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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 23, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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this is bbc world news. the headlines. india's hospitals are reporting dangerously low oxygen levels and no empty beds as coronavirus cases reach record highs. there have been 2,263 deaths in the past 2a hours. the french president, emmanuel macron, has said france will never yield to islamist terrorism. he was speaking after a female officer was stabbed to death inside a police station near paris. there are fears oxygen supplies have run out on an indonesian submarine that went missing off the coast of bali on wednesday. search teams from a number of countries are trying to find the vessel, which has 53 people on board. a new malaria vaccine developed by researchers in britain, has been 77% effective in stopping infection in early clinical trials. the drug was tested on a50 babies and toddlers from burkina faso.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the former conservative adviser, mo hussein, and the westminster correspondent at the yorkshire post, geraldine scott. lovely to see you both back. our chat in a moment, quick look though through some of the front pages. i want meeting on the dumb the coming story, the daily mail is one of those. —— on the dominic cummings story. the mail leads on former downing street adviser dominic cummings�* denials over accusations he leaked text messages sent between the prime minister and businessman, sirjames dyson — the paper describes it as "all—out war" between mr cummings and his former boss, borisjohnson. the i strikes a similar tone on its front page, noting dominic cummings�* attacks
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on the prime minister's competence and integrity. that story also the lead for the telegraph — but its front page also carries a message from government scientists who claim facemasks may not be needed this summer as the vaccine does the "heavy lifting" in the battle against coronavirus. "unethical and foolish" is the quote the times lifts from dominic cummings�* blistering attack on borisjohnson. the former adviser�*s remarks were part of a i,000—word post on his blog. the guardian describes mr cummings�* attack on the pm as "astonishing" but the paper also carries news of the biggest miscarriage ofjustice in uk history — the wrongful conviction of dozens of post office workers. the express marks that story on its front page — celebrations outside the high court as those convictions against 39 former postmasters are quashed.
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so, let�*s begin. mo and geraldine, mo you will kick us off this time around. the one story that is a meeting isjohnson versus cummings, the front page of the male really illustrating that well in the front page picture. —— of the daily mail. well in the front page picture. -- of the daily mail.— of the daily mail. what was once thou . ht of the daily mail. what was once thought as _ of the daily mail. what was once thought as a _ of the daily mail. what was once thought as a marriage _ of the daily mail. what was once thought as a marriage made - of the daily mail. what was once thought as a marriage made in l of the daily mail. what was once - thought as a marriage made in heaven and is _ thought as a marriage made in heaven and is now_ thought as a marriage made in heaven and is now going through a very bitter_ and is now going through a very bitter divorce it would seem and i think_ bitter divorce it would seem and i think it's — bitter divorce it would seem and i think it's easy to think of this as itiust _ think it's easy to think of this as itiust but — think it's easy to think of this as itjust but what kind of think it's easy to think of this as it just but what kind of stuff, think it's easy to think of this as itjust but what kind of stuff, an old adviser— itjust but what kind of stuff, an old adviser trying to get revenge and what — old adviser trying to get revenge and what doesn't matter? but i think it does_ and what doesn't matter? but i think it does matter because the things he is alleging _ it does matter because the things he is alleging are quite serious and do raise _ is alleging are quite serious and do raise issues— is alleging are quite serious and do raise issues that we know are running — raise issues that we know are running sore points for the government in terms of questions around _ government in terms of questions around calling the second block down, —
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around calling the second block down, the timing around that, the subsequent inquiry we will have in a tent maker— subsequent inquiry we will have in a tent maker into hold preparedness for covid _ tent maker into hold preparedness for covid and the response to it and questions _ for covid and the response to it and questions of a more political nature around _ questions of a more political nature around how— questions of a more political nature around how the funding is being handled — around how the funding is being handled around downing street, it's flat handled around downing street, it's fiat and _ handled around downing street, it's flat and the renovations of it. we had the _ flat and the renovations of it. we had the accusation that dominic was responsible for making various messages of the prime minister had come _ messages of the prime minister had come at _ messages of the prime minister had come at this is more than rebuttal, this is— come at this is more than rebuttal, this is him — come at this is more than rebuttal, this is him bringing many more issues — this is him bringing many more issues into— this is him bringing many more issues into the mix that now create a big _ issues into the mix that now create a big problem and big headache for number— a big problem and big headache for number 10. a big problem and big headache for numberio. —— responsible for leaking — numberio. —— responsible for leaking various messages. i spent four years — leaking various messages. i spent four years working in number 10, leaking various messages. i spent fouryears working in numberio, it is the _ fouryears working in numberio, it is the privilege of my life, it is a privilege — is the privilege of my life, it is a privilege to _ is the privilege of my life, it is a privilege to serve the country and hopefully— privilege to serve the country and hopefully make a positive change and to see _ hopefully make a positive change and to see this— hopefully make a positive change and to see this kind of warfare and tit-for-tat_ to see this kind of warfare and tit—for—tat briefing is really depressing and really beneath the office _ depressing and really beneath the office of— depressing and really beneath the office of the prime minister.
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geraldine, it is interesting because mo started off saying this does matter. does it to the british people? i matter. does it to the british --eole? ~' ., , matter. does it to the british neale? ~' ., , ., people? i think it does matter. i think of my _ people? i think it does matter. i think of my time _ people? i think it does matter. i think of my time reporting - people? i think it does matter. i think of my time reporting on i people? i think it does matter. i. think of my time reporting on those red or blue wall sees whatever you want to call them that one boris johnson the election and a lot of those areas and the rest of the country, there is a really strong sense ofjustice really, and wanting meritocracy. that is why the first set of problems here for the prime minister in terms of having business having a direct x assigned to him via whatsapp or whatever it was is damaging. —— a direct alignment. and secondly it is damaging because they want to believe this government has integrity and when your former closest aide turns on you and says to the public "there was not a lot of integrity here and there are find below the standards that you should
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expect," i think that is damaging for the government and i think this will have cut through because mike mo says this is not a bubble story, it goes further than that and a very serious allegation. it is talking about the political integrity of the government and that�*s very important to people. m0 government and that's very important to --eole. a, government and that's very important to --eole. ., to people. mo if we turn to the front page _ to people. mo if we turn to the front page of — to people. mo if we turn to the front page of the _ to people. mo if we turn to the front page of the eye _ to people. mo if we turn to the front page of the eye macro, i to people. mo if we turn to the l front page of the eye macro, this to people. mo if we turn to the - front page of the eye macro, this is embarrassing as well, what do you think was met —— of the i. i embarrassing as well, what do you think was met -- of the i.- think was met -- of the i. i think the bigger— think was met -- of the i. i think the bigger shift _ think was met -- of the i. i think the bigger shift here _ think was met -- of the i. i think the bigger shift here is _ think was met -- of the i. i think the bigger shift here is he - think was met -- of the i. i think the bigger shift here is he is - think was met -- of the i. i think the bigger shift here is he is nowi the bigger shift here is he is now wilting _ the bigger shift here is he is now willing to — the bigger shift here is he is now willing to directly criticise the prime minister and it has become really personal and this was somebody who was whispering in the prime _ was somebody who was whispering in the prime minister's here in all the key meetings, the main adviser for quite _ key meetings, the main adviser for quite a _ key meetings, the main adviser for quite a tumultuous time in our country's — quite a tumultuous time in our country's history. and it really trusted — country's history. and it really trusted by— country's history. and it really trusted by the prime minister to go from that— trusted by the prime minister to go from that did this to where this is this really— from that did this to where this is this really public spat i think is
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embarrassing for everyone. and i think— embarrassing for everyone. and i think this — embarrassing for everyone. and i think this also doesn't really help because — think this also doesn't really help because even if people may not be across _ because even if people may not be across the — because even if people may not be across the whole details or machinations that do go under westminster, it still looks like self—involved thing, government, conservative at psychodrama i hate to say, _ conservative at psychodrama i hate to say, and — conservative at psychodrama i hate to say, and that really i think will 'ar to say, and that really i think will jar with _ to say, and that really i think will jar with people who are worried about— jar with people who are worried about much more everyday stuff and recovery— about much more everyday stuff and recovery from the pandemic and with two weeks _ recovery from the pandemic and with two weeks to go before the local elections. — two weeks to go before the local elections, this should be a real concern — elections, this should be areal concern to— elections, this should be a real concern to party into the government and to— concern to party into the government and to have _ concern to party into the government and to have this message is cutting through— and to have this message is cutting through her or even not in great detail, _ through her or even not in great detail, how— through her or even not in great detail, how is this being seen by people _ detail, how is this being seen by people who want the government to worry— people who want the government to worry about them and not to be fighting — worry about them and not to be fighting amongst themselves? geraldine how much of this as we turn to the front page of the guardian, how much of this is a gift for labour? labour has been really hammering home the line of government is
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sleaze over the last couple of weeks talking about these direct lines to the prime minister taken by david cameron grabbing rishi sunak on behalf of greensill capital, etc and i have not been convinced that some of that has been sticking particularly with the james dyson affair and borisjohnson saying that he would fix it so that ventilators could get into the country, i really think people were seeing that as it was a massive crisis where people were dying and the prime minister was trying to do the best he could. however this is different i think and i think that labour will be absolutely rubbing their hands and get everything for the dominic cummings is essentially gifting them this line, i imagine there will be plenty of ministers and shadow ministers over the weekend repeating the lines back into the weeks ahead as well. , , ., i. the lines back into the weeks ahead as well. , , ., , ., ,, as well. sorry geraldine, you think this is different _ as well. sorry geraldine, you think this is different from _ as well. sorry geraldine, you think this is different from quickly - as well. sorry geraldine, you think this is different from quickly could | this is different from quickly could you expand on that? i
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this is different from quickly could you expand on that?— this is different from quickly could you expand on that? i think this is different from _ you expand on that? i think this is different from the _ you expand on that? i think this is different from the labour- you expand on that? i think this is different from the labour sleaze l different from the labour sleaze allegations because i think the public will have seen or felt at that time that really the government was doing all it could in a crisis situation. we heard throughout the pandemic that went vast sums of money were being spent, the public were very forgiving and very charitable to think really the government was doing their best. but when things like integrity and leaking, it feels much more grubby and doesn�*t feel like it is acting in interests of the public, think the public are very forgiving but not when you are not acting in their interests. very quickly on this, mo, going back to the headline on the front page of the guardian, cummings hits back. could this have been avoided? in could this have been avoided? in some ways, yes. i think this is clearly— some ways, yes. i think this is clearly a — some ways, yes. i think this is clearly a reaction to the briefing that came — clearly a reaction to the briefing that came from downing street sources — that came from downing street sources accusing him of being the
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leak _ sources accusing him of being the leak 0f— sources accusing him of being the leak. of course it will have created a response — leak. of course it will have created a response and i think they should have _ a response and i think they should have foreseen that and probably the calculation was he has left government and will not come back. so let's_ government and will not come back. so let's create this distraction, the government has been struggling on either— the government has been struggling on either front but this is what you would _ on either front but this is what you would call— on either front but this is what you would call in the trade the dead cat approach _ would call in the trade the dead cat approach but actually, someone i was talking _ approach but actually, someone i was talking to _ approach but actually, someone i was talking to earlier pointed out you have _ talking to earlier pointed out you have to _ talking to earlier pointed out you have to make sure the cat is dead if you're _ have to make sure the cat is dead if you're going — have to make sure the cat is dead if you're going to use this approach and and — you're going to use this approach and and said he has come back with a lot more _ and and said he has come back with a lot more firepower and a lot more allegations. and i think because he is talking _ allegations. and i think because he is talking about competence and integrity. — is talking about competence and integrity, it's not reallyjust about — integrity, it's not reallyjust about a _ integrity, it's not reallyjust about a cronyism or who is texting who for— about a cronyism or who is texting who for some it is much more than that now— who for some it is much more than that now and — who for some it is much more than that now and this has created a much bigger— that now and this has created a much bigger problem for number 10 and for the pm's_ bigger problem for number 10 and for the pm's team, and it could well have _ the pm's team, and it could well have been— the pm's team, and it could well have been an attempt at a preemptive strike, _ have been an attempt at a preemptive strike, we _ have been an attempt at a preemptive strike, we note that dominic will be appearing _ strike, we note that dominic will be appearing in front of mps giving more _ appearing in front of mps giving more testimony and we know he
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probably— more testimony and we know he probably has more information from his time _ probably has more information from his time at— probably has more information from his time at number 10 and we could see it _ his time at number 10 and we could see it being — his time at number 10 and we could see it being dripped out over the coming _ see it being dripped out over the coming weeks and this could be an attempt _ coming weeks and this could be an attempt to— coming weeks and this could be an attempt to try to discredit him a bit but _ attempt to try to discredit him a bit but i — attempt to try to discredit him a bit but i do think it has backfired. as we _ turn to the daily telegraph than, their front turn to the daily telegraph than, theirfront page does turn to the daily telegraph than, their front page does lay out as part of their headline sequence three claims, but how do you see if the spin that is going to be put on this to try and discredit him as mo says, geraldine?— says, geraldine? well, i think to discredit dominic— says, geraldine? well, i think to discredit dominic cummings - says, geraldine? well, i think to discredit dominic cummings for| says, geraldine? well, i think to i discredit dominic cummings for the people that already don�*t find him a very attractive figure is not difficult. they include centauri mps, there were a lot of tory mps that at the time when dominic cummings was at the heart of government they were concerned about this kind of power and influence he had over the prime minister. in terms of how it is going to be spun out from of the lanes we have seen a ready have not exactly been a strong push back from number 10, that the
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prime minister would never get in the way of an inquiry, and that everything is done within the right guidelines, it will be just enough or whether they come out swinging and going heavy with the kind of counter or if they are hoping now that this will die down but i don�*t think it�*s going to die down. as mo says, he is in front of mps next weekend i�*ve imagined this would be much more to come, it feels like the nuclear option and just the start and two weeks out from local elections, i think it could potentially be damaging on that side. on the other hand if the conservative party does well in those local elections despite all this, it might be a good opportunity to breakfrom this, it might be a good opportunity to break from the pass and get away from the dominic cummings era of government. m0 from the dominic cummings era of government-— from the dominic cummings era of covernment. ., , .,~ government. mo you are shaking your head in a very — government. mo you are shaking your head in a very resigned _ government. mo you are shaking your head in a very resigned manner - head in a very resigned manner there. before we move on to our next story and put this behind us, advice being given i had the should be handled, what do you think is being said? i the should be handled, what do you think is being said?— think is being said? i think they will be looking _ think is being said? i think they will be looking quite _ think is being said? i think they will be looking quite carefully i
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think is being said? i think they| will be looking quite carefully at what _ will be looking quite carefully at what he — will be looking quite carefully at what he has accuse them of and probably— what he has accuse them of and probably worrying about what else may be _ probably worrying about what else may be coming? i think they will want _ may be coming? i think they will want to— may be coming? i think they will want to shift the focus back on to the domestic agenda, focus on things on the _ the domestic agenda, focus on things on the doorstep and people will be voting _ on the doorstep and people will be voting on— on the doorstep and people will be voting on and pointed to the success of the _ voting on and pointed to the success of the vaccine programme and point to how— of the vaccine programme and point to how do _ of the vaccine programme and point to how do we get out of lockdown? hopefully _ to how do we get out of lockdown? hopefully hoping that this will go away in _ hopefully hoping that this will go away in a — hopefully hoping that this will go away in a few days, i personally do not think— away in a few days, i personally do not think it — away in a few days, i personally do not think it well. but their response has not really addressed many— response has not really addressed many of— response has not really addressed many of his essential allegations which _ many of his essential allegations which to— many of his essential allegations which to some people will be quite teiiinq _ which to some people will be quite teiiinq so — which to some people will be quite telling so i think they will need to try to _ telling so i think they will need to try to focus on moving the agenda on and whether— try to focus on moving the agenda on and whether they can succeed on that is another— and whether they can succeed on that is another question.— is another question. geraldine sang with the daily _ is another question. geraldine sang with the daily telegraph, _ is another question. geraldine sang with the daily telegraph, a - is another question. geraldine sang with the daily telegraph, a story i with the daily telegraph, a story covered on to paper some of the first on this particular one, the vaccine may spell the end of masks during summer, so say scientists. masks during summer, so say scientists-— masks during summer, so say scientists. , , , ., scientists. this is different from -romises scientists. this is different from promises to _ scientists. this is different from promises to the _ scientists. this is different from promises to the future - scientists. this is different from promises to the future we i scientists. this is different from promises to the future we have |
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scientists. this is different from i promises to the future we have heard in the past because this is a scientists saying if the vaccine drive is continuing to go as well as it is, by the summer we might not have to wear masks, only on public transport or may be in hospitality settings and i think a lot of people will feel very positive about that. i think a lot of us understand why we have to wear them and why it is so important but don�*t really enjoy it but the other caveat here is this is all if the vaccine programme continues to go well but also if we as the public stick to our side of the bargain and one of the big bits of that is presenteeism the scientists say of not taking yourself into work when you feel a bit funny to make sure that we are not still spreading things. there is a lot of emphasis on the public�*s behaviour to make sure we get to this stage as well. ma. behaviour to make sure we get to this stage as well.— this stage as well. mo, your thoughts — this stage as well. mo, your thoughts on _ this stage as well. mo, your thoughts on this, _ this stage as well. mo, your thoughts on this, i - this stage as well. mo, your thoughts on this, i will- this stage as well. mo, your| thoughts on this, i will show this stage as well. mo, your- thoughts on this, i will show the daily express because it�*s the same story, but their headline is smile, no masks by the summer, what are your thoughts on this story? this
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no masks by the summer, what are your thoughts on this story?- your thoughts on this story? this is a liuht at your thoughts on this story? this is a light at the _ your thoughts on this story? this is a light at the end _ your thoughts on this story? this is a light at the end of _ your thoughts on this story? this is a light at the end of the _ your thoughts on this story? this is a light at the end of the tunnel, i your thoughts on this story? this is a light at the end of the tunnel, it | a light at the end of the tunnel, it does _ a light at the end of the tunnel, it does highlight the success of the vaccine _ does highlight the success of the vaccine and it is kind of suggesting to people — vaccine and it is kind of suggesting to people there is hope which is a good _ to people there is hope which is a good thing — to people there is hope which is a good thing and people do want to see that and _ good thing and people do want to see that and we do need to have a path back to _ that and we do need to have a path back to normality but i would also ur-e back to normality but i would also urge a _ back to normality but i would also urge a bit— back to normality but i would also urge a bit of caution in flagging things— urge a bit of caution in flagging things too much in advance because it could _ things too much in advance because it could be _ things too much in advance because it could be counterproductive and step people to have a false sense of security— step people to have a false sense of security and there are many variants beyond _ security and there are many variants beyond our — security and there are many variants beyond our control. there are many different— beyond our control. there are many different ways the pandemic and still carry— different ways the pandemic and still carry on different strains and could _ still carry on different strains and could still— still carry on different strains and could still emerge. it is one piece of the _ could still emerge. it is one piece of the wider puzzle but i think sometimes being a bit more cautious in terms _ sometimes being a bit more cautious in terms of— sometimes being a bit more cautious in terms of flagging things to really— in terms of flagging things to really is _ in terms of flagging things to really is a good thing.- in terms of flagging things to really is a good thing. your paper now, bi really is a good thing. your paper how. big story — really is a good thing. your paper now, big story for _ really is a good thing. your paper now, big story for today, - really is a good thing. your paper i now, big story for today, geraldine, now, big story fortoday, geraldine, the now, big story for today, geraldine, the yorkshire post, post offices chiefs should face inquiry, you have some of those and son are rated on the front page in the article. ——
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that are exonerated. this the front page in the article. -- that are exonerated.— the front page in the article. -- that are exonerated. this is the verizon post — that are exonerated. this is the verizon post office _ that are exonerated. this is the verizon post office can - that are exonerated. this is the verizon post office can know. that are exonerated. this is the i verizon post office can know where dozens of sub—postmasters were convicted for false accounting. of sub—postmasters were convicted forfalse accounting. —— horizon post office was up when really it was this computer system that they knew had faults were making it seem like there was money missing from the tell. and they have really been exonerated, 39 have had their convictions quashed. and free people who —— three people who were convicted tragically died before their convictions could be question but people have lost theirjobs, their marriages, their homes, it has been an as with scandal and went right to the top of the post office and for a one time they would not back down on this. but labour max sanders should be a full inquiry and we�*re looking at compensation claims that go up to £1 million for some people and one of the victims who had her conviction overturned today is the same to those who were
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responsible, "watch your back" so sounds that they are really going for them and you can understand why. mo? it for them and you can understand why. mo? , , ., ,., , for them and you can understand why. mo? , , ., , ., , ., for them and you can understand why. mo? , , ., , ., ., mo? it is been a point 'ust to hear the extent — mo? it is been a point 'ust to hear the extent oft mo? it is been a point 'ust to hear the extent of the i mo? it is been a pointjust to hear the extent of the human - mo? it is been a pointjust to hear the extent of the human cost i mo? it is been a pointjust to hear the extent of the human cost of i mo? it is been a pointjust to hear. the extent of the human cost of this as geraldine has pointed out, and i think— as geraldine has pointed out, and i think lessons definitely have to be learned _ think lessons definitely have to be learned to ensure this kind of thing can never happen again. this isjust the beginning. — never happen again. this isjust the beginning, the people who have suffered — beginning, the people who have suffered i think do need more and if there _ suffered i think do need more and if there has— suffered i think do need more and if there has been any illegality or wrongdoing on the part of others, that needs — wrongdoing on the part of others, that needs to be investigated properly, an inquiry that actually has teeth— properly, an inquiry that actually has teeth and can take action because _ has teeth and can take action because the cost of this i think is incalculable and even if there is compensation, that is not going to be enough — compensation, that is not going to be enough. i think widerjustices needs— be enough. i think widerjustices needs to — be enough. i think widerjustices needs to be served here. the dish the picture — needs to be served here. the dish the picture on the front page of the daily express which also has this story— daily express which also has this story that — daily express which also has this story that met the six years of hell and for— story that met the six years of hell and for victims of post office scandai~ _ and for victims of post office scandal. ., , ., ..,,
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scandal. you resend human cost there, scandal. you resend human cost there. very _ scandal. you resend human cost there, very quickly _ scandal. you resend human cost there, very quickly geraldine, i scandal. you resend human cost i there, very quickly geraldine, they could be waiting a long time again. it's could be waiting a long time again. it�*s been nearly two decades. thea;r it's been nearly two decades. they have been waiting _ it's been nearly two decades. they have been waiting a _ it's been nearly two decades. tie: have been waiting a long it's been nearly two decades. tt;e: have been waiting a long time it's been nearly two decades. tt91 have been waiting a long time and i think you have to think about these people who some of them pled guilty because they were told that was the only way to make this go away. so the injustice of that is self has thought max another have to live however long without getting any compensation, a call for an inquiry is needed and i agree with mo, it needs to have teeth but how long do these things take? these people do deserve some justice and some kind of recompense now.— deserve some justice and some kind of recompense now. geraldine scott, mo hussein. — of recompense now. geraldine scott, mo hussein. it— of recompense now. geraldine scott, mo hussein, it has— of recompense now. geraldine scott, mo hussein, it has been _ of recompense now. geraldine scott, mo hussein, it has been fantastic- mo hussein, it has been fantastic chatting this friday evening. thank you very much to both of you. that�*s it for the papers tonight. sport next. i will be with you at the top of the hour. don�*t go away.
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hello, good evening. you�*re watching bbc news. i�*m katherine downes with the latest for you from the bbc sport centre. only the game in the premier league tonight. we�*ll start with that. arsenal hosted everton. before the match, over 1000 arsenal fans protested outside the emirates, voicing their displeasure at the club�*s involvement with the failed european super league. the demonstration centred on calls for the club�*s owner, stan kroenke, to leave. stan kroenke, the owner of arsenal, doesn�*t care about the club at all, and it�*s the same for all clubs in england. and we need as many people here as possible to just make a stand against owners that don�*t care about the club. we just need him gone now. we need someone new that cares about the club and who's going to put money back in. everybody's so upset about it. i think they're trying to just make a stand and see if we can get him out and get someone in the club who's willing to put money in, i invest it in the club and players and take us forward. _
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well, meanwhile, swedish billionaire businessman daniel ek, co—founder of spotify, has said on social media that he�*s a lifelong arsenal fan and would be interested in buying the club if kroenke wished to sell. as for the game inside the emirates, everton beat arsenal 1—0. the goal came with less than a quarter of an hour left of the match, an own goal by gunners keeper bernd leno, who fumbled the ball into his own net. so, everton now three points off the champions league places. it�*s the first time they�*ve won away at arsenal in 25 years. unbelievable gift for our supporters. i think good performance, not top performance, but solid performance. we played solid. we were good defensively. we tried to play if it was possible, and we were lucky scoring a goal. wales manager ryan giggs has been charged with assaulting two women last november. the former manchester united player is also charged with coercive
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or controlling behaviour. he�*s been bailed and is due to appear in court next wednesday. giggs has said he will plead not guilty. the welsh fa confirmed that robert page will continue as wales�* manager for this summer�*s euros. ronnie o�*sullivan�*s hopes of winning a record—equalling seventh world title are over. he is out of the world championship after losing to anthony mcgill in the second round. the match went the distance, but it was mcgill who held his nerve, winning 13—12. you could say this is one that�*s got away, but there were six that didn�*t get away. so, you know, it�*s how you want to look at it, you know? you know, i�*ve won 20 majors, whatever it is. i�*ve got kind of every record in the book apart from, obviously, the most world titles. but, you know, if i can keep the mindset that i�*ve been working on with steve peters the last few days... i just want to enjoy my snooker, you know, because i haven�*t really been enjoying it, you know? i feel like i�*ve been playing pretty poor. and i find it hard to enjoy it if i don�*t play well.
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so, the defending champion is out, but last year�*s runner—up is on course to reach the quarterfinals. kyren wilson leads barry hawkins 9—7. the first to 13 frames will reach the last eight. play resumes tomorrow afternoon. in rugby union�*s premiership, leaders bristol have lost forjust the third time this season. they were beaten by second—placed exeter 20—12 at ashton gate. tom o�*flaherty with the second of three tries for the defending champions, and the win moves exeter to eight points behind bristol. meanwhile in rugby league, hull fc have maintained their unbeaten start to the new season, extending their run to four matches. they beat wakefield 20—14. andre savelio with hull fc�*s first try. the win leaves hull fc fourth in the table, a point behind leaders st helens. wakefield are bottom having played four, lost four. and not good news for britain�*s men�*s number two cameron norrie. he�*s been knocked out of the barcelona open by rafa nadal at the quarterfinals stage of the clay court tournament.
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6—1, 6—4 the final score. nadal will now play pablo carreno—busta in the last four. he�*s aiming for a 12th title in barcelona. gymnastics now, and britain�*s jessica gadirova has won bronze in the all—around final at the european championships in basel. this was her senior international debut. she came third with an impressive score in the vault to claim her place on the podium behind 15—year—old viktoria listunova of russia, who won the gold. fellow brit amelie morgan finished in fourth. the japanese prime minister, yoshihide suga, has promised to ensure a safe tokyo olympics this summer after announcing a new state of emergency in tokyo, osaka and in two other prefectures. the measures will take place from sunday and again raises questions about japan�*s ability to host the games. mark england is the chef de mission for team gb. it�*s alarming to hear that it�*s
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a state of emergency. in the uk, we call it a lockdown. so, it�*s just a different term for broadly a similar series of government measures. and in fact, the government measures injapan are consistently more relaxed than the government measures in the uk and what we are used to. so, a state of emergency injapan really means that, you know, the bars need to shut and the restaurants need to shut by 8pm. so, it�*s a very different environment. and simon yates has won the tour of the alps after finishing safely in the pack on the fifth and final stage into riva del garda. the stage itself was won by felix grossschartner of bora—hansgrohe. yates came home in the green jersey, winning the tour by 58 seconds. the win will no doubt be great preparation for him for next month�*s giro d�*italia. thanks for watching.
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hello. wales reached 21 degrees on friday. scotland had its highest temperature of the year so far at 20. and after a warm, sunny start to the weekend, it will turn a little cooler and cloudier as the weekend goes on, especially in eastern areas. it�*s still largely dry throughout with high pressure here, but the flow of air around that as the weekend goes on will become more of a pronounced easterly across the uk, with that cooler air starting to move in and more cloud, especially by sunday and especially in the east, as we�*ll see in a moment. another chilly morning to kick off the weekend, but not as cold as recent mornings, though still there will be a patchy, mainly rural frost around and temperatures head up in the morning sunshine quite quickly. once any early mist and fog patches clear away from eastern england, there will be a bit of patchy cloud for parts of scotland, wales reached 21 degrees on friday. especially in the east
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and into north east england. but for most areas, it�*s a day of unbroken sunshine once again. shetland, though, turning cloudy with a chance of a little light rain. it will be a cooler day along north sea coasts with a breeze off the sea, but in western areas of the sunshine, every bit as warm as friday, i9, perhaps 20 degrees again. and there will be moderate to high pollen levels and moderate to high uv as well. now, we are expecting more cloud to arrive as we go after dark on saturday night. just filtering in here from the east, particularly into parts of england and wales. there could be a few mist and fog patches around, too. although temperatures again are a little bit higher as we start sunday morning, still the odd touch of frost in the countryside can�*t be ruled out. and then on sunday, don�*t be surprised to have some cloud, particularly across parts of england and wales and patchy cloud and after a warm, sunny start to the weekend, in scotland breaking to allow sunny spells. though parts of eastern england could stay rather cloudy with a chance of a light shower and an isolated heavy shower in highland scotland can�*t be ruled out. more of us noticing that easterly breeze, quite gusty through the channel, channel islands and south west england as it�*s been
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for the past few days. and quite chilly along that north sea coast, cooler elsewhere but still up to 17 in western counties of northern ireland. into next week, and high pressure giving way to low pressure and that brings a chance anyway of a little rain moving southwards monday into tuesday. doesn�*t look like it�*s going to amount to very much, at the start of a week which while likely it�*ll be cooler than average once again with a chance again for a few showers, but not enough to stop this being one of the driest aprils we�*ve known.
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this is bbc news. i�*m lukwesa burak with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. india�*s health care system buckles, as a record surge in covid cases puts pressure on hospital beds and life—saving supplies. we have a special report from the front line. if oxygen runs out, there is no leeway for many patients. time is running out to save the crew of an indonesian submarine, who�*ve been missing since wednesday. from close ally to bitter critic — dominic cummings launches an explosive attack on borisjohnson, accusing the prime minister of lacking integrity. a new malaria vaccine is hailed as a potential breakthrough, as early trials prove it to be 77% effective.
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and as hollywood gets ready for the oscars,

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