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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  April 27, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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�* the our scientists are convinced by the data that the odds of getting or giving the virus to others is very, very low if you are both fully vaccinated and out in the open air. the cdc also have clarified which outdoor activities are safer. or less safe. depending on whether you have been vaccinated. the bottom line is clear. if you are vaccinated, you can do more things, more safely, both outdoors as well as indoors. so for those who have not got the vaccination yet, especially if you're younger, or thinking you don't need it, this is another great reason to go get vaccinated, now. now. yes, the vaccines are about saving your life, but also the lives of the people around you, but they're also about
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helping to get us back to closer to normal in our living, a more normal living, getting together with friends, going to the park for a picnic, without needing to mask up. we are back to that place now, as long as you get vaccinated so go the shot. it's never been easier. and once you're fully vaccinated, you can go without a mask when you are outside and away from big crowds. i want to thank the team at the cdc for everything they are doing to help us lead with science and bring our committed tease out of this crisis safely and responsibly. and i also want to think everyone who has gotten a vaccine for doing your patriotic duty and helping us get on
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the path to independence day, which i will be discussing more in detail next week. in the meantime, i urge all americans — don't let up now. keep following the guidance. go get your vaccination now. it's free and it's convenient. 90% of the american people live within five miles of a site or you can get a vaccination. you can do this. and we will do this. thank you all, and god bless you, and as much as the temptation is to stay outdoors undisputed for day, i have got more work to do. if the risk is so little outdoors, why does _ the risk is so little outdoors, why does not — the risk is so little outdoors, why does not apply to everybody? do you have any preconditions... _ does not apply to everybody? do you have any preconditions. .. if- does not apply to everybody? do you have any preconditions... if the - have any preconditions... if the risk is so _ have any preconditions... if the risk is so low _ have any preconditions... if the risk is so low outdoors, - have any preconditions... if the risk is so low outdoors, why - have any preconditions... if the i risk is so low outdoors, why does this new— risk is so low outdoors, why does this new guidance not apply to everybody?— everybody? because the sign indicates the _ everybody? because the sign indicates the most _ everybody? because the sign indicates the most certain . everybody? because the signl indicates the most certain way everybody? because the sign - indicates the most certain way to make sure it does not spread is if both people have been vaccinated, the people you're with, and your outside. �* , ., the people you're with, and your outside. �* y., . the people you're with, and your outside. �* . ., ., the people you're with, and your outside. . ., ., .,
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outside. and you chose to wear a mask as you _ outside. and you chose to wear a mask as you walked _ outside. and you chose to wear a mask as you walked out - outside. and you chose to wear a mask as you walked out here. . outside. and you chose to wear a i mask as you walked out here. what message _ mask as you walked out here. what message were you sending by wearing a mask— message were you sending by wearing a mask outside alone?— a mask outside alone? watching me take it off stoppard _ a mask outside alone? watching me take it off stoppard do _ a mask outside alone? watching me take it off stoppard do you - a mask outside alone? watching me take it off stoppard do you have - a mask outside alone? watching me take it off stoppard do you have any| take it off stoppard do you have any preconditions of meeting with vladimir i will talk about that another day for with astrazeneca, will you make it faster to for with astrazeneca, will you make it faste ., ., .. , it faster to get the vaccines... india? i it faster to get the vaccines... india? i am — it faster to get the vaccines... india? i am sorry, _ it faster to get the vaccines... india? i am sorry, last- it faster to get the vaccines... i india? i am sorry, last question i would take. _ india? i am sorry, last question i would take, and _ india? i am sorry, last question i would take, and i'm _ india? i am sorry, last question i would take, and i'm really - india? i am sorry, last question i would take, and i'm really going| india? i am sorry, last question i l would take, and i'm really going to get in trouble. with regard to india, i spoke at length with modi, the prime minister, we are extending immediately a whole series of help that he needs. including inviting for those —— providing remdesivir and those other drugs able to do with this and prevent in some cases but recover, help recovery.
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secondly, we are sending the actual mechanical parts that are needed for the machinery they have, to build a vaccine, and that's being done as well. we are also discussing, i've discussed with him, when we will be able to send actual vaccines to india, which will be my intention to do. the problem is, right now, we have to make sure we have other vaccines like novavax and others coming on, probably, and i think we will be in a position to be able to share, to share vaccines as well as know—how with other countries who are in real need. that's the hope and expectation. and i might add, when we were in a bind at the very beginning, and he helped us. thank you. beginning, and he helped us. thank ou. �* . , �* you. and with that, president biden heads along — you. and with that, president biden heads along the _ you. and with that, president biden heads along the path _ you. and with that, president biden heads along the path and _ you. and with that, president biden heads along the path and heads - heads along the path and heads inside. let's bring in the bbc�*s gary o'donoghue, live from washington. i picked out two main
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messages there, a shift in the rules around wearing masks and also an emphasis on people who have not been vaccinated soon. i emphasis on people who have not been vaccinated soon.— vaccinated soon. i think that's a lot apart. _ vaccinated soon. i think that's a lot apart, perhaps _ vaccinated soon. i think that's a lot apart, perhaps most - vaccinated soon. i think that's a - lot apart, perhaps most significant, because there will be a lot of people in this country not wearing masks outdoors quite frankly at the moment, whether they've been vaccinated or not, but the guidance is changing. officially, this is guidance rather than the law, but a lot of states take of the cdc guidance and put that into local bylaws come if you like, but the key message here is, look, if you want to get back to normal life, the vaccine is the way to do that, and so a pivot in the messaging there for sure. �* , , ., for sure. and 'ust help me on the practicalities — for sure. and just help me on the practicalities here, _ for sure. and just help me on the practicalities here, gary. - for sure. and just help me on the practicalities here, gary. if- for sure. and just help me on the practicalities here, gary. if there | practicalities here, gary. if there is a book people in the park and some had the vaccines and some have not come how will the authorities know who should wear a mask and who should not? fit
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know who should wear a mask and who should not? .., , , ., ., should not? of course they are not, are the ? should not? of course they are not, are they? this _ should not? of course they are not, are they? this is _ should not? of course they are not, are they? this is one _ should not? of course they are not, are they? this is one of _ should not? of course they are not, are they? this is one of the - should not? of course they are not, are they? this is one of the things l are they? this is one of the things where the enforceability is slightly different than the rule directly published, but i think what they are try to do is to persuade people who have not been, because there is some hesitancy in this country over take—up of the vaccine among certain groups, and trying to persuade people, look, if you want to get back to a normal life, go into this, but there is no evidence they have either the manpower or the inclination here to go around and ask people for their vaccine certificates, even though you do get one, generally speaking, here when you've had the vaccine at. mil you've had the vaccine at. all riiht, you've had the vaccine at. all right. gary. _ you've had the vaccine at. all right, gary, we will leave it there, thank you very much indeed. thank you very much —— just at the end, president biden was asked about india, the focus of the world, with the situation with the world, with the situation with the pandemic. there's mounting evidence india is under—reporting the number of deaths from covid—i9. officially, it's recorded 2,700 deaths in the past 2a hours.
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and over 300,000 cases. it's feared both of those figures could be higher. let's start with this report from rajini vaidyanathan in delhi. a collective loss that's hard to process as the pyres keep burning. there's a tragic inevitability in india, because tomorrow these scenes will be the same. round the clock, volunteers have been helping to cremate those who have died. translation: 5096 of deaths are not registered by - the government as covid—i9. our ngo brings bodies to be cremated directly from homes of victims. the government only counts related deaths of victims who die in a hospital. he believes the actual death toll is far higher than the official numbers. and in a country dubbed the pharmacy of the world, because it produces so many medicines, there isn't enough to go around. police guard the limited supplies.
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families forced to wait for whatever they can. many feel abandoned by those in power. translation: the government has failed us so much, - that those who can normally survive would also die. so many people are dying because they are unable to get the most basic services. this kind of disaster i'm witnessing, i've never seen this level of crisis before. no cry for help can save what india has already lost. as thousands die every day, more families bear the pain. last week, india recorded over 2.21; million new cases, the highest by any country in a seven—day stretch. in that same week, it logged over 16,000 deaths. there's lots of evidence the true figures are much higher. this investigation by tv station ndtv found at least 1,150 deaths are missing from delhi's official covid count.
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another report suggests the figures recorded by crematoria may be double those of official government statistics, in part because only fatalities at hospitals are being counted. there's also evidence of undercounting of infections too. here's the bbc�*s devina gupta on that. i know of people who say that they are displaying covid symptoms, but they can't get themselves tested because the hospitals and laboratories are turning them away. i was speaking to an owner of one of the pathology labs in delhi, who said their staff is overwhelmed, they can't accommodate any more people, and that will reflect in the number of infection that is recorded by the city and will also impact the response mechanism for it. in the western state of godhra, the local media reported that in mid—april, while the state projected the death number to be between 150 to 160 people, when they went to crematoriums, over 600 bodies were brought every day. and these are grim figures,
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and that's what the challenge is for the government — to be more transparent, so that they can prepare accordingly to handle this crisis with the public. while there are many pressing elements of this crisis, sick patients are dying at home because overrun hospitals are turning them away. others are dying on the streets as they wait for treatment. then there's this picture. this was a car park — as you can see, it's now a crematorium. crematoria staff around delhi are dealing with an unprecedented number of bodies and have run out of space for them. we're also hearing that some places are now running low on wood for pyres. the city's authorities are now looking at cremating bodies next to a river bed. and we have this update from zubair ahmed, who has been to a crematorium in delhi. crematorium is in delhi are overflowing with bodies. i saw some
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heartbreaking scenes and if you commit tori him as i visited yesterday, that is on monday, and fires were lit up as bodies kept arriving in ambulances. one crematorium ran out of space, so i saw makeshift platforms being built on the open ground, and there is only one place in one of the crematorium, bodies kept coming in, and he kept performing the last rites and he seemed overwhelms —— only one priest. there's also an oxygen crisis. we're told india now has the biggest demand for oxygen out of all other low, lower middle and upper middle income countries. according to one organisation — the path oxygen needs tracker — india's demand is growing between 6% and 8% every day. healthcare facilities usually consume 15% of supply. currently, 90% has been diverted for medical use. there's a huge operation, involving trains, tankers and aircraft,
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most of it coming by rail on oxygen express trains, from the east of india to states that need it in the west. you can see some you can see some of you can see some of the routes there. you can see some of the routes there. this was the most recent arrival into delhi. this train is carrying 70 tonnes of oxygen. for some hospitals, the oxygen has come too late. here's dr yogeshjain, a public health expert and doctor, on who he thinks is to blame. it is symptomatic of the lack of preparedness that our system failed on. we know that production in this country happens adequately for all of the medical oxygen requirements that the country might have, besides the industrial requirement. it is just that, in time, we could not predict that the requirement would be as short as five to ten times as has happened, and secondly the turnaround time to transfer the oxygen from the sources of production to where it is used was not put in place. and thirdly, the
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storage bins, the storage devices which transport oxygen from one place to another were found wanting, in terms of numbers, and those have been, was the problem actually showed up, we realise we are grossly unprepared and the people have to pay the price for that. at this point, we should stress that this crisis is being felt all over india. the state of maharashtra has recorded the highest number yet. here's one doctor in gujurat the situation there. we are recording... it is not like the place like maharashtra, but we
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also have, for the major resources we are running short of is not only oxygen but also trained manpower, the trains doctors, the trained nurses. there are any less and they are being forced to face an increased duty. we had a rest period of one week, but many of my colleagues are working for the last month in covid wards. india's government denies deliberate inaccuracies in reporting deaths and insists people shouldn't be panicking. here's ashok malik, a policy adviser for india's ministry of external affairs. the number of deaths is not being underreported. every death is being accounted for. deaths can't be hidden in a country like india. what is possibly happening is that the deaths are not being categorised correctly at the moment. so people who have died of illnesses related to covid or due to covid may be categorised as having died from a co—morbidity and there will ultimately be a reconciliation.
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we saw this last year as well in the first wave, when there was a reconciliation, and that is likely to happen soon. that view isn't widely shared. yesterday, india's high court pointed the finger at the country's election commission, saying murder charges should be brought against it for not stopping political rallies — which it said violated virus protocols. in itsjudgment, it said the commission is "the only institution responsible for the situation that we are in today... ..it goes on. the who has also pointed to the failure to control large gatherings for the surge in cases. here's a spokesperson, dr margaret harris. when you are seeing health system overwhelmed, itjust looks horrific. so it is very hard to see your way through it, but the good news is that there are ways through it, that it is possible to reverse this
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virus�*s transmission as quickly as it takes off, but you have to be really serious about the public health social measures, while upping the vaccination. if the region or an area is so overwhelmed, if the virus is spreading so quickly you cannot see who has got it and he does not have it, a lockdown can be effective because you're basically putting that community into quarantine cub but to make it work, you must be able to support all the people you are locking down during that period. some help has arrived in india's hospitals. this was delhi earlier on. this is the first shipment of medical supplies from the uk. it's packed with ventilators and oxygen concentrators. the us, france, germany, canada and the who have all promised supplies, as well as india's regional rivals, pakistan and china. we've also seen sports halls, stadiums and ashrams transform into hospitals to ease pressure. this campus in delhi is now a treatment centre. it has 10,000 beds — all made out of high—strength cardboard.
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also in delhi, these train carriages are being used as make—shift medical wards. there are 4,000 coaches available — with capacity for 64,000 patients. indians have been contributing, too, in other ways. karnika kohli is in dehli. she has been cooking food and giving it to neighbours to help. it was helplessness, to be honest. reading the news every day, you're scrolling on twitter and instagram and facebook, and you see people are requesting wc people literally begging for basic medicines, oxygen, there are no hospital beds, you have seen pictures from outside of hospital... their people dying in ambulances outside hospitals, right? you can stomach can't find a ambulance to take a patient to the
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hospital the first place, and if you get one, there is not a bed. yesterday morning, the first thing i woke up to was a park termed into a commit tory him in -- it —— it into a crematorium. my brother—in—law�*s grandma, they had to wait almost when he for hours at the crematorium, because there was a line. there was this whole queue of dead bodies —— almost 2a hours. this helplessness, and you just sit at home and, to be honest, you cannot help but feel guilty for not going to with their going through, but i just wanted to help in anyway i can. in the past few minutes, joe biden has been speaking about the us is offering to india. this is he said. we're sending the actual mechanical parts that are needed for the machinery they have, to build a vaccine. and that's being done as
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well. we are also discussing, i've discussed with him, when we will be able to send actual vaccines to india, which would be my intention to do. the problem is, right now can we have to make sure... we have other vaccines like novavax and others coming on, probably, and i think we will be in a position to share vaccines, as well as know—how, with other countries who are in real need. that's the hope and expectation. and i might add, when we were in a bind at the very beginning, india helped us. next, let's hearfrom bbc�*s nikhil inamdar, who is in maharashtra, on what other help is coming. later in the week, more oxygen concentrators as well as invasive and noninvasive ventilators are scheduled to arrive in the uk government has that is continuing to have consultations with the indian government, in terms of what else it can do come in terms of providing assistance going ahead. of course
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given the scale of the crisis, this is a drop in the ocean, but india has also been seeing medical supplies and aid coming from various other parts of the world. we have seen for instance ventilators plan from frankfurt and paris and oxygen conservators from the united states. we have been focusing on india, quite rightly, but let's shift focus to brazil. few places have been as badly affected by the coronavirus pandemic as brazil, where almost 400,000 people have died. today, a senate commission launched an inquiry to find out why. and it could potentially lead to the impeachment of president bolsonaro. he's been widely criticised for his anti—lockdown, vaccine—sceptic stance. among the things he's known for saying, president bolsonaro told brazilians to "stop whining" about the coronavirus pandemic, he dismissed covid—19 as "a little flu" and said he would not take the vaccine because it could "turn you into a crocodile". let's go to sao paulo to talk to the bbc�*s camilla mota.
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help me understand the format of this inquiry? how many people that have? == this inquiry? how many people that have? ., . , this inquiry? how many people that have? ., ., , ., have? -- how many teeth will that have? -- how many teeth will that have? the — have? -- how many teeth will that have? the commission _ have? -- how many teeth will that have? the commission is - have? -- how many teeth will that have? the commission is formed l have? -- how many teeth will that l have? the commission is formed by have? -- how many teeth will that . have? the commission is formed by 11 senators who will investigate what went wrong with pandemic and who is responsible for its for the next three months, the next 90 days, and the list of things to look into is quite long for some senators will try to answerfor quite long for some senators will try to answer for example why did it take so long for the government to procure millions of vaccines or why there was a severe shortage of oxygen back injanuary, when the government was allegedly formed beforehand that the situation was getting worse they are, or the impact of bolsonaro's promotion of unproven treatment methods of covid—19. today was the commission's first meeting and they have already said they plan to bring a lot of people in to testify, including
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scientists, members of also narrow plasma cabinet and former health ministers, so we might be in for a few months of political tensions here ——jair few months of political tensions here —— jair bolsonaro jair bolsonaro's cabinet. but here -- jair bolsonaro jair bolsonaro's cabinet. but does that not require — bolsonaro's cabinet. but does that not require cooperation _ bolsonaro's cabinet. but does that not require cooperation from - bolsonaro's cabinet. but does that not require cooperation from his . not require cooperation from his colleagues? he presumably will not let them... . , ., colleagues? he presumably will not let them- - -— let them... that is what we never know what _ let them... that is what we never know what comes _ let them... that is what we never know what comes out _ let them... that is what we never know what comes out of - let them... that is what we never know what comes out of these i know what comes out of these commissions, but we know from past experience that they create a lot of noise but failed to generate concrete results, and that is a possible outcome of this one. bolsonaro has been trying to stall the process over the past few days and his allies are trying to push the agenda, that not only the federal government should be investigated that also governors and mayors, so we have to wait and see what happens this time. and mayors, so we have to wait and see what happens this time.— what happens this time. and away from the commission, _ what happens this time. and away from the commission, was - what happens this time. and away from the commission, was the - what happens this time. and away - from the commission, was the current state of the pandemic in brazil? the
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situation state of the pandemic in brazil? tue: situation got state of the pandemic in brazil? tte: situation got a state of the pandemic in brazil? "tt9 situation got a bit state of the pandemic in brazil? tt9: situation got a bit better state of the pandemic in brazil? tt9 situation got a bit better over the past week, at least now people that get sick and seek treatment can get a hospital bed. in the state of sao paulo, where i am, hospital occupancy levels have reached 80%, which is still hybrid way better than what we were seeing for the past two months, since january —— which is hybrid way better. that's, it is still high, but it has stabilised, so brazilians have been breathing a bit better over the past few days. breathing a bit better over the past few da s. . ., ., ,, breathing a bit better over the past few da s. :, :, :, ~' ,:, breathing a bit better over the past few da s. . ., ., ,, y:, few days. 0k, camilla, thank you so much for updating _ few days. 0k, camilla, thank you so much for updating us. _ few days. 0k, camilla, thank you so much for updating us. we _ few days. 0k, camilla, thank you so much for updating us. we focused . few days. 0k, camilla, thank you so | much for updating us. we focused on india and brazil. next we turn to spain. and if you've been missing the big concerts — or even small ones, for that matter — then there's some good news.
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last month, a concert was put on in barcelona to test the ability to prevent covid—19 outbreaks at large—scale cultural events, and the organisers say that there has been no sign of infection in the city. here are images from the gig, it took place on the 27th of march. looks like a regular gig, doesn't it? 5,000 people attended. they were allowed to mingle freely after passing the same—day screening tests but had to wear high—quality facemasks. here's more from guy hedgecoe. this concert by the catalan indie band love of lesbians took place in barcelona's palau santjordi, a large sports arena. nearly 5,000 people attended. all of them had to undergo antigen tests on the day of the concert itself, before the concert began, and then they were tested again over the following two weeks, with the aim of finding out how many people, if any, had been infected during the event itself. now, there were safety measures in place at the concert. everyone had to wear a facemask, there was ventilation in the venue, but, crucially, there was no mandatory social distancing,
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so people were allowed to dance around and sing along to the music — as they would at a normal rock concert. now, the results of all this show that only six people — six people who had attended that concert — tested positive for covid over the following two weeks. and of those, the researchers who have carried out the study say that four were definitely not infected at the event itself, leaving two others who may have been infected at the concert, but that cannot be confirmed one way or the other. so the scientists who carried out this study say that this is evidence that a big cultural event with a lot of people can take place without a high risk of contagion. which is very good news! thanks to quy which is very good news! thanks to guy for that update. a quick reminder, our programme began where we soughtjoe biden making a statement unproven regulations in the us. he is encouraging
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vaccinations, but he said if you have been vaccinated and your social —— you're socialising outside, you do not need to wear a mask. i will see you in a couple minutes. good evening. there's been a lot of dry weather around this april, and at times some sunshine, but the real weather feature has certainly been the frost. april 2021 is going to be the frostiest for over 60 years. in fact, there has been an air frost somewhere every night so far this month. will that change? potentially, yes, because we've seen some rain in the forecast today. this was york earlier on this afternoon. and if we take a look at the satellite picture and the rain radar combined, you can see how extensive that cloud has been and how widespread the showers have been, pushing in on a stiff easterly breeze. the exception with the sunshine down into the far southeast, that as we go through the evening and overnight, the cloud
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and the showers will drift their way steadily south and west. that's going to prevent temperatures from falling too far. we might see low single figures under some clearing skies in scotland, but you can see a relatively mild night in comparison to the month so far. so this weather front still with us to start off wednesday. quite a lot of cloud around, some showery outbreaks of rain. some of those showers potentially merging together for some longer spells of rain at times, maybe some hail, even the odd rumble of thunder next in there as well. certainly more cloud around. further north, we'll have some sunshine through northern england, scotland and northern ireland, with a few slow—moving isolated showers here, but temperatures really subdued — 8—14 degrees at the very fast in the far southeast corner. and even that milder air will quickly be pushed out of the way, as the low pressure drifts away, allows that north or northeasterly flow to drag colder air once again right across the country. so on thursday, early morning cloud and rain, leaving that kent coast to sunny
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spells for many and a scattering of showers once again, some of these heavy with some hail, maybe even a little bit of snow to higher ground as those temperatures are set to struggle — 6 to 14 degrees the high by thursday. and it looks likely that the further east you are, the cooler the weather story continues into friday and saturday, with a few scattered showers slowly easing. further west, there will be a little more in the way of sunshine, lighter winds and a little more warmth as a consequence. but it's worth bearing in mind, with clear skies by day, frosts at night.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the us is relaxing its coronavirus guide having fully vaccinated people will no longer need to wear masks outdoors. it took the easing will be an incentive for more people to get vaccinated. , an incentive for more people to get vaccinated-— vaccinated. here is the president. for those who _ vaccinated. here is the president. for those who haven't _ vaccinated. here is the president. for those who haven't got - vaccinated. here is the president. for those who haven't got their i for those who haven't got their vaccination yet, especially if you are younger or think you don't need it, that this is another great reason to go get vaccinated. now. now. :, , , reason to go get vaccinated. now. now. . _ , .:, ., now. funeral pyre is continue to burn in india. _ now. funeral pyre is continue to burn in india. the _ now. funeral pyre is continue to burn in india. the government i now. funeral pyre is continue to - burn in india. the government denies its understated the number of coronavirus does. but the real number could be more than doubled the officialfigures. if} number could be more than doubled the official figures.—
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the official figures. 50 person of dust are riot _ the official figures. 50 person of dust are not registered - the official figures. 50 person of dust are not registered by - the official figures. 50 person of dust are not registered by the i dust are not registered by the government as covid—19. bodies to be cremated _ government as covid—19. bodies to be cremated directly from home for the victim _ cremated directly from home for the victim. : ., cremated directly from home for the victim. : . ., , victim. and we have the latest in the series _ victim. and we have the latest in the series looking _ victim. and we have the latest in the series looking back— victim. and we have the latest in the series looking back at - victim. and we have the latest in the series looking back at the - the series looking back at the promises made in the uk's brexit referendum and whether they've been met. now that brexiter reality. to date we will look at northern ireland. to myanmar, which has seen one of the most intense clashes since a military coup — nearly three months ago — threw the country into crisis. this was the scene when the armed ethnic group — the karen national union — captured an army outpost in their region. here's a reminder of who they are. the karen national union are the dominant political organisation representing ethnic minority karen communities in southwestern karen state, officially known as kayin state,
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which borders thailan that region — made up of about 1.6 million people — the karen communities are the majority, and they want self—determination. (tx 00v) they have been fighting myanmar�*s army since 1949, when they were marginalised in the country's post—independence in 2012, there was a ceasefire — but that was broken when the military began launching airstrikes on kayin state in march. it is very deliberate that post was cut off by the rest of the myanmar army. the soldiers had to depend on thai soldiers to deliver them food. they were about doing my very vulnerable. they moved in the early hours around five o'clock. people on the ties hydro of gunfire and some louder explosions to suggest there was quite a bit of fighting. and then saw the various heights that are been put there by the burmese to accommodate their soldiers being set on fire. the thai side has confirmed that that's what happened. it looks like it has taken the post. what's important it reminds us that has been continued fighting over the past month. often the myanmar
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military who are defending what the national encroachments. they believe the army has eccentrically expanded its footprint under their cover—up of a nine—year—old cease—fire and is trying to hold onto that. the myanmar military has been using air pyre airpower bombing villages or the air. using artillery as well. with thousands of people displaced. this is an ongoing conflict and its link into the larger conflict in myanmar. because the current national union has been the strongest supporter of the various athletic armies. these civilian opposition is sheltering maybe 2000 people who fled from the city. when the myanmar military goes after them they have that in mind as well. so the karen support the pro—democracy movement. the movement has held huge protests like this since the military — orjunta — overthrew the democratically elected government in february. this was today in the city of yangon — hundreds took part in the largest rally in weeks.
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there have been brutal crackdowns to suppress the opposition — at least 700 have been killed. it's difficult getting footage like because of internet shutdowns and censorship, but these are pictures from just over a month ago of soldiers arresting several protesters in the south of myanmar. and since the crackdowns, kayin state has become a refuge for those escaping the military regime. shona loong is a karen state researcher at oxford university. i think the anti—coup opposition has evolved of the last couple of months. to push less for her, both the end but also for a more inclusive future from myanmar for that there are a lot of caring people on the streets protesting the city. big city as well is karen state. at the same time they are sheltering high level protesters without innate lot of high—level leaders of government exiles as well as active as i thought to be
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sheltering. also protecting partisans and karen state offering food and water. and is really emerged as one of the organisations thatis emerged as one of the organisations that is most aligned with the goals of the broader protest movement. the karen support the establishment of a national unity government — that would be made up of outsted members of parliament, leaders of anti—coup protests and ethnic minorities, all those who oppose the military rule. they want the return of this woman — aung san suu kyi —— the civilian leader who won a landslide victory in the last democratic election and has been returned to house arrest since the coup. myanmar has a number of armed ethnic groups who've spent decades fighting the military for greater autonomy and support the national unity government. if they too ramp up their fighting, the army, who need their soldiers to crackdown on protests in cities and towns,uld be in trouble. jonathan head explains why.
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so fara so far a lot of the athletic armies have given a lot of support the parallel government set up in the last novembers election. but the care are only ones who are giving active support. if those other ethnic armies try to engage the myanmar military as well it is possible it may find itself very overstretched. and people are waiting to see whether that unity government which includes the athletic armies and the promise of a five roll system whether they turns into a much more powerful arms challenge to the generals who now rule myanmar. the latest fighting is a setback for diplomatic efforts by the association of southeast asian nations — asean — to end the crisis. last weekend they held talks with the head of the army — min aung hlaing, you can see him here — to end violence directed at civilians. the military said they'd consider a plan to resolve the conflict, but would first prioritise law and order. people are sceptical of the military�*s commitment to end the violence — especially after today's this is former us ambassador to myanmar,
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scot marciel, who tweeted: "asean cannot dither here, " and international pressure is mounting. tom andrews, the un's special rapporteur on the situation of human rights in myanmar, has written an open letter to the military leader asking him to honour the commitment to end the violence at the asean summit. the commitment he made at the summit. in reality, do you think you can read it and act on it? the summit. in reality, do you think you can read it and act on it?— can read it and act on it? the risk was we all— can read it and act on it? the risk was we all knew _ can read it and act on it? the risk was we all knew going _ can read it and act on it? the risk was we all knew going in - can read it and act on it? the risk was we all knew going in that - can read it and act on it? the risk| was we all knew going in that this was we all knew going in that this was going to be simply as a propaganda ploy to make him look like he was head of state meeting with the head of states. of course thatis with the head of states. of course that is preposterous. and that legitimacy that he is seeking could only be done through play acting. that is what he was trying to do. that is what he was trying to do. that was the risk. it was attempted,
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everyone believed that asean having the most at stake among all the countries of the world and try to put this together were looking to asean to see if they can make any kind of breakthrough. the violence that we seen from the increased displacement sense that meeting, it appears as if this was indeed a propaganda ploy. just appears as if this was indeed a propaganda ploy-— appears as if this was indeed a propaganda ploy. just so i'm clear, do ou or propaganda ploy. just so i'm clear, do you or anyone — propaganda ploy. just so i'm clear, do you or anyone else _ propaganda ploy. just so i'm clear, do you or anyone else at _ propaganda ploy. just so i'm clear, do you or anyone else at the - propaganda ploy. just so i'm clear, do you or anyone else at the un i propaganda ploy. just so i'm clear, i do you or anyone else at the un have direct interactions with the military? t direct interactions with the milita ? :, :, :, :, �* military? i do not. i do not. i've issued this— military? i do not. i do not. i've issued this open _ military? i do not. i do not. i've issued this open letter. - military? i do not. i do not. i've issued this open letter. it's i military? i do not. i do not. i'vel issued this open letter. it's very, very difficult to have any communication inside of the country. we work very, very hard to overcome the obstacles that they are presenting to us. we cannot speak to the president or the state counsellor or any of the thousands of people that are in detention. so it's a very difficult and we've had no response whatsoever from the military. no response whatsoever from the milita . :, :, no response whatsoever from the milita . . ., ,., no response whatsoever from the milita . . ., ., ., military. can i ask you about what tactics you — military. can i ask you about what tactics you feel — military. can i ask you about what tactics you feel may _ military. can i ask you about what tactics you feel may work - military. can i ask you about what tactics you feel may work inside i tactics you feel may work inside myanmar? there is this long running
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civil disobedience campaign which has garnered a lot of support from abroad. is that having economic consequences that perhaps people in myanmar will be able to afford in the long run? t myanmar will be able to afford in the long run?— the long run? i think it's a significant _ the long run? i think it's a significant impact. - the long run? i think it's a significant impact. the i the long run? i think it's a| significant impact. the key the long run? i think it's a i significant impact. the key here the long run? i think it's a - significant impact. the key here is to cut the revenue that's going to enable them to reap this habit. were seeing some significant civil digital medians movements and tactics that are being used very successfully. yes, it's draining the economy, there's no question about it. and what they would like is to have the international community joined them and establish targeted, focused sanctions, coordinating sanctions. to cut their revenue stream for that they have a very large military, over 500,000 troops, they are very proud of that. but it's also a source of vulnerability. they have to feed those true, supply them and it's important for us to be able to identify the revenue streams, cut those revenue streams, cut the streams of weapons going to them. and that i believe is an
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international community would be a very important step forward to support those on the ground that are conducting those kind of campaigns with civil disobedience in various forms of strikes that are humbling and hurting the economy inside the country. so and hurting the economy inside the count . ,:, and hurting the economy inside the count _ y:, ., and hurting the economy inside the count . ., , , ., ., country. so you are pushing for that kind of pressure. _ country. so you are pushing for that kind of pressure. and _ country. so you are pushing for that kind of pressure. and while - country. so you are pushing for that kind of pressure. and while you i country. so you are pushing for that kind of pressure. and while you are| kind of pressure. and while you are do you think it is still worth asean engaging with myanmar? or should just walk away at this stage? bsebtt just walk away at this stage? asean has obviously _ just walk away at this stage? asean has obviously a _ just walk away at this stage? asean has obviously a very _ just walk away at this stage? asean has obviously a very long-term i has obviously a very long—term relationship with the jumped out. i was talking to some of the other day i said look, even though there are people you don't like to talk with sometimes it's important to do so. for example somebody who is taken hostages. in this casejunta has taken 54 million hostages. perhaps further discussion with them to try to free these hostages and relieve this crisis would be helpful. the risk again is the propaganda, that
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value that they are seeking. they want to be seen as legitimate, of course they are not. that's the risk. if there are private conversations, any kind of engagement that might actually provide us with some help in ending this crisis and it would be welcome. here in the uk the opposition labour party is openly accusing boris johnson of lying over whether he got the funds spent on redecorating his downing street flat. mrjohnson spokesperson rejects us and says he complied with all the rules and met the cost personally. the route follows persistent reports that mr johnston said he was willing to see bodies piled high when discussing covid strategy back in the autumn. ——johnson. our deputy covid strategy back in the autumn. —— johnson. our deputy lyrical editor vicki on. there is a flash photography in vicki's report.
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leading the country and setting that tone for the rest of the government. the decisions the prime ministers make every day have far reaching consequences for us all. they won't always be right. but criticism of borisjohnson isn'tjust always be right. but criticism of boris johnson isn't just about always be right. but criticism of borisjohnson isn'tjust about his judgment it's fast becoming about his integrity. everywhere they go ministers are being asked similar questions about their bosses behavior. :, , :, ~ , behavior. has a prime minister broken the _ behavior. has a prime minister broken the rules _ behavior. has a prime minister broken the rules was _ behavior. has a prime minister broken the rules was mad i behavior. has a prime minister broken the rules was mad that| behavior. has a prime minister i broken the rules was mad that refers to the expensive refurbishment of the flat mrjohnson shares with his fianc e. , , , :, fianc e. the prime ministers former adviser dominic _ fianc e. the prime ministers former adviser dominic cummings - fianc e. the prime ministers former adviser dominic cummings as the l fianc e. the prime ministers former i adviser dominic cummings as the tory leader tried to get party donors to secretly pay for the renovations. labourers say it's time to come clean. 9 :, labourers say it's time to come clean. ~ :, , labourers say it's time to come clean. 9 :, , ., :, clean. who is given alone, whose iiven the clean. who is given alone, whose given the money? _ clean. who is given alone, whose given the money? because i clean. who is given alone, whose given the money? because we i clean. who is given alone, whose i given the money? because we need to know who _ given the money? because we need to know who their prime minister, boris johnson _ know who their prime minister, boris johnson is _ know who their prime minister, boris johnson is beholden to. who has paid for his— johnson is beholden to. who has paid for his furniture, has overcome his bed that _ for his furniture, has overcome his bed that he — for his furniture, has overcome his bed that he sleeps in? and we haven't— bed that he sleeps in? and we haven't had the full and frank expiration for the minister so far. to be _ expiration for the minister so far. to be honest, he lied yesterday.
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that's _ to be honest, he lied yesterday. that's not — to be honest, he lied yesterday. that's not good enough. downing street says mrjohnson personally met the cost of wider refurbishment in this year. it hasn't denies that somebody originally picked up the bill. if they did their rules say that must be made public. the reason wh we that must be made public. the reason why we have — that must be made public. the reason why we have these _ that must be made public. the reason why we have these rules _ that must be made public. the reason why we have these rules around i why we have these rules around transparency and so that the public know who the decision—maker is up to including the prime minister. what their interests are. and to be clear that they are acting on behalf of of the people and on behalf of citizens, behalf of taxpayers. and that they're not overly influenced by donations or loans or private entrance. , , , , ~ entrance. number ten insists mr johnson entrance. number ten insists mr johnson has _ entrance. number ten insists mr johnson has it — entrance. number ten insists mr johnson has it acted _ entrance. number ten insists mr johnson has it acted in _ entrance. number ten insists mr johnson has it acted in codes i entrance. number ten insists mr johnson has it acted in codes ofl johnson has it acted in codes of conduct and electoral rules. many conservative mps are spoken to are keen to downplay the significance of all of theirs. one minister said borisjohnson has a knack of getting away with things that others wouldn't. but there is concern that lots of individual unrelated accusations could combine together
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and erode trust in the prime minister. one of the most damaging accusations mrjohnson faces is about his views on shutting down the country because of covid. he denies saying he had rather see bodies piled high than approve a third lockdown. but sources told the bbc and other media organisations that he did make the remark. it's out of the question being fired at cabinet ministers. t the question being fired at cabinet ministers. :, �* the question being fired at cabinet ministers. 9, �* :, :, , ministers. i don't need to worry about who _ ministers. i don't need to worry about who may _ ministers. i don't need to worry about who may or _ ministers. i don't need to worry about who may or didn't - ministers. i don't need to worry about who may or didn't say i ministers. i don't need to worry i about who may or didn't say what and when _ about who may or didn't say what and when the _ about who may or didn't say what and when the prime minister says he didn't— when the prime minister says he didn't say— when the prime minister says he didn't say for step that's good enough — didn't say for step that's good enough for me. because actually saving _ enough for me. because actually saving lives is where it matters. and that's — saving lives is where it matters. and that's with this prime minister has done — and that's with this prime minister has done. mr and that's with this prime minister has done. ~ . :, ,:, :, and that's with this prime minister has done. ~ i :, ,:, :, ., has done. mrjohnson would rather focus on campaigning _ has done. mrjohnson would rather focus on campaigning ahead - has done. mrjohnson would rather focus on campaigning ahead of i has done. mrjohnson would rather| focus on campaigning ahead of next week's election. but there are bucket loads of questions still to be answered. inafew in a few minutes on outside source we are going to turn to a series looking at the premises may be for brexit and consider how many are being. this time with a focus on northern ireland.
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new research has found that lockdowns and social distancing have had an impact on the speech and language skills of children starting school in england. the bbc has seen evidence that an increased number of four and five—year—olds needed more support with communication than in previous years. here's our education editor branwen jeffreys. katie is one of blackpool�*s community connectors, trained to support parents. some of the mums and dads i've spoken to have said they've noticed the children are quite scared around other children. one in particular said her little one heard another baby cry and didn't know what the noise was, so was quite startled by it. she's been visiting darren and lucy, at home with baby george, born in lockdown, and two—year—old ruby, worrying that their kids have been missing out. as a nation, we've kind of forgot about how important it is for these children to be out
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there and developing these skills young. it's mainly george it's impacted the most. with him being so young, it's the new normal for him to see people with masks, so he's not quite used to seeing people's faces. for these four and five—year—olds, there is extra help, a special programme of working with words. here, it's helped children make months of progress. we were absolutely amazed to find that some of the children who did only have a few words were able to start talking sentences in a matter of weeks. catch—up cash from the government is spreading this approach. by next year, it should be in most of england's primary schools. but many fear that unless toddlers are helped too, schools could be dealing with children's word gap for many years. branwen jeffreys, bbc news.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... president biden is told americans that if they been vaccinated they no longer need to wear a mask when meeting outdoors. we also encourage more people to ta ke to take up the offer of a job. members of european parliament about to vote on ratifying the eu. the deal was ursula varga lined the eu president and the president of the european council signed in parcel. it took four years of negotiation to get brexit to this point. but it only came into force provisionally. it still needs the european parliament to really if do not ratify it. this was the president of
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the european commission and her message. the european commission and her messaie. 9 9, the european commission and her messaie. 9 :, , the european commission and her messaie. 9 . , ., :, message. when all is said and done, what ou message. when all is said and done, what you are — message. when all is said and done, what you are voting _ message. when all is said and done, what you are voting on _ message. when all is said and done, what you are voting on today - message. when all is said and done, what you are voting on today is i what you are voting on today is momentous. in terms of what it represents. and in terms of what it secures. 9, represents. and in terms of what it secures. . ., , secures. the agreement means the ioods can secures. the agreement means the goods can be _ secures. the agreement means the goods can be traded _ secures. the agreement means the goods can be traded between i secures. the agreement means the goods can be traded between the i secures. the agreement means the i goods can be traded between the two sides free of tariffs or quotas. it also covers fishing with british both able to get more efficient waters in eu boots but not both last without their issues to deal with northern ireland a special case because it saying aligned to the eu single market. where the rest of the uk is not. i'll be looking at the topic in more detail in a moment. there are also rules in the agreement to ensure a level playing field to stop by the side for undercutting each other through government subsidies to favoured industries. there was some reflection in brussels on what what brexit means for europe. the man who negotiated the trade deal on behalf of the eu also spoke to mps. translation: this is a divorce. it's
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a warning. — translation: this is a divorce. it's a warning, brexit edited a failure. it's a warning, brexit edited a failure. it's a _ a warning, brexit edited a failure. it's a failure — a warning, brexit edited a failure. it's a failure of the european union and we _ it's a failure of the european union and we have to learn lessons from it. and we have to learn lessons from it why— and we have to learn lessons from it why did — and we have to learn lessons from it. why did 52% of the british vote against _ it. why did 52% of the british vote against leaving europe was met there are reasons _ against leaving europe was met there are reasons for that. social and tensions— are reasons for that. social and tensions existed in many regions in the uk _ tensions existed in many regions in the uk but — tensions existed in many regions in the uk but also many regions of the eeo _ the uk but also many regions of the eeo. �* the uk but also many regions of the eeo.�* ., ., ., a ., eeo. after today's vote that's not entirely the _ eeo. after today's vote that's not entirely the end _ eeo. after today's vote that's not entirely the end of _ eeo. after today's vote that's not entirely the end of it. _ eeo. after today's vote that's not entirely the end of it. ministers i entirely the end of it. ministers from the 27 eu countries still have to rubber—stamp it. unanimous approval is expected there. the vote in the european parliament is also almost guaranteed to go through. brussels correspondent. this almost guaranteed to go through. brussels correspondent.— brussels correspondent. this is a si . nificant brussels correspondent. this is a significant but _ brussels correspondent. this is a significant but largely _ brussels correspondent. this is a significant but largely symbolic i significant but largely symbolic moment. a moment in the chapter, the story of brexit. because as you are saying, this deal has been in place forfour months saying, this deal has been in place for four months now for right or wrong. and today we heard once again the various arguments in support of brexit but predominantly against brexit. and what we are seeing now
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is really a box ticking exercise, i'd suggest was that the european parliament has felt pretty sidelined throughout this whole process. in our four months after the process they're being asked to give their endorsement of it. although a lot of people said today it's not the ideal solution, it's not the best for europe, it's something which the majority of the party leaders in the parliament things should be voted on. of course the other prospect would be to throw it out and we would be to throw it out and we would go back to that no deal scenario. that was this scenario we were talking about so much last year. i think everyone wants to avoid that. year. i think everyone wants to avoid that-— year. i think everyone wants to avoid that. :, , , , , avoid that. one of the issues being discussed by _ avoid that. one of the issues being discussed by mps _ avoid that. one of the issues being discussed by mps and _ avoid that. one of the issues being discussed by mps and light - avoid that. one of the issues being discussed by mps and light lead i avoid that. one of the issues being discussed by mps and light lead upi discussed by mps and light lead up up discussed by mps and light lead up up to the european parliament vote was northern ireland. that's a subject we're going to turn our attention to now. because all week on outside source we are looking at whether promises made in the years leading up to brexit have been. we are looking at some detail now at the premises that were made concerning northern ireland. and what will happen next.
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borisjohnson made this promise on brexit and northern ireland. we will respect the peace process and the good friday agreement. but northern ireland s violent past remains clear in the memory. and this month, we ve seen reminders of that violence — the most serious for years. (biv) but where, if at all, does brexit fit into this? to answer that — we need to understand what was promised — and what has happened. there was one thing on which the eu and the uk agreed from the start. we will under no circumstances have checks at or near the border in northern ireland. but that position from the uk and the eu — didn t solve this problem. you gotta have a border somewhere. if we you gotta have a border somewhere. if we leaves— you gotta have a border somewhere. if we leaves the custom union and the single — if we leaves the custom union and the single market that has to be a border~ _ the single market that has to be a border~ it— the single market that has to be a border. it could be on the board of ireland _ border. it could be on the board of ireland are — border. it could be on the board of ireland are on the sea. but you have to have _ ireland are on the sea. but you have to have a _ ireland are on the sea. but you have to have a border. you can't magic away the need for having _ you can't magic away the need for having a _ you can't magic away the need for
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having a border. so having ruled out a land border, could brexit involve checks in the irish sea — between northern ireland and the rest of the uk? in 2018, borisjohnson ruled this out too while attacking the then prime minister theresa may s brexit plan. we will be damaging the fabric of the union with regulatory checks and even custom controls between great britain and northern ireland. as a tell you, no british conservative government could or should sign up to any such arrangement.— should sign up to any such arrangement. should sign up to any such arraniement. �* . , ., : arrangement. but that is what brexit has delivered. _ arrangement. but that is what brexit has delivered. in _ arrangement. but that is what brexit has delivered. in 2020 _ arrangement. but that is what brexit has delivered. in 2020 during - arrangement. but that is what brexit has delivered. in 2020 during the i has delivered. in 2020 during the trade talks there with this meeting between boris johnson trade talks there with this meeting between borisjohnson in ireland's prime minister. mrjohnson was clear, there will be no boarded on the irish sea. over my dead body, he said. but if that's what was said, this is what happened. the brexit trade deal comes with the northern island protocol and it stipulates that northern ireland is in effect staying in the eu single market for goods. and so certain
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goods moving to northern ireland from the rest of the uk are subject to checks. the checks we were told wouldn't happen. that's brought pressure on northern ireland peace settlement. the good friday agreement was signed in the 90s. it ended violence between nationalists who want northern ireland to remain, joined the republic of ireland and loyalists who wanted to stay in the uk. and as part of this, the irish border is completely open. no checks. and the eu and the uk agreed and he border checks risk provoking republican anger. but there was no equivalent calculation for loyalists and checks in the irish sea. and i delete my anger has followed. protocol has betrayed us and made us feel like _ protocol has betrayed us and made us feel like foreigners in our own country — feel like foreigners in our own country. tea and sympathy will not cut the _ country. tea and sympathy will not cut the mustard. we've also seen violence and sympathy will not cut the mustard. we've also seen violence in loyalist areas. this was belfast in april. this was connected to upset over
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the handling of a large republican funeral last year. and that is connected to a broader perception that loyalists are not being treated fairly. anger at the form brexit�*s taken plays into that. for his part, borisjohnson expressed concern at the violence. and he's called the checks in the irish sea unnecessary — arguing that: we are getting the barnacles off the thing. and they have been, and sam papering it into shape. this is prime minister arguing to sandpaper away the checks that he agreed to. in fact, the uk has now delayed some of those checks — which the eu says breaks breaks international law. all of which highlights that how to be outside the eu and to avoid checks remains a problem that's hard to sandpaper away. and so, not for the first time, belfast s port is centre stage. this, after all, is the city that built the titanic. something its creators thought was unsinkable. and back in 2018, as borisjohnson warned of getting the wrong type of brexit, turned to that story. the titanic springs to mind. and now
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is the time to point out the iceberg ahead. now though borisjohnson believes the uk can sail on, its peace protected, greater prosperity to come. but for some his titanic warning still stands. they see a brexit for northern ireland that isn t as promised — where the risk is greater than its creators realise. what is certain is that how brexit works for northern ireland is still being contested. something we don't often do on outside source. i want to show you quickly some pictures of the first supermoon of 2021. the supermoon is a full moon that occurs when the moon's orbits closest to earth making it appear much larger than bi. this is how it appeared in his and in turkey. this is venezuela, and in turkey. this is venezuela, and this is how it looked over new york. according to nasa at this month supermoon is set to be at peak
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illumination on april the 27th. that isjust about illumination on april the 27th. that is just about now. thanks for watching, see you soon. good evening. there's been a lot of dry weather around this april, and at times some sunshine, but the real weather feature has certainly been the frost. april 2021 is going to be the frostiest for over 60 years. in fact, there has been an air frost somewhere every night so far this month. will that change? potentially, yes, because we've seen some rain in the forecast today. this was york earlier on this afternoon. and if we take a look at the satellite picture and the rain radar combined, you can see how extensive that cloud has been and how widespread the showers have been, pushing in on a stiff easterly breeze. the exception with the sunshine down into the far southeast, but as we go through the evening and overnight, the cloud
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and the showers will drift their way steadily south and west was not that's going to prevent temperatures from falling too far. we might see low single figures under some clearing skies in scotland, but you can see a relatively mild night in comparison to the month so far. so this weather front still with us to start off wednesday. quite a lot of cloud around, some showery outbreaks of rain. some of those showers potentially merging together for some longer spells of rain at times, maybe some hail, even the odd rumble of thunder next in there as well. certainly more cloud around. further north, we will have some sunshine through northern england, scotland and northern ireland, with a few slow—moving isolated showers here, but temperatures really subdued — 8—14 degrees at the very best in the far southeast corner. and even that milder air will quickly be pushed out of the way, as the low pressure drifts away, allows that north or north easterly flow to drag colder air once again right across the country. so on thursday, early morning cloud and rain,
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leaving that kent coast to sunny spells for many and a scattering of showers once again, some of these heavy with some hail, maybe even a little bit of snow to higher ground as those temperatures are set to struggle — six to 14 degrees the high by thursday. and it looks likely that the further east you are, the cooler the weather story continues into friday and saturday, with a few scattered showers slowly easing. further west, there will be a little more in the way of sunshine, lighter winds and a little more warmth as a consequence. but it's worth bearing in mind, with clear skies by day, frosts at night.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at eight. no let up for the prime minister — more questions over who paid to renovate his downing street flat. labour accuse him of being dishonest. we haven't had that full and frank explanation for the prime minister so far. to be honest, he lied yesterday. that is not good enough. it is all been done incorrectly. there will be a cabinet office report when they put that out there and your account. that's it has all been done correctly. everybody will see what has happened. there are reports that the first minister of northern ireland, arlene foster, is facing a challenge to her leadership of the democratic unionist party. the first shipment of uk medical aid arrives in india, as coronavirus infections and deaths, reach record highs. thanks to the uk and everybody else, we too are sending thousand of
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