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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 24, 2021 9:00pm-9:30pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. experts say the worst is still to come as india's health care system buckles under more record breaking cases of coronavirus. in a break from decades of diplomatic language, president biden has described the 1915 massacres of armenians in the ottoman empire as genocide. the indonesian navy says debris has been found after the sinking of a submarine with fifty—three sailors on board. britain's prime minister is urged to explain how the refurbishment of his downing street flat was paid for, following allegations from his former chief advisor. and the latest space—x mission that sent four astronauts to the international space station —
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we'll be speaking to an astronaut who's been there three times. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. as india's health care system buckles under more record breaking cases of coronavirus, experts say the worst is still to come. they say the rate at which infections are climbing suggest the crisis still hasn't peaked. there are almost no intensive care beds left in delhi, where oxygen supplies are running out. one hospital in the city reports that shortage has led to the death of twenty—five patients. our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan�*s report contains images you may find upsetting.
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patients as far as the eye can see but oxygen remains scarce. the situation here is critical and out of control. this video was filmed inside a crowded delhi hospital. as he took a family member to casualty. the staff is really cooperative. due to overcrowding, of the main hospital, it is difficult to provide equal treatment to all the patients. that is why i cannot get inside. it is the same outside. every day as cases rise, families face a never—ending search and a terrifying wait. this 17—year—old is taking care of his grandfather. he has been here before. his father died as he waited here just a day before. my father was struggling and begging me to help him but i could not give him anything he said. imagine how i feel when my father
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is crying and begging me to save his life. patients have died because of the supply shortage. doctors have been left in a desperate situation. patients and many people have been coming to emergency, they want only beds. we have no beds or oxygen. there is a deficiency of a huge amount of oxygen. as the crisis unfolds, the prime minister is under pressure and chaired an emergency meeting to look at ways to boost oxygen supplies. many say it is too little too late. across the country, relatives continue to que for supplies as thousands continue to die. for every family who gets a canister, there are countless others who won't.
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the indonesian military has announced that a navy submarine missing since wednesday has sunk, with fifty three sailors on board. search teams have discovered debris including items from inside such as prayer mats. what remains of the submarine is believed to be at a depth of eight hundred and fifty metres, below the level at which it could safely operate. here's richard galpin with the latest. this submarine, the nanggala 402, disappeared four days ago. on board, 53 crew members taking part in a torpedo exercise off the coast of bali. contact was lost after the crew asked for permission to dive. a major operation to find the stricken submarine was launched, with malaysia and australian ships amongst those helping. today it became clear all was lost. the indonesian navy chief yudo margono told a news conference the submarine had sunk 850 metres down from the surface. but the hull could only withstand the pressure at 500 metres.
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as a result he said, the hull cracked. he also announced that some items from the stricken submarine had been recovered, including a piece of the torpedo system and a prayer mat. the navy insists the submarine was seaworthy but it was a0 years old. the search continues to find the bodies of the 53 submariners. richard galpin, bbc news. us president biden has formally described the 1915 massacres of armenians in the ottoman empire as "genocide". on the day marking the anniversary of the mass killings, his use of this word is a deliberate break from decades of carefully calibrated language from the white house. turkey has accused the united states of trying to rewrite history. jane o'brien has more from washington. this is a hugely significant and symbolic act by america,
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but also the fulfilment of a personal pledge made byjoe biden when he was campaigning for the democratic nomination. it also follows a letter written by 38 republican and democratic senators saying that he should acknowledge the truth, now, it could have a detrimental effect on turkey and us relations. they have been frayed over the last few years already. partly because turkey bought a russian defence system that many nations, including america, felt could compromise its membership of nato. there has also been great concern over turkish attacks on kurds in northern syria after us troops withdrew from there. in fact, that infuriated lawmakers, who, in 2019, passed their own legislation designating the killings
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of armenians in 1915 as a genocide. so, in many respects, this is a logical progression from actions that america had already been taking. nevertheless, joe biden, by using this language twice, calling this a genocide twice in his statement on armenian remembrance day, is a huge departure for any us president. he is the first president to actually use the term and officially acknowledge that the events of 1915 were, in fact, a genocide. i'm joined now by former us ambassador to turkey, jamesjeffrey. welcome to bbc news. it's been a long time coming. i may have spoken about this with you before. i know many presidents have agonised over whether to take the step. do you think this was the right thing for joe biden to do? think this was the right thing for joe biden to do?— think this was the right thing for joe biden to do? ~ g ., �* .,, joe biden to do? well, joe biden has to decide that. _
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joe biden to do? well, joe biden has to decide that. many _ joe biden to do? well, joe biden has to decide that. many of— joe biden to do? well, joe biden has to decide that. many of us _ joe biden to do? well, joe biden has to decide that. many of us who - joe biden to do? well, joe biden has to decide that. many of us who are i to decide that. many of us who are concerned about the important turkish american relationship cautioned against it. in the end biden had made this commitment to his voters and he carried it out. it also has a lot of support in congress was up we have to remember that many countries including many in western europe and russia have done this already.— done this already. when you talk about the important _ done this already. when you talk about the important relationship| about the important relationship with turkey, you know this relationship very well. the reaction was swift and is quite strong saying this opens a deep wound in our relationship. it's political opportunities and populism. that's what the turkeys foreign ministry is saying. 50 what the turkeys foreign ministry is sa in._ ., what the turkeys foreign ministry is sa ini_ ., ., what the turkeys foreign ministry is sa ini. ., ., ., what the turkeys foreign ministry is saini. ., ., ., saying. so far that reaction has been rhetorical. _ saying. so far that reaction has been rhetorical. that's - saying. so far that reaction has| been rhetorical. that's language saying. so far that reaction has - been rhetorical. that's language we would have expected. the key thing will be what will ddoonn say if anything. biden alerted him yesterday that he would move forward on this. president biden was also careful to put this... it’s on this. president biden was also careful to put this. . ._ careful to put this... it's getting hard to hear— careful to put this... it's getting hard to hear you, _ careful to put this... it's getting
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hard to hear you, actually. - careful to put this... it's getting hard to hear you, actually. i'm i hard to hear you, actually. i'm going to pick up again to ask you about what you think turkey might do in terms of action rather than rhetoric? i in terms of action rather than rhetoric? ~ in terms of action rather than rhetoric?— in terms of action rather than rhetoric? ~ ., , ., rhetoric? i think that they would resect rhetoric? i think that they would respect american _ rhetoric? i think that they would respect american military - rhetoric? i think that they would - respect american military operations we would have very important progress in also... in we would have very important progress in also. . ._ we would have very important progress in also... in terms of president _ progress in also... in terms of president delong, _ progress in also... in terms of president delong, do - progress in also... in terms of president delong, do you - progress in also... in terms ofl president delong, do you think progress in also... in terms of - president delong, do you think this is a particular blow to him and in a way turkey a sense of national identity? way turkey a sense of national identi ? , , identity? the turks feel sensitive about this not _ identity? the turks feel sensitive about this not because _ identity? the turks feel sensitive about this not because they - identity? the turks feel sensitive about this not because they denyj about this not because they deny what happened to the armenians in 1915 by the use of the term genocide. they see this associated only with nazi crimes and its effort to make turkey the other in the west. even though it's a nato member. that's turks. but west. even though it's a nato member. that's turks. but the us isn't the first _ member. that's turks. but the us isn't the first to _ member. that's turks. but the us isn't the first to take _ member. that's turks. but the us isn't the first to take the - member. that's turks. but the us isn't the first to take the step. - member. that's turks. but the us isn't the first to take the step. 0f| isn't the first to take the step. of course many other countries that this was genocide.—
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course many other countries that this was genocide. that's true but the us played _ this was genocide. that's true but the us played a — this was genocide. that's true but the us played a special— this was genocide. that's true but the us played a special role - this was genocide. that's true but the us played a special role in - the us played a special role in turkeys national security. it has a bigger staring than anybody else, to be honest. you bigger staring than anybody else, to be honest. ., ., , be honest. you said that president biden was determined _ be honest. you said that president biden was determined to - be honest. you said that president biden was determined to make - be honest. you said that president| biden was determined to make this move. he was vice president under obama for eight years and nothing happened then. so why the difference? what's the emotional difference? what's the emotional difference here, do you think? mr; difference here, do you think? my iuess difference here, do you think? ij�*i guess is difference here, do you think? m guess is that i difference here, do you think? m1 guess is that i was ambassador and arm from president obama did not take the position we all thought even the turks he would. at the very czarist minute he didn't, joe biden decided that was a mistake, we gotta get by this thing, we've got to get past it. get by this thing, we've got to get ast it. . , . for your time. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news. three people are reported dead in attack on an iranian fuel tanker off syria. firefighters are reported to have extinguished the blaze following a suspected drone attack. the syrian oil ministry is quoted
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as saying the tanker had been targeted from nearby lebanese waters. the president of real madrid football club has said the 12 sides who attempted to form a european super league cannot walk away as they have binding contracts. florentino perez insisted the project, or one similar to it, would be launched soon. real madrid, barcelona and juventus are the only clubs not to have pulled out despite a public backlash. the first lebanese—made car — an electric vehicle — has been formally unveiled to the public. it's called the quds rise and will sell for $35—thousand. analysts say it's a bold venture launched at a time when the lebanese economy is the grip of crisis. the prime minister is being urged to explain how the refurbishment of his downing street flat was paid for, following allegations from his former chief advisor. dominic cummings has claimed borisjohnson had considered what he called "possibly illegal" plans to have tory donors fund the work.
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downing street says mrjohnson paid for the work himself, and nothing improper took place — but the opposition is demanding an inquiry. this report from iain watson contains flashing images from the start. out but not down, borisjohnson�*s closest adviser left downing street in november but now dominic cummings has not only denied he leaked some of the prime minister's text messages but he has also opened a pandora's box of accusations against his former boss. the most serious is that the funding of last year's renovation of the downing street flat where the prime minister lives with his fiancee carrie symonds was not above board, amid reports that costs were spiralling out of control. in a blog dominic cummings said. and this former conservative law officer and long—standing critic of borisjohnson has now
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entered the fray. my impression is that there has been a constant wriggling about the source of the money for this refurbishment and that is just one illustration of the chaos that mrjohnson seems to bring in his wake. and the reason for that is because he is a vacuum of integrity. the government says the prime minister is paying for the works himself and no codes of conduct or electoral law were broken. the electoral commission is looking into whether there were any undeclared donations. number ten says all donations that need to be reported have been. but labour is accusing the government of not playing fair. they want to know if any conservative donor was initially involved in the funding and called for more transparency and an inquiry. publish the details, have the full inquiry. if there is nothing to see here, whether it is the refurb of ten, whether it is the dodgy contracts, privileged access, if there is nothing to see,
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publish everything, have a full inquiry because sunlight is the best disinfectant. but a former adviser on standards in government thinks more information rather than a new inquiry is what is needed. we have probably got enough enquiries going on, it is actual concrete hard evidence which demonstrates where things have gone wrong that is critical now and cummings mightjust be able to provide some of that. dominic cummings has a means of communicating what he knows. next month he will be able to give evidence publicly to a joint committee of mps on the government's handling of the pandemic. the prime minister's former adviser clearly believes the best form of defence is attack. he is now questioning borisjohnson�*s competence and his integrity and dominic cummings says he is happy to have every e—mail he sent and received during his time here at number ten published. dominic cummings is showing no signs of getting back in his box and that could be bad news
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for his former boss. iain watson, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... as indian hospitals struggle to cope with an escalating coronavirus crisis, experts say that the worst is still to come. one virologist told the bbc the peak was still two weeks away. in a break from decades of diplomatic language, president biden has described the 1915 massacres of armenians in the ottoman empire as genocide. four astronauts on board elon musk s spacex crew dragon spacecraft have successfully docked at the international space station for a six—month mission. it is the third launch in less than a year for nasa s commercial crew programme, which relies on private sector companies operating from the us. angus crawford reports. we start to see the detail on dragon there as it is closing in. docking just moments away.
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but endeavour�*s been here before. this its second mission to the international space station. metre by metre, the gap closes. until. dragon spacex on the big loop, soft capture confirmed. the four astronauts blasted off on friday from the kennedy space centre in florida. the first to use a rocket booster recycled from a previous flight. checks complete between space station and capsule, time to meet their crewmates for the next six months. confirmation that the crew is go. making a total of 11 astronauts now on the station. it has not been this busy for years. it is really unbelievable to be here on the space station. the space station has changed quite a bit since last time i was here. i have never seen so many astronauts on board. different spacecraft on board. i think it is a tribute to how
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strong our programme is going. a new era in space, then. thanks in part to a recycled rocket. station, this is houston, are you ready for the event? angus crawford, bbc news. steve swanson is a former nasa astronaut who flew three flights to the international space station. welcome to bbc news. thank you. how does it feel when you see pictures when they dock and unite and greeting each other, what do you think? ., ~ ., , think? one, i would like to be there but also its— think? one, i would like to be there but also its a _ think? one, i would like to be there but also it's a great _ think? one, i would like to be there but also it's a great moment - think? one, i would like to be there but also it's a great moment for - but also it's a great moment for them, for the group did crews have accomplished a lotjust to get to that point. accomplished a lot 'ust to get to that oint. . , ., , accomplished a lot 'ust to get to that nah that point. really, really happy moment. all— that point. really, really happy moment. all of _ that point. really, really happy moment. all of it _ that point. really, really happy moment. all of it must - that point. really, really happy moment. all of it must be - that point. really, really happy| moment. all of it must be filled with adrenaline of course. but what about that moment when you're just moving into dock, you know that potentially perilous, i suppose. what did it feel like for you?
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really, compared to the launch that's a pretty benign part of the mission. it's pretty well controlled, it's slow and it's easy to change if there's any kind issues that pop up. that to me is not that difficult part of the mission. it's quite apart when you dock at the station and you get to go in. fight! station and you get to go in. and then if they _ station and you get to go in. and then if they are _ station and you get to go in. and then if they are there for six months, there's the matter of keeping yourself going even when you get homesick, whatever happens. you are iioin get homesick, whatever happens. ym. are going to run into some issues with that for sure. the first couple of months are always pretty good. and then it starts to wane a little bit as it gets to be old hat. but that's environment to me is fantastic. i love that aspect of it. but then you weigh that against being away from home, being away from yourfamily and being away from home, being away from your family and friends and the food and all the other things you can't do back on earth. that starts
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to take its toll as time goes on. it's kind of interesting at the very end i got happy because i knew i was going home but i was still up there in this great environment. that was the best time for me was the last month. . , , the best time for me was the last month. ., , , , ., month. other many times when you wake u- month. other many times when you wake up and — month. other many times when you wake up and you — month. other many times when you wake up and you think _ month. other many times when you wake up and you think where - month. other many times when you wake up and you think where mi - month. other many times when you wake up and you think where mi for| month. other many times when you | wake up and you think where mi for a second? i wake up and you think where mi for a second? ., , ., second? i would definitely, for sure. especially _ second? i would definitely, for sure. especially because - second? i would definitely, for| sure. especially because you're floating. you're not used to it was up floating. you're not used to it was up it takes a little while to get used to it. a few weeks and you're probably back to normal and it becomes an normal environment. definitely any transition to space are back from space you deftly get that when you wake up in the morning kind of where am i, what's different about this feeling? oi kind of where am i, what's different about this feeling?— about this feeling? of course you are chosen _ about this feeling? of course you are chosen for _ about this feeling? of course you are chosen for many _ about this feeling? of course you are chosen for many skill - about this feeling? of course you are chosen for many skill sets - are chosen for many skill sets including your technical, scientific skills but there's also getting on with your fellow humans in a very small environment so far from home. that is a true statement. you can go with your best friend but you get to spend six months with them living
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and working side by side, you're going to have a conflict at some time. little things will come up. so we work on those kinds of skills to defuse those situations to make sure we talk about them and said that we can not have those things build up to be anything of significance. i want to ask you what you think about the future of space exploration. this is going so smoothly but space x is also been taken on as part of the men to the moon mission, get boots back on the moon. yes. the men to the moon mission, get boots back on the moon.— the men to the moon mission, get boots back on the moon. yes. i think it's a great — boots back on the moon. yes. i think it's a great motto _ boots back on the moon. yes. i think it's a great motto that _ boots back on the moon. yes. i think it's a great motto that nasa - boots back on the moon. yes. i think it's a great motto that nasa ends - it's a great motto that nasa ends space x together. it's great model. the thing i start to worry about at this point is we've had three successful group missions and i'm worried that they would get a little complacent. they are very busy at space x, they're launching all sorts of other vehicles. it's something that you really have to be diligent about. i'm hoping they keep that focus on a mission when they are doing that. it's easy as happens at
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nasa before i know that you have to fight that feeling and always stay focused. i fight that feeling and always stay focused. , , ,.,, i. fight that feeling and always stay focused. , , i. ., fight that feeling and always stay focused. , , ., focused. i suppose you are saying the are focused. i suppose you are saying they are a — focused. i suppose you are saying they are a danger _ focused. i suppose you are saying they are a danger could _ focused. i suppose you are saying they are a danger could be - focused. i suppose you are saying they are a danger could be if- focused. i suppose you are saying| they are a danger could be if there are a victim of their own success. exactly. nasa has gone through this multiple times honestly forgot that something i think everybody has to realise. i think they can do that and nasa will help them through that phase. it's not for human behaviour once you've done it a few times to get relaxing complacent. you've got to fight that feeling. i’m get relaxing complacent. you've got to fight that feeling.— to fight that feeling. i'm very excited to — to fight that feeling. i'm very excited to be _ to fight that feeling. i'm very excited to be speaking - to fight that feeling. i'm very excited to be speaking to - to fight that feeling. i'm very. excited to be speaking to you. thanks for giving us your time. mr; thanks for giving us your time. m1' pleasure, take thanks for giving us your time. m1 pleasure, take care. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sarah mulkerrins. england have won the women's six nations�* title for the third year in a row after a hard—fought final victory against france. poppy cleall scored the only try of a tight game, while emily scarratt kicked a last minute penalty as england won 10—6 — their eighth successive victory over france.
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no walkover for england — but the world cup—winning scrum—half natasha hunt felt they'd earned their latest six nations title. great to see them come out with the result. i think today, everything they talked about would have been getting the result and that is exactly what they have done, crushing for this french side. england have come out on top so many times in the last bits of the game so, yes, it is crushing for them but amazing to get the results and 36 nations championships is brilliant. the defensive effort for both teams are just ridiculous, the amount of shots going on, leg drive, contact, amazing to see, but that is why it was not a high—scoring game because defence really stood up today. i think they are so glad to get over the line and obviously they have got medals around their neck so they are smiling in the sunshine. everyone wants to win, at the end of the day. they are fierce competitors, everyone and that's what is. it is brilliant for them to lift the trophy again. in the premier league, chelsea boosted their champions league
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qualification hopes with a 1—0 win at west ham. timo werner scored the goal which means they're now three points above the hammers in fourth place. next up for thomas tuchel�*s side is a trip to real madrid on tuesday for a champions league semi—final first leg. this is clearly something very special. biggest club may be in europe. and biggest club in the last ten years of champions league history, clearly. so a good challenge but to arrive with the self—confidence and with a trust in ourselves that we can perform in tight matters on this level is a very good feeling. yeah, once again a very good experience for us and the next step is to take on tuesday. joe willock scored in the last minute of the game as newcastle earned a 1—1 at liverpool. mo salah had given the home side the lead after three minutes, but willock�*s equaliser moved newcastle further away
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from the relegation zone, and kept liverpool out of the top four. the final game of the day in the premier league is into the second half. already—relegated sheffield united have the advantage against brighton — who were seven points from safety ahead of kick—off. david mcgoldrick scoring the only goal of the game for the home side, who lead 1—0. watford have sealed promotion back to the premier league for next season. they beat millwall1—0, with ismaila sarr scoring an 11th minute penalty to give them a club—record 18th home win of the campaign and, in doing so, securing a return to the top flight at the first attempt. hibernian are through to the semi finals of the scottish cup — but only just. they led 2—0 against motherwell but conceded two goals in the last 10 minutes, taking the game to extra time and penalties. hibernian held their nerve though — winning 11—2 in the shootout. the draw for the semi—finals will be made on monday.
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former champion neil robertson is through to the quarter—finals of the world snooker championship, after beating jack lisowski. robertson showed all his tricks in a ruthless 13—9 victory. he always looked in control, scoring four century breaks in the match. and he'll now face last year's beaten finalist kyren wilson, who survived a fightback from barry hawkins. wilson had a five—frame advantage at one stage but he was pegged back to 9—9, before pulling away, to win13—10. that's all the sport for now. thanks for getting us up to date. just to remind you you can see all our stories on the bbc website including a lot more what's happening in india with the covid crisis. we've been talking to people in delhi, mumbai and others on the website. accounts from doctors from patients, relatives aboutjust what's going on there. you can talk
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to me about any of our stories on twitter where i am at philippa bbc. thanks very much for being with us on bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. it's been another day of unbroken sunshine in most areas, warm, in fact, too. in fact, in northern ireland, is that in which a topped 18 degrees, the warmest day of the year so far but of course that rain will come in useful with the wildfire in the mountains and it is very dry across the uk and it would be neat main event on sunday but there are some changes into next week. now, though, the high pressure is very close by. the flow of air around that on sunday introduces a somewhat cooler easterly more widely across england and wales so it will feel a bit cooler even if you are in the sunshine so we have got some chilly night to go under clear skies.
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will feel a bit cooler even if you are in the sunshine so we have got some chilly night to go under clear skies. more rural spot will be a bit colder so a patchy frost to the morning, —3 in the coldest parts of north—east scotland. there will be a little cloud around here and there to start the day. a lot of this is going to disappear but some will continue across parts of eastern england with a chance of a light shower and later on in the day and isolated heavy shower may develop into northern scotland and cloud and shetland can't be ruled out. gusty wind, particularly for the channel islands in south—west england. will feel quite cool, elsewhere even though it is cooler, 17 or 18 celsius in the sunshine in a few spots. as we go on through sunday night, we bring more cloud in from the north sea and also increase the cloud in north—west scotland. that is some rain moving in for monday morning but still indicate, clearer areas as we go into monday a patchy frost, at least
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on the ground, will be on offer. on monday, then, it's all change as low pressure starts moving introducing the chance of a little rain. doesn't look like a huge amount, may well be very hit and miss as well, but it will be raining in northern scotland on monday and will start to push a little bit of rain perhaps further south later in the day but it doesn't look like it will amount to very much. sunny spells elsewhere, temperatures generally in the mid to low teens and it will turn cooler is the week goes on. quite a bit of cloud around, chances and showers as well, but it doesn't look as if it was not going to be any substantial rain or changes from this being one of our driest days on record. bye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: hospitals in india struggle
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with overwhelming demand for beds, ventilators and oxygen as the country records the world's highest—ever daily rise in coronavirus infections for the third day in a row. labour has called for the government to publish full details of how work on borisjohnson's official flat was paid for, following allegations by his former chief advisor, dominic cummings. the public have been told to stay away from the mourne mountains in northern ireland, amid warnings more fires may break out this weekend. indonesian rescue teams recover debris that is believed to be from the submarine that went missing off the coast of bali on wednesday. now on bbc news, our world. under cover of covid, the amazon rainforest is under attack, with deforestation at levels not seen for more than a decade. under cover of covid, the amazon rainforest, the greatest ecosystem on earth, is under attack.

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