscated rudy _ are doing is they've confiscated rudy giuliani is a mobile devices in his electronic devices because they want to— his electronic devices because they want to see what rudy giuliani was up want to see what rudy giuliani was up to— want to see what rudy giuliani was up to and _ want to see what rudy giuliani was up to and trying to get the intel on hunter— up to and trying to get the intel on hunter biden. but also they are investigating as well the ground of the us— investigating as well the ground of the us ambassador and whether something untoward happened there. 0k, something untoward happened there. ok. it's _ something untoward happened there. ok, it's rudy giuliani at the moment but 0k, it's rudy giuliani at the moment but then— ok, it's rudy giuliani at the moment but then you are only one wing away from the _ but then you are only one wing away from the president himself. the fornter— from the president himself. the former president himself. and that makes _ former president himself. and that makes it— former president himself. and that makes it a — former president himself. and that makes it a significant move. because this would _ makes it a significant move. because this would not have happened during a trunrb _ this would not have happened during a trump administration where there was a _ a trump administration where there was a kind _ a trump administration where there was a kind of tight rule over at the justice _ was a kind of tight rule over at the justice department about what they would _ justice department about what they would and wouldn't sanction. they have _ would and wouldn't sanction. they have sanctioned this. rudy giuliani is home _ have sanctioned this. rudy giuliani is home has— have sanctioned this. rudy giuliani is home has been rated, i would imagine — is home has been rated, i would imagine donald trump and mara lago is seething _
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imagine donald trump and mara lago is seethinu. ,., thank you so much forjoining us. many of the provisions proposed by the white house would bring the us's social safety net into line with european countries. like in the uk — where many of these programmes already exist. we've had free nursery care for twenty years, paid leave for new parents since 1975, as well as more generous child tax credits, and a top income tax rate closer to 40%. let's bring in republican congressman mike mccaul — who represents texas's 10th district and is ranking member of the house foreign affairs committee. it's a great pleasure to have you on the programme thanks for sparing us a time. i went back and had a look today atjust how effective that tony blair plan was. when he was prime minister he enters in the uk and it led to an increase in the uk and it led to an increase in the uk and it led to an increase in the employment rate for mums of 3%. so it's notjust about providing
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a level playing field, it's about allowing parents to return to their jobs, getting mums back to work and thatis jobs, getting mums back to work and that is a good thing for the economy, is in a? i that is a good thing for the economy, is in a?- that is a good thing for the economy, is in a? that is a good thing for the econom , is in a? ., ~' economy, is in a? i do think when it comes to childcare, _ economy, is in a? i do think when it comes to childcare, it's _ economy, is in a? i do think when it comes to childcare, it's a _ economy, is in a? i do think when it comes to childcare, it's a very - comes to childcare, it's a very popular— comes to childcare, it's a very popular issue if you pulled out. i think— popular issue if you pulled out. i think we — popular issue if you pulled out. i think we don't know all the details of his— think we don't know all the details of his announcement tonight. i've seen _ of his announcement tonight. i've seen the — of his announcement tonight. i've seen the president at the inauguration has seen to talk about unification — inauguration has seen to talk about unification of the country and bring both parties together. you know, the covid _ both parties together. you know, the covid bill— both parties together. you know, the covid bill passed, 2 trillion was very— covid bill passed, 2 trillion was very partisan for top that was unfortunate. we have an opportunity for an— unfortunate. we have an opportunity for an infrastructure bill that both republicans and democrats support. increase _ republicans and democrats support. increase funding for infrastructure. increase funding for infrastructure. i hope _ increase funding for infrastructure. i hope he _ increase funding for infrastructure. i hope he goes down that path but i'm worried he's going to choose the partisan _ i'm worried he's going to choose the partisan pathway again. and then onto his — partisan pathway again. and then onto his final issue when it comes to health — onto his final issue when it comes to health care and education and free health care and education, it will come — free health care and education, it will come at the cost of a massive tax increase —
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will come at the cost of a massive tax increase that i think you will see members on my side of the aisle, after we _ see members on my side of the aisle, after we pass— see members on my side of the aisle, after we pass the tax cut and jobs we had _ after we pass the tax cut and jobs we had incredible growth and job growth _ we had incredible growth and job growth in — we had incredible growth and job growth in this country. we believe in a pandemic economy that this is not the _ in a pandemic economy that this is not the right time to be doing that. if not the right time to be doing that. if you _ not the right time to be doing that. if you total— not the right time to be doing that. if you total up all three of these you are — if you total up all three of these you are talking about $6 trillion. that is— you are talking about $6 trillion. that is bigger than the gdp is every country— that is bigger than the gdp is every country in _ that is bigger than the gdp is every country in the world. with the exception _ country in the world. with the exception of china and the united states— exception of china and the united states was a there is no getting away— states was a there is no getting away from that. it states was a there is no getting away from that.— away from that. it is an eye watering — away from that. it is an eye watering amount. - away from that. it is an eye watering amount. i- away from that. it is an eye watering amount. i sort - away from that. it is an eye watering amount. i sort of. away from that. it is an eye i watering amount. i sort of feel you're walking a tight path here. i want to play you a clip from cpap just a couple of months ago. here is senator ted cruz defining what the republican party is today. have a listen. the republican party is the party of steelworkers and constructionj workers and pipeline workers and taxi cab drivers and cops| and firefighters and waiters _ and waitresses and the men and women with calluses on their hands - who are working for the country! that is our party!
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congressman, i'm looking at the list here, can you oppose childcare for working parents, free community college, national parental leave programmes and still claim to be the party of blue—collar worker? weill. programmes and still claim to be the party of blue-collar worker?- party of blue-collar worker? well, i won't scream _ party of blue-collar worker? well, i won't scream as _ party of blue-collar worker? well, i won't scream as loud _ party of blue-collar worker? well, i won't scream as loud as _ party of blue-collar worker? well, i won't scream as loud as senator- party of blue-collar worker? well, i l won't scream as loud as senator cruz did. won't scream as loud as senator cruz did i_ won't scream as loud as senator cruz did~ iwill— won't scream as loud as senator cruz did~ iwillsay— won't scream as loud as senator cruz did. i will say i do think this is the trump _ did. i will say i do think this is the trump legacy. there are all sorts— the trump legacy. there are all sorts of— the trump legacy. there are all sorts of personality issues, obviously. what he was able to do is what reagan did with our party. that is reach _ what reagan did with our party. that is reach out — what reagan did with our party. that is reach out to the american working man and _ is reach out to the american working man and woman. and he did it pretty effectively _ man and woman. and he did it pretty effectively i— man and woman. and he did it pretty effectively. i think the keystone pipe loan — effectively. i think the keystone pipe loan delete like pipeline reversal— pipe loan delete like pipeline reversal hit a lot of welders and blue—collar workers in my state and across _ blue—collar workers in my state and across the _ blue—collar workers in my state and across the united states was a i think. _ across the united states was a i think. you — across the united states was a i think, you raise a good point and i think— think, you raise a good point and i think both — think, you raise a good point and i think both parties are vying for that market share of the voters. and that market share of the voters. and that is— that market share of the voters. and that is the _ that market share of the voters. and that is the blue—collar working man and woman — that is the blue—collar working man and woman. i know nothing is free in
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this country — and woman. i know nothing is free in this country. and a chicken in every pot isn't _ this country. and a chicken in every pot isn't doing that as old in politics— pot isn't doing that as old in politics is— pot isn't doing that as old in politics is the beginning of my country— politics is the beginning of my country and the nation. but it does come _ country and the nation. but it does come at _ country and the nation. but it does come at a — country and the nation. but it does come at a price. and it will come at the price _ come at a price. and it will come at the price of— come at a price. and it will come at the price of higher tax rates on businesses and capital gain tax increases — businesses and capital gain tax increases and individual tax increases. that will have an effect ithink— increases. that will have an effect i think on— increases. that will have an effect i think on all americans. and it will have — i think on all americans. and it will have a _ i think on all americans. and it will have a negative effect on the economy— will have a negative effect on the economy again at a time when i think we can— economy again at a time when i think we can at— economy again at a time when i think we can at least look least afford it. ~ , ., ., ~ ., we can at least look least afford it. when you take the lead on china and president _ it. when you take the lead on china and president his _ it. when you take the lead on china and president his argument - it. when you take the lead on china and president his argument tonight| and president his argument tonight that these are necessary to make it competitive with china. bare that these are necessary to make it competitive with china.— competitive with china. are you bu in: competitive with china. are you buying that? — competitive with china. are you buying that? l _ competitive with china. are you buying that? i think _ competitive with china. are you buying that? i think we - competitive with china. are you buying that? i think we need i competitive with china. are you buying that? i think we need in | buying that? i think we need in educated — buying that? i think we need in educated society. i think the question— educated society. i think the question is, how far you get to go with that — question is, how far you get to go with that is, — question is, how far you get to go with that is, how much is good to be free, _ with that is, how much is good to be free, what— with that is, how much is good to be free, what are the taxes look like?
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we don't _ free, what are the taxes look like? we don't have all those details. we have to _ we don't have all those details. we have to be — we don't have all those details. we have to be competitive with china. they are _ have to be competitive with china. they are our — have to be competitive with china. they are our long—term greatest national— they are our long—term greatest national security threat. the chinese _ national security threat. the chinese economies already invested $1trillion— chinese economies already invested $1 trillion in their digital economy. this is artificial intelligence, this is quantum computing, 56 versus whol way. i had a panel— computing, 56 versus whol way. i had a panel presentation at our retreat in orlando — a panel presentation at our retreat in orlando on this whole issue. we have _ in orlando on this whole issue. we have to _ in orlando on this whole issue. we have to wake up. i chairmanjust had a discussion— have to wake up. i chairmanjust had a discussion withjerry have to wake up. i chairmanjust had a discussion with jerry clinton and condoleezza rice. it was interesting how much— condoleezza rice. it was interesting how much in agreement they were on this particular issue. that people have _ this particular issue. that people have now— this particular issue. that people have now woken up to this through covid _ have now woken up to this through covid and — have now woken up to this through covid and we try to win them over in the family— covid and we try to win them over in the family of— covid and we try to win them over in the family of nations. and it didn't work _ the family of nations. and it didn't work and — the family of nations. and it didn't work. and they gave quite a morning to congress— work. and they gave quite a morning to congress today that we need to go into this _ to congress today that we need to go into this challenge eyes wide open. similar— into this challenge eyes wide open.
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similar debate on this side of the atlantic as well. congressman, good to have you with us on the program. have you got a ticket for the show tonight, are you going? i do have you got a ticket for the show tonight, are you going?— have you got a ticket for the show tonight, are you going? i do have a ticket. it tonight, are you going? i do have a ticket- it can _ tonight, are you going? i do have a ticket. it can be _ tonight, are you going? i do have a ticket. it can be different. - tonight, are you going? i do have a ticket. it can be different. usually i ticket. it can be different. usually the theatrics of standing up and sitting _ the theatrics of standing up and sitting down, this will be probably the most — sitting down, this will be probably the most unique one i've ever attended _ the most unique one i've ever attended-— the most unique one i've ever attended. ~ , ., ., ., ., attended. well, you are one of the select few- — attended. well, you are one of the select few. we _ attended. well, you are one of the select few. we look _ attended. well, you are one of the select few. we look forward - attended. well, you are one of the select few. we look forward to - select few. we look forward to speaking to you soon. india — a country of nearly 1.4—billion people, is caught in a deadly surge of the coronavirus. more than two hundred thousand people are now confirmed dead, but the real total is thought to be much higher. on average, in the past week more than 340 thousand cases many experts fear
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the true crisis is much worse. in the true crisis is much worse. in the past more than 340,000 year thing that cases have been reported each day for top what is the situation there tonight?— there tonight? well, it's been a difficult situation _ there tonight? well, it's been a difficult situation here - there tonight? well, it's been a difficult situation here for- there tonight? well, it's been a difficult situation here for the l difficult situation here for the past — difficult situation here for the past week. what we've seen outside hospitals _ past week. what we've seen outside hospitals is — past week. what we've seen outside hospitals is people bringing their families, — hospitals is people bringing their families, sometimes if there is ambulance in the back of cars and 0ort _ ambulance in the back of cars and oort rickshaws. really pleading for any kind _ oort rickshaws. really pleading for any kind of help. it's notjust a short— any kind of help. it's notjust a short of— any kind of help. it's notjust a short of hospitals it's also been an acute _ short of hospitals it's also been an acute shortage of oxygen supplies. we've _ acute shortage of oxygen supplies. we've been to hospitals where doctors — we've been to hospitals where doctors have told us that every day they reach — doctors have told us that every day they reach a point where they only have a _ they reach a point where they only have a few — they reach a point where they only have a few hours of oxygen slab. they— have a few hours of oxygen slab. they are — have a few hours of oxygen slab. they are worried about thousands of lives in _ they are worried about thousands of lives in their— they are worried about thousands of lives in their hospitals hang in the balance — lives in their hospitals hang in the balance. they say they're getting assurances from the government but no regular— assurances from the government but no regular oxygen supplies. and everywhere we've been going increasingly over the past few days
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we've _ increasingly over the past few days we've been seeing a lot of anger against — we've been seeing a lot of anger against the government. people asking, — against the government. people asking, "where are they, where other ministers, _ asking, "where are they, where other ministers, why are they helping us out, why— ministers, why are they helping us out, why aren't we getting something as basic— out, why aren't we getting something as basic as— out, why aren't we getting something as basic as oxygen that could save the lives _ as basic as oxygen that could save the lives of— as basic as oxygen that could save the lives of our loved ones? quote. so many— the lives of our loved ones? quote. so many harrowing stories are being shared on social media. people even monitoring live there oxygen levels going down. it sounds like such a fraught and difficult situation. well, it's hard to imagine that this is happening. india's capital city. it is happening. india's capital city. it has _ is happening. india's capital city. it has among the most best health care in— it has among the most best health care in the — it has among the most best health care in the country for that what we know _ care in the country for that what we know is— care in the country for that what we know is that — care in the country for that what we know is that a sharp surge in cases is being _ know is that a sharp surge in cases is being reported from many other parts _ is being reported from many other parts of— is being reported from many other parts of india. some of which have poor health — parts of india. some of which have poor health care facilities. somewhere you might have to travel miles— somewhere you might have to travel miles to _ somewhere you might have to travel miles to get to the nearest hospitals when the hospital can often _ hospitals when the hospital can often be — hospitals when the hospital can often be just a building with beds but no _ often be just a building with beds but no real equipment or enough staff to _ but no real equipment or enough staff to take care of people. it is
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even _ staff to take care of people. it is even more — staff to take care of people. it is even more difficult outside of the city. even more difficult outside of the city i_ even more difficult outside of the city. i think the, what's really scary— city. i think the, what's really scary people is, no one knows when this sort— scary people is, no one knows when this sort of— scary people is, no one knows when this sort of peak will actually come — this sort of peak will actually come. because we are seeing even at this point— come. because we are seeing even at this point worrying surge is being reported — this point worrying surge is being reported from many other parts of injury _ reported from many other parts of injury. when you point out that her criticism _ injury. when you point out that her criticism of— injury. when you point out that her criticism of the government, there's been _ criticism of the government, there's been a _ criticism of the government, there's been a lot— criticism of the government, there's been a lot of focus the —— india. the _ been a lot of focus the —— india. the hindu — been a lot of focus the —— india. the hindu festivals that have continued. is there now a recognition within governments that they've got to start isolating people better than they have? i people better than they have? i think over the past week we've suddenly— think over the past week we've suddenly seen them try to curtail mass _ suddenly seen them try to curtail mass gatherings, trying to curtail election— mass gatherings, trying to curtail election rallies. i think the question— election rallies. i think the question most people are asking is why did _ question most people are asking is why did they let it go on for that long? _ why did they let it go on for that long? as— why did they let it go on for that long? as early as the first week of
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march _ long? as early as the first week of march you — long? as early as the first week of march you were seeing surges in some districts— march you were seeing surges in some districts in— march you were seeing surges in some districts in the country. that's when — districts in the country. that's when you _ districts in the country. that's when you had the health minister make _ when you had the health minister make a _ when you had the health minister make a statement that the coronavirus pandemic was in its endgame — coronavirus pandemic was in its endgame in india. and it's that kind of messaging, that kind of complacency which started in the leadership. it trickled down to the ordinary— leadership. it trickled down to the ordinary indians. and then you had people _ ordinary indians. and then you had people not— ordinary indians. and then you had people not following covid protocols. you had people participating in weddings and other mass _ participating in weddings and other mass events. you had religious festivals — mass events. you had religious festivals taking place with thousands of people gathering and one location. and actual rallies as you pointed out. —— election. at the same _ you pointed out. —— election. at the same time — you pointed out. —— election. at the same time no — you pointed out. —— election. at the same time no preparations were being made _ same time no preparations were being made a _ same time no preparations were being made. a possible second surge. even though— made. a possible second surge. even though we _ made. a possible second surge. even though we saw all over the world that in— though we saw all over the world that in many countries were hit by a second _ that in many countries were hit by a second more — that in many countries were hit by a second more deadly wave of the coronavirus why field hospitals
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built _ coronavirus why field hospitals built during the first wave actually dismantled? why did the government almost _ dismantled? why did the government almost a _ dismantled? why did the government almost a clear victory over the pandemic?— almost a clear victory over the pandemic? almost a clear victory over the andemic? ~ ., ., ., , ., pandemic? we do apologise for the auali of pandemic? we do apologise for the quality of the _ pandemic? we do apologise for the quality of the sound. _ pandemic? we do apologise for the quality of the sound. reporting - from the heart of india's pandemic. for those watching on bbc world news — we'll be right back. arlene foster is to stand down as leader of the democratic unionist party and as the first minister of northern ireland. mrs foster was facing an internal revolt, after a letter of no confidence in her leadership was signed by around 80% of the dup�*s senior elected representatives. she said she had been incredibly humbled to have the opportunity to lead the dup and had sought to lead northern ireland away from division and towards a better path. there are people in northern ireland with british identity. others are irish, others
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aren't northern irish, others are a mixture of all three and some are new and emerging. we must all learn to be generous to each other, ——are to live together and to share this wonderful country. the future of unionism and northern ireland will not be found in division. it will only be found in sharing this place we are all privileged to call home. the independent watchdog that regulates political finance in the uk has launched a formal investigation into the funding of borisjohnson's downing street flat refurbishments. the electoral commission said there were "reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence or offences may have occurred". here in the united states congress gives new presidents 100 thousand dollars to refurbish the white house — not so in britain,
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where mrjohnson is under growing pressure from the opposition to explain whether he initially borrowed the money. here was the exchange in the commons during prime minister's questions earlier today. so i asked the prime minister again who paid the initial invoice, initial invoice for the redecoration of the flat present the initial invoice? i have given him the answer. and the answer is i have cover the cost and i think most people will find it bizarre. _ and of course there is a little | commission investigating this and i can tell him that i can| forward in full with the code of conduct, with ministerial code and officials have been cats - and advising me throughout this whole thing. _ to be clear, it's not against the rules to receive donations, but politicians must declare them so the public can see who has given them money and whether it has had any influence on their decisions. let's pick this up with our
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political correspondent helen catt. he was very firm again today that he's done nothing wrong. the question i think reverts to who paid for the excess? he gets about £30,000 for the flat. who paid for the excess and in what order? he says he pay for it buddy pay for it first? ., , , , ., first? that is exactly the question at the heart _ first? that is exactly the question at the heart of _ first? that is exactly the question at the heart of it. _ first? that is exactly the question at the heart of it. as _ first? that is exactly the question at the heart of it. as you - first? that is exactly the question at the heart of it. as you said - at the heart of it. as you said there — at the heart of it. as you said there actually is some public money available _ there actually is some public money available for private ministers to do it— available for private ministers to do it the — available for private ministers to do it the flat they get to living in downing — do it the flat they get to living in downing street. he lives above number— downing street. he lives above number it — downing street. he lives above number 11 because the flat is bigger. — number 11 because the flat is bigger, most prime ministers do that _ bigger, most prime ministers do that they— bigger, most prime ministers do that. they can do what the place and they do— that. they can do what the place and they do get— that. they can do what the place and they do get £30,000 a year for up they do get £30,000 a year for up the problem is that borisjohnson's reverb _ the problem is that borisjohnson's reverb cost — the problem is that borisjohnson's reverb cost more than that. you heard _ reverb cost more than that. you heard him — reverb cost more than that. you heard him say he covered the cost but the _ heard him say he covered the cost but the question is did he do that straight _ but the question is did he do that straight off or did as is been reported. _ straight off or did as is been reported, the conservative party paid the — reported, the conservative party paid the initial bill? under the rules— paid the initial bill? under the rules of— paid the initial bill? under the rules of loans or donations have to be declared. so the electoral commission is now investigating
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this _ commission is now investigating this i_ commission is now investigating this. i should say, it is investigating the party not be prime minister _ investigating the party not be prime minister. but this is a pretty big move~ _ minister. but this is a pretty big move~ and _ minister. but this is a pretty big move. and it does have the power to issue _ move. and it does have the power to issue sanctions if it does sound wrongdoing. for example it could find the _ wrongdoing. for example it could find the party, the conservative party— find the party, the conservative party says — find the party, the conservative party says it believes that all reportable donations have been transparently and correctly declared. there are also a couple of other— declared. there are also a couple of other reviews which have been ordered — other reviews which have been ordered. the newly appointed independent adviser on ministerial standards— independent adviser on ministerial standards is looking at how it was funded _ standards is looking at how it was funded and so too is the most senior public— funded and so too is the most senior public official in west minister. helen, — public official in west minister. helen, here in washington where milani and trump wanted to refurbish the tennis pavilion in the white house, the money was raised through a private trust. are the rulesjust a private trust. are the rulesjust a bit different, a bit less clear imprint? i a bit different, a bit less clear imrint? ~ , , . a bit different, a bit less clear imrint? ,, , , ., ., , imprint? i think yes that wants it boils down _ imprint? i think yes that wants it boils down to. _ imprint? i think yes that wants it boils down to. some _ imprint? i think yes that wants it boils down to. some of- imprint? i think yes that wants it boils down to. some of the - imprint? i think yes that wants it - boils down to. some of the newspaper are suggesting that that sort of trust _ are suggesting that that sort of trust had — are suggesting that that sort of trust had been looked at by boris johnson — trust had been looked at by boris johnson but had been rejected. his
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former— johnson but had been rejected. his former aide dominic cummings had suggested that mrjohnson had planned to try and get donors to pay for the _ planned to try and get donors to pay for the refurbishment. of course you've _ for the refurbishment. of course you've heard but borisjohnson has had to— you've heard but borisjohnson has had to say— you've heard but borisjohnson has had to say about this, you heard it there _ had to say about this, you heard it there earlier. i think the rules are 'ust there earlier. i think the rules are just a _ there earlier. i think the rules are just a little — there earlier. i think the rules are just a little bit different. the key thing _ just a little bit different. the key thing here is about the transparency of things _ thing here is about the transparency of things. as christians, donations, loans— of things. as christians, donations, loans they— of things. as christians, donations, loans they are not not allowed to politicians — loans they are not not allowed to politicians but the key thing is that they have to be declared so that they have to be declared so that the — that they have to be declared so that the public know what's happening. thank you. zoe roth from north carolina was only four when her father took a photo of her smiling slyly into the camera as a house burns down behind her. it was a controlled burn, that is, a fire intentionally set to clear a property. the picture was later posted online and went on to be viewed by millions of people round the world. and now, zoe really does have something to smirk about. father and daughter decided to list it on an internet auction site this month and were shocked when the final hammer price netted
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them 180 ethers or half a million us dollars. the item was sold as a non—fungible token — if you got any smiley photos on a jpeg got them out there. hello, there. well, after the very dry weather of april so far, the rain through today has been very welcome, across parts of england and wales in particular. we've had showers further north, too. as we head on into thursday that rain clears away, leaving sunny spells and scattered showers, and it will feel chilly. in fact, from thursday onwards, we'll see a return to overnight frost again. so, this is the area of low pressure. it's a weather front bringing the wet weather to southern parts of britain through the course of this afternoon. into the evening, it will slowly start to pull away southwards and eastwards, but there could be a bit of a hang back, though, as we head through the course of the night for east anglia and the south east. elsewhere, skies will clear. there will be some showers, though, for and northern ireland, northern,
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particularly north east england. these maybe have a wintry flavour, certainly over the high ground. and it's going to be a colder night, i think, than the previous night because we'll have lengthier clear spells for many away from the south east. that early rain and cloud will clear away from east anglia and the far south east fairly quickly, and then it's a bright day for all areas. a cold, frosty start for many. and then we'll have showers developing into the afternoon, and these will become a bit more widespread. some of them heavy with some hail and thunder mixed in as well. and factor in that very brisk north, north—easter breeze, particularly across the eastern side of the country, then it's going to feel chilly. these temperatures are below par for the time of year and struggling to get into double figures across northern and eastern scotland and the far north east of england. for friday, similar story. it's a cold, frosty start. there'll be plenty of sunshine around, but then showers will get going again through the day, particularly in the afternoon. some of them could turn out to be heavy and thundery with some hail mixed in. fairly slow—moving because the winds will be light.
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again, pretty disappointing temperatures for the time of year, ranging from around eight to 12—13 degrees across some sunnier spots of the south. as we head on into the first part of the bank holiday weekend w,e hold onto this slack air flow, so we'll see further showers developing and also the cold air remains in place. it will continue with the overnight frosts as well. so, for the bank holiday weekend, certainly saturday and sunday, cold frosty starts, bright with some sunshine, afternoon showers developing. and then as we head on into bank holiday monday, there's signs of a more significant area of low pressure moving in off the atlantic, and that could bring wet and windy weather to our shores.
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you re watching bbc news with me laura trevelyan in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories... president biden has big plans, republicans have major concerns. tonight's presidential address aims to usher in a significant overhaul of america's economy and society. one of the biggest proposals involves child tax credits. in plain english, that would mean thousands of dollars per child for american families. also in the programme.... the state of west virginia has a unique way to get people vaccinated — money. that simple. we'll talk to the state's governor , seen here , about how it works.
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and, ten years later, why is it still funny? happy ed balls day, everyone! for those not in the know, we'll explain. the vaccine roll—out here the united states is going well. but now we have more vaccines than people who want to take them. the number of americans signing up for the vaccines is falling. in west virginia however, they have a plan. to incentivise the young — there's an enticing offer — get yourjab, and we'll give you one—hundred—dollars in return. the man behind it is the republican governorjim justice — it is targeted at those aged between 16—35 to get the coronavirus vaccine — but how will it work? lets ask him. i should wish her happy birthday. i
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know it was your 70th birthday yesterday. thank you for experiencing time. —— wish you. tell me about plan. experiencing time. -- wish you. tell me about plan-— me about plan. christian, first of all come might _ me about plan. christian, first of all come might break— me about plan. christian, first of all come might break that - me about plan. christian, first of all come might break that you i all come might break that you could've — all come might break that you could've avoided that right off that — could've avoided that right off that. that's about my birthday,. you thank— that. that's about my birthday,. you thank you _ that. that's about my birthday,. you thank you so— that. that's about my birthday,. you thank you so much. the way this works— thank you so much. the way this works is— thank you so much. the way this works is the _ thank you so much. the way this works is the state of west virginia today, _ works is the state of west virginia today, we — works is the state of west virginia today, we have 78.5% of our all of our people — today, we have 78.5% of our all of our people age 65 and older that i receive _ our people age 65 and older that i receive vaccines. we are targeting trying _ receive vaccines. we are targeting trying to— receive vaccines. we are targeting trying to get 85, but to get to a total— trying to get 85, but to get to a total population number of 70%, the ones that— total population number of 70%, the ones that are the transmitters today are the _ ones that are the transmitters today are the people that think they are invincible, — are the people that think they are invincible, the kids, so we need everybody— invincible, the kids, so we need everybody tojump in invincible, the kids, so we need everybody to jump in and try and help and — everybody to jump in and try and help and really come if we can just -et help and really come if we can just get 70% _ help and really come if we can just get 70% of— help and really come if we can just get 70% of those 16 to 35, that they are vaccinated, we would absolutely shut this _ are vaccinated, we would absolutely shut this thing down completely and west virginia. that is our goal. to do s0, _
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west virginia. that is our goal. to do so, we — west virginia. that is our goal. to do so, we will give a savings line, basically— do so, we will give a savings line, basically something from way in the past, _ basically something from way in the past, something that all countries should _ past, something that all countries should consider from the standpoint of this— should consider from the standpoint of this is— should consider from the standpoint of this is a _ should consider from the standpoint of this is a way of infusing a little — of this is a way of infusing a little more patriotism back into all of our— little more patriotism back into all of our hearts. that's savings bonds. today— of our hearts. that's savings bonds. today in _ of our hearts. that's savings bonds. today in the — of our hearts. that's savings bonds. today in the us, i know too many places. _ today in the us, i know too many places, where two divided on politics— places, where two divided on politics and we need to get that out of a. boo— politics and we need to get that out of a. ~ . ~ politics and we need to get that out ofa.~ ., ,, i, politics and we need to get that out ofa. .,~' , , of a. we talked yesterday about the census and we _ of a. we talked yesterday about the census and we were _ of a. we talked yesterday about the census and we were explaining - of a. we talked yesterday about the census and we were explaining to l census and we were explaining to people that the number of congressional seats that you get is directly equivalent to how many people are in your state. the tragedy of the story of west virginia is that you lost so many people during the coronavirus that you actually lost a congressional seat. ~ ., , ., , you actually lost a congressional seat. ., , . , seat. we did. to be honest, west viruinia seat. we did. to be honest, west virginia has _ seat. we did. to be honest, west virginia has been _ seat. we did. to be honest, west virginia has been losing _ seat. we did. to be honest, west. virginia has been losing population for a long _ virginia has been losing population for a long time. we have a gotta going _ for a long time. we have a gotta going on— for a long time. we have a gotta going on here from the standpoint of surplus— going on here from the standpoint of surplus and — going on here from the standpoint of surplus and get things that are happening and being able to really step up— happening and being able to really step up and put a stake in education and helping our veterans and doing other— and helping our veterans and doing other things we're doing, but west
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virginia _ other things we're doing, but west virginia is — other things we're doing, but west virginia is an elderly state, and along _ virginia is an elderly state, and along the — virginia is an elderly state, and along the way we have lost population. in other congressional seat was _ population. in other congressional seat was bad. —— losing a congressional seat was bad. i propose — congressional seat was bad. i propose to get rid of our personal income _ propose to get rid of our personal income tax — propose to get rid of our personal income tax in west virginia and we have _ income tax in west virginia and we have been— income tax in west virginia and we have been working get and we've gotten _ have been working get and we've gotten long ways down the road but that is _ gotten long ways down the road but that is the _ gotten long ways down the road but that is the kind of stress we have -ot that is the kind of stress we have got to— that is the kind of stress we have got to do— that is the kind of stress we have got to do in— that is the kind of stress we have got to do in west virginia. convincing people and lawmakers and stuff not _ convincing people and lawmakers and stuff not come i'm not the king, it is really— stuff not come i'm not the king, it is really tough to do but we are working — is really tough to do but we are working hard on the.— is really tough to do but we are working hard on the. governor come if we turn to — working hard on the. governor come if we turn to the _ working hard on the. governor come if we turn to the president's - if we turn to the president's address to congress tonight, you're one of the most influential voices urging president biden to go big on coronavirus relief. do you support him going big on this american families act? i him going big on this american families act?— families act? i do in every way exce -t families act? i do in every way except one — families act? i do in every way except one way, _ families act? i do in every way except one way, and - families act? i do in every way except one way, and that - families act? i do in every way except one way, and that is i families act? i do in every way i except one way, and that isjust this, _ except one way, and that isjust this, these _ except one way, and that isjust this, these pet potjocks, billing out pension plans and everything, instead _ out pension plans and everything, instead incentivising people not to work, _ instead incentivising people not to work, -- _ instead incentivising people not to work, —— pet projects, i'm not in
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that— work, —— pet projects, i'm not in that bow— work, —— pet projects, i'm not in that bow at— work, —— pet projects, i'm not in that bow at all. i'm a business guy. i'm that bow at all. i'm a business guy. i'm a _ that bow at all. i'm a business guy. i'm a guy— that bow at all. i'm a business guy. i'm a guy that truly believes if you try and _ i'm a guy that truly believes if you try and put— i'm a guy that truly believes if you try and put a band—aid on cancer you will never— try and put a band—aid on cancer you will never get there. and really even _ will never get there. and really even if— will never get there. and really even if we _ will never get there. and really even if we went a little too big and -ot even if we went a little too big and got ourselves over the top of the mountain— got ourselves over the top of the mountain come and got our people are genuinely— mountain come and got our people are genuinely really back to work, and really— genuinely really back to work, and really help— genuinely really back to work, and really help the families that really need the — really help the families that really need the help, i would really help the families that really need the help, iwould be really help the families that really need the help, i would be all in. i really— need the help, i would be all in. i really think— need the help, i would be all in. i really think always to go just a little _ really think always to go just a little bigger than you think and get there _ little bigger than you think and get there. that is my belief all along. but you _ there. that is my belief all along. but you do— there. that is my belief all along. but you do have a that grinding poverty in the appalachian mountains in west virginia and president biden is saying essentially by giving people direct payments if they have kids, that will solve poverty. but you don't think it will? you think it will stop the working? taste you don't think it will? you think it will stop the working?- you don't think it will? you think it will stop the working? we like to work in west _ it will stop the working? we like to work in west virginia. _ it will stop the working? we like to work in west virginia. we - it will stop the working? we like to work in west virginia. we are - work in west virginia. we are craftsmen. we are good people. we are people _ craftsmen. we are good people. we are people that know how to love and
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appreciate _ are people that know how to love and appreciate others for all the good stuff that — appreciate others for all the good stuff that they do. so in west virginia. _ stuff that they do. so in west virginia. i_ stuff that they do. so in west virginia, ithink stuff that they do. so in west virginia, i think we wanted to be at work _ virginia, i think we wanted to be at work we _ virginia, i think we wanted to be at work. we don't want to be sitting on a porch _ work. we don't want to be sitting on a porch we — work. we don't want to be sitting on a porch. we don't want to move toward — a porch. we don't want to move toward socialism. we want to work. and make _ toward socialism. we want to work. and make great things happen across this country and that is what we have _ this country and that is what we have always done, so from that standpoint i'm not in that vote. governor— standpoint i'm not in that vote. governorjim justice, standpoint i'm not in that vote. governorjimjustice, get standpoint i'm not in that vote. governorjim justice, get heavy on the programme. thank you. —— good to have you on the programme. one of the most radical aspects ofjoe biden's first 100 days in office will be his child tax credit. for one year, all but the richest families in america will — from july — get up to 3000 600 dollars a yearfor each child under six, and 3000 dollars for kids over six. the poorest families will get direct payments of 300 dollars a month. democrats say this is an ambitious effort to end child poverty and they want to make it permanent — president biden has proposed extending the credit until 2025. but republicans claim it's a massive expansion in government welfare
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that could discourage people from working. playtime in west haven, connecticut. for over 40 years, preschool children have learned to play at this innovative centre. now, these kids will qualify for president biden's child tax credits. kathy, whose grandchildren are thriving here, says the money will help with the cost of childhood. families have been struggling for years and it is finally about time that somebody will help them out so that they can provide an adequate future for their children. it will help with some out of poverty as well but on a day—to—day basis, take a look around you. what better investment do you have been investing to the quinn's mother giuliana teaches her son loves attending. they too will benefit from the child tax credit. the $300 a month will help with the expense of raising quinn.
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money has been tight since giuliana's husband lost hisjob during the pandemic. gotta help out a lot and in clothes and everything, just having many for clothes for the summer, i had to take out a credit card just to get him clothes for the summer. the vice president came here in march to highlight the impact of the child tax credit. the centre directive believes extra money will take the strain off of the parents. families, in order for them to survive, they need to be happy and calm and invested in their own children and they will be able to do that, form their own relationships with their children, trusting relationships if they don't have that outside stress. america has some of the highest rates of child poverty in the industrialised world. president biden, with his ambitious tax credit, wants to lift millions of american children out of poverty. but right now it is only a temporary measure, so what happens after a year? we will make it permanent. the president is for making it permanent. evicted from her new haven home
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as a kid, congresswoman rosa delaura has fought for the child tax credit for years. it is not a hand—out, she tells me. it is a story. for me, it is like the fdr new deal, and you think about social security in the united states, it lifted 90% of singers out of poverty and the child tax credit is transformative. it will lift millions of children and their families out of poverty. on capitol hill, conservative thinkers like scott are sceptical about making the child tax credit permanent, fearing it will discourage people from working and then there is the cost. there's also risk to deficits which is a whole bigger story underlying all of this to the extent which we are spending like drunken sailors and nobody seems to care these days, eventually that bill will come due as well. the biden administration hopes that tackling child poverty will save money in the long run. this huge expansion in the safety net for families is an experiment for america and democrats will have to
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fight to make it permanent. that if the big debate. whether you spend money to create money within the economy. through the day, dear viewer, laura since we interesting titbits on e—mail and she sent me something. fascinating. here's one. she's been tracing back were a child tax allowance comes from. in fact, he started in 1909. lloyd george, very proud welshman, the last liberal prime minister that we had introduced such an allowance in his first people's budget. i didn't know that. i'll child tax allowance has followed from that. it was his initiative. what is interesting is that his was really for the middle class, christian. what president biden is doing here is for all but the very richest americans. a bit of a departure there a century apart from one side of the pond to the other. keep the e—mails coming. i
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there will be a delusion. we were spekaing earlier in the programme about the situation in india, which has seen more covid cases in the last seven days than any other country. the official death toll has surpassed 200,000 people, but experts believe that number may be higher. dr ashistha, the dean of the brown university school of public health, has been calling on the us to help india by sending ppe and other aid, as well as lifting an export ban on raw materials needed to produce vaccines. hejoins us now. lovely to see you. i thing i don't understand is there are tens of millions of astrazeneca doses sitting in warehouses in america and the white house has said as soon as we get fda approval for those we will send some of them to india which i'm sure would be very welcome but they're already using astrazeneca and india. why do they need fda approval if it is all ready been passed in india? first need fda approval if it is all ready been passed in india?— been passed in india? first of all, thank ou been passed in india? first of all, thank you for— been passed in india? first of all, thank you for having _ been passed in india? first of all, thank you for having me. - been passed in india? first of all, thank you for having me. i - thank you for having me. i
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completely agree. i don't think they need fda _ completely agree. i don't think they need fda authorisation or approval for use _ need fda authorisation or approval for use in— need fda authorisation or approval for use in the united states. the issue _ for use in the united states. the issue they— for use in the united states. the issue they should check on is making sure those _ issue they should check on is making sure those vaccine doses are still in good _ sure those vaccine doses are still in good shape, they've been a storage. — in good shape, they've been a storage, making sure there are no production— storage, making sure there are no production problems with that should be relatively quick review i agree, we do _ be relatively quick review i agree, we do not — be relatively quick review i agree, we do not need it to be authorised in the _ we do not need it to be authorised in the us — we do not need it to be authorised in the us. these are very good vaccines— in the us. these are very good vaccines used in the uk, used in india. _ vaccines used in the uk, used in india. we — vaccines used in the uk, used in india, we should get them to india as soon— india, we should get them to india as soon as — india, we should get them to india as soon as possible. this india, we should get them to india as soon as possible.— as soon as possible. this is unlike any challenge _ as soon as possible. this is unlike any challenge we _ as soon as possible. this is unlike any challenge we face _ as soon as possible. this is unlike any challenge we face so - as soon as possible. this is unlike any challenge we face so far. - as soon as possible. this is unlike| any challenge we face so far. went per billion people. if we gather all the vaccines given so far around the world and put them all into india, they would still be 400,000 doses short. that is the magnitude of what we are talking about here. can you meet that challenge without waiving some of the pain for pfizer and return? it some of the pain for pfizer and return? . . some of the pain for pfizer and return? , ., . ., return? it is a huge challenge. -- modernity _ return? it is a huge challenge. -- modernity. you _ return? it is a huge challenge. -- modernity. you need _ return? it is a huge challenge. -- modernity. you need to - return? it is a huge challenge. -- modernity. you need to get - return? it is a huge challenge. -- modernity. you need to get a - return? it is a huge challenge. -- i modernity. you need to get a large chunk— modernity. you need to get a large chunk of— modernity. you need to get a large chunk of the population vaccinated in order— chunk of the population vaccinated in order to — chunk of the population vaccinated in order to slow down the population. in terms of how to
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increase — population. in terms of how to increase supply, the key issue is how do— increase supply, the key issue is how do we — increase supply, the key issue is how do we increase the supply of global— how do we increase the supply of global vaccines. patents are part of the snow— global vaccines. patents are part of the snow solution, giving them is reasonable as long as it is coupled with the _ reasonable as long as it is coupled with the whole lot of other things. if with the whole lot of other things. if we _ with the whole lot of other things. if we just — with the whole lot of other things. if we just way pet is tomorrow and do nothing — if we just way pet is tomorrow and do nothing else, it will not have a huge _ do nothing else, it will not have a huge impact on the number of vaccines— huge impact on the number of vaccines available. we really have to work— vaccines available. we really have to work on — vaccines available. we really have to work on production and technology transfer. _ to work on production and technology transfer. a _ to work on production and technology transfer, a whole set of issues. i want _ transfer, a whole set of issues. i want to— transfer, a whole set of issues. i want to see _ transfer, a whole set of issues. i want to see more work on that. unfortunately none of it will be very big — unfortunately none of it will be very big. india needs to both the public— very big. india needs to both the public health measures now come use the vaccine _ public health measures now come use the vaccine it has, it is the worlds largest— the vaccine it has, it is the worlds largest vaccine producer so it needs to make _ largest vaccine producer so it needs to make more. and then we have to come _ to make more. and then we have to come up _ to make more. and then we have to come up with a strategy for long—term vaccine manufacturing expansion — long-term vaccine manufacturing exansion. ., long-term vaccine manufacturing mansion-— long-term vaccine manufacturing exansion. ., ., , expansion. doctor, you have been wantin: expansion. doctor, you have been wanting throughout _ expansion. doctor, you have been wanting throughout this _ expansion. doctor, you have been wanting throughout this pandemic about the dangers of exponential increases in the number of coronavirus cases. is that what we are seeing now in india, the nightmare scenario?- are seeing now in india, the nightmare scenario? yes, no doubt. in the last nightmare scenario? yes, no doubt. in the last six _ nightmare scenario? yes, no doubt. in the last six weeks, _ nightmare scenario? yes, no doubt. in the last six weeks, exactly - nightmare scenario? yes, no doubt. in the last six weeks, exactly what i in the last six weeks, exactly what we have _ in the last six weeks, exactly what we have seen. the problem of the
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accidental— we have seen. the problem of the accidental growth is it really doesn't _ accidental growth is it really doesn't look that scary until it does — doesn't look that scary until it does it— doesn't look that scary until it does it is— doesn't look that scary until it does. it is one of those things where — does. it is one of those things where in — does. it is one of those things where in late february you saw the cases _ where in late february you saw the cases in— where in late february you saw the cases in india doubling from ten to 20000 _ cases in india doubling from ten to 20000 and set it is only 20,000. then— 20000 and set it is only 20,000. then 40,000. 80,000 people ignored it. it then 40,000. 80,000 people ignored it it is _ then 40,000. 80,000 people ignored it. it is starting to level off but still in — it. it is starting to level off but still in a — it. it is starting to level off but still in a bad shape. a long way to id still in a bad shape. a long way to go before — still in a bad shape. a long way to go before this turns around and india~ _ go before this turns around and india. ~ ., ., ., ., , india. what role have the many different variants _ india. what role have the many different variants in _ india. what role have the many different variants in india - india. what role have the many| different variants in india played in the spread and should we be concerned about the kind of super variant that could come to other countries?— countries? this is been much discussed- — countries? this is been much discussed. the _ countries? this is been much discussed. the 117, _ countries? this is been much discussed. the 117, the - countries? this is been muchl discussed. the 117, the variant countries? this is been much - discussed. the 117, the variant and from _ discussed. the 117, the variant and from the _ discussed. the 117, the variant and from the uk, that has played a role in northern— from the uk, that has played a role in northern india. it has spread in the us— in northern india. it has spread in the us and — in northern india. it has spread in the us and other places, there's a lot of— the us and other places, there's a lot of hype — the us and other places, there's a lot of hype about this double
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mutant. _ lot of hype about this double mutant, this 1617, and i have to say it we _ mutant, this 1617, and i have to say it we don't— mutant, this 1617, and i have to say it we don't know that much about a font that _ it we don't know that much about a font that we don't know how widespread it is, there's not a good surveillance — widespread it is, there's not a good surveillance the way is for the uk. we don't — surveillance the way is for the uk. we don't how big a role it is playing _ we don't how big a role it is playing. i'm not convinced it is a huge _ playing. i'm not convinced it is a huge role — playing. i'm not convinced it is a huge role but it might be. we need to gather— huge role but it might be. we need to gather more data. i'm not worried that somehow that variant will end ”p that somehow that variant will end up rendering all of our vaccines across— up rendering all of our vaccines across the _ up rendering all of our vaccines across the world to be ineffective, but it _ across the world to be ineffective, but it does — across the world to be ineffective, but it does put it emphasis on us to -et but it does put it emphasis on us to get these _ but it does put it emphasis on us to get these big outbreaks under control— get these big outbreaks under control because the future variance there _ control because the future variance there will— control because the future variance there will be back and get us into trouble — there will be back and get us into trouble. . . there will be back and get us into trouble. ., , , _, . trouble. that is the big concern. thank you. _ trouble. that is the big concern. thank you, doctor. _ trouble. that is the big concern. thank you, doctor. always - trouble. that is the big concern. thank you, doctor. always good | trouble. that is the big concern. i thank you, doctor. always good to talk to you. we'll have more on the situation in india after the break, with congressman raja krishnamoorthy. also still to come: the social media mishap which has been celebrated on 28 april for the past ten years — why is it still funny?
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england's deputy chief medical officer, professorjonathan van—tam, has suggested the uk is at or close to the bottom of levels of coronavirus cases, as he hailed the public for sticking to lockdown measures. at a downing street press briefing earlier today, the health secretary matt hancock also announced that the uk has purchased another 60—million doses of the pfizer covid jab — to support a booster vaccination programme which will begin in the autumn. mr hancock emphasised the importance of protecting the progress that the country had made in the pandemic. the vaccine is helping us to bring back ourfreedom. and we must protect this progress. the biggest risks to that progress is the risk posed by a new variant. so we are working on our plans for booster shots too and this is the final thing i want to talk about. to keep us safe and free here, while we get this disease under control
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across the whole world, we have been working on a programme of booster shots again for over a year now. and we backed some of the only clinical trials in the world looking specifically at booster shots. i'm delighted to be able to tell you that we have secured a further 60 million doses of the pfizer vaccine that will be used alongside others as part of our booster shot programme later this year. and that is all about protecting the progress that we have made. we have a clear route out of this crisis, but this is no time for complacency. it is a time for caution. so we can keep the virus under control while we take the steps safely back to normal life. so please remember that the basics of hands, face, space and fresh air, and crucially, if like me you get the call, join me and get the jab.
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we've covered a lot this hour from president biden to congress in this multitrillion dollar plans for the us economy. the covid—19 crisis fortunately we are joined by a member of congress. she can touch on all of these issues. lets talk to democratic congressman, raja krishnamoorti he is with us. lovely to have you with us. let's start where we were just talking with doctorjob. i know you have indian heritage you were born there. in i right?— you have indian heritage you were born there. in i right? yes. do you think the us _ born there. in i right? yes. do you think the us government - born there. in i right? yes. do you think the us government has - born there. in i right? yes. do you think the us government has done enough _ think the us government has done enough so — think the us government has done enough so farto think the us government has done enough so far to support the international effort. i think
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they've _ international effort. i think they've made a good start but we need _ they've made a good start but we need more. i'm glad they listen to my call— need more. i'm glad they listen to my call on— need more. i'm glad they listen to my call on saturday to release astrazeneca vaccines which we are not going — astrazeneca vaccines which we are not going to use for the purpose of helping _ not going to use for the purpose of helping hard—hit countries like but now have — helping hard—hit countries like but now have to execute promptly otherwise we won't be able to save as many— otherwise we won't be able to save as many lives. i otherwise we won't be able to save as many lives-— as many lives. i release there's been a lot _ as many lives. i release there's been a lot of— as many lives. i release there's been a lot of criticism. -- - as many lives. i release there's| been a lot of criticism. -- there been a lot of criticism. —— there has been a lot of criticism. you talk today about whether they had done enough today. and now we have reports that they are removing trees that are critical of the government. what do you make of all of that? i what do you make of all of that? i am concerned about that type of activity — am concerned about that type of activity i— am concerned about that type of activity. i think right now i hope that the — activity. i think right now i hope that the number one concern for anybody— that the number one concern for anybody like myself or anybody who
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is focus _ anybody like myself or anybody who is focus on — anybody like myself or anybody who is focus on what is going on in india~ — is focus on what is going on in india~ we _ is focus on what is going on in india. we have to save lives. you both— india. we have to save lives. you both know — india. we have to save lives. you both know the numbers. they are devastating you stay. if we don't do it out _ devastating you stay. if we don't do it out of— devastating you stay. if we don't do it out of a _ devastating you stay. if we don't do it out of a sense of morality or love _ it out of a sense of morality or love or— it out of a sense of morality or love or compassion for humanity we have to _ love or compassion for humanity we have to do _ love or compassion for humanity we have to do if— love or compassion for humanity we have to do if our best interest. there — have to do if our best interest. there are _ have to do if our best interest. there are more than 730 variance course~ _ there are more than 730 variance course it — there are more than 730 variance course. it only takes one of those variance — course. it only takes one of those variance overpower our vaccines and they were _ variance overpower our vaccines and they were all back to square one. if they were all back to square one. if we they were all back to square one. we could they were all back to square one. if we could turn into the big event here in washington tonight, or a subdued address to congress by president biden because of the coronavirus, he is proposing now $6 trillion in us government spending on the economy. with something so ambitious be proposed were not for the pandemic do you think was blue i think you are right to bring out the pandemic. find think you are right to bring out the andemic. �* ., think you are right to bring out the andemic. . ., ., ., , ., ~
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pandemic. and the all that has taken on americans- _ pandemic. and the all that has taken on americans. we _ pandemic. and the all that has taken on americans. we still _ pandemic. and the all that has taken on americans. we still have - pandemic. and the all that has taken on americans. we still have more . on americans. we still have more than _ on americans. we still have more than telling them people unemployed in the united states and whole industries are still devastated from hospitality to the restaurant industry _ hospitality to the restaurant industry and so forth. sol hospitality to the restaurant industry and so forth. so i do think the timeliness of the aid right now makes _ the timeliness of the aid right now makes a _ the timeliness of the aid right now makes a lot of sense and i think that is— makes a lot of sense and i think that is why— makes a lot of sense and i think that is why it is so popular because so many— that is why it is so popular because so many people need the aid in so many— so many people need the aid in so many businesses need the assistance. but when _ many businesses need the assistance. but when it— many businesses need the assistance. but when it comes to the american families plan with this expansion of childcare, free community college, republicans are saying this is all unnecessary government overreach and they will not support it. how will you get it through? fine they will not support it. how will you get it through?— you get it through? one of the interesting _ you get it through? one of the interesting things _ you get it through? one of the interesting things we - you get it through? one of the interesting things we have - you get it through? one of the - interesting things we have learned during _ interesting things we have learned during the pandemic is how many women _ during the pandemic is how many women for— during the pandemic is how many women for instance have been sidelined — women for instance have been sidelined by the pandemic because let's face _ sidelined by the pandemic because let's face it, women are the primary child rears— let's face it, women are the primary child rears in— let's face it, women are the primary child rears in our family. and when our children— child rears in our family. and when our children were not able to go to school. _
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our children were not able to go to school. the — our children were not able to go to school, the women dropped out of the workforce _ school, the women dropped out of the workforce and stayed home. what we have learned is that obviously it hurts _ have learned is that obviously it hurts women professionally look but it hurts _ hurts women professionally look but it hurts our— hurts women professionally look but it hurts our economy. when virtually 50% of _ it hurts our economy. when virtually 50% of the _ it hurts our economy. when virtually 50% of the population is affected in some _ 50% of the population is affected in some way— 50% of the population is affected in some way shape or form in this way either— some way shape or form in this way either as— some way shape or form in this way either as caregivers for their parents _ either as caregivers for their parents or caregivers for their children _ parents or caregivers for their children. so childcare and assistance make sense. some of these other parts— assistance make sense. some of these other parts also make sense because remember. _ other parts also make sense because remember, so many people are going to need _ remember, so many people are going to need to _ remember, so many people are going to need to be of skilled and need a good _ to need to be of skilled and need a good quality post secondary education and community colleges. the jobs _ education and community colleges. the jobs they had before the pandemic may not exist, got a dependent. we pandemic may not exist, got a dependent-— pandemic may not exist, got a deendent. ~ , ., ., ., dependent. we should point out that havin: two dependent. we should point out that having two women _ dependent. we should point out that having two women on _ dependent. we should point out that having two women on stage - dependent. we should point out that having two women on stage tonight| having two women on stage tonight behind joe biden, both from california. let's talk aboutjoe biden. for many years, he has set in the audience and watched a president on stage. i get the sense that he is
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relishing what he is doing. they dumped him sleepyjoe but he is anything but. he has any hurry. he has to be. there is such a rather thin majority in the houses. do you get a sense he is writing to the challenge and really wants to do something transformational? yes challenge and really wants to do something transformational? tesi challenge and really wants to do something transformational? yes i do aet something transformational? yes i do net that something transformational? yes i do get that sense- _ something transformational? yes i do get that sense. you _ something transformational? yes i do get that sense. you saw _ something transformational? yes i do get that sense. you saw that - something transformational? yes i do get that sense. you saw that in - something transformational? yes i do get that sense. you saw that in the i get that sense. you saw that in the american _ get that sense. you saw that in the american rescue plan and how quickly they got— american rescue plan and how quickly they got through congress. largely because _ they got through congress. largely because of his advocacy by the way you see _ because of his advocacy by the way you see that with the infrastructure plan and _ you see that with the infrastructure plan and now of course this other plan and now of course this other plan that— plan and now of course this other plan that he put forth, i do think he senses — plan that he put forth, i do think he senses that we are at an inflection— he senses that we are at an inflection point, where this pandemic has set us back but as we built on— pandemic has set us back but as we built on the — pandemic has set us back but as we built on the momentum of the vaccinations that are growing day by day, vaccinations that are growing day by day. we _ vaccinations that are growing day by day. we are — vaccinations that are growing day by day, we are either going to spring out of— day, we are either going to spring out of this— day, we are either going to spring out of this with the economy rolling back. _ out of this with the economy rolling back. or— out of this with the economy rolling back. or we — out of this with the economy rolling back, or we will not and a whole set of people _ back, or we will not and a whole set of people in— back, or we will not and a whole set of people in this population will be lagging _ of people in this population will be lagging behind. ithink of people in this population will be lagging behind. i think he
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of people in this population will be lagging behind. ithink he really wants— lagging behind. ithink he really wants to — lagging behind. ithink he really wants to make sure that everybody can participate in our prosperity going _ can participate in our prosperity going forward. can participate in our prosperity going forward-— can participate in our prosperity uaoinforward. ., ,, ., ., , going forward. congressman, lovely to talk to you- _ going forward. congressman, lovely to talk to you. come _ going forward. congressman, lovely to talk to you. come on _ going forward. congressman, lovely to talk to you. come on the - to talk to you. come on the programme again.- to talk to you. come on the programme again. to talk to you. come on the rouramme aaain. . ~' ,, . you know what day it is today? it is the ten year anniversary of ed balls day. so for those who don't know ed balls, he is a very famous dancer, and was also quite a senior british politician. not a particularly famous one. until he loaded the twitter app on his blackberry and searched for his own name to see what people were saying about him. except he didn't search for his own name. he accidentally tweeted it. and suddenly ed balls was a viral sensation. because universally that tweet appealed to everyone's most childish impulses. and it was celebrated notjust that year, but on year two, year three, year four. it never gets old.
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and so, to his twitter feed today. here he is, with a cake. happy ed balls day everyone! enough to make you want to get back on twitter. ~ , ,., , ., enough to make you want to get back ontwitter. ~ , ., ., , _ on twitter. absolutely not. happy ed balls da . hello there. wednesday brought some changes to our weather. it felt very different across england and wales, a lot more cloud around, outbreaks of rain. in fact, the skies were pretty leaden across the london area. but we did have some very useful rain, as it's been ever so dry for the month so far. now, this area of low pressure which brought the rain on wednesday will be clearing away. as it pulls away, it'll allow arctic air to flood southwards again across the country on a north— north—easterly breeze. so it'll be chilly by day, and once again we're going to see a return to overnight frosts, and we've seen plenty of those for april so far. it's been a record—breaking month for frosty nights. so, we start thursday off on a chilly note.
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some frost around for many of us, plenty of sunshine, mind you, and it'll be bright, as well, for the south—east. showers will get going, though, into the afternoon. some of these could turn out to be quite heavy and thundery in places, maybe some hail mixed in, too. temperatures pretty disappointing for the time of year, particularly across north sea coasts. single figures here. we could see 12 or 13 in the warmer spots further south. that is below par. so, as we move out of thursday into friday, it's a similar story. if anything, our isobars widen, so it means the air flow will be even slacker, so it looks like winds will be lighter away from the north—east of scotland. again, we start off cold, some frost around, some sunshine, but then showers will get going again into the afternoon, and some of them could be quite heavy, with some hail and thunder mixed in and perhaps forming bands in places, too. some areas may stay dry altogether. similar sorts of temperatures, pretty disappointing for the time of year, eight to twelve or thirteen degrees. for much of the bank holiday weekend it's going to look pretty samey. we're going to start off chilly and we'll have sunshine and showers through the day, and winds will tend to be light. so, this is the picture for saturday
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in a bit more detail. we start cold and frosty. there'll be quite a lot of sunshine around, mind you, fairly lights winds, too. through the day, temperatures will begin to rise after the chilly start, and that will set off showers once again, some of them heavy, some hail mixed in, too, a little bit of wintriness over the higher ground in scotland. and again, they could form lines, merged together, in places, so some areas could be quite wet. for sunday, subtle changes. again it's a chilly start. we'll have sunshine and showers, but then an area of low pressure will start to encroach into the west. that'll bring thicker cloud to northern ireland, western scotland, with some rain here by the end of the day. and that's because we'll start to see the greaterjet, that i'll come onto in a moment. to recap the bank holiday weekend, it's looking pretty samey. saturday and sunday, largely chilly with sunshine and showers, and then, for bank holiday monday, it could feel quite different, wetter and windier in places as a pretty deep area of low pressure sweeps in off the atlantic. and the key to that is the jet stream — something we haven't seen for a while, it's been so weak and allowed high pressure
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to dominate for april, bringing us the cold and sunny weather — the jet will invigorate across the atlantic, racing towards our shores. and whenever we see a jet like that, that's going to bring areas of low pressure, steer them towards us. we could see a few deeper ones moving in next week to bring a spell of maybe even gales and some heavy rain, which will bring a relief to all the dry weather. but it'll feel very different from what we've been used to, certainly for most of april. so, a strongerjet through next week will bring a greater chance of wet and windy weather, some very much—needed rainfall, and with ourair coming in off the atlantic, from the south—west, it looks like temperatures will gradually recover, as well, closer to the seasonal norm.
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tonight at ten — an official investigation has now been launched into the funding of renovation work on boris johnson's flat. there are grounds to suspect an offence may have happened, according to the electoral commission, and labour stepped up its attack. what do we get from this prime minister and this conservative government? dodgy contracts, jobs for their mates and cash for access, and who's at the heart of it? the prime minister, major sleaze sitting there. week after week, the people of this country can see the difference between a labour party that twists and turns with the wind, that thinks of nothing except playing political games, whereas this party gets on with delivering on the people's priorities. we'll be asking what the involvement of the electoral commission
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could mean for the prime minister. also tonight... arlene foster is to step down as leader of the democratic unionists

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