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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 27, 2021 2:00am-2:30am BST

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this is bbc news — i'm david eades with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. india's covid crisis deepens. doctors say people are dying on the streets. the head of the who describes the situation as beyond heartbreaking. could help come from the us? president biden agrees to donate millions of vaccine doses from stockpiles. the us justice department launches an enquiry into the police force that shot breonna taylor to see if its officers routinely behaved unconstitutionally. if violations are found, the justice department will aim to work with the city and police department to arrive at a set of initially agreeable steps they can take to prevent and
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protect unlawful patterns and practices. here in the uk, borisjohnson denies saying he'd rather see bodies pile up than order another lockdown. british—iranian nazanin zaghari ratclife�*s given a new one year prison sentence in tehran — her husband says he fears his wife is facing an "open—ended detention". hello to all of our viewers around the globe. the worsening situation in india has been well documented — hospitals running out of beds for patients, and in some cases running out of oxygen. more than 352,000 new cases were reported in the past 2a hours and more
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than 2,800 deaths. the head of the world health organization says it is beyond heartbreaking stop now it is reported the country is also running out of covid vaccines just at the point where the government was planning to boost the nationwide vaccination program. the indian government says there is no need to panic as our correspondent devina gupti reports. a haunting warning — as these funeral pyres burn through the night in the western indian city of nakpur, they indicate how the country is failing to save precious lives. for the fifth straight day, india saw a record high a worsening scenario as hospitals and covid hotspots face acute shortage of beds, oxygen supply and medicine.
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this public hospital in india's capital, delhi, is simply unable to cope. romilla kumar came with her mother, who is on oxygen support and needs immediate aid. but, like many others, they are forced to wait for hours outside. since morning, we are calling people, trying for oxygen and everything, but nobody�*s responding. and i don't think these have enough. i don't know, since my mother is ill and i have been panicked since so long. the ambulance driver who drove them here feels helpless. translation: we've been waiting since 11am in the morning. - they're not taking the patient. look how seriously ill she is. even though the government is opening new covid facilities to admit patients and transporting additional oxygen supply to the city, they cannot meet the unprecedented rush in the hospitals. for now, countries like the uk and the us have come to india's aid with essential medical supplies and oxygen kits, but much more is needed.
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and until then, for thousands in the city, the endless nightmare continues during the day. on sunday, this hospital in north delhi, as its oxygen stock dwindled. families like that of this man were told to organise oxygen on their own. he managed to refill the cylinder by paying 900 times the regular cost. for him, it's a small price to keep his father alive and breathing in the icu. translation: | got 10 | litres of oxygen cylinder but how will it help? it won't last for more than one hour. where do we go? which government should we go to? who will give us oxygen? my father is in the hospital right now. as radit rushes to search for another oxygen refill, throughout the day, countless others are running out of time in india's capital.
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devina gupta, for bbc news, delhi. there is some help at hand. the us has announced that it will immediately provide raw materials for indian vaccine manufacturers. president biden held a telephone call with india's prime minister narendra modi, pledging steadfast support — and said the us would provide a range of emergency assistance, including oxygen—related supplies and therapeutics. soon after his conversation, the indian pm tweeted: whenjoined by when joined by an whenjoined by an infectious disease experts at the john cochrane medical centre and a san luis board of health and
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90s in missouri. thank you for joining us. it is quite a bit to get through here. let's start with the astrazeneca vaccine, it doesn't have regulatory approval in the us, can it nonetheless being shipped off to other countries straightaway? the shipped off to other countries straightaway?— shipped off to other countries straightaway? the phase three clinical trial _ straightaway? the phase three clinical trial data _ straightaway? the phase three clinical trial data from - clinical trial data from astrazeneca was very, very positive as far as the high efficacy and the safety data but we all know that shortly thereafter there were reports, much like what the us has just experienced with thejohnson & johnson vaccine, around blood clots. these clots are very rare but it was important to spend some time looking at this data to make sure that although they are rare, that they are not deadly to a point where they should not be put into the general public. in the benefits of positive. but general public. in the benefits of positive-— of positive. but it is not bein:
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of positive. but it is not being used _ of positive. but it is not being used in _ of positive. but it is not being used in the - of positive. but it is not being used in the us i of positive. but it is not being used in the us so of positive. but it is not - being used in the us so there will be plenty of people thinking, ok, theirview is they are not using it so we will ship it on to people who will ship it on to people who will use it. i will ship it on to people who will use it.— will use it. i think the consideration - will use it. i think the consideration here i will use it. i think the consideration here is| will use it. i think the - consideration here is that the us had procured much more product from pfizer and moderna with the phase three clinical trials being positive. they beenin trials being positive. they been in the community and been received well. it is not so much that they don't have a good product but that the us already has enough of the pfizer vaccine and moderna to be able to meet its vaccines needs. . , , ., ., needs. that sense of dare i sa , needs. that sense of dare i say. america _ needs. that sense of dare i say, america first - needs. that sense of dare i say, america first and - needs. that sense of dare i l say, america first and charity begins at home and all of that. there is an easing off now of the sense that yes we can start to share this a bit.— to share this a bit. yes, i think there _ to share this a bit. yes, i think there has _ to share this a bit. yes, i think there has been - to share this a bit. yes, i think there has been a i to share this a bit. yes, i | think there has been a lot to share this a bit. yes, i i think there has been a lot of positive pressure, as there should be. we are not an island here in the us and any threat anywhere in the world affects us all. if you are going to be considered the world's greatest
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superpower than it takes leadership and charity. i was very encouraged to see that they had approved these doses and they will have to meet quality standard approvals before they are shipped. it also seen that there are shipments of ppe and oxygenation machines another raw material for india to be able to make their own. this is the kind of leadership we need this time. i the kind of leadership we need this time. ., the kind of leadership we need this time. . ., the kind of leadership we need this time. ., . , ., this time. i am glad you brought _ this time. i am glad you brought up _ this time. i am glad you brought up the - this time. i am glad you brought up the raw i this time. i am glad you i brought up the raw materials. people are wondering what kind of raw materials go into making a vaccine. it is a whole range of different products that i needed and a vast majority of which, if not, a proportion of which, if not, a proportion of which are actually manufactured in the united states. if they are not providing them it is going to be a struggle. absolutely and this was important, very important for it to be a package deal. not just money being sent on the
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vaccines themselves but the ability to create a sustainable situation for india to meet this absolute crisis that they are seeing right now. and so we know that outside of the novelty of things that we have seen within the last year around nrma for example, vaccines are otherwise made up of very many of the same tried and true ingredients, many of which are made here in the us so the ability to provide those and offset some of the pressure that india is facing trying to manage this would be of great benefit. ., , manage this would be of great benefit. . , ., benefit. certainly, the indian serum institute _ benefit. certainly, the indian serum institute is _ benefit. certainly, the indian serum institute is crying i benefit. certainly, the indian serum institute is crying out| serum institute is crying out for it, isn't it? we will have to leave it there. thank you very much indeed for your insight. very much indeed for your insiaht. ., ~ very much indeed for your insiaht. ., ,, ,, very much indeed for your insiaht. ., ~' . very much indeed for your insiaht. ., . ., insight. thank you so much for havin: insight. thank you so much for having me- _ the usjustice department has called for an investigation into the louisville, kentucky police department after the shooting of breonna taylor. this comes just after police officer derek chauvin was convicted for killing george floyd, sparking black lives matters process dusty.
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the attorney—general says investigation will look into whether police acted unconstitutionally. the us attorney—general said the investigation into the lousiville police will look at whether the police behaved unconstitutionally — here's the moment he made that announcenement. today, thejustice department is opening a civil investigation into the louisvillejefferson county metro government and the louisville metro police department, to determine whether lmpd engages in a pattern of practice of violations of the constitution and of federal law. today's announcement is based on an extensive review of publicly available information about lmpd conducted and thejustice department's civil rights division. the investigation will assess whether lmpd engages in a pattern or practice
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of using unreasonable force, including with respect to people involved in peaceful expressive activities. i peter. what about the timing, why now? it i peter. what about the timing, wh now? ., , i peter. what about the timing, wh now? , i peter. what about the timing, why now?— why now? it has 'ust been over a ear why now? it has 'ust been over a year — why now? it has 'ust been over a year since the i why now? it hasjust been over a year since the shooting i why now? it hasjust been over a year since the shooting of. a year since the shooting of breonna taylor, an unarmed black woman, shot dead by police during a botched raid on her apartment. police during a botched raid on herapartment. it led police during a botched raid on her apartment. it led to protests in the streets but more significant than any anniversary simply a change in attitude by the department of since the election of president joe biden. there is a much greater emphasis on racial justice and i understand that mr biden will be talking about police reform during his first speech to congress on wednesday of this week. i think that is usually significant and of course as you mentioned, it is less than a week now since a very similar enquiry, investigation was launched into the activities of the minneapolis police department following the conviction of the white police officer, of the murder of george floyd and the
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trial dominating television coverage for the past few weeks. and very much in people's mines. we now have two investigations, not into the specifics of a specific case but into the general activities of a police department, unconstitutional use of force, use of force not only in terms of individuals and police officers responding to a crime but also force against protesters involved in many of the protest that we have seen on the streets over the past year. on the streets over the past ear. �* ~ . ~' on the streets over the past ear. �* ~ ., on the streets over the past ear. ~ ., ,, year. and merrick garland spelt out a fairly _ year. and merrick garland spelt out a fairly clear _ out a fairly clear determination as to what this enquiry will be looking for and i guess the reaction clearly will come in different directions here.- will come in different directions here. a ., directions here. the reaction is broadly — directions here. the reaction is broadly positive _ directions here. the reaction is broadly positive to - directions here. the reaction is broadly positive to this. i directions here. the reactionl is broadly positive to this. we have heard from the mayor of louisville and he has said that this was long time coming. he put it, the momentum had been building for this kind of ordered for a number of months. we have heard from the police chief who has talked about
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rebuilding their product, saying that she is pushing for more resources, more training and more tools. she says of only four force. we and more tools. she says of only fourforce. we have had some political reaction as well from mitch mcconnell, the republican leader in the senate. he of course represents the state of kentucky and he has said that in the light of what has happened in his state over the past 12 months that this is certainly a justified investigation and it is justified by the department of justice. justified by the department of 'ustice. ., ~ justified by the department of 'ustice. . ~' , ., justified by the department of 'ustice. ., ,, , ., , justice. peter, thank you very much indeed. _ thank you for being with us here on the bbc news. there are those who say this is just not cricket. the indian premier league competition deemed inappropriate at a time of such suffering, ora inappropriate at a time of such suffering, or a more welcome distraction from the doom and gloom across india? we will be finding out. nothing, it seemed, was too big to withstand the force of the tornado.
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the extent of the devastation will lead to renewed calls for government help to build better housing. internationally, there have already been protests. sweden says it received no warning of the accident. indeed, the russians at first denied anything had gone wrong. only when radioactivity levels began to increase outside russia were they forced to admit the accident. for the mujahideen, the mood here is of great celebration. this is the end of a 12—year war for them. they have taken the capital that they have been fighting for for so long. it was seven o'clock _ in the morning when power began to pass from the minority- to the majority, when africa, after 300 years, reclaimed its last white colony. -
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines: india's covid crisis deepens: doctors say people are dying on the streets. the head of the who describes the situation as "beyond heart breaking". president biden agrees to donate millions of vaccine doses from its stockpiles. the star—studded indian premier league is the world's biggest and richest cricket tournament. it's being held in venues — including delhi — without fans and players in biobubbles. but there's fierce debate over whether it's inappropriate given india's unprecedented covid crisis. i'm joined by gideon haigh — the cricket columnist for the australian newspaper in melbourne. it has been a strange and eerie feeling watching the ipl season because the grounds are empty
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but there is a pretense that nothing is going on outside that there is no reason for the tournament to be taking place under these circumstances it has been referred to only cursorily. over the last few days finally commentators and players have begun to acknowledge the awfulness of the issue and some players have begun to feel both insecure about their place in the tournament on the right rightfullness of continuing under these circumstances. it does feel as if the broadcasters have been pressured into recognition of what is going on in the country when someone as big as ashwin says i can't do this at the moment, this must call into question whether it can continue. the other thing about the bcci which runs the ipl is that it has close links to the bjp.
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two senior officials, president and secretary are related , related by blood ties to some of the senior figures in the bjp and it has almost become a bit of an arm of the indian government. so in some respect it has had to move in alignment with the government which has been slow to realise the scale of the disaster. there is another side to this, obviously. india is a cricket loving nation and probably extremely welcome distraction for many people at a difficult time. if you cut off something like this itjust adds to that oppression of what is going on in the country, possibly. it also keeps people at home and they are being encouraged to do that. the argument in favour of the ipl continuing is mainly that it would make no difference for it to cease at this point. there would still be a pandemic in india there would just be no cricket to distract us from it.
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at the same time, however, there is i think a growing disquiet about the resources being ploughed into the ipl to keep the show on the road and the fact that, essentially, this is a financial decision because the ipl provides about 60% of indian sporting revenue, about 30% of global cricket revenue. if it does not go ahead then it leaves a big hole in cricket's exchequer. covid issues here in the uk are top of the agenda again. boris johnson has denied saying i top of the agenda again. boris johnson has denied saying that he would let the bodies piled high in their thousands rather than agree to a new lockdown. those remotes were alleged to have been made last autumn amid heated discussion in downing street. people who are familiar with the conversation say the prime minister did make the comment with an athletic mr johnson says the reports were total while bish. a political editor reports. —— total rubbish. our political editor
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reports. are you ready? politics is notjust a game, but a constant back—and—forth over the most serious of decisions. boris johnson's alleged, in the autumn, to have made the most serious of remarks, suggesting around the time of the second lockdown that the bodies of those dying of coronavirus could just pile up. did he? no, but, again, ithink the important thing, i think, people want us to get on and do as a government is to make sure that the lockdowns work. yet back in early autumn, it was tense. ministers and advisers divided over whether to lock down again as coronavirus rose. after arguments, borisjohnson did agree to reintroduce restrictions. you must stay at home, you may only leave home for specific reasons. but several sources, familiar with private conversations at the time, say the prime minister did then suggest he would let bodies pile high in their thousands rather than repeat the process again. at the time, dominic cummings was by borisjohnson�*s side.
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now the prime minister's former chief adviser is very firmly out of government and very firmly on the warpath. there's a list of dangerous claims stacking up at downing street's door, notjust about the prime minister's attitude during the pandemic but about how contracts were awarded, what promises he made, and how and who paid for an expensive makeover of the downing street flat where he lives above the shop. theresa may gave a rare glimpse of the flat in her last week in office, but the pink sofas and beige carpets were moved out when borisjohnson and his fiancee moved in. it's claimed tory donors initially picked up the tab for tens of thousands of pounds of renovation. if so, that should've been declared, and that hasn't happened yet. and the most senior civil servant in the country wasn't willing to shed much light on it for mps this afternoon. i asked you whether you were aware whether or not any private donations had been used to
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refurbish the flat. i mean, that's a straightforward yes or no, really. so, as i said, the prime minister's asked me to conduct a review into how this has been done and asked that i share the details of those conclusions with the committee. after months of claims, downing street now says the prime minister paid out of his own pocket, but we don't know when or where he got the money. for the opposition, sparks flying in downing street are a political gift. we've got lots of investigations going on, but we haven't got anything that's looking at the pattern of behaviour. and day after day, there are new allegations of sleaze, of favours, of privileged access. we need a full investigation to get to the bottom of that, and, most importantly, make recommendations about change because we need to change the rules. borisjohnson�*s sometimes been proud of pushing political convention. downing street is adamant
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that, in all senses, regulations were followed. but with a long list of claims against him, it isn't yet clear if he was always following the rules. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. the british—iranian aid worker nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been sentenced to a further 12 months in prison in tehran on charges of spreading propaganda against the iranian regime. last month she completed a 5—year sentence for spying — a charge she vehemently denied. her husband said he was bitterly disappointed at the court's decision, as our correspondent caroline hawley reports. nazanin�*s baby girl is now almost seven and gabriella has only celebrated one birthday, herfirst, with both her parents there. she's now watching her daughter grow up over the phone. there she is! there she is. neither parent can bear to break the news of the latest sentence to her. we haven't told her yet and, in fact, i want to check
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with nazanin — does she want me to tell her, does she want to tell her? i suspect she'll want to protect her for as long as we can. but how can richard protect nazanin? he says she and other dual nationals are being used as bargaining chips over a long—standing military debt iran wants britain to repay, and that her fate may also now be tied to negotiations with iran over its nuclear activities. what do you want the government to do now? there clearly is both the need to get nazanin home and the others home as quickly as possible, and to make it clear that this is... you can't do diplomacy this way. that is going to need discussions with all of the western world. it's more than five years since she was arrested at tehran airport, on her way home to the uk. since then, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been through solitary confinement, two trials, and now two sentences. i think it's wrong that she's there in the first place and we'll be working very hard to secure her release from iran, herability to return to herfamily here in the uk, just as we work
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for all our dual—national cases in iran. and the government will not stop, we will redouble our effort. this used to be a favourite spot for nazanin — they used to come here together as a family. but richard says a 1—year travel ban is to follow the 1—year sentence. so, without a solution, they're now looking at another two years apart. caroline hawley, bbc news. one of the many firsts at this year's oscars ceremony was youn yuh—jong, who became the first south korean actress to win an oscar for her role of the grandmother in the korean—american drama minari. she beat a stellar list of nominations, that included olivia colman, amanda seyfried, maria bakalova, and glenn close. when she spoke to us on bbc world earlier, youn yuh—jong shared her memories of her own grandmother. have a listen. during the korean war, you know, wartime makes... you're not human any more because everything is not normal. after we got back from — we went down to the south part of korea as a refugee,
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then came back home. and then, the whole city was destroyed. then there was a shortage of everything — rice and rationing everything, and water and everything. and my great—grandmother was trying to reuse the water — to me, i was nine or eight, and i thought she was very dirty, she used the water again and again. i felt so sorry for her, and she always said she wasn't hungry, she always skipped lunch. i thought she was not hungry. when i became 60 years old, then i realised she was sacrificing food for us.
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that is bbc news. thank you for watching. hello again. this month has been a really dry month, particularly across parts of england and wales, where we've just recorded five millimetres of rainfall so far. and that's left the ground completely dried out, desiccated and cracked in places. but there are changes on the way. on monday, we started to see low pressure move in across scotland, and that brought some thicker cloud and finally some rain. and looking at the rainfall amounts that we're expecting through the rest of this week, we'll get around 5—10 millimetres of rain. in the grand scheme of things, that's not a huge amount, but it's easily doubling what we've seen for many so far this month. so the rain, i'm sure, is going to be pretty welcome for the farmers and growers, although you probably want even more than we're going to get. so, there's our area of low pressure moving its way in, and as we go through the next few hours, the rain will continue
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to push its way southwards, always quite showery in nature, across northern ireland, northern parts of england as well. but with the cloudy skies across these northern areas, it doesn't get that cold. in the south, still cold enough, though, for some pockets of frost. it's here where we'll have the clear skies to start the day, and for some it will be a nice sunrise as well. through the day, our centre of low pressure is going to start to wobble back inland and dive in a diagonal south—westwards towards wales, and that will bring outbreaks of rain across northern england, wales, into the midlands. still some showers around for northern ireland and scotland as well, but it is an area of low pressure where the amount of rain that we see from place to place is going to vary quite a lot. now, on into wednesday, our low pressure continues its journey southwards, so again we'll see some rain moving into wales, parts of the midlands, southern areas of england this time with a few showers following. but on wednesday, we'll also start to get a really quite brisk and cold
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east—to—north—easterly wind blowing in off the chilly north sea, and that means around some of our eastern coasts, temperatures may well struggle to get into double figures in places. even further west, it's not going to be exactly warm for the time of year. now, looking at the weather charts as we end the week, our area of low pressure moves back out into europe, but in its place, the winds tend to become pretty light. we've got cold air back with us, so again we're likely to see some night—time frosts. there will be loads of showers around, particularly on friday. and because there's not going to be that much wind around, there'll be nothing really to blow those showers along, so some of them could end up being pretty slow—moving in nature. and it's not going to be a particularly warm end to the week, but at least there's going to be a bit of rain.
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this is bbc news,
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the headlines: doctors in india report people are dying on the streets outside hospitals in the capital delhi, as the country records more than 3,000 new covid—i9 infections for the fifth consecutive day. the head of the world health organsation says the situation is "beyond heartbreaking" us says its supply of the astrazeneca vaccine will be shared with other countries. they say up to 60 million doses will be available. there has been growing this is the country was hoarding vaccines to the detriment of global efforts. here in the uk borisjohnson has denied saying he'd rather see bodies pile high, than order another lockdown. the prime minister's faced fierce criticism after reports he made the comments in a heated debate over whether to reintroduce the restrictions last autumn.
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now on bbc news, it's monday in parliament.

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