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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 28, 2021 4:30pm-5:01pm BST

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�* had been no confidence in her had been circulated amongst dup meps and mlas and the party said it was not going to comment but it was understood there had been a majority of support amongst the party's stormont and westminster ranks, about 80% of them, calling for a change in leadership. that is now going to happen and they will only be a small number of the dup membership who will get to vote —— there will only. in the leadership contest, that is. it is notable, in her statement, towards the end, she talks about wanting to see greater unity in northern ireland, and she says, i have sought to lead the party in northern ireland away from division and towards a better path, there are people in northern ireland with a british identity, others are irish and others are northern irish and others are a mixture of all three,
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and some are new and emerging. we must all learn to be generous to each other, live together, and share this wonderful country, she said, and she ends by saying the future of unionism in the country will not be found in division, it will only be found in division, it will only be found in division, it will only be found in sharing this place we are all privileged to call home, she says. who knows who is going to be in line to take over the du p leadership role, and of course the first minister role in northern ireland. which way will the du p choose to go? we will be getting much more reaction to arlene foster's decision later here bbc news. a formal investigation has been launched into the funding of borisjohnson�*s downing street flat refurbishments by the electoral commission.
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the watchdog announced it was "satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence or offences may have occurred." mrjohnson came under sustained pressure from the labour leader during prime ministers questions about whether he'd initially borrowed the money. the prime minister said again he had covered costs but has asked the new advisor on ministers interests to advise on whether any further statements are needed. our political correspondent iain watson reports. dominic cummings lit the political fuse. the prime minister's former adviser accused his old boss of planning to ask conservative donors to pay for refurbishing the downing street flat. he said this would have been unethical and possibly illegal. today, the party political watchdog, the electoral commission, announced a formal inquiry into the funding of the flat, saying it was satisfied "there are reasonable grounds to suspect an offence or offences may have occurred." are you worried about _ the investigation, prime minister? it's not the backdrop to pmqs that ideally borisjohnson would have wanted. unsurprisingly, the labour leader
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asked the prime minister about the electoral commission investigation. it's incredibly serious. can the prime minister tell the house, does he believe that any rules or laws have been broken in relation to the refurbishment of the prime minister's flat? prime minister. no, idon't, mr speaker. keir starmer wanted to explore whether there was a potential conflict of interest, had borisjohnson initially paid for works to the flat or was it someone else? either the taxpayer paid the initial invoice, or it was the conservative party, or it was a private donor, or it was the prime minister. i'm making it easy for the prime minister, it's now multiple—choice. the answer is i have covered the costs and most people will find it absolutely bizarre... of course, there is an electoral commission investigating this. i can tell him i have conformed in full with the code of conduct. don't the british people deserve a prime minister they can trust
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and a government that isn't mired in sleaze, cronyism and scandal? week after week, the people of this country can see the difference between a labour party that twists and turns with the wind, that thinks of nothing except playing political games. the snp focused on borisjohnson�*s denial of reports that he'd said last autumn that he'd be willing to see bodies pile high rather than go into further lockdowns. parlimentary rules stop me from saying that the prime minister has repeatedly lied to the public over the last week. can i ask the question, are you a liar, prime minister? i did not say those words. what i do believe is that a lockdown is a miserable thing and i did everything i could to try to protect the british public throughout the pandemic, to protect them from lockdowns, but also to protect them from disease. this is the new adviser of ministerial standards, a former private secretary
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to the queen, and borisjohnson will take his advice on when anything further needs to be said about the flat. ever since the allegations were made, number 10 has insisted no codes of conduct have been breached and no electoral laws broken, but the timing of the electoral commission investigation is farfrom ideal, potentially distracting the conservatives from campaign messages they would prefer to be talking about ahead of crucial elections next week. and the government will need to do more if it is to reclaim the agenda. iain watson, bbc news. next thursday, people in many parts of england will get the chance to elect their local councillors, who are responsible for running services such as schools and bin collections. on the same day there will be a by—election to elect a new mp in the uk constituency of hartlepool. victoria derbyshire is spending the day there for us,
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but first she's been taking a closer look at the demographics of the town. just over 90,000 people live in hartlepool, and it's a town that has had a labour mp since the seat was created in 197a. hartlepool is one of the most deprived areas in the country. over 33% of children in the town are eligible for free school meals. average earnings in hartlepool are 7% lower than the national average. life expectancy is also below the national average, and the hartlepool by—election will be a key focus on may the 6th, and it's an election that could test political ties and potentially send shock waves far beyond the town's boundaries. and we can cross to victoria now. hi, we are at hartlepool marina. this is an area of the town that was regenerated in about 2008. and this is the kind of regeneration that people who live here would like to see elsewhere in the town. we have got a couple of voters here who are due to vote next week. we have got corin. she makes and sells cakes and cakes supplies, and she is going to
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vote labour next thursday in the by—election. we have philip. expanded metal is what? it is by-election. we have philip. expanded metal is what? it is metal that is stretched. _ expanded metal is what? it is metal that is stretched. the _ expanded metal is what? it is metal that is stretched. the disposable - that is stretched. the disposable barbecues you see in supermarkets is expanded _ barbecues you see in supermarkets is expanded metal. he barbecues you see in supermarkets is expanded metal.— expanded metal. he is going to vote conservative- _ expanded metal. he is going to vote conservative. why _ expanded metal. he is going to vote conservative. why are _ expanded metal. he is going to vote conservative. why are you _ expanded metal. he is going to vote conservative. why are you voting - conservative. why are you voting labour? i conservative. why are you voting labour? . ., ., conservative. why are you voting labour? . ., , , labour? i am voting labour because i feel that while _ labour? i am voting labour because i feel that while the _ labour? i am voting labour because i feel that while the conservatives - feel that while the conservatives are in_ feel that while the conservatives are in place _ feel that while the conservatives are in place at_ feel that while the conservatives are in place at the _ feel that while the conservatives are in place at the moment, - feel that while the conservatives| are in place at the moment, they feel that while the conservatives - are in place at the moment, they do not have _ are in place at the moment, they do not have our— are in place at the moment, they do not have our interest _ are in place at the moment, they do not have our interest in _ are in place at the moment, they do not have our interest in heart - are in place at the moment, they do not have our interest in heart in - not have our interest in heart in the town — not have our interest in heart in the town. while _ not have our interest in heart in the town. while voting - not have our interest in heart in the town. while voting labour. not have our interest in heart in - the town. while voting labour would be the _ the town. while voting labour would he the naturat— the town. while voting labour would be the natural thing _ the town. while voting labour would be the natural thing to _ the town. while voting labour would be the natural thing to do, _ the town. while voting labour would be the natural thing to do, in- the town. while voting labour would be the natural thing to do, in this i be the natural thing to do, in this case _ be the natural thing to do, in this case it— be the natural thing to do, in this case it is— be the natural thing to do, in this case it is the _ be the natural thing to do, in this case it is the lesser— be the natural thing to do, in this case it is the lesser of— be the natural thing to do, in this case it is the lesser of two - be the natural thing to do, in this case it is the lesser of two evils. i case it is the lesser of two evils. i'm looking _ case it is the lesser of two evils. i'm looking for— case it is the lesser of two evils. i'm looking for the _ case it is the lesser of two evils. i'm looking for the person- case it is the lesser of two evils. i'm looking for the person he - case it is the lesser of two evils. | i'm looking for the person he was going _ i'm looking for the person he was going to — i'm looking for the person he was going to do — i'm looking for the person he was going to do the _ i'm looking for the person he was going to do the least _ i'm looking for the person he was going to do the least damage. i i'm looking for the person he was. going to do the least damage. that is how ou going to do the least damage. is how you express it? going to do the least damage. that is how you express it? yes. - going to do the least damage. that is how you express it? yes. why i going to do the least damage. that| is how you express it? yes. why are ou is how you express it? yes. why are you voting — is how you express it? yes. why are
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you voting conservative? hartlepool tends to be the _ you voting conservative? hartlepool tends to be the neglected _ you voting conservative? hartlepool tends to be the neglected bubble. i| tends to be the neglected bubble. i think on_ tends to be the neglected bubble. i think on the back of the tees valley mayor, _ think on the back of the tees valley mayor, on_ think on the back of the tees valley mayor, on the back of that, that is why i_ mayor, on the back of that, that is why i am _ mayor, on the back of that, that is why i am voting why i am voting. i think— why i am voting why i am voting. i think it— why i am voting why i am voting. i think it will — why i am voting why i am voting. i think it will catch the eye of the government to give more investment to the _ government to give more investment to the town, — government to give more investment to the town, and it will be on the radar— to the town, and it will be on the radar as — to the town, and it will be on the radar as well. politics aside, he has done — radar as well. politics aside, he has done a _ radar as well. politics aside, he has done a fantasticjob in the region — has done a fantasticjob in the region it _ has done a fantasticjob in the region. it could be labour, it could be conservative, it could be an independent, but i've seen from the results _ independent, but i've seen from the results that — independent, but i've seen from the results that that is the reason for my votes— results that that is the reason for my votes going that direction. the conservative _ my votes going that direction. the conservative metro my votes going that direction. tte: conservative metro mare my votes going that direction. tt9: conservative metro mare came my votes going that direction. tt9 conservative metro mare came in my votes going that direction. t“t9 conservative metro mare came in in 2017. you think he has made a difference. you think you need a conservative mp to attract the attention of the westminster conservative government? t
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attention of the westminster conservative government? i think there is a natural— conservative government? i think there is a natural fit _ conservative government? i think there is a natural fit to _ conservative government? i think there is a natural fit to do - conservative government? i think there is a natural fit to do so. - there is a natural fit to do so. because _ there is a natural fit to do so. because otherwise a conservative government neglects the bubble of hartlepool? it is government neglects the bubble of hartleool? , :, government neglects the bubble of hartleool? , . , , , hartlepool? it is a bubble. it will continue existing, _ hartlepool? it is a bubble. it will continue existing, continue - hartlepool? it is a bubble. it will continue existing, continue whatj continue existing, continue what it's doing. — continue existing, continue what it's doing. but _ continue existing, continue what it's doing, but it's— continue existing, continue what it's doing, but it's an _ continue existing, continue what| it's doing, but it's an opportunity on the _ it's doing, but it's an opportunity on the track— it's doing, but it's an opportunity on the back of— it's doing, but it's an opportunity on the back of what _ it's doing, but it's an opportunity on the back of what ben - it's doing, but it's an opportunity on the back of what ben has - on the back of what ben has achieved _ on the back of what ben has achieved. [it— on the back of what ben has achieved-— on the back of what ben has achieved. , , , :, �* ., achieved. it is because of ben, not because of— achieved. it is because of ben, not because of the _ achieved. it is because of ben, not because of the local _ achieved. it is because of ben, not because of the local conservative i because of the local conservative candidate or the conservative prime minister. :, , :, candidate or the conservative prime minister. . , . ., ~ minister. that is a little mark a . ainst minister. that is a little mark against that— minister. that is a little mark against that candidate. - minister. that is a little mark against that candidate. she l minister. that is a little mark| against that candidate. she is minister. that is a little mark i against that candidate. she is in hartlepool. _ against that candidate. she is in hartlepool, she _ against that candidate. she is in hartlepool, she is _ against that candidate. she is in hartlepool, she isjust - against that candidate. she is in hartlepool, she isjust not - hartlepool, she isjust not available to us. you said it is the lesser of two evils, voting labour, even though you are a labour woman. can i ask you what you think of the job that sir keir starmer is doing as leader? ~ job that sir keir starmer is doing as leader?— job that sir keir starmer is doing as leader? ~ ,, ., . ., as leader? when keir starmer came in after takin: as leader? when keir starmer came in after taking over _ as leader? when keir starmer came in after taking over from _ as leader? when keir starmer came in after taking over from jeremy - after taking over from jeremy corbvn. — after taking over from jeremy corbvn. my— after taking over from jeremy corbyn, my husband - after taking over from jeremy corbyn, my husband and - after taking over from jeremy corbyn, my husband and i- after taking over from jeremy- corbyn, my husband and i decided
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that we _ corbyn, my husband and i decided that we would _ corbyn, my husband and i decided that we would give _ corbyn, my husband and i decided that we would give him _ corbyn, my husband and i decided that we would give him a - corbyn, my husband and i decided that we would give him a chance, i corbyn, my husband and i decided i that we would give him a chance, see how things _ that we would give him a chance, see how things went, _ that we would give him a chance, see how things went, and _ that we would give him a chance, see how things went, and in _ that we would give him a chance, see how things went, and in january - that we would give him a chance, see how things went, and in january we . how things went, and in january we actually— how things went, and in january we actually cancelled _ how things went, and in january we actually cancelled our— how things went, and in january we actually cancelled our labour - how things went, and in january we actually cancelled our labour partyl actually cancelled our labour party membershiu _ actually cancelled our labour party membershiu we _ actually cancelled our labour party membership. we were _ actually cancelled our labour party membership. we were not- actually cancelled our labour party membership. we were not happy. actually cancelled our labour party. membership. we were not happy with how things _ membership. we were not happy with how things were — membership. we were not happy with how things were going. _ membership. we were not happy with how things were going. we _ membership. we were not happy with how things were going. we feel- membership. we were not happy with how things were going. we feel that l how things were going. we feel that he is not _ how things were going. we feel that he is not trying _ how things were going. we feel that he is not trying to _ how things were going. we feel that he is not trying to push— how things were going. we feel that he is not trying to push things - he is not trying to push things forward, — he is not trying to push things forward, that— he is not trying to push things forward, that he _ he is not trying to push things forward, that he is— he is not trying to push things forward, that he isjust - he is not trying to push things forward, that he isjust happy| he is not trying to push things . forward, that he isjust happy to keep— forward, that he isjust happy to keep things _ forward, that he isjust happy to keep things muddling _ forward, that he isjust happy to keep things muddling along. - forward, that he isjust happy to keep things muddling along. doj forward, that he isjust happy to keep things muddling along. do you think it has been _ keep things muddling along. do you think it has been more _ keep things muddling along. do you think it has been more difficult - keep things muddling along. do you think it has been more difficult for l think it has been more difficult for him because we are in a pandemic? t him because we are in a pandemic? i won't lie, it probably has been. but everybody— won't lie, it probably has been. but everybody is — won't lie, it probably has been. but everybody is struggling _ won't lie, it probably has been. but everybody is struggling at - won't lie, it probably has been. but everybody is struggling at the - everybody is struggling at the moment— everybody is struggling at the moment and _ everybody is struggling at the moment and everybody- everybody is struggling at the moment and everybody is - everybody is struggling at the . moment and everybody is trying everybody is struggling at the - moment and everybody is trying to make _ moment and everybody is trying to make the _ moment and everybody is trying to make the best _ moment and everybody is trying to make the best of _ moment and everybody is trying to make the best of this _ moment and everybody is trying to make the best of this bad - moment and everybody is trying tol make the best of this bad situation. so he _ make the best of this bad situation. so he needs— make the best of this bad situation. so he needs to _ make the best of this bad situation. so he needs to step— make the best of this bad situation. so he needs to step up— make the best of this bad situation. so he needs to step up as _ make the best of this bad situation. so he needs to step up as far- make the best of this bad situation. so he needs to step up as far as - make the best of this bad situation. | so he needs to step up as far as you are concerned?— are concerned? yes, i think he really needs — are concerned? yes, i think he really needs to _ are concerned? yes, i think he really needs to do _ are concerned? yes, i think he really needs to do more, - are concerned? yes, i think he really needs to do more, not l are concerned? yes, i think he i really needs to do more, notjust for hartlepool, _ really needs to do more, notjust for hartlepool, but _ really needs to do more, notjust for hartlepool, but for _ really needs to do more, notjust for hartlepool, but for the - really needs to do more, not justl for hartlepool, but for the country and his— for hartlepool, but for the country and his labour— for hartlepool, but for the country and his labour membership. - for hartlepool, but for the country and his labour membership. findl for hartlepool, but for the country and his labour membership. and let me ask you. — and his labour membership. and let me ask you, what _ and his labour membership. and let me ask you, what do _ and his labour membership. and let me ask you, what do you _ and his labour membership. and let me ask you, what do you think- and his labour membership. and let me ask you, what do you think of. and his labour membership. and let| me ask you, what do you think of the job borisjohnson is doing as prime minister? t job boris johnson is doing as prime minister? ., , job boris johnson is doing as prime minister? ~ , :, ., :, :, minister? i think he is doing a good “ob minister? i think he is doing a good job through — minister? i think he is doing a good job through brexit, _ minister? i think he is doing a good job through brexit, covid _ minister? i think he is doing a good job through brexit, covid and - minister? i think he is doing a good job through brexit, covid and the i job through brexit, covid and the rest _ job through brexit, covid and the rest it— job through brexit, covid and the
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rest it is— job through brexit, covid and the rest. it isjust a shame that some of the _ rest. it isjust a shame that some of the sleaze things that are going on at _ of the sleaze things that are going on at the — of the sleaze things that are going on at the moment have been a distraction _ on at the moment have been a distraction to the leadership. 30 distraction to the leadership. s: that distraction to the leadership. sc thatis distraction to the leadership. sr that is cutting through to you? integrity is an important thing to me, integrity is an important thing to me. so— integrity is an important thing to me. so it — integrity is an important thing to me, so it does not sit very well, what _ me, so it does not sit very well, what is — me, so it does not sit very well, what is going on at the moment. does boris johnson — what is going on at the moment. does boris johnson have _ what is going on at the moment. tt9: borisjohnson have integrity in your view? i would borisjohnson have integrity in your view? iwould rather borisjohnson have integrity in your view? i would rather not say. that is a very diplomatic answer. thank you very much for your time today. karen, thank you. philip, thank you. thank you for being on bbc news with us. we are going to talk to more voters a little bit later.— voters a little bit later. thank ou, voters a little bit later. thank you, victoria. _ you can find the full list of candidates standing in the hartlepool by—election on our website, bbc.co.uk. let's bring you more on that breaking news — that arlene foster has announced her resignation as leader
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of the dup and first minister of northern ireland. she gave this statement. good afternoon. a short time ago i called my party chairman too and for him that i intend to step down as leader of the democratic unionist party, and as the first minister of northern ireland at the end ofjune. it is important to give space over the next few weeks to the party officers to allow them to make arrangements for the election of a new leader, and when elected i will work with the new leader on transition arrangements. as first minister, it is important that i complete work on a number of important issues for northern ireland, alongside other executive callings. northern ireland and its people have been heavily impacted by the covid—i9 pandemic, and there remains more work to do in order to steer us through the pandemic and to lessen its impact on the lives of everyone. it has been the privilege of my life to serve the people of northern ireland as their first
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minister, and of course to represent my home constituency. i first entered the assembly in 2003, and undoubtedly the journey of this last 18 years has been memorable. there are many people who have helped and supported me throughout that period, and i will always be grateful for the kindness and support shown to me by them. and while there have been many difficult and testing times for the executive, it remains my firm view that northern ireland has been better served having local ministers at this time. it is unthinkable that we could have faced into the coronavirus pandemic without our own devolved ministers in place, and no ministerial direction for departments. as i prepare to depart the political stage, it is my view that if northern ireland is to prosper then it will only do so built on the foundations of a
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successful and durable devolution. that will require continued hard work and real determination and courage on all sides. while the focus is on me today, and i recognise that that will pass, for me the decision to enter politics was never about party or person, it was never about party or person, it was about speaking up for the voiceless and building a northern ireland which could prosper and be at peace within the united kingdom. i am in the first to recognise that there have been ups and downs over this last five and a half years. the 2016 assembly election result and our party's best ever westminster result in 2017 do stand out amongst the high points, when the electorate sent a clear message that they wanted to keep northern ireland moving forward. the confidence and supply agreement was able to bring £1 billion extra into northern
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ireland for spending, and our priorities were not narrow but based on more investment in mental health, hospitals, ringing broadband to rural communities, improving our roads and ensuring funding to ensure more shared housing and accommodation. for our innocent victims, i am accommodation. for our innocent victims, iam proud accommodation. for our innocent victims, i am proud that we have battled together and whilst too late for some we finally secured a truly deserved pension for you. for our armed service, the veterans position is in place and you have an advocate to stand up for you and make sure your voice is heard at the heart of government. of course, as with highs, there were lows along the way. the three years without devolution caused untold harm to our public services and the rhi enquiry was a difficult period. the protocol being forced on northern ireland against the will of unionists has served to destabilise northern
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ireland in more recent times. while there is still a job of work to do, i am proud that there is a young generation of democratic unionists getting involved in politics and trying to shape northern ireland for the better. 0ver trying to shape northern ireland for the better. over this past 12 months, i have been holding online meetings with young people, mainly from working class communities, and encouraging them, especially the young women, to get involved. and i echo that encouragement today. politics and debate is the only path to effect change in society. you will and can be mps, and las, to effect change in society. you willand can be mps, and las, and the councillors of tomorrow. my election as leader of the democratic unionist party broke a glass ceiling, and i am glad that i have inspired other women to enter politics and spurs them on to getting involved in elected office. i understand the misogynistic criticism is that female public
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figures have had to take, and sadly it is the same for all women in public life. so i want to encourage you to keep going and don't let the online lynch mob get you down. to the hundreds of party supporters who have been in touch over this past few days, i say a sincere thank you for the opportunities to serve you and the support you have given to me. foralmost and the support you have given to me. for almost five and a half years, i have been incredibly humbled to have had the opportunity to lead the democratic unionist party. i have sought to lead the party and northern ireland away from the division and towards a better path. there are people in northern ireland with a british identity, others are irish, others are another irish, others are a mixture of all three, and some are new and emerging. we must all learn to be generous to each other, to live
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together and to share this wonderful country. the future of unison and northern ireland will not be found in division, it will only be found sharing this place we are all privileged to call home. —— unionism. privileged to call home. -- unionism-— privileged to call home. -- unionism. : �*, , ., unionism. arlene foster's statement. we have a statement _ unionism. arlene foster's statement. we have a statement from _ unionism. arlene foster's statement. we have a statement from northern i we have a statement from northern ireland's deputy first minister. she says, "i have worked beside arlene foster this year. throughout the pandemic, i acknowledge the efforts arlene foster has made as first minister and the service she has given as we battle the biggest health crisis in a generation. it is now a matter for the health crisis in a generation. it is now a matterfor the du p2 choose health crisis in a generation. it is now a matter for the du p2 choose a replacement. the incoming leader should recognise that the political landscape across our island has changed, the broad community are impatient for social reform and
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political change that reflects a modern and progressive society where everyone can feel that they belong on an equal basis." it goes on in that vein and finishes it saying, the electorate want parties to work in their interest, "this is certainly my priority now." with me now is the political editor of the unionist newsletter newspaper sam mcbride. it seems that arlene foster was brushing off this threat and said, these are stories, from time to time. now is going.— time. now is going. that is absolutely _ time. now is going. that is absolutely correct. - time. now is going. that is absolutely correct. it - time. now is going. that is absolutely correct. it was l time. now is going. that is i absolutely correct. it was just time. now is going. that is - absolutely correct. it was just 27 hours _ absolutely correct. it was just 27 hours ago — absolutely correct. it was just 27 hours ago where arlene foster really quite breezily dismissed what we had been reporting on our front page yesterday— been reporting on our front page yesterday morning, that there was growing _ yesterday morning, that there was growing discontent with her leadership. and she said she had lrigger— leadership. and she said she had bigger things to concentrate on. it
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is really— bigger things to concentrate on. it is really clear now that she accepts belatedly— is really clear now that she accepts belatedly that that was not the case _ belatedly that that was not the case i— belatedly that that was not the case. i think the significant thing here _ case. i think the significant thing here is— case. i think the significant thing here is that arlene foster is not 'ust here is that arlene foster is not just accepting that there was an enormous — just accepting that there was an enormous opposition to her internally. she is that that was so insurmountable that she wouldn't even _ insurmountable that she wouldn't even stand as a candidate in what these _ even stand as a candidate in what these people were asking for, which was a _ these people were asking for, which was a leadership contest. do not even _ was a leadership contest. do not even decide what her great political hero margaret thatcher did, shows the scale _ hero margaret thatcher did, shows the scale of what she was facing here~ _ the scale of what she was facing here that — the scale of what she was facing here. that goes against every one of instincts _ here. that goes against every one of instincts. she is not somebody who likes to _ instincts. she is not somebody who likes to give in. she is determined, she is— likes to give in. she is determined, she is tenacious, those are her strengths, _ she is tenacious, those are her strengths, they are also her weaknesses. to throw the towel in it such an _ weaknesses. to throw the towel in it such an early — weaknesses. to throw the towel in it such an early stage, i think, shows how overwhelming the opposition to her had _ how overwhelming the opposition to her had been within the dup. why was there discontent _ her had been within the dup. why was there discontent with _ her had been within the dup. why was there discontent with her _ there discontent with her leadership?— there discontent with her leadership? there discontent with her leadershi? , ., , :, leadership? there is a very long tail to this- _ leadership? there is a very long tail to this. really, _
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leadership? there is a very long tail to this. really, the - leadership? there is a very long tail to this. really, the first - leadership? there is a very long | tail to this. really, the first year of arlene — tail to this. really, the first year of arlene foster's leadership, five years _ of arlene foster's leadership, five years ago. — of arlene foster's leadership, five years ago, was incredibly successful. she was mistress of everything as she surveyed, a really popular— everything as she surveyed, a really popular leader of unionism, someone who was— popular leader of unionism, someone who was working at that point really closelv _ who was working at that point really closely with mark mcguinness. and it all fell— closely with mark mcguinness. and it all fell apart with the cash for ash scandal — all fell apart with the cash for ash scandal. from that point on, a year into her— scandal. from that point on, a year into hertenure, she never scandal. from that point on, a year into her tenure, she never recovered her authoritv — into her tenure, she never recovered her authority. many people in the dup and outside the dup have really been surprised how long she has lasted _ been surprised how long she has lasted i— been surprised how long she has lasted. i think the fluke result by having _ lasted. i think the fluke result by having that 2017 election result which _ having that 2017 election result which propelled her to national significance in holding the balance of power— significance in holding the balance of power in the house of commons, that was— of power in the house of commons, that was something that really masked — that was something that really masked the scale of the difficulties for her— masked the scale of the difficulties for her internally, and then over recent— for her internally, and then over recent years the northern ireland protocol, — recent years the northern ireland protocol, the irish sea border, which — protocol, the irish sea border, which is — protocol, the irish sea border, which is really cut northern ireland off from _ which is really cut northern ireland off from the rest of the uk, that is
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something — off from the rest of the uk, that is something which happened on her watch~ _ something which happened on her watch. and i think that is now the central— watch. and i think that is now the central difficulty for her successor. how do they unravel these problems— successor. how do they unravel these problems that have grown over recent years and _ problems that have grown over recent years and really in some cases, is there _ years and really in some cases, is there anything credibly they can do about— there anything credibly they can do about some of these issues? to what extent had her— about some of these issues? to what extent had her views _ about some of these issues? to what extent had her views softened, - extent had her views softened, though? when you read parts of the statement she has issued and you listen to what she has said, she is talking about how northern ireland has changed, that different identities have to be recognised and respected in northern ireland. that the future of unionism and northern ireland will not be found in division. that is also echoed by the statement that the deputy first minister has issued. is that a problem for the party? this apparent softenin: ? problem for the party? this apparent softening? if— problem for the party? this apparent softening? if a _ problem for the party? this apparent softening? if a problem _ problem for the party? this apparent softening? if a problem with - problem for the party? this apparent softening? if a problem with some i problem for the party? this apparentj softening? if a problem with some of their supporters who want to see them _ their supporters who want to see them go — their supporters who want to see them go any more traditional territorv _ them go any more traditional territory. that is where the party came _ territory. that is where the party came from _ territory. that is where the party came from. that is where many of its members _ came from. that is where many of its members are —
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came from. that is where many of its members are most comfortable. the reality— members are most comfortable. the reality in _ members are most comfortable. the reality in northern ireland, which a growing _ reality in northern ireland, which a growing number of dup members accept, _ growing number of dup members accept, the growing centre ground, constitutional swing voters, people open to _ constitutional swing voters, people open to being persuaded, depending on who— open to being persuaded, depending on who can _ open to being persuaded, depending on who can make the best argument, those _ on who can make the best argument, those are _ on who can make the best argument, those are the people who they really need to _ those are the people who they really need to go— those are the people who they really need to go for now. will they go for those _ need to go for now. will they go for those people by tackling hard to the right, _ those people by tackling hard to the right, or— those people by tackling hard to the right, orwillthey those people by tackling hard to the right, or will they get those people by being _ right, or will they get those people by being more persuasive, opening themselves up a bit more, being a bit less— themselves up a bit more, being a bit less secretive and dogmatic, a bit less secretive and dogmatic, a bit less— bit less secretive and dogmatic, a bit less of— bit less secretive and dogmatic, a bit less of the swagger that has defined — bit less of the swagger that has defined the dup. generally i believe there is— defined the dup. generally i believe there is a _ defined the dup. generally i believe there is a perception that the dup has relied — there is a perception that the dup has relied on raw political power. that has — has relied on raw political power. that has been successful in the short—term. in the long term i think it has— short—term. in the long term i think it has been— short—term. in the long term i think it has been disastrous. they are in the position— it has been disastrous. they are in the position where they have very few friends in london or in belfast. if few friends in london or in belfast.
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if you _ few friends in london or in belfast. if you are _ few friends in london or in belfast. if you are not a instinctive dup supporter. _ if you are not a instinctive dup supporter, you are likely to quite significantly dislike the party. arlene — significantly dislike the party. arlene foster was a very divisive figure _ arlene foster was a very divisive figure to— arlene foster was a very divisive figure to a _ arlene foster was a very divisive figure. to a certain extent she overcompensated at various points. she actually wasn't at heart quite as hard—line as those positions made out. as hard—line as those positions made out she _ as hard—line as those positions made out she was — as hard—line as those positions made out. she was a church of ireland and anglican— out. she was a church of ireland and anglican person in the dup, that is quite _ anglican person in the dup, that is quite uncommon. she was the first female _ quite uncommon. she was the first female leader of the party. she had more _ female leader of the party. she had more liberal views on things like -ay more liberal views on things like gay rights — more liberal views on things like gay rights then some dup members. but i gay rights then some dup members. but i think— gay rights then some dup members. but i think she increasingly felt that she — but i think she increasingly felt that she had to really show the party _ that she had to really show the party that she was of them, and therefore — party that she was of them, and therefore did things which were perhaps— therefore did things which were perhaps not instinctively in keeping with her— perhaps not instinctively in keeping with her own views but which created an image _ with her own views but which created an image of— with her own views but which created an image of her which was not quite in keeping _ an image of her which was not quite in keeping with what she actually believed — in keeping with what she actually believed herself. we
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in keeping with what she actually believed herself.— in keeping with what she actually believed herself. we will see who the dup chooses _ believed herself. we will see who the dup chooses next. _ believed herself. we will see who the dup chooses next. arlene - believed herself. we will see who i the dup chooses next. arlene foster talked about how difficult it was being a woman in public life. thank you very much. " arlene is a truly dedicated public servant... " that's the statement from the northern ireland secretary, brandon lewis. in a moment, the health secretary will lead a downing street press conference alongside professorjonathan van tam
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the deputy chief medical officer for england and nhs england's dr nikki kanani. but there's no doubt that matt hancock will face questions from journalists over the funding of borisjohnson's downing street flat refurbishments — earlier the electoral commission announced a formal investigation — saying it was "satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence or offences may have occurred." joining me is the co—leader of the green party, jonathan bartley. the prime minister very much under pressure but coming out fighting. what more do you want to know from him? fish what more do you want to know from him? : :, , what more do you want to know from him? : . , :, ., , what more do you want to know from him? i, , him? an answer to a very simple straightforward _ him? an answer to a very simple straightforward question. - him? an answer to a very simple straightforward question. it i him? an answer to a very simple straightforward question. it was | him? an answer to a very simple i straightforward question. it was put to him in multiple—choice form, a, b, c, or d. where did the money come from? who paid for the original invoice? we know this because if it was a donor, we need to know what was a donor, we need to know what was behind that gift? what was the person giving the gift expecting from the prime minister? of course, this is potentially a conflict of interest, potentially breach of the
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ministerial code. by the prime minister cannot come out with a straightforward answer? he minister cannot come out with a straightforward answer?- minister cannot come out with a straightforward answer? he has said thou~h, the straightforward answer? he has said though, the prime _ straightforward answer? he has said though, the prime minister, - straightforward answer? he has said though, the prime minister, that i straightforward answer? he has said though, the prime minister, that he | though, the prime minister, that he will provide whatever extra information is required? surely that is now up to the new person who is overseeing ministers interests and standards, and the electoral commission to do that? truths; standards, and the electoral commission to do that? why on earth should we have _ commission to do that? why on earth should we have to _ commission to do that? why on earth should we have to have _ commission to do that? why on earth should we have to have an _ should we have to have an investigation when the prime minister could have today or anytime in the last 48 hours come out and said very clearly how the refurbishment of his flat was originally paid for. he must know the answer to this. why is he not telling anyone about it? but if you got to hide? is said already countless examples of him lying in the house of commons stop we have seen a video that has been viewed over 13 million times online. we
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hope the bbc will cover it and ask the questions. we have seen arlene foster resigning. he effectively lied to the dup over the irish border. this and other things has led to the resignation of arlene foster. is there no end to the trouble and difficulty caused by the prime minister's incompetence? this prime minister's incompetence? this prime minister's incompetence? this prime minister needs to be called to account, he needs to be asked a straight question. can account, he needs to be asked a straight question.— straight question. can i 'ust put this to bed * straight question. can i 'ust put this to bed once i straight question. can i 'ust put this to bed once and i straight question. can ijust put this to bed once and for - straight question. can ijust put this to bed once and for all, i straight question. can ijust put| this to bed once and for all, that we are covering it. that is why we are having you on. just because we are having you on. just because we are not showing a film by someone else does not mean that we are not covering this story. it is lead on our bulletins, lead on our website, and i really would like to put that to bed. �* :, :, :, i. to bed. i'm not going to let you get awa with to bed. i'm not going to let you get away with that. _
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to bed. i'm not going to let you get away with that. the _ to bed. i'm not going to let you get away with that. the video - to bed. i'm not going to let you get away with that. the video has i to bed. i'm not going to let you get away with that. the video has ten l away with that. the video has ten examples of the prime minister telling untruths and lies. hate examples of the prime minister telling untruths and lies. we are constantly talking _ telling untruths and lies. we are constantly talking to _ telling untruths and lies. we are constantly talking to people i telling untruths and lies. we are constantly talking to people like | constantly talking to people like you about the problems with politician's conduct. we are. we are constantly examining what is happening at prime minister's questions. whether the prime minister is asking the right questions or not. hate minister is asking the right questions or not.— minister is asking the right questions or not. minister is asking the right ruestions or not. ~ . :, ., questions or not. we are doing that all the time- _ questions or not. we are doing that all the time. yesterday, _ questions or not. we are doing that all the time. yesterday, a - questions or not. we are doing that all the time. yesterday, a group i questions or not. we are doing that all the time. yesterday, a group of| all the time. yesterday, a group of mps across party, went to meet the speaker of the house of commons. you did not even cover it on the six o'clock news. we did not even cover it on the six o'clock news.— did not even cover it on the six o'clock news. ~ . :, ., , o'clock news. we covered it in many other... o'clock news. we covered it in many other- -- the — o'clock news. we covered it in many other... the bbc _ o'clock news. we covered it in many other... the bbc is _ o'clock news. we covered it in many other... the bbc is more _ o'clock news. we covered it in many other... the bbc is more than... i other... the bbc is more than... there are many other bbc outlets where you can find all of this information. let's talk about how we clean it up, then. where should the pressure be coming from on the prime minister and other ministers as well? besides the media as well. we
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have seen keir starmer at the dispatch box, we know that caroline lucas has been calling for transparency because people care about this stuff.— about this stuff. well, people do. 13 million people _ about this stuff. well, people do. 13 million people have _ about this stuff. well, people do. 13 million people have watched i about this stuff. well, people do. i 13 million people have watched that video alone. what we need is the bbc to be asking by the prime minister is not coming forward with a response to the questions now, but we also need to see reform of the ministerial code. we are on the absurd position in this country where the ministerial code is presided over by the prime minister. the prime minister is supposed to mark his own homework. in what universe is that a good way to run a democracy? we need those fundamental questions asked about the scandal that has gone on for years in this country, where people can effectively buy their seats in the
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