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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  April 22, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. president biden tells world leaders they face a "moral imperative" to replace their polluting fossil fuels with clean, greener technologies. the white house is re—engaging in the climate challenge after four years in which the united states had vacated the stage. mr biden says he will cut us emissions by 52% by 2030, throwing down the gauntlet to a0 heads of state who joined him ina virtualsummit. this is the decisive decade. this is the decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis. a roller—coaster week in minneapolis — from the conviction of derek chauvin to the funeral of 20—year—old daunte wright,
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another black man shot dead after a routine traffic stop over expired licence plates. i come to minnesota to tell| you your tags have expired. your tags of racism have expired. also in the programme — india has recorded the highest one—day tally of new covid—19 cases anywhere in the world. they are dying in record numbers, and many while waiting for oxygen. the oscars socially distanced. but on sunday, hollywood's finest will, at least, walk the red carpet, and all the way to union station. we'll explain all as we give you the runners and riders. hello, i'm laura trevelyan in washington. christian fraser is in london. it's earth day, and world leaders tried to put their strategic rivalries aside today at a virtual white house summit
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on the climate crisis. after president trump spent four years trying to tear up everything president obama had done on climate, now president biden is trying to lead from the front again. as the us is the second—biggest polluter in the world after china, change here can drive change all around the world. to that end, joe biden has made a big pledge today. he has committed the united states to cutting greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 52% by the end of this decade. he's also launching an international climate finance plan to help underwrite the transition to a decarbonised global economy. international investment from both public and private sectors will flow toward the breakthrough technologies that we must find in the next ten years. our science editor david shukman has been watching the first day of conference. the more the world heats up, the more dangerous it becomes. that's what this is all about. more intense flooding in the uk and many parts of the world is more likely. while in some regions, like central america, the big fear is droughts
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getting even worse. failed harvests are already forcing thousands to leave their homes. all of a sudden, we can see the whole, whole sphere.. i it's one reason why, with a video, president biden is making climate a priority. we knowjust how critically important that is because scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade. this is the decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of a climate crisis. this virtual gatherings saw the leaders of the world's biggest economies and some of its most vulnerable nations all calling for action on climate change. we're suddenly getting a flurry of promises, counted in different ways, but all significant. the united states — to cut its emissions by up to 52% by 2030. the european union — 55% by the same year. and the uk - 78% by 2035. china, the world's biggest polluter,
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says its emissions will fall from 2030, but president xi wants more developed nations to cut first. translation: developed countries need to increase climate _ ambition and action and make concrete efforts to help developing countries accelerate the transition to green and low—carbon development. to make any real difference, every country has to play its part, and despite all the talking in recent decades, the scale of the challenge has got even bigger. that's because human activity every year emits something like 50 billion tonnes of the gases that are heating up the atmosphere. now, scientists say that needs to come down by nearly half by 2030 to have any decent chance of keeping a lid on the rise in temperatures, and emissions should then fall to basically zero by 2050. but, at the moment, the world is not heading in that direction. so, what's likely to happen? well, electric cars are on their way. we're going to see far more of them.
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fewer flights may be on the cards because prices may have to go up if there are charges for pollution. eating less red meat is another recommendation from government advisors, who say it'll save carbon. and heating our homes, not with gas boilers, but with heat pumps or hydrogen, but the details still need to be worked out. we're working with everybody, from the smallest nations - to the biggest emitters, _ to secure commitments that will keep change to within 1.5 degrees. but for younger people, this is all too slow. this earth day protest was in indonesia, and american politicians got a similar message from greta thunberg. we, the young people, are the ones who are going to write about you in the history books.
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we are the ones who get to decide how you will be remembered. so my advice for you is to choose wisely. already green technologies are becoming far cheaper, but the transition to a zero—carbon world will need a lot more political will and help for the countries most at risk, and all of that still needs to be negotiated. david shukman, bbc news. so, how big is the challenge ahead of us? this graph shows us how global carbon emissions have risen over the years. they were still relatively low until the mid—20th century. and these latest figures show the countries that are now the biggest emitters. they are china, the us and india. let's bring in the democratic congresswoman from virginia abigail spanberger, who's on the house foreign affairs committee. thank you so much for being with us. so given the history of political division in this country, and you know from all about that, you are in the ultimate swing seat in congress, the ultimate swing seat in congress, the releasee of us lawmakers really coming together to make these drastic cuts in emissions that
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president biden is suggesting? i think notably what president biden is suggesting presents tremendous opportunity for our country to much of this_ opportunity for our country to much of this opportunity for us to make investments in renewable energy in the jobs _ investments in renewable energy in the jobs that those investments would _ the jobs that those investments would bring in fortifying our electrical grid, which of course would — electrical grid, which of course would bring jobs and resiliency. and bringing _ would bring jobs and resiliency. and bringing innovations to the state of agriculture. it also served on the agriculture — agriculture. it also served on the agriculture committee, so there are areas _ agriculture committee, so there are areas where — agriculture committee, so there are areas where we can find bipartisan support— areas where we can find bipartisan support for— areas where we can find bipartisan support for the innovations and the efforts— support for the innovations and the efforts that it will take to meet these — efforts that it will take to meet these goals. but efforts that it will take to meet these goals-— efforts that it will take to meet these goals. efforts that it will take to meet these coals. �* _, , ., these goals. but when it comes to these goals. but when it comes to the world leaders _ these goals. but when it comes to the world leaders who _ these goals. but when it comes to the world leaders who were - these goals. but when it comes to the world leaders who were there | the world leaders who were there today, given that president bush pulled out of the kyoto protocol, president donald trump pulled out of the paris agreement, how can world agreements it would not be all changed again from the us on climate company 24? this changed again from the us on climate company 24?— company 24? this is a concern. as a member of— company 24? this is a concern. as a member of the _ company 24? this is a concern. as a member of the foreign _ company 24? this is a concern. as a member of the foreign affairs - member of the foreign affairs committee and some who has previously spent time working in
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national— previously spent time working in national security, i know that the us is— national security, i know that the us is positioned as a trusted partner— us is positioned as a trusted partner is— us is positioned as a trusted partner is vital to our own national security— partner is vital to our own national security and — partner is vital to our own national security and certainly to our partnerships. my expectation is that president _ partnerships. my expectation is that president biden will demonstrate over the — president biden will demonstrate over the next four years he real commitment to leading on the issue of addressing global climate change as well— of addressing global climate change as well as _ of addressing global climate change as well as a many other spaces. but ithink— as well as a many other spaces. but i think notablyjust this week, i served — i think notablyjust this week, i served on— i think notablyjust this week, i served on the subcommittee for europe's— served on the subcommittee for europe's energy and environment in the house _ europe's energy and environment in the house foreign affairs committee and we _ the house foreign affairs committee and we had a bipartisan hearing focused — and we had a bipartisan hearing focused on transatlantic partnerships and their roles in combating climate change and how the us can _ combating climate change and how the us can be _ combating climate change and how the us can be a _ combating climate change and how the us can be a good partner and what some _ us can be a good partner and what some of— us can be a good partner and what some of the lessons that have been learned _ some of the lessons that have been learned in _ some of the lessons that have been learned in europe have been. we are presented _ learned in europe have been. we are presented is— learned in europe have been. we are presented is from the european commission and from the un f ccc, and it— commission and from the un f ccc, and it was— commission and from the un f ccc, and it was a — commission and from the un f ccc, and it was a tremendously informative and valuable conversation. that i would hope was a 'oy conversation. that i would hope was a joy to _ conversation. that i would hope was ajoy to members conversation. that i would hope was a joy to members of congress on both sides of— a joy to members of congress on both sides of the _ a joy to members of congress on both sides of the aisle. so hopefully
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that's— sides of the aisle. so hopefully that's an — sides of the aisle. so hopefully that's an indicator of where we can continue _ that's an indicator of where we can continue to— that's an indicator of where we can continue to have effective and longer—term conversations when it comes— longer—term conversations when it comes to _ longer—term conversations when it comes to beating climate change. we comes to beating climate change. w's. could be comes to beating climate change. - could be sceptical but let's face it, it is vitally important that the united states is politically engaged in this and when you retrofit an economy as big as the american economy as big as the american economy injust ten economy as big as the american economy in just ten years, that has to drag the rest along. the question is how do you encourage countries like australia that exports a lot of minerals that seemingly while you are going forwards, it is going the opposite direction? you are going forwards, it is going the opposite direction?— opposite direction? you know, i think it's a _ opposite direction? you know, i think it's a bit — opposite direction? you know, i think it's a bit by _ opposite direction? you know, i think it's a bit by purchasing - opposite direction? you know, i l think it's a bit by purchasing what we preach— think it's a bit by purchasing what we preach as one might say it. demonstrating real commitment here at home _ demonstrating real commitment here at home in— demonstrating real commitment here at home in the us so that when we make _ at home in the us so that when we make expectations or requests of our partners. _ make expectations or requests of our partners, that those are expectations that they themselves want to— expectations that they themselves want to make for their own countries. from again to speak to the bipartisan nature of this
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discussion, ijust introduce a piece of legislation today with a republican colleague focused on mining _ republican colleague focused on mining standards and environmentally sound _ mining standards and environmentally sound practices for us imports. and it really— sound practices for us imports. and it really putting some heft behind our movement here at home towards getting _ our movement here at home towards getting really serious about combating climate change. while i've not ou combating climate change. while i've got you come — combating climate change. while i've got you come l _ combating climate change. while i've got you come i want _ combating climate change. while i've got you come i want to _ combating climate change. while i've got you come i want to talk _ combating climate change. while i've got you come i want to talk about - got you come i want to talk about some other issues. famously at the time of the election when the results came out and of course the democrats lost seats in the house, you have a narrow majority now, you said that the debate within the democratic party over police defunding could cost you the house in the midterms. i want to have a listen to ilhan 0mar, the minnesota covers woman talking about this. i am tired about people talking about the filibuster! _ i'm tired of people talking about the narrow margins|
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we have in the senate! it is time for people to go. beyond the press releases, to go beyond the press conferences and to actually do the right - thing in moving our- country towards progress! clearly she is on the progressive wing of the party but does this sort of police reform she is calling for, does it work in the seventh congressional district in virginia or would that cost you your see? 50. or would that cost you your see? so, notabl , or would that cost you your see? so, notably. in — or would that cost you your see? so, notably. in my _ or would that cost you your see? so, notably, in my comments, though i'm a little _ notably, in my comments, though i'm a little stunned to hear that they were _ a little stunned to hear that they were famously broadcast across the bbc, notably at my comments focus on the fact— bbc, notably at my comments focus on the fact that _ bbc, notably at my comments focus on the fact that we have to be clear in the fact that we have to be clear in the message of what it is that we intend _ the message of what it is that we intend to — the message of what it is that we intend to do and deliver. and that slogans, — intend to do and deliver. and that slogans, while they have their place. — slogans, while they have their place, that does not speak to the role of— place, that does not speak to the role of legislators, that does not speak— role of legislators, that does not speak to — role of legislators, that does not speak to the actual reforms that quite _ speak to the actual reforms that quite frankly we in the house wrote in the _ quite frankly we in the house wrote in the wake — quite frankly we in the house wrote in the wake of george floyd's murder and passed _ in the wake of george floyd's murder and passed with bipartisan support in the _ and passed with bipartisan support in the us — and passed with bipartisan support in the us. this is a bill that we
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passed — in the us. this is a bill that we passed last year and throughout the summer— passed last year and throughout the summer i_ passed last year and throughout the summer i was engaged in efforts to continue _ summer i was engaged in efforts to continue to— summer i was engaged in efforts to continue to get traction for it because _ continue to get traction for it because we did not see it having the next step— because we did not see it having the next step to success in the us senate — next step to success in the us senate in _ next step to success in the us senate. in the house, we pass again the george _ senate. in the house, we pass again the george floyd justice in policing bill, a _ the george floyd justice in policing bill, a bill— the george floyd justice in policing bill, a bill that his account accountability and that is about transparency and that is about reforms — transparency and that is about reforms and training and that is about— reforms and training and that is about banning tactics that have led to the _ about banning tactics that have led to the death of black and brown americans, the chokehold, the no knock— americans, the chokehold, the no knock warrant, and we passed that bill again— knock warrant, and we passed that bill again in— knock warrant, and we passed that bill again in the house and i continue _ bill again in the house and i continue to be engaged in efforts to see its— continue to be engaged in efforts to see its progress in the senate so that we — see its progress in the senate so that we can actually make meaningful change. _ that we can actually make meaningful change, the sort of changed people across— change, the sort of changed people across this — change, the sort of changed people across this country want and the type _ across this country want and the type of— across this country want and the type of change that we need and remarkably given the verdict in the derek— remarkably given the verdict in the derek chauvin trial for the murder of george — derek chauvin trial for the murder of george floyd, a change that we must _ of george floyd, a change that we must implement to honour his life
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and to— must implement to honour his life and to honour the efficacy of so many _ and to honour the efficacy of so many people across our country who are calling _ many people across our country who are calling for progress notjust in action— are calling for progress notjust in action across a community but actual laws and _ action across a community but actual laws and legislation.— laws and legislation. lovely to have ou on the laws and legislation. lovely to have you on the programme. _ laws and legislation. lovely to have you on the programme. thank - laws and legislation. lovely to have you on the programme. thank you. j you on the programme. thank you. thank you so much. we will talk much more on the programme about the conference today but my italian friend got in touch today saying he had been watching the conference today and some of it was lost in translation. have a look. this is not all about some expensive, politically—correct, green act of bunny—hugging, or however you want to put it. not going to be bunny—hugging, but you know what i'm driving at. penny for the thought... penny for the thought. .. hugging an italian, christian? _ penny for the thought. .. hugging an italian, christian? with _ penny for the thought. .. hugging an italian, christian? with apologies i italian, christian? with apologies to our italian _ italian, christian? with apologies
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to our italian viewers, _ italian, christian? with apologies to our italian viewers, it - italian, christian? with apologies to our italian viewers, it is - to our italian viewers, it is this... to make the hugging of the rabbits. spare a thought for the translator who was in the glass box that had to translate that into mandarin, yeah! hugging rabbits. had to interpret, i never covering the un that they are interpreters and you to somehow create the meaning behind that. the you to somehow create the meaning behind that-— behind that. the hugging of the rabbits. behind that. the hugging of the rabbits we _ behind that. the hugging of the rabbits. we will _ behind that. the hugging of the rabbits. we will move - behind that. the hugging of the rabbits. we will move on. - behind that. the hugging of the i rabbits. we will move on. indeed behind that. the hugging of the - rabbits. we will move on. indeed we will. it has been a seismic week in minneapolis, bittersweet for many. relief at the conviction of derek chauvin, but a return to the grief today at the funeral of 20—year—old daunte wright, another black man killed two weeks ago by policejust ten miles from where george floyd had been murdered. in the last few hours, mourners have been gathering at the church, including some of george floyd's family members. the reverend al sharpton delivered the eulogy.
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these are some of the pictures from a little earlier. mr wright was pulled over because he had an expired tag on his vehicle, a minor traffic incident. the now former police officer kim potter pulled her gun on him rather than her taser and shot him. she's been charged with manslaughter. the family say it's inconceivable an officer who trained police recruits and had served in the force for 26 years could make such a mistake. 0ur north america correspondent larry madowo is in minneapolis outside the church where the service took place. we sat in the headlines it has been such a roller coaster week in minneapolis back to grief today. tell us a little bit about the funeral. �* , , ., tell us a little bit about the funeral. h , . ., , .,~ funeral. it's been a heartbreaking da in a funeral. it's been a heartbreaking day in a heartbreaking _ funeral. it's been a heartbreaking day in a heartbreaking week - funeral. it's been a heartbreaking day in a heartbreaking week in i funeral. it's been a heartbreaking day in a heartbreaking week in a l day in a heartbreaking week in a heartbreaking month, but today the family— heartbreaking month, but today the family of— heartbreaking month, but today the family of daunte wright saying goodbye to him. his mother to overcome _ goodbye to him. his mother to overcome with grief to continue her speech _ overcome with grief to continue her speech. she told of how devoted he was to— speech. she told of how devoted he
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was to his _ speech. she told of how devoted he was to his son daunte wrightjunior, who was— was to his son daunte wrightjunior, who was about to deserve too. and his sister— who was about to deserve too. and his sister said he did not deserve this and — his sister said he did not deserve this and his — his sister said he did not deserve this and his other brother told the family— this and his other brother told the family he — this and his other brother told the family he was so proud of the man daunte _ family he was so proud of the man daunte wright was becoming. and he was only— daunte wright was becoming. and he was only 20 years old and his mother said he _ was only 20 years old and his mother said he and _ was only 20 years old and his mother said he and the smile of $1 million that lit _ said he and the smile of $1 million that lit up _ said he and the smile of $1 million that lit up the room that he walked into _ that lit up the room that he walked into and _ that lit up the room that he walked into and in— that lit up the room that he walked into. and in the general programme, the paragraph about his life was four paragraphs long because it is was only— four paragraphs long because it is was only beginning. daunte wright has become another name in the movement— has become another name in the movement and also a personal tragedy for this— movement and also a personal tragedy for this family that lost a loved one and — for this family that lost a loved one and the reverend al sharpton and ben grump— one and the reverend al sharpton and ben crump who represents the george floyd and _ ben crump who represents the george floyd and daunte wright families point _ floyd and daunte wright families point out — floyd and daunte wright families point out that daunte wright's mother— point out that daunte wright's mother is white and his father is black— mother is white and his father is black and — mother is white and his father is black and they are an all—american family— black and they are an all—american family and — black and they are an all—american family and now they have lost their 20—year—old son. i family and now they have lost their 20-year-old son.— family and now they have lost their 20-year-old son. i watched his aunt toda on 20-year-old son. i watched his aunt today on morning _ 20-year-old son. i watched his aunt today on morning television - 20-year-old son. i watched his aunt today on morning television over- today on morning television over there and it was pretty hard to watch, to be honest. she makes the point and a lot of people have made
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this point that there are professional standards that people have to uphold. if doctors make a mistake, they take a hippocratic oath, they lose theirjobs but for policeman, she says, it is different. if doctors so called "make - a mistake", oh, they go forthem. so, again, forthe people to protect and serve us, i you take an oath to protect me, i to protect my children, to protect ben, to protect everybody! at the end, we shouldn't end up six feet deep! - maybe later this week the standard has changed. that maybe later this week the standard has changed-— has changed. that is the complaint here, that there _ has changed. that is the complaint here, that there is _ has changed. that is the complaint here, that there is a _ has changed. that is the complaint here, that there is a double - here, that there is a double standard _ here, that there is a double standard here and police officers in the us— standard here and police officers in the us often when fired for misconduct in one part of the country— misconduct in one part of the country can easily go to another part of— country can easily go to another part of the — country can easily go to another part of the country and get hired by another— part of the country and get hired by another police department because there _ another police department because there is— another police department because there is not a national police force — there is not a national police force. america is essentially made up force. america is essentially made up of— force. america is essentially made up of nearly 18,000 different police department with different standards
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and that— department with different standards and that is one of the things that the george floyd justice in policing active _ the george floyd justice in policing active supposed to change come to have a _ active supposed to change come to have a national registry a policeman and to— have a national registry a policeman and to outlaw some of the more outrageous complaints of the black community has had. it has passed the house _ community has had. it has passed the house but _ community has had. it has passed the house but a _ community has had. it has passed the house but a difficult battle to get it through the senate where they would _ it through the senate where they would need ten republicans to vote with the _ would need ten republicans to vote with the democrats. and would need ten republicans to vote with the democrats.— with the democrats. and it has with such a whirlwind _ with the democrats. and it has with such a whirlwind week— with the democrats. and it has with such a whirlwind week for— such a whirlwind week for minneapolis, as we have been saying. just two days after the guilty verdict for derek chauvin but now the funeral. how would you sum up the funeral. how would you sum up the mood? do people feel that change is coming or that is one step forward and one step back with another killing in north carolina by police of a black man just yesterday? police of a black man 'ust yesterdayafi police of a black man 'ust esterda ? ., , ., . ., yesterday? people feel that change is cominu yesterday? people feel that change is coming to — yesterday? people feel that change is coming to slowly, _ yesterday? people feel that change is coming to slowly, and _ yesterday? people feel that change is coming to slowly, and this - yesterday? people feel that change is coming to slowly, and this is - yesterday? people feel that change is coming to slowly, and this is too | is coming to slowly, and this is too exhausting — is coming to slowly, and this is too exhausting. i thought people here who told _ exhausting. i thought people here who told me what people have always had to _ who told me what people have always had to endure this trauma that now with this _ had to endure this trauma that now with this trauma on display on television _ with this trauma on display on television every time you turn on your— television every time you turn on your social— television every time you turn on
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your social media feed, another dad, how do— your social media feed, another dad, how do you _ your social media feed, another dad, how do you deal with all of that? they— how do you deal with all of that? they welcome moves like the attorney general _ they welcome moves like the attorney general investigating the minneapolis police department for systemic— minneapolis police department for systemic issues and for unconstitutional policing but they realise _ unconstitutional policing but they realise it — unconstitutional policing but they realise it is a national problem that needs to be reimagined, and those _ that needs to be reimagined, and those who've been calling for defunding the police to reimagine the police or to abolish the police said that — the police or to abolish the police said that is — the police or to abolish the police said that is the only way to reimagine policing in a way that it is not _ reimagine policing in a way that it is not proportionately meting out violence — is not proportionately meting out violence to block and brick amenities and where a routine traffic— amenities and where a routine traffic stop does not mean a death sentence — traffic stop does not mean a death sentence. . , ., ~ traffic stop does not mean a death sentence. . , ., ,, , ., let's get some of the day s other news. a man who set off a pipe bomb during rush hour in a new york subway station has been sentenced to life in prison. akayed ullah detonated the bomb in times square station in december 2017. he later claimed he had only wanted to kill himself and was not acting on behalf of the islamic state group.
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india has recorded the highest one—day tally of new covid—19 cases anywhere in the world and the country's highest number of deaths over 24 hours. the country is struggling with a second wave, raising more fears about its overwhelmed health care system. many hospitals are now running out of oxygen supplies. for those watching on bbc world news, we'll be right back, the uk government has formally apologised for the failure to commemorate properly the deaths of tens of thousands of black and asian troops who fought for the british empire during the first world war. the commonwealth war graves commission found that at least 116,000 people who died weren't given headstones because of what they call "pervasive racism". here's the defence secretary, ben wallace, addressing the house of commons. there can be no doubt prejudice played a part in some of the commission's decisions. in some cases, the iwgc assumed that
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communities of forgotten personnel would not recognise or value individual forms of commemoration. in other cases, they were simply not provided with the names or burial locations. mr speaker, on behalf of the commonwealth war graves commission and the government both of the time and today, i want to apologise for the failures to live up to their founding principles all those years ago and express deep regret that it's taken so long to rectify the situation. in los angeles, they're rolling out the red carpet for sunday's 0sca rs ceremony. despite covid—19, the organisers are determined that it will go ahead in—person and not as one big zoom show. this year, in order to maintain social distancing, the ceremony will partly take place inside la's union station, the largest railway station on the west coast. talking movies' presenter tom brook has been to inspect it.
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he'sjoining us from 42nd street in new york,?bags in hand, en route tojfk airport to fly to the ceremony in los angeles. he will be covering for the bbc for the 39th time. it has not aged you one bit. but let me ask you about this connection to union station. is union station granted for an 0scars ceremony? in granted for an 0scars ceremony? in many ways, it might sound quite odd to have _ many ways, it might sound quite odd to have the _ many ways, it might sound quite odd to have the oscars in a railway station, — to have the oscars in a railway station, but union station in los angeles — station, but union station in los angeles is — station, but union station in los angeles is a beautiful building. it was built— angeles is a beautiful building. it was built in 1939, and it is very grand — was built in 1939, and it is very grand it's _ was built in 1939, and it is very grand. it's like a work of art in certain— grand. it's like a work of art in certain places. it's also un—appropriate venue because many of my many— un—appropriate venue because many of my many movies have been shot there, more _ my many movies have been shot there, more than _ my many movies have been shot there, more than 150 films, some quite well known _ more than 150 films, some quite well known ones~ — more than 150 films, some quite well known ones. but really i think the reason _ known ones. but really i think the reason the — known ones. but really i think the reason the academy chose it was because — reason the academy chose it was because it — reason the academy chose it was because it had these features but also because it's very spacious and
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they are _ also because it's very spacious and they are very concerned about social distancing _ they are very concerned about social distancing and doing everything i’ilht distancing and doing everything right in— distancing and doing everything right in the mounting of an 0scars ceremony— right in the mounting of an 0scars ceremony in the midst of a pandemic. i'm ceremony in the midst of a pandemic. i'm looking _ ceremony in the midst of a pandemic. i'm looking forward to it, but i'm sure like many people who are watching, i'm not really sure i'm going to know the films that are getting the awards. we have been locked out of the cinema for the past year. how much will the viewing public appreciate what these films are? ., ., , are? your actually right. there was are? your actually right. there was a survey recently _ are? your actually right. there was a survey recently and _ are? your actually right. there was a survey recently and it _ are? your actually right. there was a survey recently and it showed - are? your actually right. there was | a survey recently and it showed that in terms _ a survey recently and it showed that in terms of— a survey recently and it showed that in terms of the potential viewing audience — in terms of the potential viewing audience of the oscars, there was very little — audience of the oscars, there was very little awareness of the eight films _ very little awareness of the eight films selected for best picture, so this does— films selected for best picture, so this does actually present the organisers with a big challenge. they— organisers with a big challenge. they are — organisers with a big challenge. they are not going to get an audience _ they are not going to get an audience of people if they don't know— audience of people if they don't know the — audience of people if they don't know the films. and i think there's a variety— know the films. and i think there's a variety of— know the films. and i think there's a variety of reasons. everybody has been _ a variety of reasons. everybody has been sitting at home, engaging in streaming. there's been a lot of content, —
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streaming. there's been a lot of content, and you really have to have a very— content, and you really have to have a very special film to break through that and _ a very special film to break through that and make an impact on people. and we _ that and make an impact on people. and we have not really... we have had some — and we have not really... we have had some very fine films this year but there — had some very fine films this year but there has not been a film that's broken _ but there has not been a film that's broken through. so this does present the organisers with a big challenge. so what _ the organisers with a big challenge. so what is _ the organisers with a big challenge. so what is your pick for best picture? so what is your pick for best icture? ., ., ., , , ., ,, , picture? you will have to speak up as i am competing _ picture? you will have to speak up as i am competing with _ picture? you will have to speak up as i am competing with rush - picture? you will have to speak up as i am competing with rush hour| as i am competing with rush hour traffic— as i am competing with rush hour traffic and — as i am competing with rush hour traffic and i— as i am competing with rush hour traffic and i think you asked me what _ traffic and i think you asked me what film — traffic and i think you asked me what film is going to do well. i hope _ what film is going to do well. i hope i— what film is going to do well. i hope i got _ what film is going to do well. i hope i got that right.— what film is going to do well. i hope i got that right. yes! i think nomadland _ hope i got that right. yes! i think nomadland is — hope i got that right. jazz! i think nomadland is going to hope i got that right. 193i i think nomadland is going to take hope i got that right. 193i i think nomadland is going to take home the prize of— nomadland is going to take home the prize of best picture. that has been the anointed 0scars front runner since _ the anointed 0scars front runner since it's— the anointed 0scars front runner since it's lost —— launch in venice last year — since it's lost —— launch in venice last year it — since it's lost —— launch in venice last year. it did really well. it looks — last year. it did really well. it looks like _ last year. it did really well. it looks like an epic. francis mcdormand is fantastic in the lead role _ mcdormand is fantastic in the lead role and —
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mcdormand is fantastic in the lead role. and chloe zhao, the director, has relate — role. and chloe zhao, the director, has relate blended professional performances with real—life itinerant _ performances with real—life itinerant people in a magical way. but is _ itinerant people in a magical way. but is not — itinerant people in a magical way. but is not the film i would like to win _ but is not the film i would like to win that— but is not the film i would like to win. that would be sound of metal, which _ win. that would be sound of metal, which i _ win. that would be sound of metal, which i thought was a very profound film. which i thought was a very profound film~ we _ which i thought was a very profound film. we are all dealing with loss right— film. we are all dealing with loss right now. — film. we are all dealing with loss right now, look at the reporting from _ right now, look at the reporting from india — right now, look at the reporting from india right now. loss has really— from india right now. loss has really coloured our world in recent times— really coloured our world in recent times and — really coloured our world in recent times and sound of metal deals with a man, _ times and sound of metal deals with a man. a _ times and sound of metal deals with a man, a musician, who loses his hearing _ a man, a musician, who loses his hearing and — a man, a musician, who loses his hearing and deals with how you cope with loss _ hearing and deals with how you cope with loss and a really creative way. tom, _ with loss and a really creative way. tom, thank— with loss and a really creative way. tom, thank you so much was that we did not get to ask you what you're going to be wearing on the red carpet but i can tell you that time is very dapper but he is wearing a lot of leisure this last year and the new york bureau so i hope you'll be wearing his customary tuxedo. did you know that 40 years ago whenjohn lennon was killed that tom was one of the first reporters on the scene there in central park? i did of the first reporters on the scene there in central park?— there in central park? i did know that because _ there in central park? i did know that because he _ there in central park? i did know that because he only _ there in central park? i did know that because he only recently - there in central park? i did know| that because he only recently did there in central park? i did know. that because he only recently did a report on it and i was just looking
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back, 1980s he was his first 0scars. henry fonda was a leading actor for on golden pond.— henry fonda was a leading actor for on golden pond. hello. temperatures 17 degrees in highland scotland today and a little warmer for many of us tomorrow. and lots of weather watcher pictures with a similar theme — shades of green and blue, but here's a different take just showing how dry at least the topsoil is at the moment. all proof, of course, that it is high pressure in control at the moment, and with that, barely a cloud in the sky today. just a little area of cloud that's right across northern scotland, and we've had the odd shower in the northern isles, more especially in shetland. but with this area of high pressure right across us again, tomorrow, it's really a repeat of today's weather. we stay mainly clear overnight with the exception of that cloud towards the north and northeast of scotland. still the chance of a shower in shetland, and it's still quite windy through the english channel,
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channel islands and into south west england. but the areas of blue showing up here will indicate that under clear skies, temperatures on the way down, so many of us getting a frost again into the morning. parts of eastern england could be down to —4 degrees. now, the lyrid meteor shower peaked last night, and here's one picture from a lucky weather watcher that saw something. there still could be something to see tonight, as well, under those clear skies. a chilly, but sunny start to the day tomorrow. you'll pick out still this cloud in the northeast of scotland, still the chance of a shower in the northern isles. we could well see a little high cloud increasing, turning the sunshine hazy in some spots. for most, the winds are light, and it's still quite a gusty wind through the channel, channel islands and into south west england. but away from the fairly chilly weather in north east scotland, it will be an even warmer day. could see 20 celsius somewhere tomorrow, and if that happens, that's the first time this month away from the channel islands we've seen temperatures that high. but hankies at the ready for pollen and hay fever sufferers
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here because it's looking high across much of the uk. moderate to high uv even if you're in a relatively chilly breeze. that sun is still strong. now, on friday evening, if you're going to be alfresco, the sunshine until sunset. high pressure still close by over the weekend, but more of an easterly breeze starting to filter in, and that will turn things gradually cooler as the weekend goes on, particularly across eastern areas where eventually there'll be cloud, especially on sunday but gradually clearing. the best of the sunshine and the warmth will continue to be across the western side of the uk, and throughout this weekend, it stays dry.
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you re watching bbc news with me laura trevelyan in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories... joe biden sets a high bar on cutting back on us emissions, and he's calling other nations to take action as well. this is a moral imperative, and economic imperative. a moment of peril, but also a moment of extraordinary possibilities. just days after the george floyd verdict, the funeral takes place of daunte wright — who was shot dead by police, in the same city. also in the programme.... statehood for washington dc has long been a political pipe dream. but today's vote in the house was very real. we'll look at whether full representation can become a reality. and, after a 13 month hiatus,
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the new york philharmonic return triumphantly, we'll talk to their artistic director. the response of world leaders to the climate crisis has thus far, been somewhat like my former attitude to homework. delay, put off, postpone — anything to avoid having to sit down and work out what's required. but all that procrastination doesn't change the reality of the fast—approaching deadline. and so eventually, belatedly maybe even grudgingly — you get on with it — and that is how it is for 40 world leaders, who today gathered for a virtual climate summit. speak for yourself, i was the girly swot — and i certainly got better than marks than the us government might be awarded
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for their performance this past decade. but at least the us is now returning to the pledges it has made, and going further. joe biden is ripping up the climate target he and president obama signed up to four years ago. in fact he's pledging a 52% cut in emmissions by 2030, twice the cut obama had set for 2025. so, how will other world leaders respond? translation: we should protect . nature and preserve the environment like we protect our eyes. second, we must be committed to green development. green mountains are gold mountains. to protect the environment is to protect productivity, and to improve the environment is to boost productivity. we need action at the highest scale, on a large scale - and with a global scope. we in india are doing our part.
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translation: we have - embraced one of the cleanest energy mixes in the world, marked by renewed investments in solar, wind, hydro and bio—based energy. i'm convinced that the fight for preserving our climate should certainly unite the efforts of the international community as a whole. russia is willing to prepare a whole range ofjoint projects and to consider potential benefits even for foreign companies that would like to invest in clean technologies, including in our countries. coal has been for us - a very important resource, but by the latest, and i heard antonio gutierrez on that, i by the very latest by 2038, we will face our coal- electrification and we will invest further into renewables. - leaders at that summit today. heather zichal is the chief executive of the american clean power association, former environment aide
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in the obama white house and advisor onjoe biden's 2020 campaign. she joins us from northern virginia. we also have andrew steer, president and ceo of the bezos earth fund — the climate iniative launched by the amazon bossjeff bezos. thank you both so much forjoining us. heather, ifi thank you both so much forjoining us. heather, if i could ask you, all those world leaders setting aside their differences, the russians, the americans, not talking about ukraine, the chinese not talking about the south china sea. how significant is the fact of this summit actually happening? well, for starters, summit actually happening? well, for starters. it's — summit actually happening? well, for starters, it's incredibly _ starters, it's incredibly significant. and if we look at the climate — significant. and if we look at the climate science and what we need to do as— climate science and what we need to do as a _ climate science and what we need to do as a globe, this is a critical moment— do as a globe, this is a critical moment to _ do as a globe, this is a critical moment to commit to decisive action, and what's _ moment to commit to decisive action, and what's exciting for me is that not only— and what's exciting for me is that not only were world leaders able to set aside _ not only were world leaders able to set aside differences and focus on this major— set aside differences and focus on this major crisis in front of us which — this major crisis in front of us which is — this major crisis in front of us which is climate change, but they also came —
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which is climate change, but they also came forward and upped ambition. you had japan's saying, we are going _ ambition. you had japan's saying, we are going to— ambition. you had japan's saying, we are going to take our emissions targets— are going to take our emissions targets of— are going to take our emissions targets of 46%. south korea saying, we are _ targets of 46%. south korea saying, we are going to not provide any new public— we are going to not provide any new public financing for coal plants. canada — public financing for coal plants. canada also increasing its omission targets— canada also increasing its omission targets in— canada also increasing its omission targets in line with the united states — targets in line with the united states. not only is it important that you've got these 40 world leaders — that you've got these 40 world leaders setting aside their differences, they are also importantly stepping up and leaning in and _ importantly stepping up and leaning in and trying to recognise that this is the _ in and trying to recognise that this is the time — in and trying to recognise that this is the time to act. gk, in and trying to recognise that this is the time to act.— in and trying to recognise that this is the time to act. 0k, andrew, how does the us — is the time to act. 0k, andrew, how does the us fulfil _ is the time to act. 0k, andrew, how does the us fulfil this _ is the time to act. 0k, andrew, how does the us fulfil this incredibly - does the us fulfil this incredibly ambitious goal of having the 2005 emissions targets by 2030? can we do that through renewable energy? weill. that through renewable energy? well, there has been — that through renewable energy? well, there has been a _ that through renewable energy? well, there has been a revolution in our understanding _ there has been a revolution in our understanding of— there has been a revolution in our understanding of climate - there has been a revolution in our understanding of climate action. i there has been a revolution in our. understanding of climate action. we used to— understanding of climate action. we used to believe _ understanding of climate action. we used to believe that _ understanding of climate action. we used to believe that acting - understanding of climate action. we used to believe that acting on - used to believe that acting on climate — used to believe that acting on climate would _ used to believe that acting on climate would be _ used to believe that acting on climate would be nice - used to believe that acting on climate would be nice but- used to believe that acting on climate would be nice but is. used to believe that acting on - climate would be nice but is going to cost— climate would be nice but is going to costjobs— climate would be nice but is going to cost jobs and _ climate would be nice but is going to cost jobs and competitiveness. climate would be nice but is going i to cost jobs and competitiveness and your edge~ _ to cost jobs and competitiveness and your edge~ we — to cost jobs and competitiveness and your edge~ we now— to cost jobs and competitiveness and your edge. we now know— to cost jobs and competitiveness and your edge. we now know that's - to cost jobs and competitiveness and your edge. we now know that's the l your edge. we now know that's the economics — your edge. we now know that's the economics of — your edge. we now know that's the economics of the _ your edge. we now know that's the economics of the last _ your edge. we now know that's the economics of the last century. - your edge. we now know that's the economics of the last century. we i economics of the last century. we
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know _ economics of the last century. we know that — economics of the last century. we know that actually _ economics of the last century. we know that actually smart - economics of the last century. we know that actually smart climate i know that actually smart climate action _ know that actually smart climate action leads _ know that actually smart climate action leads to _ know that actually smart climate action leads to more _ know that actually smart climate action leads to more economic l action leads to more economic efficiency. _ action leads to more economic efficiency. it— action leads to more economic efficiency, it drives _ action leads to more economic efficiency, it drives new- efficiency, it drives new technologies, _ efficiency, it drives new technologies, and - efficiency, it drives new technologies, and it - efficiency, it drives new. technologies, and it lowers efficiency, it drives new- technologies, and it lowers the risk _ technologies, and it lowers the risk today _ technologies, and it lowers the risk today is _ technologies, and it lowers the risk. today is about _ technologies, and it lowers the risk. today is aboutjobs. - technologies, and it lowers the risk. today is aboutjobs. if- technologies, and it lowers the| risk. today is about jobs. if you want _ risk. today is about jobs. if you want to— risk. today is about jobs. if you want to build _ risk. today is about jobs. if you want to build back _ risk. today is about jobs. if you want to build back better, - risk. today is about jobs. if you want to build back better, you i risk. today is about jobs. if you - want to build back better, you have -ot want to build back better, you have got $3 _ want to build back better, you have got $3 trillion — want to build back better, you have got $3 trillion to _ want to build back better, you have got $3 trillion to spend _ want to build back better, you have got $3 trillion to spend on - want to build back better, you have got $3 trillion to spend on it, - got $3 trillion to spend on it, don't _ got $3 trillion to spend on it, don't build _ got $3 trillion to spend on it, don't build yesterday's - got $3 trillion to spend on it, - don't build yesterday's economy, build _ don't build yesterday's economy, build tomorrows. _ don't build yesterday's economy, build tomorrows. yes, _ don't build yesterday's economy, build tomorrows. yes, it- don't build yesterday's economy, build tomorrows. yes, it is- don't build yesterday's economy, build tomorrows. yes, it is green energy. — build tomorrows. yes, it is green energy. but— build tomorrows. yes, it is green energy. but it _ build tomorrows. yes, it is green energy. but it is _ build tomorrows. yes, it is green energy, but it is also _ build tomorrows. yes, it is green energy, but it is also nature - build tomorrows. yes, it is green. energy, but it is also nature —based solutions. _ energy, but it is also nature —based solutions. new— energy, but it is also nature —based solutions, new building _ energy, but it is also nature —based solutions, new building materials, i solutions, new building materials, investment— solutions, new building materials, investment in— solutions, new building materials, investment in the _ solutions, new building materials, investment in the future, - solutions, new building materials, investment in the future, so, - solutions, new building materials, i investment in the future, so, there is no _ investment in the future, so, there is no massive — investment in the future, so, there is no massive amount _ investment in the future, so, there is no massive amount of— investment in the future, so, there is no massive amount of research i is no massive amount of research that shows — is no massive amount of research that shows if _ is no massive amount of research that shows if you _ is no massive amount of research that shows if you have _ is no massive amount of research that shows if you have money - is no massive amount of research that shows if you have money to. that shows if you have money to spend _ that shows if you have money to spend and — that shows if you have money to spend and you _ that shows if you have money to spend and you want _ that shows if you have money to spend and you want to - that shows if you have money to spend and you want to get - that shows if you have money to spend and you want to get the l spend and you want to get the economy— spend and you want to get the economy going. _ spend and you want to get the economy going, you _ spend and you want to get the economy going, you get - spend and you want to get the economy going, you get a - spend and you want to get the economy going, you get a loti spend and you want to get the - economy going, you get a lot more 'obs economy going, you get a lot more jobs a _ economy going, you get a lot more jobs a lot— economy going, you get a lot more jobs a lot quicker, _ economy going, you get a lot more jobs a lot quicker, a _ economy going, you get a lot more jobs a lot quicker, a lot _ economy going, you get a lot more jobs a lot quicker, a lot more - jobs a lot quicker, a lot more sustainable _ jobs a lot quicker, a lot more sustainable if— jobs a lot quicker, a lot more sustainable if you _ jobs a lot quicker, a lot more sustainable if you put - jobs a lot quicker, a lot more sustainable if you put them l jobs a lot quicker, a lot morel sustainable if you put them in jobs a lot quicker, a lot more - sustainable if you put them in more modern _ sustainable if you put them in more modern and — sustainable if you put them in more modern and greener— sustainable if you put them in more modern and greener investments. i modern and greener investments. bottom _ modern and greener investments. bottom line. — modern and greener investments. bottom line, yes. _ bottom line, yes. i bottom line, yes. i was _ bottom line, yes. i wasjust- bottom line, yes. | i wasjust listening bottom line, yes. - i was just listening to bottom line, yes. - iwasjust listening tojohn bottom line, yes. _ iwasjust listening tojohn kerry i was just listening tojohn kerry before we came on air. he says no politician in the future is going to undo this because all over the world, trillions of dollars, private dollars are going to be invested in the new marketplace will that is true, but i can't help but think that policy leads. in this country,
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for instance, a good example of that was the plan that the government put in place to get rid of the combustion engine by 2030. previously, we were talking about 2080. suddenly, all the car manufacturing companies have to start looking at electric and quickly because they won't be able to sell them here. so public policy in a way has to lead first, doesn't it? , . _ , in a way has to lead first, doesn't it? , _ , ., ., it? public policy must lead, and the rivate it? public policy must lead, and the private sector _ it? public policy must lead, and the private sector recognises _ it? public policy must lead, and the private sector recognises that. - it? public policy must lead, and the | private sector recognises that. what we saw _ private sector recognises that. what we saw today from the biden administration with its commitment to reduce _ administration with its commitment to reduce up to 52% emissions by 2030 _ to reduce up to 52% emissions by 2030 was — to reduce up to 52% emissions by 2030 was clear recognition that the science _ 2030 was clear recognition that the science is— 2030 was clear recognition that the science is dictating that we need to take further more aggressive action, but we _ take further more aggressive action, but we also — take further more aggressive action, but we also recognise that to a certain— but we also recognise that to a certain extent, a lot of these investments are inevitable. if you look at _ investments are inevitable. if you look at solar, the costs have gone down _ look at solar, the costs have gone down 90% — look at solar, the costs have gone down 90% since 2009, wind, a reduction — down 90% since 2009, wind, a reduction in price by 70% since
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2009 — reduction in price by 70% since 2009 so— reduction in price by 70% since 2009. so as important as public policy— 2009. so as important as public policy is, — 2009. so as important as public policy is, and absolutely come of this administration is focused on what _ this administration is focused on what they— this administration is focused on what they can do to double down, i would _ what they can do to double down, i would also — what they can do to double down, i would also say there is just a certain— would also say there is just a certain inevitability because of the fact that _ certain inevitability because of the fact that all of this, all of these investments make sense for corporate companies _ investments make sense for corporate companies bottom lines. 0ur member companies _ companies bottom lines. 0ur member companies look at this, look at the targets— companies look at this, look at the targets today, and we are ready to roll up _ targets today, and we are ready to roll up our— targets today, and we are ready to roll up our sleeves and work with this administration, not only because _ this administration, not only because it makes sense for the bottom — because it makes sense for the bottom line and createsjobs, but it does have _ bottom line and createsjobs, but it does have that incredible added benefit — does have that incredible added benefit of being good for climate change — change. jeff businesses doing change. — jeff businesses doing particularly well, but only 2% of the cars on american roads are electric at the moment. how do you make steel without coal? how do you fly around america without releasing those planet cooking polluters? there is so much to do. tell us a little bit about what the basals fund does and where it targets its money. there
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about what the basals fund does and where it targets its money.— where it targets its money. there is so much to — where it targets its money. there is so much to do. _ where it targets its money. there is so much to do, but _ where it targets its money. there is so much to do, but there _ where it targets its money. there is so much to do, but there are - where it targets its money. there is so much to do, but there are some | so much to do, but there are some any opportunities _ so much to do, but there are some any opportunities. two _ so much to do, but there are some any opportunities. two years - so much to do, but there are some any opportunities. two years ago l any opportunities. two years ago when _ any opportunities. two years ago when the — any opportunities. two years ago when the w _ any opportunities. two years ago when the ip pc, _ any opportunities. two years ago when the ip pc, the _ any opportunities. two years ago when the ip pc, the group - any opportunities. two years ago when the ip pc, the group of- when the ip pc, the group of scientists— when the ip pc, the group of scientists told _ when the ip pc, the group of scientists told us, _ when the ip pc, the group of scientists told us, actually, i when the ip pc, the group of. scientists told us, actually, we need _ scientists told us, actually, we need to— scientists told us, actually, we need to keep _ scientists told us, actually, we need to keep climate - scientists told us, actually, we need to keep climate warming | scientists told us, actually, we . need to keep climate warming to scientists told us, actually, we - need to keep climate warming to 1.5 degrees _ need to keep climate warming to 1.5 degrees rather— need to keep climate warming to 1.5 degrees rather than _ need to keep climate warming to 1.5 degrees rather than 2 _ need to keep climate warming to 1.5 degrees rather than 2 degrees, - need to keep climate warming to 1.5 degrees rather than 2 degrees, it. need to keep climate warming to 1.5 degrees rather than 2 degrees, it is| degrees rather than 2 degrees, it is much _ degrees rather than 2 degrees, it is much harder— degrees rather than 2 degrees, it is much harder to _ degrees rather than 2 degrees, it is much harder to do, _ degrees rather than 2 degrees, it is much harder to do, and _ degrees rather than 2 degrees, it is much harder to do, and everybodyl much harder to do, and everybody thought— much harder to do, and everybody thought that — much harder to do, and everybody thought that leaders _ much harder to do, and everybody thought that leaders would - much harder to do, and everybody thought that leaders would run - much harder to do, and everybody thought that leaders would run for the hills — thought that leaders would run for the hills the _ thought that leaders would run for the hills. the opposite _ thought that leaders would run for the hills. the opposite happened, | the hills. the opposite happened, why? _ the hills. the opposite happened, why? because _ the hills. the opposite happened, why? because leaders _ the hills. the opposite happened, why? because leaders actually . the hills. the opposite happened, | why? because leaders actually like to lead _ why? because leaders actually like to lead and — why? because leaders actually like to lead. and they _ why? because leaders actually like to lead. and they realise _ why? because leaders actually like to lead. and they realise that - to lead. and they realise that something _ to lead. and they realise that something disruptive - to lead. and they realise that something disruptive is- to lead. and they realise that| something disruptive is about to lead. and they realise that i something disruptive is about to happen, — something disruptive is about to happen. exactly— something disruptive is about to happen, exactly as _ something disruptive is about to happen, exactly as you - something disruptive is about to happen, exactly as you just - something disruptive is about to| happen, exactly as you just said. something disruptive is about to - happen, exactly as you just said. we are going _ happen, exactly as you just said. we are going to— happen, exactly as you just said. we are going to get— happen, exactly as you just said. we are going to get rid _ happen, exactly as you just said. we are going to get rid of— happen, exactly as you just said. we are going to get rid of the _ happen, exactly as you just said. we are going to get rid of the internal. are going to get rid of the internal combustion— are going to get rid of the internal combustion engine. _ are going to get rid of the internal combustion engine. general- are going to get rid of the internal. combustion engine. general motors hasjust_ combustion engine. general motors hasjust announced _ combustion engine. general motors has just announced it's _ combustion engine. general motors has just announced it's not - combustion engine. general motors has just announced it's not going i combustion engine. general motors hasjust announced it's not going to| hasjust announced it's not going to smell— hasjust announced it's not going to smell -- _ hasjust announced it's not going to smell -- sell— hasjust announced it's not going to smell —— sell small— hasjust announced it's not going to smell —— sell small vehicles - hasjust announced it's not going to smell —— sell small vehicles using l smell —— sell small vehicles using an internal— smell —— sell small vehicles using an internal combustion _ smell —— sell small vehicles using an internal combustion engine - smell —— sell small vehicles using l an internal combustion engine after 2035, _ an internal combustion engine after 2035, subject — an internal combustion engine after 2035, subject bozos _ an internal combustion engine after 2035, subject bozos is _ an internal combustion engine after 2035, subject bozos is an— an internal combustion engine after 2035, subject bozos is an incrediblyj 2035, subject bozos is an incredibly generously— 2035, subject bozos is an incredibly generously decided _ 2035, subject bozos is an incredibly generously decided to _ 2035, subject bozos is an incredibly generously decided to potentially. generously decided to potentially involve _ generously decided to potentially involve his— generously decided to potentially involve his of— generously decided to potentially involve his of its _ generously decided to potentially involve his of its own _ generously decided to potentially involve his of its own resources l generously decided to potentiallyl involve his of its own resources to helpjump-start _ involve his of its own resources to helpjump—start some _ involve his of its own resources to helpjump—start some of- involve his of its own resources to help jump—start some of these i help jump—start some of these revolutions _ help jump—start some of these revolutions to— help jump—start some of these revolutions to inject _ help jump—start some of these revolutions to inject funds, - help jump—start some of these . revolutions to inject funds, grant funds— revolutions to inject funds, grant funds where _ revolutions to inject funds, grant funds where they _ revolutions to inject funds, grant funds where they are _ revolutions to inject funds, grant funds where they are needed - revolutions to inject funds, grant funds where they are needed in i revolutions to inject funds, grant - funds where they are needed in order to get— funds where they are needed in order to get these — funds where they are needed in order to get these revolutions _ funds where they are needed in order to get these revolutions to _ funds where they are needed in order to get these revolutions to that - to get these revolutions to that tipping — to get these revolutions to that tipping point _ to get these revolutions to that tipping point beyond _ to get these revolutions to that tipping point beyond which - to get these revolutions to that| tipping point beyond which they become — tipping point beyond which they become unstoppable. _ tipping point beyond which they become unstoppable. it- tipping point beyond which they become unstoppable. it is- tipping point beyond which theyl become unstoppable. it is going tipping point beyond which they. become unstoppable. it is going to become unstoppable. it is going to be spent _ become unstoppable. it is going to be spent down _ become unstoppable. it is going to be spent down this _ become unstoppable. it is going to be spent down this decade -
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become unstoppable. it is going to| be spent down this decade because this is— be spent down this decade because this is actually— be spent down this decade because this is actually the _ be spent down this decade because this is actually the decisive - this is actually the decisive decade~ _ this is actually the decisive decade. :, this is actually the decisive decade. ., ., :, decade. so, heather, we saw all of those world — decade. so, heather, we saw all of those world leaders _ decade. so, heather, we saw all of those world leaders today - decade. so, heather, we saw all of those world leaders today joining i those world leaders todayjoining the zoom at the white house. you are in the obama white house and then you had to watch president trump basically take a torch to all of the climate policies of president obama. how can throws world leaders trust that the next president won't just up that the next president won't just up those pledges? that the next president won't 'ust up those pledges?i up those pledges? well, listen, i think that that _ up those pledges? well, listen, i think that that is _ up those pledges? well, listen, i think that that is one _ up those pledges? well, listen, i think that that is one of - up those pledges? well, listen, i think that that is one of the - think that that is one of the challenges united states has in engaging the rest of the world as we lead up _ engaging the rest of the world as we lead up to— engaging the rest of the world as we lead up to the fall climate meeting in glasgow. but i also think you started — in glasgow. but i also think you started with an administration that on day— started with an administration that on day one — started with an administration that on day one said we are getting back in paris _ on day one said we are getting back in paris a — on day one said we are getting back in paris. a two, they said we are going _ in paris. a two, they said we are going to — in paris. a two, they said we are going to provide for permits. every single _ going to provide for permits. every single day, — going to provide for permits. every single day, this administration is chipping — single day, this administration is chipping away at the climate challenge with the whole of government approach. i think the rest of— government approach. i think the rest of the — government approach. i think the rest of the world recognises that. i also think. — rest of the world recognises that. i also think, you know, you commented
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on mr— also think, you know, you commented on mr carey's — also think, you know, you commented on mr carey's comments, there is, as i on mr carey's comments, there is, as i said _ on mr carey's comments, there is, as i said earlier, — on mr carey's comments, there is, as i said earlier, there is some inevitability built around the fact that these investments make sense for a business's bottom line. so, while, _ for a business's bottom line. so, while, yes, — fora business's bottom line. so, while, yes, i_ for a business's bottom line. so, while, yes, ithink for a business's bottom line. so, while, yes, i think there for a business's bottom line. so, while, yes, ithink there is for a business's bottom line. so, while, yes, i think there is going to be _ while, yes, i think there is going to be a _ while, yes, i think there is going to be a credibility gap and a question— to be a credibility gap and a question about whether or not the united _ question about whether or not the united states will stay committed from administration to administration, i believe the investments that the biden administration is making early, the actions _ administration is making early, the actions from kerry to engage the rest of— actions from kerry to engage the rest of the — actions from kerry to engage the rest of the world to show that we are in. _ rest of the world to show that we are in. we — rest of the world to show that we are in, we are leaning in, we are asking— are in, we are leaning in, we are asking everybody to work with us, we are global— asking everybody to work with us, we are global ambition. the more we are collectively _ are global ambition. the more we are collectively to cement these concrete commitments about emissions reductions, _ concrete commitments about emissions reductions, the harder it is to unwind — unwind. i'm- unwind. i'm feeling cautiously unwind. — i'm feeling cautiously optimistic. i'm feeling cautiously optimistic. i'm feeling cautiously optimistic. i'm feeling better about it after listening to the two of you, but i suppose drunk areas right. 0nce listening to the two of you, but i suppose drunk areas right. once you get big investors leaning into this, it does affect, andrew, supply chains, doesn't it? because the
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global world is so interconnected, countries aren't going to be able to produce things that are polluting because you want to get export licenses for them, producers won't want to use them.— want to use them. that is exactly ri . ht. we want to use them. that is exactly right. we shouldn't _ want to use them. that is exactly right. we shouldn't get _ want to use them. that is exactly right. we shouldn't get carried i want to use them. that is exactly i right. we shouldn't get carried away here~ _ right. we shouldn't get carried away here for— right. we shouldn't get carried away here for some _ right. we shouldn't get carried away here. for some this— right. we shouldn't get carried away here. for some this morning - right. we shouldn't get carried awayj here. for some this morning started with secretary—general _ here. for some this morning started with secretary—general butera - here. for some this morning started with secretary—general butera as i with secretary—general butera as saying _ with secretary—general butera as saying we — with secretary—general butera as saying we are _ with secretary—general butera as saying we are on _ with secretary—general butera as saying we are on the _ with secretary—general butera as saying we are on the edge - with secretary—general butera as saying we are on the edge of- with secretary—general butera as saying we are on the edge of a i saying we are on the edge of a precipice _ saying we are on the edge of a precipice so— saying we are on the edge of a precipice. so good _ saying we are on the edge of a precipice. so good news- saying we are on the edge of a precipice. so good news for. saying we are on the edge of a i precipice. so good news for the future, — precipice. so good news for the future, good _ precipice. so good news for the future, good commitments, i precipice. so good news for the| future, good commitments, but precipice. so good news for the i future, good commitments, but we precipice. so good news for the - future, good commitments, but we now need to— future, good commitments, but we now need to act _ future, good commitments, but we now need to act. you're _ future, good commitments, but we now need to act. you're absolutely _ need to act. you're absolutely right — need to act. you're absolutely right we _ need to act. you're absolutely right we now— need to act. you're absolutely right. we now need _ need to act. you're absolutely right. we now need to - need to act. you're absolutely right. we now need to get i right. we now need to get international— right. we now need to get international supply- right. we now need to get| international supply chains right. we now need to get i international supply chains truly green~ — international supply chains truly green~ so— international supply chains truly green~ so why— international supply chains truly green. so why are _ international supply chains truly green. so why are we _ international supply chains truly green. so why are we losing i international supply chains truly i green. so why are we losing forests in southeast — green. so why are we losing forests in southeast asia _ green. so why are we losing forests in southeast asia and _ green. so why are we losing forests in southeast asia and having - green. so why are we losing forests in southeast asia and having a i in southeast asia and having a massively _ in southeast asia and having a massively bad _ in southeast asia and having a massively bad impact - in southeast asia and having a massively bad impact on - in southeast asia and having a i massively bad impact on climate? it's massively bad impact on climate? it's because — massively bad impact on climate? it's because of— massively bad impact on climate? it's because of palm _ massively bad impact on climate? it's because of palm oil. _ massively bad impact on climate? it's because of palm oil. we - massively bad impact on climate? it's because of palm oil. we all. massively bad impact on climate? i it's because of palm oil. we all eat palm _ it's because of palm oil. we all eat palm oil. _ it's because of palm oil. we all eat palm oil. we — it's because of palm oil. we all eat palm oil. we all— it's because of palm oil. we all eat palm oil, we all consume - it's because of palm oil. we all eat palm oil, we all consume it. - it's because of palm oil. we all eat palm oil, we all consume it. we i it's because of palm oil. we all eatl palm oil, we all consume it. we put it in makeup. — palm oil, we all consume it. we put it in makeup. we _ palm oil, we all consume it. we put it in makeup, we probably- palm oil, we all consume it. we put it in makeup, we probably use i palm oil, we all consume it. we put it in makeup, we probably use a i it in makeup, we probably use a three _ it in makeup, we probably use a three or— it in makeup, we probably use a three or four— it in makeup, we probably use a three or four times _ it in makeup, we probably use a three or four times a _ it in makeup, we probably use a three or four times a day. - it in makeup, we probably use a three or four times a day. the . three or four times a day. the supply— three or four times a day. the supply chain _ three or four times a day. the supply chain goes _ three or four times a day. the supply chain goes all - three or four times a day. the supply chain goes all the i three or four times a day. the supply chain goes all the wayl three or four times a day. the - supply chain goes all the way from us in _ supply chain goes all the way from us in the _ supply chain goes all the way from us in the supermarkets _ supply chain goes all the way from us in the supermarkets all - supply chain goes all the way from us in the supermarkets all the - supply chain goes all the way from us in the supermarkets all the way back to _ us in the supermarkets all the way back to the — us in the supermarkets all the way back to the producers, _ us in the supermarkets all the way back to the producers, all - us in the supermarkets all the way back to the producers, all the - us in the supermarkets all the way back to the producers, all the way| back to the producers, all the way down _ back to the producers, all the way down to— back to the producers, all the way down to the — back to the producers, all the way down to the smallholder, - back to the producers, all the way down to the smallholder, so - back to the producers, all the way down to the smallholder, so to i down to the smallholder, so to
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speak — down to the smallholder, so to speak. scientists— down to the smallholder, so to speak. scientists can _ down to the smallholder, so toi speak. scientists can measure. down to the smallholder, so to - speak. scientists can measure. we now know — speak. scientists can measure. we now know where _ speak. scientists can measure. we now know where the _ speak. scientists can measure. we now know where the palm - speak. scientists can measure. we now know where the palm oil- speak. scientists can measure. we. now know where the palm oil comes from, _ now know where the palm oil comes from. where — now know where the palm oil comes from, where dozens— now know where the palm oil comes from, where dozens come _ now know where the palm oil comes from, where dozens come from, - now know where the palm oil comes from, where dozens come from, sol from, where dozens come from, so what _ from, where dozens come from, so what we _ from, where dozens come from, so what we need — from, where dozens come from, so what we need to— from, where dozens come from, so what we need to do _ from, where dozens come from, so what we need to do is— from, where dozens come from, so what we need to do is make - from, where dozens come from, so what we need to do is make the - from, where dozens come from, so. what we need to do is make the whole add up _ what we need to do is make the whole add up to— what we need to do is make the whole add up to him — what we need to do is make the whole add up to him true _ what we need to do is make the whole add up to him true whether— what we need to do is make the whole add up to him true whether it's- what we need to do is make the whole add up to him true whether it's a - add up to him true whether it's a hydrogen— add up to him true whether it's a hydrogen economy, _ add up to him true whether it's a hydrogen economy, whether- add up to him true whether it's a hydrogen economy, whether it's| add up to him true whether it's a. hydrogen economy, whether it's a hydrogen— hydrogen economy, whether it's a hydrogen economy, _ hydrogen economy, whether it's a hydrogen economy, whether- hydrogen economy, whether it's a hydrogen economy, whether its . hydrogen economy, whether it's a . hydrogen economy, whether its new building _ hydrogen economy, whether its new building materials, _ hydrogen economy, whether its new building materials, whether- hydrogen economy, whether its new building materials, whether it - hydrogen economy, whether its new building materials, whether it is, . building materials, whether it is, for example. _ building materials, whether it is, for example, shifting _ building materials, whether it is, for example, shifting diets. - building materials, whether it is, for example, shifting diets. we l building materials, whether it is, - for example, shifting diets. we need to get— for example, shifting diets. we need to get the _ for example, shifting diets. we need to get the best — for example, shifting diets. we need to get the best of _ for example, shifting diets. we need to get the best of technology- for example, shifting diets. we need to get the best of technology with i to get the best of technology with the test— to get the best of technology with the best behavioural— to get the best of technology with the best behavioural changes- to get the best of technology with the best behavioural changes and| the best behavioural changes and bring _ the best behavioural changes and bring all— the best behavioural changes and bring all the _ the best behavioural changes and bring all the players _ the best behavioural changes and bring all the players together. . the best behavioural changes and bring all the players together. i. bring all the players together. i mean. — bring all the players together. i meah. how— bring all the players together. i mean, how exciting _ bring all the players together. i mean, how exciting today- bring all the players together. i mean, how exciting today that i bring all the players together. i. mean, how exciting today that 43 interhatiohat_ mean, how exciting today that 43 international banks _ mean, how exciting today that 43 international banks declared - mean, how exciting today that 43 international banks declared that| international banks declared that they are — international banks declared that they are going _ international banks declared that they are going to _ international banks declared that they are going to know— international banks declared that they are going to know truly- international banks declared that. they are going to know truly carbon neutrat— they are going to know truly carbon neutral tty— they are going to know truly carbon neutral by 2050. _ they are going to know truly carbon neutral by 2050. that's _ they are going to know truly carbon neutral by 2050. that's a _ they are going to know truly carbon neutral by 2050. that's a very- neutral by 2050. that's a very encouraging _ neutral by 2050. that's a very encouraging sign. _ neutral by 2050. that's a very encouraging sign.— neutral by 2050. that's a very encouraging sign. neutral by 2050. that's a very encourauuin sin. �* ,, . encouraging sign. andrew steere and heather, encouraging sign. andrew steere and heather. thank— encouraging sign. andrew steere and heather, thank you _ encouraging sign. andrew steere and heather, thank you so _ encouraging sign. andrew steere and heather, thank you so much - encouraging sign. andrew steere and heather, thank you so much for - heather, thank you so much for joining us for that fascinating discussion. the american flag has 50 stars, one for each state. and 13 stripes, one for each of the original 13 colonies. the stars and stripes — but will it always be 50.
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there's growing momentum for another star to be added. statehood for washington dc is one of those hardy perrenials. but it never fully blooms — because two senators for washington who would almost certainly be democrats would tip the balance of power in the upper chamber. today the house of representatives approved a measure that would give the district full representation in congress. right now it only has a non—voting representative. but even that was not without controversy. a democratic congressman from new york angered his republican colleagues by saying that their opposition to the measure was due to the city's large african american population. i have had enough of my colleagues racist insinuations that somehow the people of washington, dc are incapable or even unworthy of our democracy. one senate republican said that dc wouldn't be a, quote, "well— rounded working—class state". i had no idea there were so many syllables in the word "white".
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those words were met by boos and calls for "point of order" by republicans. congressmanjones withdrew his comments, but then proceeded along similar lines. joining us now to discuss this is republican strategist and friend of the programme ron christie. ron is also, as he told us today, a dc resident and admitted member of the dc bar — court of appeals — since 2000. you would want to centres —— senators, when you? you would want to centres -- senators, when you?- you would want to centres -- senators, when you? well, good evenin: , senators, when you? well, good evening. i— senators, when you? well, good evening, i would _ senators, when you? well, good evening, iwould if— senators, when you? well, good evening, iwould if i _ senators, when you? well, good evening, i would ifi didn't - senators, when you? well, good evening, i would if i didn't want l senators, when you? well, good. evening, i would if i didn't want to follow— evening, i would if i didn't want to follow the — evening, i would if i didn't want to follow the constitution of the united — follow the constitution of the united states of america. i have to take you _ united states of america. i have to take you all— united states of america. i have to take you all the way back to our constitutional convention, and i have _ constitutional convention, and i have to — constitutional convention, and i have to take it back to the federalist paper 43 written byjames madison, _ federalist paper 43 written byjames madison, one of our founding fathers. — madison, one of our founding fathers, and what our founders looked — fathers, and what our founders looked at — fathers, and what our founders looked at is that they did not want any particular state to have undue influence — any particular state to have undue influence over the federal governments, which is why we have the district — governments, which is why we have the district of columbia, which is why washington, dc is not a state.
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so, why washington, dc is not a state. so. yes, _ why washington, dc is not a state. so, yes, believe me, having lived in virginia _ so, yes, believe me, having lived in virginia for — so, yes, believe me, having lived in virginia for the last 29 years, what i virginia for the last 29 years, what i love _ virginia for the last 29 years, what i love to _ virginia for the last 29 years, what i love to have two senators and a member— i love to have two senators and a member of— i love to have two senators and a member of congress in dc, sure, i would _ member of congress in dc, sure, i would but— member of congress in dc, sure, i would. but only if we have a constitutional amendment to make that so— constitutional amendment to make that so rather than a vote by the united _ that so rather than a vote by the united states congress. there _ united states congress. there would be someone who would vote for senator ron christie. as i understand it, i understand the argument you're making, but as i understand it from in the bill that was approved today, what they are saying is they are going to shrink the seat of government and then leave a large part of the district of columbia outside it. so, actually, the principal would still stand. it wouldn't stand, my friend. this is how— it wouldn't stand, my friend. this is how it's — it wouldn't stand, my friend. this is how it's going to work. it would essentially— is how it's going to work. it would essentially leave the district of columbia to be from where the united states _ columbia to be from where the united states capitol building is to wear most _ states capitol building is to wear most of— states capitol building is to wear most of those federal imposing buildings that use the up to the white _ buildings that use the up to the white house and then the rest of the population, some 700,000 would be part of— population, some 700,000 would be part of this _ population, some 700,000 would be part of this district of douglas atter— part of this district of douglas after frederick douglass. but here, once again. —
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after frederick douglass. but here, once again, this is where the problem _ once again, this is where the problem comes in. the framers never intention— problem comes in. the framers never intention for— problem comes in. the framers never intention for us. from my point of view— intention for us. from my point of view from — intention for us. from my point of view from being a constitutional scholar. — view from being a constitutional scholar, you have to look at the 23rd _ scholar, you have to look at the 23rd amendment, which was ratified in1961._ 23rd amendment, which was ratified in 1961. that specifically says that you have — in 1961. that specifically says that you have two electors for essentially the senate and one elected — essentially the senate and one elected for the house of representatives or in other words, you have _ representatives or in other words, you have three electoral college votes _ you have three electoral college votes to — you have three electoral college votes to equal the least populous state _ votes to equal the least populous state in _ votes to equal the least populous state in the united states. welcome you know _ state in the united states. welcome you know what's come if you're going to pass _ you know what's come if you're going to pass legislation like this, it's going _ to pass legislation like this, it's going to — to pass legislation like this, it's going to offend the constitution because — going to offend the constitution because we already have an amendment. what are you going to do with those _ amendment. what are you going to do with those other additional three electorat— with those other additional three electoral college votes? this is where — electoral college votes? this is where those who propose to have a new state _ where those who propose to have a new state don't actually look at the constitutional ratifications of it, christiah — constitutional ratifications of it, christian. ., , ., constitutional ratifications of it, christian. ., . , christian. run from you are being ve , christian. run from you are being very. very — christian. run from you are being very. very error — christian. run from you are being very, very error date, _ christian. run from you are being very, very error date, but, - christian. run from you are being very, very error date, but, why i christian. run from you are being very, very error date, but, why is| very, very error date, but, why is it fair that both vermont, indeed, and wyoming have got two senators each when their populations are less
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them the 700,000 who live here in washington, dc, and on top of that in the wake of the racial reckoning here in america, as you heard there, congress man saying that there is a racial at congress man saying that there is a racia ., , racial of this. the - racial of this. the 4696 - racial of this. the 4696 of | racial of this. l the 4696 of the racial of this. _ the 4696 of the population of dc is the 46% of the population of dc is black and does not have representation. good late afternoon to you, laura. i am a _ good late afternoon to you, laura. i am a lawyer — good late afternoon to you, laura. i am a lawyer. i've been licensed to practice _ am a lawyer. i've been licensed to practice taw— am a lawyer. i've been licensed to practice law for over 20 years. we learned _ practice law for over 20 years. we learned this — practice law for over 20 years. we learned this in first year constitutional law that the framers specifically intended that the district — specifically intended that the district of columbia would not be a state _ district of columbia would not be a state for _ district of columbia would not be a state for exactly the same reason i 'ust state for exactly the same reason i just such _ state for exactly the same reason i just such a — state for exactly the same reason i just such a christian, that they did not want _ just such a christian, that they did not want any particular state to have _ not want any particular state to have undue influence. and you look at the _ have undue influence. and you look at the counties of georgetown, the counties _ at the counties of georgetown, the counties of— at the counties of georgetown, the counties of arlington and alexandria, which originally ceded tands— alexandria, which originally ceded lands to _ alexandria, which originally ceded lands to the district of columbia which, _ lands to the district of columbia which, if— lands to the district of columbia which, if you look very carefully why the — which, if you look very carefully why the pentagon is now in virginia and hot _ why the pentagon is now in virginia and hot in — why the pentagon is now in virginia and not in dc is because, of course, some _ and not in dc is because, of course, some of— and not in dc is because, of course, some of this — and not in dc is because, of course, some of this land was sent back. here _ some of this land was sent back. here is _ some of this land was sent back. here is the —
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some of this land was sent back. here is the important thing. there is no _ here is the important thing. there is no racial— here is the important thing. there is no racial component to this. there — is no racial component to this. there is— is no racial component to this. there is no— is no racial component to this. there is no racist component to this, _ there is no racist component to this, this — there is no racist component to this, this is _ there is no racist component to this, this is the law, this is the constitution, and if those members -- for— constitution, and if those members -- for those — constitution, and if those members —— for those members of congress who seek to _ —— for those members of congress who seek to have _ —— for those members of congress who seek to have the state of douglas, i say, seek to have the state of douglas, i say. you _ seek to have the state of douglas, i say, you know what, let's have another— say, you know what, let's have another constitutional amendment. we've _ another constitutional amendment. we've had — another constitutional amendment. we've had 27, the original 13 colonies. _ we've had 27, the original 13 colonies, we have had 37 state sehtehce. _ colonies, we have had 37 state sentence, let's do it the right way. ron christie, constitutionalist, think you stop the good to see you both. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the opening notes of what many hope will be the symphony of regular life. musicians take the stage at the shed in new york. we will speak to the cultural�*s centre's artistic director. documents released at the high court have shed more light on how ppe contracts were awarded at the start of the pandemic. they suggest there was a vip route that allowed certain companies to fast track the process. here's lucy manning well, over the last year,
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the bbc has revealed details of millions of gowns and facemasks that couldn't be used because they didn't meet the right standards, and there's been concern over this vip route. this was where mps, ministers, officials could refer companies and they would get on this route, and many of them did get more contracts to supply ppe. well, the good law project, a campaign group, took the government to court over some of these deals. there's been a hearing today. e—mails have been published, and we can see the concern that some civil servants had at the time about this vip route. 0ne e—mail system says from a civil servant... and we also get some detail in these e—mails about how companies got into the vip route. pestfix, a company that we revealed some of their masks couldn't be used, well, one of their company officials was at an 80th birthday party with the father—in—law of one
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of the department of health officials, and that's how they got involved in the system. ayanda capital, who we also revealed some of their facemasks couldn't be used, they had an adviser who was also advising the government on trade, andrew mills. one of the e—mails says "one for the vip route". ayanda capital in response says "any accusations of cronyism are unsubsta ntiated". why does this all matter? well, it raises the question of, yes, there was a panic, a scramble to get ppe at the height of covid, but was the government wasting taxpayers' money with companies that didn't have track records and equipment that, in the end, some of it couldn't be used? the excitement of live music has
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been a casualty of the pandemic — and for a city like new york which thrives on performance, that has been especially hard for musicians and audiences alike. things could be looking up though. after a thirteen month hiatus, the new york philharmonic performed last week to a small audience of 150 people. the recital took place at the shed in hudson yards, a venue in manhattan that is following new york state's covid—precautions to bring live shows back to life. alex poots, artistic director and ceo of the shed, joins us now. this is good news because i read over here, actually, six months ago the hudson yard was in trouble because of the pandemic. it's a new part of western manhattan, i think, isn't it, did you feel that there was some life coming back to the area? i was some life coming back to the area? , . ., area? i did. there is life coming back to the _ area? i did. there is life coming back to the city, _ area? i did. there is life coming back to the city, really. - area? i did. there is life coming back to the city, really. i - area? i did. there is life coming back to the city, really. i think, | back to the city, really. i think, you know. _ back to the city, really. i think, you know, with the vaccines going well, _ you know, with the vaccines going wett, as— you know, with the vaccines going well, as i— you know, with the vaccines going well, as i hear they are going in for uk, — well, as i hear they are going in for uk, there is a real sense of optimism _ for uk, there is a real sense of optimism. we were given part of a
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task force — optimism. we were given part of a task force that really worked on the guidelines— task force that really worked on the guidelines last year for flexible spaces — guidelines last year for flexible spaces to reopen. so there is a group — spaces to reopen. so there is a group of— spaces to reopen. so there is a group of us _ spaces to reopen. so there is a group of us who in the last weeks have _ group of us who in the last weeks have treeh— group of us who in the last weeks have been reopening with in person and live _ have been reopening with in person and live performance. how _ and live performance. how do _ and live performance. how do you seat an orchestra socially distanced? it how do you seat an orchestra socially distanced?— socially distanced? it was the strin . s socially distanced? it was the strings of _ socially distanced? it was the strings of the _ socially distanced? it was the strings of the philharmonic i socially distanced? it was the i strings of the philharmonic and socially distanced? it was the . strings of the philharmonic and a sort was — strings of the philharmonic and a sort was an— strings of the philharmonic and a sort was an evening of string music, and, _ sort was an evening of string music, and. of— sort was an evening of string music, and, of course, there is no woodwind or singing _ and, of course, there is no woodwind or singing irr— and, of course, there is no woodwind or singing in that which allows and makes _ or singing in that which allows and makes for— or singing in that which allows and makes for much easier performance with the _ makes for much easier performance with the guidelines. they were sociatty— with the guidelines. they were socially distanced. 0n with the guidelines. they were socially distanced. on stage, we have _ socially distanced. on stage, we have 23 — socially distanced. on stage, we have 23 string players on stage, and ditto with _ have 23 string players on stage, and ditto with the organs in the space. we can— ditto with the organs in the space. we can normally for 1200 people in our space, — we can normally for 1200 people in our space, but we had 150 very happy audiehce _ our space, but we had 150 very happy audience members. a beautiful venue. audience members. abeautifulvenue. . . . a beautiful venue. and again last niuht a beautiful venue. and again last ni . ht with a beautiful venue. and again last night with ren e _ a beautiful venue. and again last night with ren e fleming. - a beautiful venue. and again last night with ren e fleming. a - night with ren e fleming. beautiful venue just looking at the pictures. beautiful venue 'ust looking at the ictures. . beautiful venue 'ust looking at the ictures. , �*, ., ,�* pictures. yes, it's gorgeous, isn't it? like you. _ pictures. yes, it's gorgeous, isn't it? like you. i— pictures. yes, it's gorgeous, isn't it? like you, i live _ pictures. yes, it's gorgeous, isn't it? like you, i live in _ pictures. yes, it's gorgeous, isn't it? like you, i live in new- pictures. yes, it's gorgeous, isn't it? like you, i live in new york i it? like you, i live in new york city, and last year, the soundtrack of the city in the spring was the
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wailing of ambulances. so what was it like for you as a musician to hear live classical music? well, it was very moving. _ hear live classical music? well, it was very moving, actually. - hear live classical music? well, it was very moving, actually. the i hear live classical music? well, it l was very moving, actually. the first night _ was very moving, actually. the first night we _ was very moving, actually. the first night we had live music was with a young _ night we had live music was with a young american artist called kelsey lu, and _ young american artist called kelsey lu, and she created, she devised a special— lu, and she created, she devised a special piece for us with her 14 musiciahs. _ special piece for us with her 14 musicians, and after that was the new york— musicians, and after that was the new york philharmonic., and really those _ new york philharmonic., and really those emotional events were emotional for us, we've missed those emotional events were emotionalfor us, we've missed it terribly _ emotionalfor us, we've missed it terribly. when i moved to new york for was _ terribly. when i moved to new york for was this— terribly. when i moved to new york for was this love affair with live performance, and gallery exhibitions. we were able to open our gallery— exhibitions. we were able to open our gallery business last october, but it's— our gallery business last october, but it'sjust been lying limp on the side of— but it'sjust been lying limp on the side of the — but it'sjust been lying limp on the side of the streets, really, but the whole _ side of the streets, really, but the whole performance side of things, and it's— whole performance side of things, and it'sjust been wonderful to reawakeh _ and it'sjust been wonderful to reawaken with others in the city in life experience.— life experience. yes, it's 'ust amazing. �* life experience. yes, it's 'ust amazing, isn't i life experience. yes, it's 'ust amazing, isn't a? i life experience. yes, it's 'ust amazing, isn't a? alex, i life experience. yes, it'sjust amazing, isn't a? alex, what life experience. yes, it'sjust - amazing, isn't a? alex, what you think emotionally, you're talking about that just there, what have
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think emotionally, you're talking about thatjust there, what have we lost emotionally and this year, briefly, through not having live music? ., ~' ., ~' briefly, through not having live music? ., ,, ., ,, music? you know, i think we come toaether, music? you know, i think we come together. don't _ music? you know, i think we come together, don't we, _ music? you know, i think we come together, don't we, as _ music? you know, i think we come together, don't we, as societies i music? you know, i think we come. together, don't we, as societies and as, you _ together, don't we, as societies and as, you know, wherever we are in the world, _ as, you know, wherever we are in the world, we _ as, you know, wherever we are in the world, we come together to experience things, whether that be faith or— experience things, whether that be faith or culture or protest, you know. — faith or culture or protest, you know. we _ faith or culture or protest, you know, we do things collectively, and ithink— know, we do things collectively, and ithihk this _ know, we do things collectively, and i think this sense of loss that we had no _ i think this sense of loss that we had no you — i think this sense of loss that we had no you know experiences, whichever— had no you know experiences, whichever we choose, whether it's music, _ whichever we choose, whether it's music, theatre, oras i whichever we choose, whether it's music, theatre, or as i said, prayer. _ music, theatre, or as i said, prayer. i_ music, theatre, or as i said, prayer, i think we missed them terribly — prayer, i think we missed them terribly. so i know certainly i have — terribly. so i know certainly i have and _ terribly. so i know certainly i have. and this reawakening that we are having, — have. and this reawakening that we are having, and we hope that there won't _ are having, and we hope that there won't be _ are having, and we hope that there won't be two steps forward three steps _ won't be two steps forward three steps back in a couple of months, but i _ steps back in a couple of months, but i do _ steps back in a couple of months, but i do think that both countries are doing — but i do think that both countries are doing such great work with the vaccines— are doing such great work with the vaccines that there has to be hope. yes. _ vaccines that there has to be hope. yes, absolutely. alex, thank you so much forjoining us. thank you.
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great to see the philharmonic thank you. — great to see the philharmonic back. fabulous. that's it for my. find great to see the philharmonic back. fabulous. that's it for my.— fabulous. that's it for my. and on both sides — fabulous. that's it for my. and on both sides of _ fabulous. that's it for my. and on both sides of the _ fabulous. that's it for my. and on both sides of the pond _ fabulous. that's it for my. and on both sides of the pond as - fabulous. that's it for my. and on both sides of the pond as alex - fabulous. that's it for my. and on | both sides of the pond as alex was saying there. that's it from us. you will see is the same time next week. hello. thursday was a high—output day from our weather watchers. well, what a day for taking a photo. the common theme, various shades of green and blue. there was barely a cloud in the sky. an alternative take here, though, indicating just how dry at least the topsoil is at the moment, all of this proof that, so far this month, high pressure has been dominant. it is now, right across us, and will stay with us through the weekend. just into next week, there are some changes on the way, and we'll see those in a moment. april also has delivered numerous frosty nights, and many of us will start with a frost friday morning then a repeat of thursday's weather. there'll be some patchy cloud in northern scotland, with the chance of a shower, quite windy through the english channel, the channel islands and south—west
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england. warmerfor many. quite chilly in the north—east of scotland, but elsewhere you could see temperatures as high as 20 degrees. and if we get that high, it's the first time away from the channel islands that's been achieved this month. now, high pressure going into the weekend is centred just a little to the north of us, gradually allowing more of an easterly flow to come in across more of the uk. very subtle changes on saturday, though. there could just be a bit more cloud around parts of eastern scotland, perhaps northern and eastern england, but still plenty of sunshine coming through. it's a little cooler, especially in eastern areas, but the west is still going to see the highest temperatures and the strongest sunshine at up to around the high teens in places. and then for part two of the weekend on sunday, somewhat of a stronger easterly flow coming in across more of england and wales, and overnight and into sunday morning some cloud coming in on that, as well, so it could be rather grey first thing on sunday. many places, though, breaking out into the sunshine with perhaps some spots in eastern england, though, staying rather cloudy. more of a brisk east—northeasterly wind across more of england and wales. that really does peg the temperatures back a little across eastern parts in particular,
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whereas still in the west it will feel quite warm in the sunshine even though temperatures aren't as high as they've been. and then into high pressure low pressure tries to move in on monday. it's not the biggest area of low pressure we've ever seen. it's not going to produce the heaviest rain. it does look as if, though, it will bring some rain into scotland and maybe a few parts of northern england, whereas elsewhere in england, wales and northern ireland it looks to be staying dry, still with some sunny spells around. that area of low pressure gradually sinking southwards on monday night into tuesday — with its cloud, the chance of seeing some rain, and even behind that on tuesday we're left with, well, more cloud than we've seen recently, the chance for a few showers. and look at the arrows coming in here from the north—east. of course, that's a cool direction, so we're expecting on tuesday temperatures to be a good few degrees below average for the time of year. just the 13 is the highest showing up here. now, whilst there is still some uncertainty about what happens later next week, what we can see
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here on the big picture is that there's no big area of high pressure keeping us largely settled. there is low pressure close by. this one mayjust start to bring some rain up towards southern and south—western areas later in the week whilst at the same time turning things perhaps a little less chilly here, whereas elsewhere we maintain the easterly breeze and temperatures below average. so we'll keep you updated on the detail of exactly what happens later next week, but we've growing confidence that next week's weather will deliver cooler than average weather, although the nights may not be as chilly because there'll be more cloud around. and there is at least the chance of seeing some rain but certainly not enough to prevent this april going down as one of the driest we've seen. that's your latest weather for the week ahead.
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tonight at ten — president biden urges world leaders to unite and fight climate change together, in what he calls "a decisive decade". meeting online, joe biden pledged to cut us emissions by at least 50% by 2030, but says he can't do it alone. scientists say urgent action is needed to avoid more frequent fires, floods and extreme weather. this is the decisive decade. this is a decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis. but there were no new commitments from two of the biggest polluters, china and india. also tonight... india's covid crisis — hospitals are running out of oxygen — some in delhi have none left, as the country records the world's highest ever number of new infections in a day.

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