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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 27, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at eight. no let up for the prime minister — more questions over who paid to renovate his downing street flat. labour accuse him of being dishonest. we haven't had that full and frank explanation for the prime minister so far. to be honest, he lied yesterday. that is not good enough. it is all been done incorrectly. there will be a cabinet office report when they put that out there and your account. that's it has all been done correctly. everybody will see what has happened. there are reports that the first minister of northern ireland, arlene foster, is facing a challenge to her leadership of the democratic unionist party. the first shipment of uk medical aid arrives in india, as coronavirus infections and deaths, reach record highs. thanks to the uk and everybody else, we too are sending thousand of
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oxygen concentrators in field hospitals and people, but it is wonderful to see the world standing up wonderful to see the world standing up and helping. wejust need wonderful to see the world standing up and helping. we just need to wonderful to see the world standing up and helping. wejust need to keep that spirit going throughout this pandemic. researchers say lockdowns and other covid measures, adversely affect the speech development, of young children. some schools are now offering additional support. back to royal duties — the duke and duchess of cambridge and also the queen have carried out their first official public engagements since the death of the duke of edinburgh. good evening and welcome to bbc news. labour have escalated their attack on borisjohnson — now openly accusing him of lying over where he got the tens of thousands of pounds spent on the redecoration
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of his downing street flat. it's an accusation rejected by the prime minister's spokesman who said he'd complied with all the rules and that any costs have been met by the prime minister personally. the row follows persistent reports that mrjohnson said he was willing to see "bodies pile high" when discussing covid strategy — something downing street has insisted he did not say. as our deputy political editor, vicki young reports, it all adds up to mounting pressure on the government. a warning, there is flash photography in vicki's report. leading the country and setting the tone for the rest of government. the decisions prime ministers make every day in this room have far—reaching consequences for us all. they won't always be right, but criticism of borisjohnson isn't just about hisjudgment, it's fast becoming about his integrity. everywhere they go, ministers are being asked similar questions about their boss's behaviour. has the prime minister broken the rules, mr raab? no. that refers to the expensive
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refurbishment of the flat mrjohnson shares with his fiancee. the prime minister's former adviser dominic cummings says the tory leader tried to get party donors to secretly pay for the renovations. labour say it's time to come clean. who's given the loan, who's given the money? because we need to know who the prime minister, who borisjohnson, is beholden to, who has paid for his furniture, for his sofa, for the bed he sleeps in. and we haven't had that full and frank explanation from the prime minister so far. to be honest, he lied yesterday. that's not good enough. downing street says mrjohnson personally met the cost of wider refurbishment in this year but hasn't denied that someone else originally picked up the bill. if they did, the rules say that must be made public. the reason why we have these rules around transparency is so that the public know who decision—makers, up to and including the prime minister, what their interests are and to be clear that they are acting on behalf of the people, on behalf of citizens,
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on behalf of taxpayers, and that they're not overly influenced by donations or loans or private interests. number ten insists mrjohnson has acted in accordance with codes of conduct and electoral rules. many conservative mps i've spoken to are keen to downplay the significance of all of this. one minister said borisjohnson has a knack of getting away with things that others wouldn't. but there is concern that lots of individual unrelated accusations could combine together and erode trust in the prime minister. one of the most damaging accusations mrjohnson faces is about his views on shutting down the country because of covid. he denies saying he would rather see bodies pile high than approve a third lockdown, but sources told the bbc and other media organisations that he did make the remark. it's another question being fired at cabinet ministers. i don't need to worry about who may have or didn't say what and when. the prime minister says he didn't say it, that's good
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enough for me, because, actually, saving lives is what matters, and that's what this prime minister has done. mrjohnson would rather focus on campaigning ahead of next week's elections, but there are bucketloads of questions still to be answered. let's cross to our political correspondent ben wright. we correspondent ben wright. were told not least byt newspaper we were told not least by the newspaper this morning that the prime minister wanted to move on from this. how successful has the government been today? flat from this. how successful has the government been today?- from this. how successful has the government been today? not at all reall . his government been today? not at all really. his questions _ government been today? not at all really. his questions still— government been today? not at all really. his questions still lapping . really. his questions still lapping the door of downing street. they are cumulatively damaging and they do stop the government being able to talk about other things. was so close as vicki was saying to elections and important elections next week. the real mystery i think is around the flat. that potentially could be the most politically damaging of the story. it is not clear why number ten are not spelling out now precisely how the
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prime minister originally paid for the redecoration of the residence in downing street. they said he paid for her personally but also speculation about whether there was a loan or a donation from the tory party, questions which really happens side step by the prime minister spokesperson consistently now. we know to the promise to actually cabinet secretary, the most senior civil servant, to look into all of this and i think the expectation is that there will be a declaration made at some point in one of the registers probably the register of ministerial interest that show precisely how this has been paid for and how the prime minister presumed has paid the money back but it remains very opaque and as yet the government have decided they are not yet ready to spell out now exactly how this redecoration project was paid for.— project was paid for. thank you, ben. project was paid for. thank you, ben- everybody _ project was paid for. thank you, ben. everybody also _ project was paid for. thank you, ben. everybody also want - project was paid for. thank you, ben. everybody also want to - project was paid for. thank you, l ben. everybody also want to know will will be in the papers tomorrow. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered
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in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are former fleet street editor, eve pollard, and thejournalist and broadcaster, jenny kleeman. the bbc understands that at least three quarters of the democratic unionists' members of the northern ireland assembly and half of their eight mps have signed a no—confidence motion in their party leader, arlene foster. mrs foster has led the dup and been northern ireland's first minister for more than five years. this was what she had to say to reporters duing a visit to a youth centre earlier today.... do you have the backing of your party? do you have the backing of your .a ? , �* ., party? sorry, i'm here today with peter to visit _ party? sorry, i'm here today with peter to visit the _ party? sorry, i'm here today with peter to visit the youth _ party? sorry, i'm here today with peter to visit the youth centre. i peter to visit the youth centre. stories— peter to visit the youth centre. stories on— peter to visit the youth centre. stories on leadership, from time to time _ stories on leadership, from time to time it_ stories on leadership, from time to time it is_ stories on leadership, from time to time. it is one of those times. we williust_ time. it is one of those times. we willjust deal with it and move on.
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i have _ willjust deal with it and move on. i have bigger things to do. including getting us to this covid—19 pandemic and listening to the concerns of working—class communities and i'm really pleased to be _ communities and i'm really pleased to be here — communities and i'm really pleased to be here today to listen to them. you're _ to be here today to listen to them. you're confident in your position as leader? figs you're confident in your position as leader? �* , , you're confident in your position as leader? a , ., , leader? as i say, the stores come about from _ leader? as i say, the stores come about from time _ leader? as i say, the stores come about from time to _ leader? as i say, the stores come about from time to time - leader? as i say, the stores come about from time to time and - leader? as i say, the stores come about from time to time and thisl leader? as i say, the stores comel about from time to time and this is no different. let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page. i think she also says she had bigger things to deal with. they don't get much bigger than a leadership challenge if a majority of your mps, more than that if you are mla, seem to have lost confidence, the other people who actually vote the leadership election.- people who actually vote the leadership election. that is right. no doubt that _ leadership election. that is right. no doubt that arlene _ leadership election. that is right. no doubt that arlene foster - no doubt that arlene foster leadership this evening is under some severe pressure. just a couple of hours after she was saying what she said they're in that clip in west belfast come at a news programme that a letter was circulating amongst the dup selected representatives expressing no confidence in her and calling for a
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leadership contest. now in 50 years at the dup existence, there has never been a leadership contest. arlene fossett is really the third leader, the founder was in charge fairly long time and succeeded by peter robertson and five years ago mrs foster succeeded mr robinson but she was a candidate for the leadership. remains to be seen whether or not there will actually be leadership contest. or she put yourself forward for a leadership election or if she would stand down and we would either be into another single candidate coming forward or a leadership election between two or more candidates from within the party. but it does seem to me at the moment unlikely that mrs foster is going to be able to see off this challenge to her leadership as you say, looking pretty stark for her at least three quarters of the dup members of the storm mina simply
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saying they take no confidence in her and at least half of the parties mps at westminster also signing that later. —— s torment. mps at westminster also signing that later. -- s torment.— later. -- s torment. listening to the radio — later. -- s torment. listening to the radio earlier _ later. -- s torment. listening to the radio earlier in _ later. -- s torment. listening to the radio earlier in the _ later. -- s torment. listening to the radio earlier in the bbc - later. -- s torment. listening to the radio earlier in the bbc also | the radio earlier in the bbc also saw a letterfrom dup the radio earlier in the bbc also saw a letter from dup counsellors, implying similar lack of confidence in her and implying similar lack of confidence in herand nigel implying similar lack of confidence in her and nigel dodds, or deputy. presuming that close off the option of even appealing to the wider membership. —— stormont assembly. letting the meps know you don't want to get right get rid of. yes. recently — to get right get rid of. yes. recently the _ to get right get rid of. yes. recently the size _ to get right get rid of. yes. recently the size of - to get right get rid of. yes. recently the size of the - to get right get rid of. yes. | recently the size of the sent to get right get rid of. yes. - recently the size of the sent and the satisfaction with their leadership have been more obvious in the grassroots of the party then the stronger assembly. most of the issues are about brexit and the northern ireland protocol, the system where goods are checked whenever they arrive in northern ireland. the union and see that as a trade border with of the uk, something that threatens their sense of britishness and is cause a lot of unease in those communities and they had a link of that issue by the dup
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leadership i think it's one of the key reasons why we are now seeing this moving xmas foster.— key reasons why we are now seeing this moving xmas foster. thank you, chris. -- this moving xmas foster. thank you, chris- -- this— this moving xmas foster. thank you, chris. -- this move _ this moving xmas foster. thank you, chris. -- this move against _ this moving xmas foster. thank you, chris. -- this move against mrs - chris. —— this move against mrs foster. with me now is the newsletter�*s political editor sam mcbride. chris was talking about the northern ireland protocol. some listening in other parts of the uk will say surely it was the prime minister who said he would do one thing and then let the dup down. why is she getting the blame? she let the dup down. why is she getting the blame? ., . let the dup down. why is she getting the blame? ,, , , ., the blame? she is getting the plane artl the blame? she is getting the plane partly because _ the blame? she is getting the plane partly because her— the blame? she is getting the plane partly because her primary - partly because her primary responsibility as a leader of unionist_ responsibility as a leader of unionist is to protect the union and however_ unionist is to protect the union and however you pushing the blame for this, she _ however you pushing the blame for this, she has failed in that regard. she has_ this, she has failed in that regard. she has not— this, she has failed in that regard. she has not been able to protect the union _ she has not been able to protect the union in_ she has not been able to protect the union. in normaltimes she has not been able to protect the union. in normal times i think i might— union. in normal times i think i might have _ union. in normal times i think i might have been something she could have dismissed and said i'm a regional— have dismissed and said i'm a regional party leader within a very large _ regional party leader within a very large country, we are a tiny part of the uk _ large country, we are a tiny part of the uk i_ large country, we are a tiny part of the uk. i don't have the power. but that is_ the uk. idon't have the power. but that is hot— the uk. i don't have the power. but that is not will really happen here. when _ that is not will really happen here. when the — that is not will really happen here. when the dup had power westminster, there was_ when the dup had power westminster, there was this preponderance towards
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there was this preponderance towards the swagger, no humility, a really sense _ the swagger, no humility, a really sense that — the swagger, no humility, a really sense that they were in charge, they could _ sense that they were in charge, they could drive _ sense that they were in charge, they could drive policy and they took credit _ could drive policy and they took credit for— could drive policy and they took credit for policy so when they did that in_ credit for policy so when they did that in the — credit for policy so when they did that in the good times, it is hard to wash — that in the good times, it is hard to wash her— that in the good times, it is hard to wash her hands up in the bad times — to wash her hands up in the bad times. 0" — to wash her hands up in the bad times. ., ,., to wash her hands up in the bad times. ., ., to wash her hands up in the bad times. . ,., ., 4' to wash her hands up in the bad times. ., ., ~ ., times. on that some of the kind of wider kind of— times. on that some of the kind of wider kind of challenges _ times. on that some of the kind of wider kind of challenges facing - wider kind of challenges facing unionist at the moment, will we had a year away from the next assembly elections come in my right in my memory was the last union election with the dup was of the largest party in the first time it was unionist collectively was a bigger majority of the vote. presumably there are wider forces here that the party must naturally be worried about her moving against them. is that part of why they don't feel her leadership is dynamic enough to defend their position?— defend their position? there is frankly just _ defend their position? there is franklyjust a _ defend their position? there is franklyjust a sense _ defend their position? there is franklyjust a sense across - defend their position? there is i franklyjust a sense across much defend their position? there is - franklyjust a sense across much of the dup, _ franklyjust a sense across much of the dup, it — franklyjust a sense across much of the dup, it is pretty much the subtle — the dup, it is pretty much the subtle will most of the dup based on the figures we see tonight that arlene — the figures we see tonight that arlene foster is simply not up to the job — arlene foster is simply not up to the job a— arlene foster is simply not up to the job. a question of competence and a _ the job. a question of competence and a question of tone and a
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question— and a question of tone and a question of how she is by voters. i think— question of how she is by voters. i think it _ question of how she is by voters. i think it is — question of how she is by voters. i think it is as— question of how she is by voters. i think it is as you allude to moving beyond _ think it is as you allude to moving beyond something party politics. for the first— beyond something party politics. for the first time and a long time, the idea in_ the first time and a long time, the idea in the — the first time and a long time, the idea in the possibility of the united _ idea in the possibility of the united ireland is at least being talked — united ireland is at least being talked about seriously or semi—seriously and belfast. unionist leaders _ semi—seriously and belfast. unionist leaders are _ semi—seriously and belfast. unionist leaders are starting to wonder about it would _ leaders are starting to wonder about it would be _ leaders are starting to wonder about it would be the best leader to leave unionism _ it would be the best leader to leave unionism in— it would be the best leader to leave unionism in a border campaign. most people _ unionism in a border campaign. most people in_ unionism in a border campaign. most people in other island would agree olly foster would be pretty disastrous at that job. she is somebody who divides opinion and didn't— somebody who divides opinion and didn't bring aboard the centre ground — didn't bring aboard the centre ground -- _ didn't bring aboard the centre ground. —— arlene foster. people are starting _ ground. —— arlene foster. people are starting to— ground. —— arlene foster. people are starting to look beyond this and also looking to next year and next assembly— also looking to next year and next assembly elections, they'll be the first time — assembly elections, they'll be the first time it will be a chance after that in_ first time it will be a chance after that in 2024 based on outcome of that in 2024 based on outcome of that election for the assembly to vote on— that election for the assembly to vote on the irish sea border and that is— vote on the irish sea border and that is something that moves us beyond — that is something that moves us beyond a — that is something that moves us beyond a psychological party to a really _ beyond a psychological party to a really significant practical blue if
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they cannot make anything of that consent— they cannot make anything of that consent mechanism that borisjohnson really eventually built into his deal — really eventually built into his deal for— really eventually built into his deal for brexit.— deal for brexit. thus that strengthen _ deal for brexit. thus that strengthen the _ deal for brexit. thus that strengthen the argumentj deal for brexit. thus that - strengthen the argument within deal for brexit. thus that _ strengthen the argument within the dup terms for a leader like maybe sirjeffrey dahmer sin who is an mp at westminster who defected of cost but used to be the biggest unionist party and because he has a seat at westminster is the advantage of olly foster it has that he can challenge the prime minister across the dispatch box in a future prime minister? ——jeffrey dispatch box in a future prime minister? —— jeffrey damerson. dispatch box in a future prime minister? ——jeffrey damerson. i minister? —— jeffrey damerson. i think if anything, being at westminster now is something of a handicap— westminster now is something of a handicap or politicians with the pollution — handicap or politicians with the pollution in place really stormont is the _ pollution in place really stormont is the seat of real power for the most _ is the seat of real power for the most part— is the seat of real power for the most part in northern ireland. that is how— most part in northern ireland. that is how it _ most part in northern ireland. that is how it is — most part in northern ireland. that is how it is perceived by voters. therefore — is how it is perceived by voters. therefore the fact jeffrey donaldson is at westminster and it can't be first minister is a problem for him, there _ first minister is a problem for him, there is— first minister is a problem for him, there is talk— first minister is a problem for him, there is talk of a split leadership of him _ there is talk of a split leadership of him maybe being the leader at westminster and doing what sinn fein do and _
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westminster and doing what sinn fein do and having a separate leader in stormont — do and having a separate leader in stormont who would be the dup first minister— stormont who would be the dup first minister but really increasingly there _ minister but really increasingly there is— minister but really increasingly there is a — minister but really increasingly there is a sense i think within the dup people are questioning jeffrey donaldson about two years ago he was the heir— donaldson about two years ago he was the heirapparent is donaldson about two years ago he was the heir apparent is seen as the person— the heir apparent is seen as the person who overwhelmingly was likely to take _ person who overwhelmingly was likely to take over from olly foster, a lot of people _ to take over from olly foster, a lot of people went to him to move in various— of people went to him to move in various points and he did not move against _ various points and he did not move against her~ — various points and he did not move against her. this time people are talking _ against her. this time people are talking about edwin, possibly at first minister and also as party leader~ — first minister and also as party leader. �* , ,., , ~ leader. briefly, it sounds like thins leader. briefly, it sounds like things are — leader. briefly, it sounds like things are moving _ leader. briefly, it sounds like things are moving very - leader. briefly, it sounds like | things are moving very quickly there. could we see the end of arlene foster's leadership tonight or in the next 24 hours? we could. they really — or in the next 24 hours? we could. they really comes _ or in the next 24 hours? we could. they really comes down _ or in the next 24 hours? we could. they really comes down to - or in the next 24 hours? we could. | they really comes down to whether or in the next 24 hours? we could. i they really comes down to whether or not she _ they really comes down to whether or not she decides to fight this. the numbers— not she decides to fight this. the numbers are overwhelming. a few minutes— numbers are overwhelming. a few minutes ago somebody in the dp texted _ minutes ago somebody in the dp texted me to say it is 981% of our backing _ texted me to say it is 981% of our backing this letter. basically for her to— backing this letter. basically for her to go — backing this letter. basically for her to go. —— 81%. that is survivable. _ her to go. —— 81%. that is survivable. then i see to see that and decide —
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survivable. then i see to see that and decide to get out before there is a humiliation in terms of the actual— is a humiliation in terms of the actual numbers? 0r is a humiliation in terms of the actual numbers? or does she do what thatcher— actual numbers? or does she do what thatcher did _ actual numbers? or does she do what thatcher did and say i will fight all the — thatcher did and say i will fight all the way, that is in her nature, but i _ all the way, that is in her nature, but i think— all the way, that is in her nature, but i think there will be people around — but i think there will be people around her saying perhaps tonight is the time _ around her saying perhaps tonight is the time to— around her saying perhaps tonight is the time to reconsider that strategy. the time to reconsider that strate: . ,,. the time to reconsider that strategy-— the time to reconsider that strate: . ., ~ , ., , strategy. sam, thank you very much for “oininr strategy. sam, thank you very much forjoining us— strategy. sam, thank you very much forjoining us with _ strategy. sam, thank you very much forjoining us with the _ strategy. sam, thank you very much forjoining us with the latest - strategy. sam, thank you very much forjoining us with the latest on - forjoining us with the latest on arlene foster. we will bring you more later in the course of this hour in the rest of the evening if there are any further developments. covid infections in india continue to rise by hundreds of thousands each day and that's led to soaring death rates. the official number of deaths is put at close to 200,000 but local reports suggest that it is almost certainly an under—estimate. with hospitals having to turn patients away because they've run out of resources — especially oxygen supplies — aid from abroad is arriving in the country. the first shipment of medical supplies from the uk landed today. devina gupta reports now from delhi and a warning, some viewers might find it distressing. lives erased in india, their fate sealed by the pandemic.
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but even as families seek closure in this crematorium built on a car park in india's capital, delhi, some are being denied dignity even in their death, as the actual reason of their demise is being buried with them. translation: 5096 of deaths are not registered by - the government as covid—19. our ngo brings bodies to be cremated directly from homes of victims. the government only counts related deaths of victims who die in a hospital. under—reporting cases is becoming a problem in india in major covid hotspots. a public health worker told me that in many cases, they are under pressure to attribute pandemic deaths to a pre—existing disease of the patient and not count them as covid deaths to help the government save face in this crisis. experts say the actual numbers are much worse.
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the enormity, the velocity and the ferocity of india's second surge is something to really take a lesson from for the rest of the world — because the virus curve was so quiet, and then the footsteps of the virus, we could not hear, but itjust exploded. and the severity of this wave cannot be silenced. with an unprecedented rush of patients, oxygen and essential medical supplies are running out in the city. countries like the uk have rushed to india's aid. a shipment from britain, including 100 ventilators and 95 oxygen concentrators, arrived in the capital today. the us and the eu have also come forward. but india needs more, as it struggles with the reality behind the hidden numbers. devina gupta, bbc news, delhi. stay with us. more about what the
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international community should be doing. we will speak to somebody in the us. the headlines on bbc news... no let up for the prime minister. downing street denies conservative party funds are being used to cover the refurbishment and administers back the prime minister. infections and deaths are continuing and daily highs. 42—year—olds in england are not able to put their coronavirus jab, the second time this week it has been extended to a category in those aged 40 and over. now let's get the sport. good evening. thank you forjoining us in good evening to everybody watching.
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chelsea are in the spanish capital playing real madrid in what is their first champions league semifinal in seven years — and it's also a first meeting between the two sides in 23 years... this is the first leg with the second to be played at stamford bridge next wednesday and it's currently 1—0 chelsea. with eden hazard the former chelsea star on the subs bench for the 13 time winners real. the owners of arsenal, stan and josh kroenke have released a statement saying they remain "100% committed to the club" and are not interested in selling their stake. we heard yesterday how club legends thierry henry, dennis bergkamp and patrick vieira had joined spotify co—founder and billionaire daniel ek�*s bid to buy the club with fans protesting at the emirates last week after the failed european super league plans. the head of the professional footballers association — gordon taylor — speaking to a parliamentary committee — has denied that the organisation has been too slow to act over increasing evidence that concussion in sport is linked to neurological
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conditions like dementia. while on the same subject a new study has found that teenage girls are almost twice as likely to suffer concussion playing football, compared to teenage boys. researchers at the university of glasgow and in the us, are now calling for more work to be done looking at the risks to girls. this is a controversial thing to suggest but maybe we need to think about the differences in engagement with the game. maybe if girls are getting concussed more regularly from head hitting the ball and collision with the ball, we should think about should adolescent females the ball at all. should we be thinking of differences in the heading approach in the athlete? uefa have announced they'll be distributing more money to the women's champions league — 24 million euros — that's more than four times the current amount. the winner could earn 1.4 million euros — depending on their results across the competition. it's being hailed as a huge boost for the women's game, but it is worth noting the winner
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of the men's champions league can earn up to around 82 and a half million euros over the tournament. the all england club has announced that it hopes to welcome at least 25% of its usual crowds to wimbledon for the tournament which starts at the end ofjune. they've said they hope henman hill will be open for business — with social distancing in place. and from next year there will be a change to the schedule — it was announced play on the middle sunday of the tournament will become a permanent addition. previously that day has only been used to accommodate a backlog of matches from the first week — but improvements in technology mean the grass courts no longer need a day of rest. geraint thomas is in second place, after the prologue of the tour de romandie in switzerland. the opening stage was a short two and a half mile time trial before the first full—length stage tomorrow, and the welshman was on good form. he's building up to leading the ineos grenadiers at this year's tour de france — and finished todayjust nine seconds behind the leader, his team—mate, the australian time trial specialist rohan dennis.
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the quarterfinal schedule got under way today at the world snooker championship in sheffield. we've had two matches featuring former world champions and a close contest between world number onejudd trump and 2005 champion shaun murphy. neither man was ever ahead by more than one frame, murphy won the last frame with a break of 67 to square it at four all. on the other table mark selby leads mark williams 6—2 with the evening session under way where there's live overage across the bbc. coverage across the bbc. live picture right now. nell robinson is leading. he has won five sets in a row. he has won five sets in a row. anthony mcgill and former champion stuart bingham started their second session level at 4—4 while another former champion that's all the sport for now. my my daughter's favourite colour is the colour of your tire. i will try
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and get one myself. somebody actually gave me this. another reason. your doctor has good taste. i want to claim it as my idea but somebody else by thank you. that's your daughter has good taste. the latest government figures on coronavirus show 2,685 new infections in the latest 24—hour period — which means an average of 2,332 new cases per day in the last week. and there are just over 16 hundred people in hospital with coronavirus — the number continues to fall. 17 deaths were recorded in the last 24 hours — of people who'd had a positive covid—19 test within the previous 28 days. these figures are often lower on a monday the average number the total number of uk deaths is now 127,451. onto vaccinations, and a total of nearly 34 million people have now had their firstjab. the overall number who've had their second jab, is now 13 point two million.
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our health editor hugh pym has been looking at how each nation is doing with the vaccine rollout. it was only a couple of weeks ago that the government was hailing the fact that the nine priority groups, including those aged 50 and over, had all been offered a first dose. now the programme is moving rapidly down through the age groups. let's take a look at the numbers in different parts of the uk. from today, those aged 42 and over in england are being offered a first dose, contacted by text and e—mail and so on. and there may be a move down to 30—year—olds in a week. northern ireland has already got there. it is offering those aged 35 and over a firstjab. in wales, is as young as 30 being offered that first dose. in scotland, it's 45—year—olds and over who are being offered the vaccines. in terms of the percentage of adults who have had a first dose. wales is out there with 68%
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who have had that firstjab. in england, it 63% of adults. in scotland, 62% and northern ireland 61% of adults who have had that firstjab. if you look at all the numbers added up, one quarter of uk adults have had a first and second dose. so there is quite confident that things are progressing well, but of course, there is still a crisis in many countries, including india, as we have been hearing. more about india later in this half hour. there's growing evidence that the coronavirus lockdowns have adversely affected the language skills of young children. a study has found that reduced social interaction, and the wearing of face coverings in public, have deprived youngsters of experiences, essential for increasing vocabulary. of 58 primary schools surveyed across england: 76% said pupils starting school in september 2020 needed more support
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with communication than in previous years. 96% said they were concerned about pupils�* speech—and—language development. and 56% of parents were concerned about their child starting at school following the lockdown in the spring and summer. here's our education editor, branwenjeffreys. hey, i found a worm. this is how children learn words, but new experiences have been limited by the pandemic. parents know toddlers have seen and heard less. at this point, she's spent half of her life in lockdown. so whereas we'd normally do singing groups and toddler groups, she's not had any of that. they need to be with other children. you know, it's good forthem, isn't it? yeah, making new friends and stuff. it's easy to think with children this little that they haven't missed
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out on much and they've got plenty of time. but if they don't have the experiences, don't learn the words they need to understand the world, they'll carry that with them throughout their schooling. katie is one of blackpool's community connectors, trained to support parents. some of the mums and dads i've spoken to have said they've noticed their children are quite scared around other children. one in particular said her little one heard another baby cry and didn't know what the noise was, so was quite startled by it. she's been visiting darren and lucy, at home with baby george, born in lockdown, and two—year—old ruby, worrying that their kids have been missing out. as a nation, we've kind of forgot about how important it is for these children to be out there and developing these skills young. it's mainly george it's impacted the most.
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with him being so young, it's the new normal for him to see people with masks, so he's not quite used to seeing people's faces. they will be missing a whole amount of skills that we need them to have. merle davies leads blackpool's work on very young children. she fears that problems have been missed. health visitors haven't seen families at home. in many areas, they've been moved to other work. these children are the forgotten children of the pandemic. they definitely are. they are the ones we've completely overlooked and the ones who in a few years' time, when they go to school, won't have the skills that we expect them to have to be able to be able to engage in education. for these four and five—year—olds, there is extra help, a special programme of working with words. here, it's helped children make months of progress. we were absolutely amazed to find that some of the children who did only have a few words were able
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to start talking sentences in a matter of weeks. catch—up cash from the government is spreading this approach. by next year, it should be in most of england's primary schools. but many fear that unless toddlers are helped too, schools could be dealing with children's word gap for many years. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. let's speak to janet cooper, an expert adviser in speech and language development from the royal college of speech and language therapists. thank you very much for talking to us about this. we saw the numbers before the report. they clearly show that there is widespread concern about this in primary schools. how worried are you or is it a case that a given time as we returned to normal hopefully that a lot of these problems will resolve themselves?
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i think it is really concerning, i think it is about communication is a life skill, it is important for all aspects of education, social interaction, it is the way we express ourselves and be go about our lives in the world. we are born to be social, so if children are not getting those crucial skills of the stages that they need to, it can have long—term impacts on lots of things. i am worried about that 0—3 group notjust in school. find things. i am worried about that 0-3 group notjust in school.— group not 'ust in school. and in -ractical group notjust in school. and in practical terms, _ group notjust in school. and in practical terms, how— group notjust in school. and in practical terms, how you - group notjust in school. and in practical terms, how you deal l group notjust in school. and in i practical terms, how you deal with it because we have sought in those figures in primary school, compared to previous years, there was a major demand and need for extra support, how do you provide that in the context of day today education? you still have to deal with all the kids were not affected this way. yes. were not affected this way. yes, it's not just _ were not affected this way. yes, it's notjust the _ were not affected this way. yes, it's not just the teacher's - were not affected this way. yes, it's notjust the teacher's job, i it's notjust the teacher's job, communication is everyone's business. this is about parents having the tools and skills to know
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what to do to support the children at home and it's about families and communities encouraging language and interaction and seeking support from people who have speech and language therapists if children are really struggling to get that help at the right time. it is a whole systems approach and it is everybody�*s business. b. approach and it is everybody's business. �* . . approach and it is everybody's business. �* , ., , ., , ., business. a strange story, of listenin: business. a strange story, of listening to _ business. a strange story, of listening to an _ business. a strange story, of listening to an order - business. a strange story, of. listening to an order recording explaining how as a baby, he had been left by a parent and effectively, he in the parrot ended up effectively, he in the parrot ended up copping each other and that was how his parents found out that he was being taken where he shouldn't have been taken by the nanny. because of that effect. but is that the children do? they mimic, effectively, the kind of language they are picking up from adults and other children around them? yes. children pick— other children around them? yes. children pick up _ other children around them? yes. children pick up the _ other children around them? jazz children pick up the words from the world around them and all the experience that they have and they put those connections to what they see and when people but all those
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things together, they link that to the experiences. during lockdown, some of those experiences have been restricted and it has impacted children language learning. another thin bein: children language learning. another thing being referred _ children language learning. another thing being referred to _ children language learning. another thing being referred to is _ children language learning. another thing being referred to is the - thing being referred to is the government is talk to the work being done the language intervention. do you tell us what that is? it is about a great _ you tell us what that is? it 3 about a great intervention for children in year one and it is about a catcher programme, over 20 weeks in a small group but for a lot of children, that stage is too late. but we really want to do is make sure children much younger than that have those language experiences so that gap is in there and it does not widen. it is a great opportunity to have small social group interactions but we really need to do much more than that too. it but we really need to do much more than that too-— than that too. if you made a point that it's not _ than that too. if you made a point that it's not just _ than that too. if you made a point that it's notjust about _ than that too. if you made a point that it's not just about teachers i that it's not just about teachers and school or nursery workers, it is about us as adults interacting with children. if there are mums, dads or
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grandparents, cousins, watching who have regular contact or friends who have regular contact or friends who have regular contact with this, what can the do? which they be thinking aboutjust to try can the do? which they be thinking about just to try and improve can the do? which they be thinking aboutjust to try and improve the quality of their interaction for the child's sake in this speech and language area?— child's sake in this speech and language area? child's sake in this speech and lanuae area? ., ~ , language area? there are some key thins language area? there are some key thin . s that language area? there are some key things that work _ language area? there are some key things that work for _ language area? there are some key things that work for everybody. - things that work for everybody. having some quiet time which can be tricky, especially if you're working from home and all those things, but having quiet time built into the dates of children learn the space to connect basic listening skills. the country of quality time and making eye contact and meeting face to face being at the same level and sharing activities together and again, and busy households, that often gets overlooked when the russian renderings of the things. but really important. and at this point now, although screens have been totally, we have been depended on remote access to things by the internet, we do need to make sure that they have
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real interactions with real people. thank you very much. good evening. we may well close out the month of april in a few days' time, but we finally got the showers today the month is famous for. this was east lothian a little earlier on. plenty of showers have been piling in from the east and they are drifting their way steadily westwards, courtesy of this weather front. so through the night tonight, quite a lot of cloud across england and wales with showery outbreaks of rain expected, really, through the midlands, down into wales, central and southwest england as well. so that's going to act like a blanket of cloud, preventing temperatures from falling too far. further north, we'll see some clear skies. low single figures quite likely in scotland. so we start off with some sunny spells tomorrow in scotland, northern england and northern ireland, but that weather front continues to enhance some showers,
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some of them heavy, maybe with the odd rumble of thunder and a little bit of hail mixed in there as well. perhaps southeast england and to the east of the pennines staying largely fine and dry, but the temperatures are going to struggle — 8 to 14 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. no let up for the prime minister — more questions over who paid to renovate his downing street flat. labour accuse him of being dishonest. asked to sign a letter of no confidence in their leader northern ireland's first minister reports that his significant number have already done so. the first shipment of medical supplies arrive in covid stricken india. infections and deaths have now reached record highs. researchers say lockdowns
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and other covid measures, adversely affect the speech development, of young children. some schools are now offering additional support. more now on the first uk medical supplies arriving in india, as the country struggles with an unprecedented surge in coronavirus infections and deaths. dr margaret harris from the world health organization welcomed the help from the international community but said it needed to continue throughout the pandemic. this is again by v have been saying all along that this virus way this a lot of people, theyjust have a very mild illness or a centy medic illness, but you need complex medical care in a hospital —— asymptomatic. if you have huge numbers of cases, you are 15% of your numbers and analysis are people way beyond your capacity to deal with. and this is what we are seeing
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and thanks to the uk and everyone else, we are sending thousands of oxygen concentrators and people, but it is wonderful to see the world standing up and helping. you just need to keep that spirit going throughout this pandemic in terms of getting the vaccines thoroughly distributed and everything else so we can end this. in the past hour, us presidentjoe biden has been speaking about the help his administration is giving to india including material for vaccines. we are sending the actual mechanical parts that are needed for the machinery they have to build the vaccine and that is being done as well. we are also discussing when we will be able to send actual vaccines to india, which would be my intention to do. the problem is
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right now, we have to make sure the behalf of the vaccines coming on and will be in a position to share vaccines as well as know—how with other countries who are in real need. that is the hope and expectation and i might add when we are in a bind at the very beginning, india helped us. professor krishna udayakumar is the founding director of the duke global health innovation center in north carolina and has been analysing the global response to the crisis in india. can you give us a sense of essence of perspective _ can you give us a sense of essence of perspective of — can you give us a sense of essence of perspective of what _ can you give us a sense of essence of perspective of what we - can you give us a sense of essence of perspective of what we have - can you give us a sense of essence. of perspective of what we have seen of perspective of what we have seen of this crisis taking different forms and some time searching sometimes people saying we have got beyond it and others surprisingly, brazil, even in the uk too. what is
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significant about the situation that india finds itself and apart from the individual personal tragedy, we put in the wider global context. we've seen this pandemic is highly dynamic. we have seen waves and waves in the us we are hoping to fend off a fourth wave based on what we have gone through and in india, there was a first wave that happened last fall that was bad, but not incredibly bad and so, that led to a sense of complacency by many and in some cases, the political leadership at some and difference of sorts that facilitated large gatherings like election rallies, large religious ceremonies as well to take place, knowing that this was around the corner and while it could've been predicted and could've been prevented, will actually saw was that political leaders took steps
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that political leaders took steps that made it worse and so it is really shocking here is not what we're seeing a second wave, but rather the size and scope of that which is overwhelming the system in many parts of india. the which is overwhelming the system in many parts of india.— many parts of india. the point you make is that _ many parts of india. the point you make is that we _ many parts of india. the point you make is that we have _ many parts of india. the point you make is that we have to _ many parts of india. the point you make is that we have to be - many parts of india. the point you make is that we have to be aware | many parts of india. the point you l make is that we have to be aware of a country like the uk where there's a country like the uk where there's a danger of complacency about the vaccination programme and that you could be confident that it's off the whole problem and you do everything that you're doing before is it that never happened. presumably, a different situation and scale and that vaccination hasn't reached so extensively, but it is a note of caution how the rest of the world behaves too. we caution how the rest of the world behaves too-— caution how the rest of the world behaves too. we are seeing is that none of us — behaves too. we are seeing is that none of us are _ behaves too. we are seeing is that none of us are safe _ behaves too. we are seeing is that none of us are safe until— behaves too. we are seeing is that none of us are safe until all- behaves too. we are seeing is that none of us are safe until all of- behaves too. we are seeing is that none of us are safe until all of us l none of us are safe until all of us are safe. we talk about the conception only that a global pandemic requires a global response. we're seeing it play out now that even highly vaccinated countries like the uk are at risk from the variance that are going to develop
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in the virus will continue with that is india, brazil or other parts of the world. we really unsafe even if vaccinated as long the pandemic continues in its current scope. in terms of india, we have oxygen supplies and more importantly, the machine that allows the generation of oxygen and raw materials for vaccine production which america has agreed can be allowed in and it was used in the defence production act, producing vaccine doses. allow for all of that, presumably that is not going to change the situation in india anytime soon. unfortunately, what is going _ india anytime soon. unfortunately, what is going to — india anytime soon. unfortunately, what is going to happen _ india anytime soon. unfortunately, what is going to happen in - india anytime soon. unfortunately, what is going to happen in the - what is going to happen in the coming days and weeks is already baked into the system. the global community is doing now to respond is absolutely critical and every single african slave with doing so. but were not going to turn the corner in
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a matter of days. the best case scenario is that the peak in india and that is just a reported case in the actual number, there actually much worse. and we are to see a downturn where we can think about strengthening the health system and including higher rates of vaccination, health systems and making sure that we don't get complacent in every part of the world that could be next. . thank ou ve world that could be next. . thank you very much — world that could be next. . thank you very much for _ world that could be next. . thank you very much for being - world that could be next. . thank you very much for being with - world that could be next. . thank you very much for being with us i world that could be next. . thank. you very much for being with us on bbc news. fascinating to talk to you and also troubling as well. and tomorrow, the bbc is bringing you a special day of coverage on the deepening coronavirus crisis in india and its significance for the global fight against the pandemic.
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we ll have reports, interviews fight against the pandemic. and digital throughout the day. a union representing senior public servants has been given the go—ahead to bring a high court challenge against borisjohnson's decision to stand by the home secretary following bullying accusations. because she did not intend to bully anyone. let's speak to the general secretary of the union bringing the case — dave penman — from the first division association thank you for being with us. first, a traditional review and the question is whether it falls within
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the legitimate discretion of ministers. why do you think that this is something where you could be proved to be correct by the challenging the court of the prime minister prosperous discretion. being held to the same standards of conduct of several servants and the prime minister and their interpretation of the ministerial court when the saddam secretary had not breached the code despite being found to have bullied several servants. asking the court to agree with us, to indicate that the prime minister did it, but the government have been trying to avoid that and trying to block the court from looking at it, essentially saying the ministerial code should not be subject to the rule of law is essentially their argument. but the court agreed with us and will move to a full hearing and will get the facts and not
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it is not a statute, not the law of the land. does that give the ministers of all political stripes, they have all use this approach, huge discretion it is in the argument for that discretion that ultimately, if we do not like with they do, we vote them out, and that is what makes a difference for civil servants of i don't like with one of your colleagues does, i have no to determine their future.— determine their future. there are elements of _ determine their future. there are elements of the _ determine their future. there are elements of the code _ determine their future. there are elements of the code which - determine their future. there are elements of the code which we i determine their future. there are l elements of the code which we say absolutely and simply for the prime minister whether they hire or fire ministers but this is the only mechanism for civil servants to raise complaints about ministers and the prime minister is also the ministerfor the civil the prime minister is also the minister for the civil service and this is essentially where these complaints and up and we do not think it is fair to the prime minister can essentially make up a set of rules and not be challenged around that went up like a different standard of conduct for ministers as applies to the civil servants working her department. if they were
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accused of bullying and said, i did not intend to bully, it would not be let off and it makes it quite clear in the guidance that the impact is the issue. of the home secretary can say, i did not mean it and the prime minister can say that was fine, you did not breached the ministerial code and you get off either scott or lightly. we do not think that is fair, we think it's it's a really bad precedent and that the prime minister needs to think again. what minister needs to think again. what we are dealing _ minister needs to think again. what we are dealing with _ minister needs to think again. what we are dealing with the last few days, controversy over the prime minister is handling of the financing of the refurbishment of number 11, financing of the refurbishment of number11, downing financing of the refurbishment of number 11, downing street, the flat there which the one in downing street is regarded as big enough and has several prime ministers. but in terms of that and the wider questions about the way downing street is run at the moment, one of the fda's concerns are relevant to your role in referencing civil
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servants?— your role in referencing civil servants? ~ . your role in referencing civil servants? ~ , ., , servants? the prime minister really sets the precedent _ servants? the prime minister really sets the precedent here, _ servants? the prime minister really sets the precedent here, sets - servants? the prime minister really sets the precedent here, sets the i sets the precedent here, sets the standard for government and on this issue, we think it is really important. we offered them a way out and reconsider,, reinterpret in state the intent is important as the impact and they have not done that and that is why we are in court. i think it is really important whether it is about the standards of propriety in relation to financial conduct of the prime minister and government or the conduct of the ministers in relation to civil servants that the prime minister understands what he does and says is a huge impact notjust on the civil service but across the country. thank you very much. 11 minutes to nine, let us take a look at the news so far.
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no let up for the prime minister — more questions over who paid to renovate his flat. downing street denies conservative party funds are being used to cover the refurbishments and ministers back borisjohnson. there are reports that the first minister of northern ireland, arlene foster, is facing a challenge to her leadership of the democratic unionist party. the first shipment of medical supplies arrive in covid stricken india. infections and deaths have now reached record highs. five people have been arrested, after police in warwickshire found a suspected amphetamine lab, during a raid near redditch. officers from the national crime agency and warwickshire police, discovered what they believe to be a large scale operation, to produce the illegal drug. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. the end of a long investigation in rural warwickshire. two people arrested here among five detained today in raids
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by the national crime agency, backed by police, fire brigade and a chemicals expert. in an outhouse, this is what they discovered. a drugs lab, like something out of the drama breaking bad. police claim it's capable of producing amphetamine worth £10 million on the street every month. when the door was opened, vapour drifted out. the type of equipment and chemicals used aren't easy to obtain. to use them safely and obtain the end product is very complex. it takes someone who knows exactly what they are doing. laboratories that have been encountered overseas, they tend to be operated by someone who's a trained scientist. this investigation and many others started with the interception by french police of encrypted phone messages from a network
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called encrochat. police say suspects had no idea their messages were being read, and they discussed their activities openly. but millions of messages were gathered, and the number of investigations into them grows steadily. 1,500 people have been arrested so far. tom symonds, bbc news, warwickshire. an inquest into the deaths of the two people killed by the convicted terrorist, usman khan, near london bridge has heard how he'd been involved in �*extremist bullying' in prison. it also emerged that, despite the fact he was being monitored by a government agency, khan had been allowed to travel from stafford to london unaccompanied. jack merrit, who was 25, and 23 year old saskia jones were attacked by khan at an educational event at fishmongers' hall, in 2019. black women face a significantly higher risk of suffering a miscarriage than white women — that's the finding in a new global study published in the respected
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medical journal, the lancet. it looked at six countries in europe and america. here in the uk — it's estimated that at least 1 in 5 women lose a pregnancy at some point in their lifetime. but as data is limited this figure is thought to under—estimate the problem. the study also suggests that losing a pregnancy leaves women from all ethnic backgrounds more vulnerable to long—term health problems. our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar reports. i remember seeing the positives on my pregnancy test for the first time, and ijust was so happy that me and my husband were basically creating life together. katie was 28 when she found out she was pregnant, but one day, out of the blue, she started bleeding heavily and she lost the pregnancy. ijust felt so low, so hopeless, literally just felt like my world had ended. katie was advised to try again and did become pregnant within a few months, but once again the pregnancy ended in miscarriage. both were second trimester losses.
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it was like a blanket of heaviness over my whole body, over my mind, like a dark cloud. and, yeah, ijust could not see any hope for a long time. so these are the memory boxes that we received at the hospital, that we were so grateful for. katie says she feels much stronger now to be able to talk about her losses, but this study found that black women are 43% more likely than white women to have a miscarriage. we are not sure why miscarriage is more common in black women but we think it is a combination of factors, we think it is may be black women are more susceptible to things like diabetes and hypertension and those diseases must be well controlled. we also think there may be some social factors in that black women feel reluctant to seek medical help. the research also saw a greater risk of other health complications for women of all ethnic groups, the more losses they experience.
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the risk of suffering with depression was more than twice as likely after a one miscarriage and four times as likely after two or more losses. and although the numbers were low, women were still at four times the risk of suicide after one loss. they were also more vulnerable to developing blood clots and heart problems. experts are calling for a revolutionary change in miscarriage services so that couples can access specialist support after one loss instead of having to wait for at least three miscarriages, as is mostly the case in the uk at the moment. whilst miscarriage can be a very distressing thing for a woman to go through, it's important to be aware that most women go on to have a perfectly healthy baby. this research brings together what needs to happen, and that is after one miscarriage we can learn from that by identifying simple things such as a woman stopping smoking, achieving a healthy body weight, or identifying simple medical conditions that can be treated. what's this?
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katie is now a proud mum to two—year—old little maximus after receiving specialist treatment. it is impossible to know for sure whether that is what led to the success of her third pregnancy, but she says she feels extremely fortunate. he's just a ray of sunshine and he brings me hope, he brings mejoy, and i guess all the pain that i went through with my first two pregnancies, ijust feel like i came at the other side. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. the queen has been photographed carrying out an official engagement for the first time since the funeral of prince philip. she held audiences with foreign diplomats using a video link. meanwhile the duke and duchess of cambridge have been visiting a family farm in county durham two days before their 10th wedding anniversary. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. cheering can it really be ten years? but, yes, it can. ten years ago this week, they were on the balcony
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of buckingham palace after their wedding at westminster abbey. now, a decade later, william and catherine are more heavily committed than ever to the demands of royal duty. today was not untypical. they were to be found on a farm near darlington in county durham, and so there were close encounters with some of the cleanest sheep you're likely to find, there was a very large tractor which, of course, just had to be driven. william went first — a quick circuit of the field, no mishaps, nothing damaged — and then it was time for catherine to have a go — a moment of intense concentration, and then off she went. but alongside the photo opportunities, a serious purpose — a discussion with farmers about the challenges of the past year — and then on to something called the cheesy waffles project, which helps young people and adults with additional needs. for william and catherine, ten years after their marriage, a typical day of royal duty — the kind of thing william pledged
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to continue after the death of his grandfather. and speaking of his grandparents, here was the queen today, holding video audiences with ambassadors. 18 days after her husband's death, normal service is being resumed. nicholas witchell, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. good evening. there's been a lot of dry weather around this april, and at times some sunshine, but the real weather feature has certainly been the frost. april 2021 is going to be the frostiest for over 60 years. in fact, there has been an air frost somewhere every night so far this month. will that change? potentially, yes, because we've seen some rain in the forecast today. this was york earlier on this afternoon. and if we take a look
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at the satellite picture and the rain radar combined, you can see how extensive that cloud has been and how widespread the showers have been, pushing in on a stiff easterly breeze. the exception with the sunshine down into the far southeast, that as we go through the evening and overnight, the cloud and the showers will drift their way steadily south and west. that's going to prevent temperatures from falling too far. we might see low single figures under some clearing skies in scotland, but you can see a relatively mild night in comparison to the month so far. so this weather front still with us to start off wednesday. quite a lot of cloud around, some showery outbreaks of rain. some of those showers potentially merging together for some longer spells of rain at times, maybe some hail, even the odd rumble of thunder mixed in there as well. certainly more cloud around. further north, we'll have some sunshine through northern england, scotland and northern ireland, with a few slow—moving isolated showers here, but temperatures really subdued — 8—14 degrees at the very best in the far southeast corner.
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and even that milder air will quickly be pushed out of the way, as the low pressure drifts away, allows that north or northeasterly flow to drag colder air once again right across the country. so on thursday, early morning cloud and rain, leaving that kent coast to sunny spells for many and a scattering of showers once again, some of these heavy with some hail, maybe even a little bit of snow to higher ground as those temperatures are set to struggle — 6 to 14 degrees the high by thursday. and it looks likely that the further east you are, the cooler the weather story continues into friday and saturday, with a few scattered showers slowly easing. further west, there will be a little more in the way of sunshine, lighter winds and a little more warmth as a consequence. but it's worth bearing in mind, with clear skies by day, frosts at night.
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this is bbc news — americans have been wearing masks outside a lot more than in some countries. that's about to change. the cdc says us adults should now feel free to take off the mask, in small outdoor gatherings. but only if they've been vaccinated. no jab, mask on. the recommendations are welcome news for a country eager for summer barbecues and baseball games. at the white house, the president stressed that this is another reason for people to go get their shots. the bottom line is clear, if you are vaccinated, you can do more things, more safely, outdoors as well as indoors. the us census tells us who lives here — then politicians take that data and spin it to their advantage.
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who wins and who loses from the brand new census numbers.

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