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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 22, 2021 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

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�* cloud �*cleud elsewhere. scotland. patchy cloud elsewhere. the winds for the most part are light but very brisk into the south and southwest. tomorrow is looking warmer. this is bbc news. i'm kasia madera. the headlines at 8pm — president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders and pledges to cut america's carbon emissions by at least half. we're here at this summit to discuss how each of us, each country, can set higher climate ambitions that will in turn create good—paying jobs, advance innovative technologies and help vulnerable countries adapt to climate impacts. how long do you think you can continue to ignore the climate crisis, the global aspect of equity and historic emissions, without being held accountable? india's coronavirus cases hit record levels, and as the countryjoins the uk's red list in less than 2a
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hours, british travellers try desperately to get back to the uk. documents released at the high court suggest there was a controversial a formal government apology after failing to commemorate properly more than 100,000 black and asian people who died fighting for the british empire during the first world war. nasa's perseverance rover makes breathable oxygen on the surface of mars. # bye—bye, baby, baby, goodbye...# and the lead singer of the bay city rollers, les mckeown, has died at the age of 65.
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president biden has opened a major global climate summit with a call to other world leaders to step up to the challenge. joe biden pledged to cut us emissions by at least half from 2005 levels by the end of this decade, but he warned his country couldn't take action alone. he told world leaders that scientists were calling this the "decisive decade" for tackling climate change and action was needed now. this graph shows how global carbon emissions have risen over the years. they were still relatively low until the mid—20th century. the latest figures show the countries who are the biggest emitters are china, the us and india. 0ur science editor david shukman has this report. the more the world heats up, the more dangerous it becomes, that's what this is all about. more intense flooding
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in the uk and many parts of the world is more likely. while in some regions, like central america, the big fear is droughts getting even worse. failed harvests are already forcing thousands to leave their homes. all of a sudden, we. can see the whole... it's one reason why, with a video, president biden is making climate a priority. we knowjust how critically important that is because scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade. this is the decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of a climate crisis. this virtual gatherings saw the leaders of the world's biggest economies and some of its most vulnerable nations all calling for action on climate change. we're suddenly getting a flurry of promises, counted in different ways, but all significant. the united states — to cut its emissions by up to 52% by 2030. the european union —
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55% by the same year. and the uk - 78% by 2035. china, the world's biggest polluter, says its emissions will fall from 2030, but president xi wants more developed nations to cut first. other countries need to increase climate ambition and action and make concrete efforts to help developing countries accelerate the transition to green and low—carbon development. to make any real difference, every country has to play its part, and despite all the talking in recent decades, the scale of the challenge has got even bigger. that's because human activity every year emits something like 50 billion tonnes of the gases that are heating up the atmosphere. now, scientists say that needs to come down by nearly half by 2030 to have any decent chance of keeping a lid on the rise in temperatures, and emissions should then fall to basically zero by 2050. but, at the moment, the world is not
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heading in that direction. so, what's likely to happen? well, electric cars are on their way. we're going to see far more of them. fewer flights may be on the cards because prices may have to go up if there are charges for pollution. eating less red meat is another recommendation from government advisors, who say it will save carbon. and heating our homes, not with gas boilers, but with heat pumps or hydrogen, but the details still need to be worked out. we're working with everybody, from the smallest nations - to the biggest emitters, to secure commitments| that will keep change | to within 1.5 degrees. but for younger people, this is all too slow. this earth day protest was in indonesia, and american politicians got a similar message from greta thunberg. we, the young people,
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are the ones who are going to write about you in the history books. we are the ones who will get to decide how you are remembered. so my advice for you is to choose wisely. already green technologies are becoming far cheaper, but the transition to a zero—carbon world will need a lot more political will and help for the countries most at risk, and all of that still needs to be negotiated. david shukman, bbc news. 0ur north american editorjon sopel says president biden�*s plans to cut carbon emissions are ambitious. it marks a decisive break with the trump era, who pulled america out of the climate change agreement, and, yeah, it goes way further than barack 0bama in 2015. so, that's the optics of it. in terms of what it would require, it's going to require people to change their behaviour, the way they drive in a gas—guzzling economy, the way people heat and cool their homes, the way industry operates. and then, of course, you're going to need to get congressional approval for much of this, and it's farfrom clear that the votes are there.
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republicans are much more sceptical, not just about the science, but on the wisdom of going ahead with this if, as we heard in david shukman's report, you don't have the chinese and the indians promising to make similar pledges to cut omissions. so, if the ambition of this is to show thatjoe biden has global leadership and america is back on the international stage, then box ticked. if it's to show that america is going to cut its emissions by 50% in the next few years, well, that's a big question mark. with me now isjohn holdren, professor of environmental policy at harvard university and a former science adviser to president 0bama. hejoins me from cape cod in massachusetts. also i'm joined by helen mountford from the world resources institute, a non—profit organisation that helps government and business leaders with climate change policy. she is in washington, dc. both of you, welcome to you. we hurt
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our north american editor then speak about how this is what president biden has and is calling for is more ambitious than president 0bama. do you think it is too ambitious? it is you think it is too ambitious? it is certainly more — you think it is too ambitious? it is certainly more ambitious than president 0bama was. that's because we have _ president 0bama was. that's because we have more information about urgency— we have more information about urgency and we have more tools with which _ urgency and we have more tools with which to _ urgency and we have more tools with which to meet that urgency. i think it is appropriate. i think it is very— it is appropriate. i think it is very challenging. i don't think very challenging. idon't think anybody— very challenging. i don't think anybody knows whether it is really attainable, but i think everybody should _ attainable, but i think everybody should know that pursuing it is the best thing — should know that pursuing it is the best thing we can do under the current— best thing we can do under the current circumstances. pursuing it will move — current circumstances. pursuing it will move us— current circumstances. pursuing it will move us more strongly forward toward _ will move us more strongly forward toward a _ will move us more strongly forward toward a sustainable future with respect — toward a sustainable future with respect to climate change than will continuing — respect to climate change than will continuing with business as usual. so how— continuing with business as usual. so how do— continuing with business as usual. so how do you pursue this? because this will take a huge effort from
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businesses to individuals, a seismic change in everyday behaviour. absolutely. but i think the thing that we — absolutely. but i think the thing that we are _ absolutely. but i think the thing that we are seeing _ absolutely. but i think the thing that we are seeing is _ absolutely. but i think the thing that we are seeing is there - absolutely. but i think the thing that we are seeing is there is. that we are seeing is there is action— that we are seeing is there is action that _ that we are seeing is there is action that is _ that we are seeing is there is action that is building - that we are seeing is there is- action that is building momentum from _ action that is building momentum from all— action that is building momentum from all sectors _ action that is building momentum from all sectors which _ action that is building momentum from all sectors which is - action that is building momentum from all sectors which is actuallyl from all sectors which is actually behind _ from all sectors which is actually behind this, _ from all sectors which is actually behind this, supporting - from all sectors which is actually behind this, supporting and - from all sectors which is actually behind this, supporting and willl behind this, supporting and will help the — behind this, supporting and will help the government _ behind this, supporting and will help the government to - behind this, supporting and will| help the government to achieve behind this, supporting and will. help the government to achieve it. so we _ help the government to achieve it. so we have — help the government to achieve it. so we have seen _ help the government to achieve it. so we have seen even _ help the government to achieve it. so we have seen even in— help the government to achieve it. so we have seen even in the - help the government to achieve it. so we have seen even in the last . so we have seen even in the last four years — so we have seen even in the last four years when _ so we have seen even in the last four years when we _ so we have seen even in the last four years when we lacked - so we have seen even in the last. four years when we lacked federal leadership— four years when we lacked federal leadership on _ four years when we lacked federal leadership on climate _ four years when we lacked federal leadership on climate change, - four years when we lacked federal leadership on climate change, we| four years when we lacked federal - leadership on climate change, we saw cities, _ leadership on climate change, we saw cities, states, — leadership on climate change, we saw cities, states, businesses, _ cities, states, businesses, investors. _ cities, states, businesses, investors, universities- cities, states, businesses,| investors, universities step cities, states, businesses, - investors, universities step up and take action — investors, universities step up and take action. what _ investors, universities step up and take action. what president- investors, universities step up and take action. what president biden| investors, universities step up and i take action. what president biden is doing _ take action. what president biden is doing now— take action. what president biden is doing now is — take action. what president biden is doing now is harnessing _ take action. what president biden is doing now is harnessing the - take action. what president biden is doing now is harnessing the power. take action. what president biden isi doing now is harnessing the power of all of that— doing now is harnessing the power of all of that putting _ doing now is harnessing the power of all of that putting in _ doing now is harnessing the power of all of that putting in place _ doing now is harnessing the power of all of that putting in place a - all of that putting in place a couple _ all of that putting in place a couple of _ all of that putting in place a coopie of kev _ all of that putting in place a couple of key measures - all of that putting in place a . couple of key measures which all of that putting in place a - couple of key measures which will really _ couple of key measures which will really start — couple of key measures which will really start to _ couple of key measures which will really start to boost _ couple of key measures which will really start to boost our _ couple of key measures which will really start to boost our climate . really start to boost our climate action _ really start to boost our climate action to — really start to boost our climate action to invest _ really start to boost our climate action to invest in _ really start to boost our climate action to invest in the _ really start to boost our climate action to invest in the kind - really start to boost our climate action to invest in the kind of. action to invest in the kind of infrastructure _ action to invest in the kind of infrastructure that _ action to invest in the kind of infrastructure that can - action to invest in the kind of| infrastructure that can deliver lower— infrastructure that can deliver lower admissions, _ infrastructure that can deliver lower admissions, whether. infrastructure that can deliverl lower admissions, whether it's renewable _ lower admissions, whether it's renewable energy— lower admissions, whether it's renewable energy or— lower admissions, whether it's renewable energy or battery. renewable energy or battery technologies, _ renewable energy or battery technologies, around - renewable energy or battery technologies, around public| technologies, around public transport, _ technologies, around public transport, restoring - technologies, around public. transport, restoring degraded technologies, around public- transport, restoring degraded lands, these _ transport, restoring degraded lands, these are _ transport, restoring degraded lands, these are the — transport, restoring degraded lands, these are the infrastructure - transport, restoring degraded lands, these are the infrastructure which i these are the infrastructure which will actually — these are the infrastructure which will actually boost _ these are the infrastructure which will actually boost our _ these are the infrastructure which will actually boost our economic. will actually boost our economic growth, — will actually boost our economic growth, will— will actually boost our economic growth, will reduce _ will actually boost our economic growth, will reduce it— will actually boost our economic growth, will reduce it emissions will actually boost our economic- growth, will reduce it emissions but also incredibly— growth, will reduce it emissions but also incredibly important _ growth, will reduce it emissions but also incredibly important right - growth, will reduce it emissions but also incredibly important right nowl also incredibly important right now will actually — also incredibly important right now will actually deliver _ also incredibly important right now will actually deliver the _ also incredibly important right now
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will actually deliver the jobs - also incredibly important right now will actually deliver the jobs that l will actually deliver the jobs that we need — will actually deliver the jobs that we need they— will actually deliver the jobs that we need. they tend _ will actually deliver the jobs that we need. they tend to _ will actually deliver the jobs that we need. they tend to deliver. will actually deliver the jobs that - we need. they tend to deliver about double _ we need. they tend to deliver about double the _ we need. they tend to deliver about double the amount _ we need. they tend to deliver about double the amount of _ we need. they tend to deliver about double the amount ofjobs - we need. they tend to deliver about double the amount ofjobs or- we need. they tend to deliver about double the amount ofjobs or more. we need. they tend to deliver aboutl double the amount ofjobs or more in some _ double the amount ofjobs or more in some cases _ double the amount ofjobs or more in some cases than _ double the amount ofjobs or more in some cases than what _ double the amount ofjobs or more in some cases than what you _ double the amount ofjobs or more in some cases than what you get - double the amount ofjobs or more in some cases than what you get from l some cases than what you get from the same _ some cases than what you get from the same investments _ some cases than what you get from the same investments in _ some cases than what you get from the same investments in coal, - some cases than what you get from the same investments in coal, oil. some cases than what you get froml the same investments in coal, oil or -as. the same investments in coal, oil or gas so— the same investments in coal, oil or gas so it's — the same investments in coal, oil or gas so it's really— the same investments in coal, oil or gas. so it's really a _ the same investments in coal, oil or gas. so it's really a solution - the same investments in coal, oil or gas. so it's really a solution which . gas. so it's really a solution which is better— gas. so it's really a solution which is better for— gas. so it's really a solution which is better for the _ gas. so it's really a solution which is better for the economy, - gas. so it's really a solution which is better for the economy, betterl is better for the economy, better for society— is better for the economy, better for society and _ is better for the economy, better for society and going _ is better for the economy, better for society and going to - is better for the economy, better for society and going to help - for society and going to help deliver— for society and going to help deliver this _ for society and going to help deliver this ambitious - for society and going to help deliver this ambitious new. for society and going to help - deliver this ambitious new climate target _ deliver this ambitious new climate target 50— deliver this ambitious new climate tar: et. ,, ., deliver this ambitious new climate tar et, ., deliver this ambitious new climate tarret. . , ~ target. so we heard president biden the 're target. so we heard president biden they're talking _ target. so we heard president biden they're talking about _ target. so we heard president biden they're talking about creation - target. so we heard president biden they're talking about creation of- they're talking about creation of jobs. is that the way to do it, then? will that genuinely make people stop using those huge gas guzzling cars, take fewer plane journeys when you think about actually the benefits far outweigh the risks where we are?— actually the benefits far outweigh the risks where we are? there are many things _ the risks where we are? there are many things that _ the risks where we are? there are many things that have _ the risks where we are? there are many things that have to - the risks where we are? there are many things that have to be - the risks where we are? there are many things that have to be done | many things that have to be done simultaneously. but i think it's extremely important that president biden— extremely important that president biden is— extremely important that president biden is putting job creation in the centre _ biden is putting job creation in the centre of— biden is putting job creation in the centre of this picture. it's the right— centre of this picture. it's the right thing to do, and it's terribly important — right thing to do, and it's terribly important for building the coalition that will— important for building the coalition that will be required to put this whole — that will be required to put this whole initiative across the finish line _ whole initiative across the finish line. ~ . ., ,
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whole initiative across the finish line. ~ , ., whole initiative across the finish line. , ., , line. when it comes to fossil fuels, incredibly the _ line. when it comes to fossil fuels, incredibly the subsidies _ line. when it comes to fossil fuels, incredibly the subsidies that - line. when it comes to fossil fuels, incredibly the subsidies that go - incredibly the subsidies that go into this, how doesjoe biden and the rest of the world, how do you stop something like that that is so inherent? it is obscene not going to come overnight, but it is just so ingrained at the moment. come overnight, but it isjust so ingrained at the moment. fossil fuel subsidies have _ ingrained at the moment. fossil fuel subsidies have been _ ingrained at the moment. fossil fuel subsidies have been around - ingrained at the moment. fossil fuel subsidies have been around for - ingrained at the moment. fossil fuel subsidies have been around for a - subsidies have been around for a long. _ subsidies have been around for a long. long — subsidies have been around for a long. long time _ subsidies have been around for a long, long time and _ subsidies have been around for a long, long time and a _ subsidies have been around for a long, long time and a river- subsidies have been around for a long, long time and a river well. subsidies have been around for a l long, long time and a river well in 2009 _ long, long time and a river well in 2009 when — long, long time and a river well in 2009 when president _ long, long time and a river well in 2009 when president 0bama - long, long time and a river well in 2009 when president 0bama and | long, long time and a river well in. 2009 when president 0bama and the 620 said _ 2009 when president 0bama and the 620 said we — 2009 when president 0bama and the g20 said we need _ 2009 when president 0bama and the g20 said we need to— 2009 when president 0bama and the g20 said we need to phase _ 2009 when president 0bama and the g20 said we need to phase out- 2009 when president 0bama and the g20 said we need to phase out fossil| g20 said we need to phase out fossil fuel subsidies — g20 said we need to phase out fossil fuel subsidies. they— g20 said we need to phase out fossil fuel subsidies. they are _ g20 said we need to phase out fossil fuel subsidies. they are still- g20 said we need to phase out fossil fuel subsidies. they are still here. i fuel subsidies. they are still here. but one _ fuel subsidies. they are still here. but one of— fuel subsidies. they are still here. but one of the _ fuel subsidies. they are still here. but one of the things _ fuel subsidies. they are still here. but one of the things that - fuel subsidies. they are still here. i but one of the things that president biden— but one of the things that president biden did _ but one of the things that president biden did was — but one of the things that president biden did was he _ but one of the things that president biden did was he came _ but one of the things that president biden did was he came in— but one of the things that president biden did was he came in right - but one of the things that presidentj biden did was he came in right after he is taking — biden did was he came in right after he is taking over— biden did was he came in right after he is taking over of— biden did was he came in right after he is taking over of the _ biden did was he came in right after he is taking over of the presidency i he is taking over of the presidency and within— he is taking over of the presidency and within a — he is taking over of the presidency and within a week— he is taking over of the presidency and within a week he _ he is taking over of the presidency and within a week he had - he is taking over of the presidency and within a week he had an- and within a week he had an executive _ and within a week he had an executive order— and within a week he had an executive order where - and within a week he had an executive order where he i and within a week he had an- executive order where he committed to phase _ executive order where he committed to phase out — executive order where he committed to phase out fossil— executive order where he committed to phase out fossil fuel— executive order where he committed to phase out fossil fuel subsidies - to phase out fossil fuel subsidies in the _ to phase out fossil fuel subsidies in the us, — to phase out fossil fuel subsidies in the us, so— to phase out fossil fuel subsidies in the us, so that's _ to phase out fossil fuel subsidies in the us, so that's already- in the us, so that's already starting _ in the us, so that's already starting to— in the us, so that's already starting to move _ in the us, so that's already starting to move forward i in the us, so that's already. starting to move forward and in the us, so that's already- starting to move forward and that is part of— starting to move forward and that is part of what — starting to move forward and that is part of what will— starting to move forward and that is part of what will contribute - starting to move forward and that is part of what will contribute to - starting to move forward and that is part of what will contribute to this l part of what will contribute to this plan _ part of what will contribute to this plan. today. _ part of what will contribute to this plan. today. in— part of what will contribute to this plan. today, in addition _ part of what will contribute to this plan. today, in addition to - plan. today, in addition to announcing _ plan. today, in addition to announcing unexciting - plan. today, in addition to| announcing unexciting new plan. today, in addition to - announcing unexciting new target to the us— announcing unexciting new target to the us in—
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announcing unexciting new target to the us in terms— announcing unexciting new target to the us in terms of— announcing unexciting new target to the us in terms of reducing - the us in terms of reducing emissions, _ the us in terms of reducing emissions, he _ the us in terms of reducing emissions, he also - the us in terms of reducing emissions, he also put - the us in terms of reducing - emissions, he also put forward a plan _ emissions, he also put forward a plan on — emissions, he also put forward a plan on how— emissions, he also put forward a plan on how he _ emissions, he also put forward a plan on how he is— emissions, he also put forward a plan on how he is going - emissions, he also put forward a plan on how he is going to- emissions, he also put forward a plan on how he is going to help i emissions, he also put forward a i plan on how he is going to help and how the _ plan on how he is going to help and how the us — plan on how he is going to help and how the us will _ plan on how he is going to help and how the us will help _ plan on how he is going to help and how the us will help other - how the us will help other countries, _ how the us will help other countries, developing - how the us will help other - countries, developing countries to meet _ countries, developing countries to meet their— countries, developing countries to meet their targets _ countries, developing countries to meet their targets and _ countries, developing countries to meet their targets and to - countries, developing countries to meet their targets and to adapt i countries, developing countries to meet their targets and to adapt to climate _ meet their targets and to adapt to climate action. _ meet their targets and to adapt to climate action. in _ meet their targets and to adapt to climate action. in one _ meet their targets and to adapt to climate action. in one of- meet their targets and to adapt to climate action. in one of the - meet their targets and to adapt toi climate action. in one of the things in that— climate action. in one of the things in that is— climate action. in one of the things in that is to — climate action. in one of the things in that is to actually _ climate action. in one of the things in that is to actually phase - climate action. in one of the things in that is to actually phase out - in that is to actually phase out support— in that is to actually phase out support for— in that is to actually phase out support for fossil— in that is to actually phase out support for fossil fuels - support for fossil fuels internationally- support for fossil fuels internationally as- support for fossil fuels | internationally as well. support for fossil fuels . internationally as well. so support for fossil fuels - internationally as well. so we support for fossil fuels _ internationally as well. so we are starting — internationally as well. so we are starting it— internationally as well. so we are starting it is— internationally as well. so we are starting. it is nowhere _ internationally as well. so we are starting. it is nowhere near- internationally as well. so we are i starting. it is nowhere near enough. we know— starting. it is nowhere near enough. we know that — starting. it is nowhere near enough. we know that during _ starting. it is nowhere near enough. we know that during the _ starting. it is nowhere near enough. we know that during the initial- we know that during the initial stages — we know that during the initial stages of— we know that during the initial stages of the _ we know that during the initial stages of the economic- we know that during the initial. stages of the economic stimulus we know that during the initial- stages of the economic stimulus last year. _ stages of the economic stimulus last year. even _ stages of the economic stimulus last year. even in— stages of the economic stimulus last year. even in the _ stages of the economic stimulus last year, even in the us— stages of the economic stimulus last year, even in the us as _ stages of the economic stimulus last year, even in the us as well - stages of the economic stimulus last year, even in the us as well as - stages of the economic stimulus last year, even in the us as well as a - year, even in the us as well as a many— year, even in the us as well as a many other— year, even in the us as well as a many other countries, _ year, even in the us as well as a many other countries, there - year, even in the us as well as a many other countries, there was major— many other countries, there was major funds— many other countries, there was major funds that _ many other countries, there was major funds that were _ many other countries, there was major funds that were pumped l many other countries, there was . major funds that were pumped into oil and _ major funds that were pumped into oil and gas — major funds that were pumped into oil and gas sectors, _ major funds that were pumped into oil and gas sectors, into— major funds that were pumped into oil and gas sectors, into fossil- oil and gas sectors, into fossil fuel intensive _ oil and gas sectors, into fossil fuel intensive sectors - oil and gas sectors, into fossil fuel intensive sectors like - fuel intensive sectors like aviation. _ fuel intensive sectors like aviation, like _ fuel intensive sectors like aviation, like shipping, i fuel intensive sectors like| aviation, like shipping, so fuel intensive sectors like - aviation, like shipping, so there has been — aviation, like shipping, so there has been a _ aviation, like shipping, so there has been a lot _ aviation, like shipping, so there has been a lot even— aviation, like shipping, so there has been a lot even recently. i aviation, like shipping, so there. has been a lot even recently. but aviation, like shipping, so there - has been a lot even recently. but he is certainly _ has been a lot even recently. but he is certainly setting _ has been a lot even recently. but he is certainly setting a _ has been a lot even recently. but he is certainly setting a trajectory- is certainly setting a trajectory forward — is certainly setting a trajectory forward now _ is certainly setting a trajectory forward now which _ is certainly setting a trajectory forward now which is - is certainly setting a trajectory forward now which is going - is certainly setting a trajectory forward now which is going tol is certainly setting a trajectory. forward now which is going to be moving — forward now which is going to be moving away— forward now which is going to be moving away from _ forward now which is going to be moving away from these - forward now which is going to be moving away from these and - forward now which is going to be - moving away from these and instead focusing _ moving away from these and instead focusing on— moving away from these and instead focusing on how _ moving away from these and instead focusing on how to _ moving away from these and instead focusing on how to help _ moving away from these and instead focusing on how to help those - focusing on how to help those communities— focusing on how to help those communities and _ focusing on how to help those communities and how - focusing on how to help those communities and how to - focusing on how to help those communities and how to help| focusing on how to help those . communities and how to help the workers _ communities and how to help the workers to— communities and how to help the workers to transition _ communities and how to help the workers to transition to _ communities and how to help the workers to transition to new- workers to transition to new opportunities _ workers to transition to new opportunities and _ workers to transition to new opportunities and it - workers to transition to new opportunities and it really. workers to transition to new- opportunities and it really building up opportunities and it really building up the _ opportunities and it really building up the sectors _ opportunities and it really building up the sectors of _ opportunities and it really building up the sectors of the _ opportunities and it really building up the sectors of the future. - opportunities and it really building up the sectors of the future. so i opportunities and it really building|
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up the sectors of the future. so we have not up the sectors of the future. so we have got joe _ up the sectors of the future. so we have got joe biden _ up the sectors of the future. so we have got joe biden setting - up the sectors of the future. so we have got joe biden setting that - have gotjoe biden setting that trajectory as help it was saying but will republicans genuinely get on board? because they can see the countries, india and china, are not making those similar pledges. even canada. so how... what is the political will for this?- political will for this? first of all, i political will for this? first of all. i would _ political will for this? first of all, i would if _ political will for this? first of all, i would if the _ political will for this? first of all, i would if the size - political will for this? first of all, i would if the size that i political will for this? first of. all, i would if the size that china has been — all, i would if the size that china has been and is doing a lot. they are not— has been and is doing a lot. they are not doing enough but it is absolutely wrong to suggest as some do that— absolutely wrong to suggest as some do that china is not doing anything in this— do that china is not doing anything in this direction. they are leaders in this direction. they are leaders in the _ in this direction. they are leaders in the deployment of renewable technologies of wind and solar. they are investing in energy efficiency. they— are investing in energy efficiency. they are — are investing in energy efficiency. they are investing in technologies to capture — they are investing in technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide — to capture and sequester carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. the indians, too, i can commitments easily— the indians, too, i can commitments easily start _ the indians, too, i can commitments easily start at a much lower level. so i easily start at a much lower level. so i think— easily start at a much lower level. so i think that argument is not going — so i think that argument is not going to — so i think that argument is not going to hold up in congress. and i think— going to hold up in congress. and i think and _ going to hold up in congress. and i think and i— going to hold up in congress. and i think and i hope that republicans in the congress, like democrats, will
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realise _ the congress, like democrats, will realise that it is in the interest of the — realise that it is in the interest of the us— realise that it is in the interest of the us economy and in the interest— of the us economy and in the interest of us prosperity and not 'ust interest of us prosperity and not just in— interest of us prosperity and not just in the — interest of us prosperity and not just in the interest of the rest of the world — just in the interest of the rest of the world that the united states to take this _ the world that the united states to take this leadership role in reducing our own omissions and helping — reducing our own omissions and helping others to reduce theirs. i would _ helping others to reduce theirs. i would add — helping others to reduce theirs. i would add that it is very important and president biden recognises it's important — and president biden recognises it's important to approach and pursue adaptation to the changes in climate that we _ adaptation to the changes in climate that we can no longer avoid. no matter— that we can no longer avoid. no matter what we do on emissions reductions, we cannot stop climate change _ reductions, we cannot stop climate change overnight. it is going to be terribly— change overnight. it is going to be terribly important to invest in adaptation to my preparedness and resilience _ adaptation to my preparedness and resilience to deal with a more powerful— resilience to deal with a more powerful storms, the bigger wildfires, the stronger he waves and to help _ wildfires, the stronger he waves and to help other countries do the same. that was— to help other countries do the same. that was actually part of the paris agreement in 2015. the wealthy nations— agreement in 2015. the wealthy nations would provide the countries in need _ nations would provide the countries in need at _ nations would provide the countries in need at least $100 million of additional assistance per year by 2020 _ additional assistance per year by 2020 and — additional assistance per year by 2020 and that was last year and it has not _ 2020 and that was last year and it has not happened. and maintain that
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level of— has not happened. and maintain that level of increased assistance at least _ level of increased assistance at least until 2025. that was a pillar of the _ least until 2025. that was a pillar of the paris — least until 2025. that was a pillar of the paris agreement and we need now to _ of the paris agreement and we need now to make up for lost time in meeting — now to make up for lost time in meeting it _ now to make up for lost time in meeting it because the problem of adaptation, preparedness and resilience is no less important and no less— resilience is no less important and no less urgent than the problem of reducing _ no less urgent than the problem of reducing emissions. gn no less urgent than the problem of reducing emissions.— no less urgent than the problem of reducing emissions. on that urgent note, we reducing emissions. on that urgent note. we are _ reducing emissions. on that urgent note, we are going _ reducing emissions. on that urgent note, we are going to _ reducing emissions. on that urgent note, we are going to leave - reducing emissions. on that urgent note, we are going to leave it - note, we are going to leave it there. john and helen, good of you both tojoin us, thank there. john and helen, good of you both to join us, thank you. there. john and helen, good of you both to join us, thank you.- both to 'oin us, thank you. thank ou for both to join us, thank you. thank you for having — both to join us, thank you. thank you for having us. _ both to join us, thank you. thank you for having us. thank- both to join us, thank you. thank you for having us. thank you. - india has registered around 315,000 new cases of coronavirus in the past 2a hours. the state of maharashtra accounts for about a fifth of all cases. as the second wave batters india, hospitals are running out of oxygen. the bbc�*s mayuresh konnur reports?from mumbai. the state of maharashtra is recording the highest number of coronavirus cases in india.
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hospitals are running out of oxygen, and some are telling patients to source their own supply. bbcjournalist nilesh dhotre went to this with his father. translation: when the hospital ran out of oxygen, i brought two - cylinders from a nearby government covid centre. i tried to get two cylinders from the local municipality. we saw a van carrying oxygen cylinders on the road. we asked him to give us some. thankfully, the driver of the van agreed. hospitals also move patients after oxygen supplies run out. but such is the demand, some hospitals are refusing to admit new patients. this doctor is caring for 27 covid patients in pune. translation: last week was horrible. many patients need more oxygen support because of the new mutated strain of the virus.
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even a 20—year—old needs support. such a demand was not expected. the government is stunned. i know four or five patients who died because oxygen was not available. the situation at oxygen refilling plants is also critical. this plant in central maharashtra is working around the clock. yet they're not able to meet the demand. translation: in normaltimes, we supply 100-150 cylinders - we work six to seven hours, - but now industrial sales are banned and the government is asking us to produce 700 cylinders- every day for hospitals. that is a huge task.
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maharashtra is sourcing supplies from across india and has also called on the indian air force to help, but the state government can only do so much. as the other states declare oxygen emergencies, maharashtra is far from alone. mayuresh konnur, bbc news, mumbai. the headlines on bbc news — sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's . sport centre, here's tulsen. good evening. there's one game in the premier league this evening which is important for both teams in differing ways. the hosts, leicester city, have lost their last two as they cling on to third spot, while west bromwich albion have scored eight goals winning their past two games, but they still sit nine points from safety. currently goalless in that one just 18 minutes played.
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earlier today, arsenal manager mikel arteta confirmed that both the owner stan kroenke and ceo of the club vinai venkatasham apologised to him over the failed bid to form a super league. arteta says it's been a warning to owners that fans must never be forgotten. this has given a big lesson, and it shows the importance of football in the world. and it shows that the soul of the sport belongs to the fans, and that's it. during this pandemic, for a year, we've been trying to sustain this industry with no fans in the stadium, but when the fans have to come out and talk, they talk really loud and clear and they send probably the strongest message that has ever been sent in football world. and every club have done the right thing, so that's a massive sustainment for the history of football.
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the la liga presidentjavier tebas has said the super league "as it is, is dead." barcelona said it would be a massive mistake to notjoin the league and they said they would stay involved. carlo ancelotti, who managed real in spain for two years, says football needs promotion and relegation for the sport to move forward. they wanted to build up the competition without sport merit, and this is not retractable because our culture, we were born to have merit. if you are good, you play football and you'll be professional. if you are not good, you are not professional. if you are better, you have to win. you have to play the best competition, and this is, i think, what they didn't take in consideration and they were wrong. while football managers are used to providing injury updates for their squad, brighton boss graham potter had to explain how he got this impressive black eye. i'd love to be able to tell you there's a heroic, chivalrous story that i can make
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myself look really good, but unfortunately ijust missed my footing walking over some steps and went crashing into a metal railing. and i've got a flash on my back and i look a little bit better, so the lady upstairs tells me, looking more rugged and handsome, but i think she's crazy of course. three tries for wigan athletic meant they ended castle for�*s unbeaten beginning. and now st. helens leading huddersfield 6—0 withjust the one drop. britain's cameron norrie will face 11—time champion rafael nadal in the quarterfinals of barcelona 0pen. norrie went through after eighth seed david goffin retired with an injury, while nadal beat kei nishikori in three sets.
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mark selby at the snicker championships made his way through after easing to a victory. after doing the hard work prior to this final shot, doing the hard work prior to this finalshot, his doing the hard work prior to this final shot, his challenger missed and left mark selby with an easy shot to move on. it's four frames all between ronnie 0'sullivan and anthony mcgill in their all—english second—round contest, after mcgill won the last two frames of the session to put the pressure on the six—time world champion 0'sullivan. they will continue to play tomorrow morning. how is your snicker? anchor: pretty lousy to be honest. thank you. documents released at the high court today have shed more light on how ppe contracts were awarded at the start of the pandemic last year. they suggest there was a controversial vip route that allowed certain companies to fast track the process. our special correspendent lucy manning has more.
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well, over the last year, the bbc has revealed details of millions of gowns and facemasks that couldn't be used because they didn't meet the right standards, and there's been concern over this vip route. this was where mps, ministers, officials could refer companies, and they would get on this route and many of them did get more contracts to supply ppe. well, the good law project, a campaign group, took the government to court over some of these deals. there's been a hearing today. e—mails have been published, and we can see the concern that some civil servants had at the time about this vip route. 0ne e—mail system says from a civil servant... and we also get some detail in these e—mails about how companies got into the vip route. pestfix, a company we revealed some of their masks couldn't be used.
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well, one of their company officials was at an 80th birthday party with the father—in—law of one of the department of health officials, and that's how they got involved in the system. ayanda capital, who we also revealed some of their facemasks couldn't be used, they had an adviser who was also advising the government on trade, andrew mills. one of the e—mails says "one for the vip route". ayanda capital says in response "any accusations of cronyism are unsubsta ntiated". why does this all matter? well, it raises the question of, yes, there was a panic, a scramble to get ppe at the height of covid, but was the government wasting taxpayers' money with companies that didn't have track records and equipment that, in the end, some of it couldn't be used? the latest coronavirus figures here show there were there were 2729 new infections recorded
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in the latest 24—hour period. 2471 new cases were reported on average per day in the last week. just over 1900 people are in hospital. 18 deaths were reported. that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 22 deaths were announced every day. the total number of deaths is now 127,345. as for vaccinations, just under 118,000 people have had their first dose in the latest 24—hour period, meaning more than 33.2 million have now had theirfirst dose. the take up for the second jab remains high, withjust over a16,000 in the latest 24—hour period, meaning just under 11.2 million
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people are now fully vaccinated. the prime minister has offered an "unreserved apology" for the failure to commemorate properly the deaths of tens of thousands of black and asian troops who fought for the british empire during the first world war. the commonwealth war graves commission found that at least 116,000 people who died weren't given headstones because of what they call "pervasive racism". our home editor mark easton has the story. the imperial war graves commission was established with a remit to remember every individual who died for their country regardless of rank, class, religion or race. in france, the immaculate memorial is an example ofjust that. but outside europe, the commission enacted a policy of discrimination,
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categorising the fallen as white, indians or what it called natives. this village in punjab, then part of british india, sent 460 men to fight in the first world war, the largest of any village in south asia. and yet the war dead are not named. a shock to a british gp who went to research his ancestors from there. i just came across the whitewashing of history when it came to the world wars. and growing up born and bred in nottingham, in history lessons, i never saw a photograph or any story of a black soldier or an indian soldier. in southern kenya, white war dead lie beneath war memorials in a well—tended cemetery. beyond the fence is where their african comrades are very, no names and no gravestones. this man headed the commonwealth war
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graves commission and said natives were not civilised enough to appreciate individual headstones. the report finds at least 116,000 casualties of world war i, mostly africans and indians, were not commemorated by name or were not commemorated at all. the consequence of pervasive racism. it was a policy encouraged by winston churchill, secretary of state for the colonies. he advised the commission would not erect individual headstones for native troops, but a central memorial in some suitable locality. shortly after sunrise... the commission has known for years there were significant issues with the way black and asian servicemen had been honoured, a century too late. today, the prime minister gave his personal backing. i want to apologise for the failures to live up to their founding principles all those years ago and have deep regret
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that it has taken so long to rectify the situation. they are inviting me to have a conversation that will be difficult to have and have someone like me pointing out what they should have done years ago without glorifying colonialism and without glorifying the empire. there are promises to act, but true healing will take time. not only has there been a great historical injustice to black and asian servicemen, but our nation's story has been missing vital pages. mark easton, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. it may have been warm in the sunshine today, it's another chilly night on the way. many of us, a risk of frost, looks to be coldest across parts of eastern england. could be —4 into the morning. some areas of cloud in the far northeast of scotland and the chance of a shower in the northern isles, still quite windy through the english channel and channel islands into southwest england. so where that wind is strongest, you will avoid frost, but many of us
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will be at orjust below freezing. again, looks coldest into eastern england. but after that chilly start, temperatures rebound quickly tomorrow, with plenty of sunshine again, a little hazy with high cloud here and there, still some cloud in the far northeast of scotland, and in the northern isles it may threaten a shower. still that brisk, gusty wind through the channel islands and into southwest england, where elsewhere the winds are light and in that strong sunshine it will feel warmer tomorrow and temperatures could be up to around 20 celsius in a few spots, gradually turning a little cooler and cloudier over the weekend. hello this is bbc news with me, kasia madera. the headlines... president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders, and pledges to cut america's carbon emissions, by at least half. india's coronavirus cases hit record levels, and as the countryjoins the uk's red list in less than 24 hours, british travellers try desperately,
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to get back to the uk. documents released at the high court suggest there was a controversial route that allowed certain companies to fast track the process for awarding ppe contracts. a formal government apology after failing to commemorate properly more than a hundred thousand black and asian people who died fighting for the british empire during the first world war. nasa's perseverance rover makes breathable oxygen on the surface of mars and the lead singer of the bay city rollers — les mckeown — has died, at the age of 65. back to our top story: and president biden opened a major virtual climate summit today, pledging to dramatically cut us emissions over the next nine years.
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let's take a look at the commitments made by each country, as we've heard, the united states will aim to cut carbon emissions by 50—52% below 2005 levels by the end of this decade. borisjohnson announced a target for the uk to cut emissions by 78% on 1990 levels by 2035. the eu says it will reduce emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared with 1990 levels. and japan has pledged to increase its carbon reduction target to 46% on 2013 levels by 2030. no new commitments yet from china — and it is now responsible for 28% of global carbon emissions. this afternoon, president biden said industrial innovation would be key to the united states meeting its target. i want to build a critical
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infrastructure to produce and deploy clean technology, both those we can harness today and those that we will invent tomorrow. i talked to the experts and i see the potentialfor a more prosperous and equitable future. the signs are unmistakable. the science is undeniable. and the cost of inaction keeps mounting. the united states is not waiting, we are resolving to take action. most of the world's emissions are produced by large companies around the globe. but what can individuals do if they want to play their part to cutting emissions? its all down to your carbon footprint, as our reality check correspondent chris morris reports. sometimes it's hard for an individual to know where to start with climate change. it's such a big subject, how can one person actually make a difference? well, one way and it's
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not necessarily easy, is to look at how you can reduce your own personal carbon footprint. the carbon footprint refers to the total amount of greenhouse gases released into the earth's atmosphere as a result of the activities of an individual or an organisation. remember, greenhouse gases trap heat inside the atmosphere and that's over heating the planet, so if you want to work out your own carbon footprint, you need to know the amount of greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide, you are responsible for creating. it's a difficult thing to measure precisely and there are different definitions about how best to calculate it, but roughly speaking there is the direct impact of using energy when we travel or to power our homes, and there is the indirect impact of the energy used to create all the things we use or consume. in the developed world in particular, transport is a big
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part of your carbon footprint. cutting down on the use of petrol or diesel cars and taking fewer flights is one of the most effective ways of reducing it. the place you live also contributes to your personal footprint. it is important to make sure that your home is heated or cooled efficiently and is well insulated. the more you can use sustainable energy like solar and wind power, the more you cut your emissions. the stuff we use at home also adds to the problem. all that plastic, metal and cardboard takes a lot of energy to produce and dispose of. so recycling can help reduce your carbon footprint but not as much as how you travel or eat and cool your home. then there is your diet. above all, red meat makes your carbon footprint bigger because cows produce so much methane and other greenhouse gas. a huge numbers of trees are cut down to create pastures on which cattle can graze. in the developing world, polluting stoves are a real problem too,
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so it's important to try to replace them with more efficient methods of cooking. but overall, people in poorer countries produce far smaller amounts of greenhouse gases than people in richer countries to do. so if you look atjust what a country produces, the average amount of carbon dioxide emissions per person in the united states is about 16.1 tonnes per year. in china it is 7.1 tonnes and in the uk it's about 5.5 tonnes. but in the democratic republic of the congo, it's only 0.03 tonnes, while in qatar, which has a really small population but produces so much oil and gas, it's 38.6 tonnes. that's just production. it doesn't take into account all the other thing we talked about, how much you consume. but obviously the more money you have, the more you tend to consume, so if people in richer countries really want to reduce their carbon
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footprint, they need to make huge changes in their lifestyles. it can be done and new technologies to make things greener are coming on stream all the time. but it is a reminder that the declared aim in many countries of going carbon neutral by the middle of this century means a revolution in the way we live. downing street has announced an internal inquiry into the leak chris morris with some practical solutions there. downing street has announced an internal inquiry into the leak of private text messages between boris johnson and billionaire sirjames dyson over the tax status of his employees. the bbc revealed these text messages sent at the start of the pandemic, in which borisjohnson says he would "fix" tax rules that the businessman sirjames dyson said presented an obstacle to making ventilators for the nhs. labour have called for all correspondence from mrjohnson's phone about government business to be released. 0ur political editor,
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laura kuenssberg has more. ticking. there wasn't time to waste. at the start of the pandemic, those at the cabinet table were under the most intense pressure. but were mistakes made in the rush? yesterday, we revealed the prime minister and the businessman sirjames dyson had been in touch by direct text. dyson had offered to make ventilators for the nhs in the uk, but the firm wanted guarantees they wouldn't have to pay extra tax if they brought more staff in. government business is meant to be transparent — labour's calling foul. we've got this bizarre situation, where you've got some people who've got the prime minister's number and can access him and he apparently will respond by telling people that he'll get things done and then you've got the vast majority of people who've got no such access. dyson spent £20 million and didn't get a contract in the end.
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the firm says they were only trying to comply with the rules. sirjames became a uk tax resident again this week and ministers have defended what went on. what the prime minister did was to ensure that things happened. now this is the dither and delay of the socialists. they don't want to do things, they want to put the process ahead of succeeding. let us praise dyson for all that he has contributed to british manufacturing — the huge success that he has been. there were concerns in government, though, about how boris johnson communicates. 0ne senior whitehall figure told me there was great anxiousness about this prime minister doing deals on whatsapp. nobody trusted him, nobody knew what was improper. and number 10 did not officially deny today claims that borisjohnson had been advised to change his phone number in the autumn. downing street emphasises this was happening during an emergency, adamant nothing went wrong and confident of some public sympathy, but it's not the only strand of concern about access and influence — raising doubts about whether this is a government that really plays fair.
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whatever the tangle, one question is the same — can you be sure those with the wrong motives never sneak behind the gates? laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. the most senior civil servant at the treasury, sir tom scholar, has said the failed finance company, greensill capital, "persistently" lobbied the department to be included in the government's covid support schemes. sir tom said the former prime minister, david cameron — who was an adviser to the firm — had rung him and sent a series of text messages, but all the proposals put forward were rejected. mr cameron has there's been no wrong doing. ——mr cameron has said there's been no wrong doing. separately the bank of england has released a series of messages showing mr cameron and lex greensill�*s attempts to persuade it to extend support to cover greensill capital's activities. in the us, the funeral of daunte wright, a 20 year black man shot
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by police earlier this month, is being held in minneapolis. his coffin arrived at the church earlier, under tight security. this is taking place in the same city where george floyd was murdered by police. since derek chauvin was found guilty on monday, some of the attention on that trial, has shifted to this funeral, with the same questions being asked about police violence against black people — in minneapolis — and across the united states. daunte wright's parents spoke of their loss at the funeral. i mean, i don't really speak much, but words can't even explain how i feel right now. you know, that was my son. i'm going to...man. applause.
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i remember when daunte wright first became a father. his son was born at 28 weeks along, so he was premature, and the joy that junior brought to daunte's life was truly amazing. he was so happy and so proud, and he always said he couldn't wait to make his son proud. and... he...was, just, junior was the joy of his life, and he lived for him every single day. and now he's not going to be able to see him. the reverend al sharpton, the veteren civil rights campaigner, gave the eulogy. yes, some of us have different tactics, but all of us have the same
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goal. talk about some of your civil rights, some of y'all are street activists, we are all street activists, we are all street activists and we are all civil rights, some of us young, some of us old. but we are all the same. they don't discriminate us because of age. and that's why when i talked to brother aubrey and told him that we'd be there for him, whatever he needs, because we see this young man as royalty. the reverend al sharpton giving the eulogy at daunte wright's funeral. jaguar land rover is shutting its two main uk carfactories temporarily from monday, due to a shortage of computer chips. the manufacturer says it has had to adjust production schedules due supply chain disruption caused by covid—19. 0ur reporter nina nanji is here.
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jaguar land rover are not the only one facing supply difficulties? that's right. we have seen similar warnings from car—makers all over the world. and jl are is just the latest in a long line. so earlier today, they issued a statement saying that they were halting production at two of their major car factories in the uk. so those are at castle brome edge and also at hillwood. but they did insist that their production at the solihull factory would continue. they also said that they were working with their suppliers to try and minimise their suppliers to try and minimise theissues their suppliers to try and minimise the issues and reduce the issues to customers as well with their orders. the question is why would a shortage of chips because such a major issue. if you look at what a modern car is or looks like this nowadays, it's a computer on wheels because it contains so many electronic devices, everything from cameras to electronic gadgets, and all of those
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require semi conductors in order to be able to function. that is something that the entire industry is struggling to get its hands on right now. is struggling to get its hands on riaht now. �* ., ., right now. i've got to say, sometimes _ right now. i've got to say, sometimes i _ right now. i've got to say, sometimes i look - right now. i've got to say, sometimes i look at - right now. i've got to say, sometimes i look at my . right now. i've got to say, l sometimes i look at my car right now. i've got to say, - sometimes i look at my car and it is cleverer than i am. in terms of these chips, what has caused the shortage? it these chips, what has caused the shortaae? ., �* , , , ., shortage? it won't surprise you that the pandemic— shortage? it won't surprise you that the pandemic is _ shortage? it won't surprise you that the pandemic is played _ shortage? it won't surprise you that the pandemic is played a _ shortage? it won't surprise you that the pandemic is played a big - shortage? it won't surprise you that the pandemic is played a big part i shortage? it won't surprise you that the pandemic is played a big part in| the pandemic is played a big part in that. so firstly, the supply side, as we know, production and also shipping has really been impacted by coronavirus. also, on the demand side, we have seen a huge surge in demand for things like electronic equipment, laptops, computers, for all of those people that have been working from home during the pandemic. that has really caused something of a perfect storm, and it's caused this global shortage of semi conductors. but it's notjust the car industry that's impacted. there is a whole range of industries that are hugely reliant on semi conductors in order to function from everything from tvs, phones, video games, you name it. and all of these industries are in a way sort of competing for each other with this limited amount of supply. so that is
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where we are in in this situation commander part is, no one seems to know right now how long the disruption will continue. that is because it takes time to ramp up chip productions, even if it is stepped up, it's likely the disruption would continue for some weeks and months to come. fascinating insiahts, months to come. fascinating insights, nina, _ months to come. fascinating insights, nina, as— months to come. fascinating insights, nina, as always, i months to come. fascinating - insights, nina, as always, thanks so much. thank you. scottish labour has launched its manifesto for the holyrood election next month. it says it will guarantee a job for every young person in scotland and the party has also called for the country to unite behind a national covid recovery plan.? here's our scotland editor sarah smith. the banks of the river clyde were once rock—solid labour ground. the party that once dominated scotland now languishes in third place and their new leader admits will not form the next scottish government. i would love to say to you, sarah, that i have these superpowers to reverse a 20 year decline in ten weeks. i'm not pretending to have such a superpower. but what i do want to do
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is to be honest and direct with people across scotland. the labour party hasn't been good enough, you deserve a better labour party, and i'm going to work day and night to give you that better labour party you deserve so we can all rebuild the country that we love. scottish labour propose under 25s and the long—term unemployed to be guaranteed a job in the public sector, rapid diagnostic centres for cancer patients, a free digital device for every school pupil, increasing the scottish child payment to £20 a week and opposing an independence referendum within the next five years. if the result of this election is a majority of msps who support independence, how can labour stand in the way of what voters have chosen, which is to have another referendum? what people are worried about right now in scotland isn't the date of a referendum. what they're worried about is keeping their loved ones safe, when are they going to get a vaccine? if and when they'll have a job to go back to, their children's education and mental health, the cancelled operation or the failure to get a cancer diagnosis, the planet we're going to leave our children and our grandchildren.
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these are the big issues, i think. could you work with an snp government whilst they were, at the same time, pursuing an independence referendum within the next three years? firstly, this isn't a party manifesto, it's a recovery plan for all of scotland. i don't support independence, i don't support a referendum but is that going to stop me from working with people to challenge child poverty, to get a great investment in our nhs, to get people back to work? no. if labour succeed in becoming the main opposition party in scotland, it wants to concentrate on covid recovery not the constitution. labour say the country can't recover from the pandemic whilst politicians are arguing about independence. it's also true that labour's fortunes in scotland can't recover whilst independence dominates. squeezed between the snp and the staunchly pro—unionist conservatives, labour often struggles to get its arguments heard. sarah smith, bbc news, greenock. what a beautiful vision there, a nice background there. nasa's perseverance rover continues to make history from the surface of mars.
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just days after the first powered, controlled flight on another world, the rover has now made another stunning advance. a toaster—sized device on the rover has made oxygen from the planet's carbon dioxide atmosphere — equivalent to what an astronaut on the red planet would need to breathe for roughly 10 minutes. the oxygen was generated by a small device called moxie. dr michael hecht from the massachusetts institute of technology is the principal investigator behind that oxygen—making device and hejoins us now. i hope i'm pronouncing that right. tell us a bit about this toaster sized device.— tell us a bit about this toaster sized device. . , ., , sized device. certainly, i am very lad to sized device. certainly, i am very glad to be _ sized device. certainly, i am very glad to be here _ sized device. certainly, i am very glad to be here and _ sized device. certainly, i am very glad to be here and we _ sized device. certainly, i am very glad to be here and we have - sized device. certainly, i am very. glad to be here and we have made oxygen on mars, but i'm breathing easier today here on earth. moxie is a term if you will, a mechanical tree, in that it does the same thing
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a tree does. a turn c02 into oxygen that we can breathe and more importantly that our rockets can use to breathe so they can burn their fuel. that's the real long—term goal of moxie, to help astronauts come home from mars some day because they need a huge tank of oxygen to lift that rocket off the ground. moxie works something like a fuel—cell in a chemical reaction, in this case carbon dioxide going to its components to oxygen and carbon monoxide is driven by an electric current, by a power supply, and that's how we generate oxygen in and out of c02 on mars.— out of c02 on mars. when you describe it _ out of c02 on mars. when you describe it like _ out of c02 on mars. when you describe it like that, _ out of c02 on mars. when you describe it like that, it - out of c02 on mars. when you describe it like that, it sounds| describe it like that, it sounds absolutely incredible. moxie has made these five grams of oxygen which will let an astronaut to
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breathe for around ten minutes. i'm assuming the greater plan is to scale this up so you could have a whole colony of people out there? what is your thinking? the shorter-term _ what is your thinking? the shorter-term plan - what is your thinking? the shorter-term plan is - what is your thinking? tie: shorter—term plan is for those what is your thinking? tue: shorter—term plan is for those first missions to mars, when a crew of maybe four astronauts may land on the surface, spend a year or a year and a half on the surface and then come home. and, you know, they will have with them only what they can take with them. so this way, we can provide 25 tonnes of oxygen for them to breathe, and more important, so they can actually get back home from they can actually get back home from the planet. in the longer term from you are quite right, i hope we have a research station, like many countries have in antarctica, that we can keep populated with new crews coming in every couple of years to continue doing research on the surface of the red planet. now, for all of us who _ surface of the red planet. now, for all of us who watch, _ surface of the red planet. now, for all of us who watch, say _ surface of the red planet. now, for all of us who watch, say martian i all of us who watch, say martian with matt damon, you know, is that your thinking? that we will have people up there getting on with their lives, doing experiments, it just sounds absolutely from a sci—fi
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film. tt just sounds absolutely from a sci-fi film. . . , just sounds absolutely from a sci-fi film. . ., , ., , just sounds absolutely from a sci-fi film. . ., , .,,�* just sounds absolutely from a sci-fi film. . ., , ., , �* film. it certainly does. but i hope to see it. film. it certainly does. but i hope to see it- i— film. it certainly does. but i hope to see it. i certainly _ film. it certainly does. but i hope to see it. i certainly expect - film. it certainly does. but i hope to see it. i certainly expect my i to see it. i certainly expect my kids to see it. i hope to live long enough to see that day, maybe 15—20 years where we take those first steps. we are very grateful, i have to say, to indy where for writing and creating the movie the martian because what we are doing is the oxygenate or, and when we say the oxygenate or, and when we say the oxygenate or, and when we say the oxygenate or, people now know what we mean. find oxygenate or, people now know what we mean. �* . oxygenate or, people now know what we mean. . , ., , , we mean. and 'ust i am super impressed— we mean. andjust i am super impressed that _ we mean. andjust i am super impressed that moxie - we mean. andjust i am super impressed that moxie has - we mean. andjust i am super impressed that moxie has its | we mean. and just i am super- impressed that moxie has its own merchandising as well, it's a very fetching jill a that you are wearing. but on a serious note, you are talking about having something like this in the next 15 years. that's just quite staggering. tt is that'sjust quite staggering. it is indeed. that'sjust quite staggering. it is indeed- you _ that'sjust quite staggering. te 3 indeed. you know, it is hard to predict the political future, indeed. you know, it is hard to predict the politicalfuture, i think we can say with confidence that the technology can happen by then, and fortunately, it is not
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just nasa any more who is engaged in thatjourney. and i don't mean space sectors, so many other countries, just look this year at different spacecrafts from different countries arriving at mars. i'm truly confident that that this next step of our human journey to another planet is going to continue. tt’s planet is going to continue. it's extraordinary, isn't it? absolute pleasure. please that you are breathing freely today from the massachusetts institute of technology. thank you so much. thank ou for technology. thank you so much. thank you for having — technology. thank you so much. thank you for having me. _ technology. thank you so much. thank you for having me. thank _ technology. thank you so much. thank you for having me. thank you. - officers say they were responding to reports of an altercation between a group of men. —— the neck neck police in surrey have launched a murder investigation after a man was killed when he was hit by a car
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in walton—on—thames. officers say they were responding to reports of an altercation between a group of men — one of the men then got into a white bmw and is reported to have driven at two of the other men in the group. a man in his 40s was pronounced dead at the scene — the owner of the car has been arrested. we are monitoring the situation. driving tests resumed today in england and wales after being parked in december because of the pandemic. and a backlog built up during lockdown — of around 450,000 cancelled tests . here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. sometimes, it takes a few attempts before things line up. but learner drivers have rarely had to wait this long to get a test. i've had my test cancelled i think eight times by this point, but i've kind of lost count. i live quite literally in the middle of nowhere with the nearest bus station being about a mile or two away. it's almost impossible to get around or go anywhere without asking someone else to give me a lift. the last car driving tests for non—key workers was before christmas. the delay has had an impact on instructors too, many of whom haven't been able to work. you've still got overheads to cover for the cars, you've got to pay for the cars and the insurances and all
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that sort of stuff. and also, it's been very frustrating for a lot of the pupils that you teach. effectively, it's three and a half, four months since they've last been in a car. and to have that break when you're a fairly inexperienced driver is quite difficult for a lot of them. but the wait is almost over. there are currently over 400,000 people waiting for a car test in britain. more examiners are now working weekends, extra people have been recruited, and some have been brought back out of retirement. even the boss is now taking some of the tests. waiting time varies around the country, because it depends on how many other people are in the queue, and how many examiners we've got in any given location. so it can vary quite a bit. i think the key thing there is that we will add more test appointments each week as time moves on. no one knows how long it will take to clear the backlog, so l plates may need to stay on far longer than many would like.
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caroline davies, bbc news. good luck to anyone taking their test. the bay city rollers singer, les mckeown, has died at the age of 65. # bye — bye # bye—bye baby, baby goodbye. the band — which had hits with tracks like bye bye baby and shang—a—lang — were tartan—clad sensations in the uk and us in the 1970s. they were hugely successful, selling more than 120 million records. les mckeownjoined in 1973 and left in 1978. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson says they were the biggest band since the beatles. back to back number ones, bye bye baby, give a little love, only three scottish groups in history have
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topped the us charts, the average white band, simple minds and a city rollers the average white band, simple minds and bay city rollers with saturday night. that is an example of how big they are. les mckeown joined them after they had been going for about seven years or so. he was the second singer replacing nobby clark, and he was only a teenager and really brought the popularity with him. famous for the tattered outfits, the cutoff trousers and also being dubbed. they were the first band, really, to be dubbed the biggest band since the beatles. colin patterson paying tribute to les mcewan who has passed away. i will be back a little later with the papers, but now let's have a look at the weather. hello. temperatures 17 degrees in highland scotland today and a little warmer for many of us tomorrow. and lots of weather watcher pictures with a similar theme — shades of green and blue, but here's a different take just showing how dry at least the topsoil is at the moment. all proof, of course, that it is high pressure in control at the moment,
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and with that, barely a cloud in the sky today. just a little area of cloud that's right across northern scotland, and we've had the odd shower in the northern isles, more especially in shetland. but with this area of high pressure right across us again, tomorrow, it's really a repeat of today's weather. we stay mainly clear overnight with the exception of that cloud towards the north and northeast of scotland. still the chance of a shower in shetland, and it's still quite windy through the english channel, channel islands and into southwest england. but the areas of blue showing up here will indicate that under clear skies, temperatures on the way down, so many of us getting a frost again into the morning. parts of eastern england could be down to —4 degrees. now, the lyrid meteor shower peaked last night and here's one picture from a lucky weather watcher that saw something. there still could be something to see tonight as well under those clear skies. a chilly but sunny start to the day tomorrow. you'll pick out still this cloud in the northeast of scotland, still the chance of a shower in the northern isles. we could well see a little high cloud increasing, turning the sunshine hazy
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in some spots. for most, the winds are light and it's still quite a gusty wind through the channel, channel islands and into southwest england. but away from the fairly chilly weather in northeast scotland, it will be an even warmer day. could see 20 celsius somewhere tomorrow, and if that happens, that's the first time this month away from the channel islands we've seen temperatures that high. but hankies at the ready for pollen and hay fever sufferers here because it's looking high across much of the uk. moderate to high uv even if you're in a relatively chilly breeze. that sun is still strong. now, on friday evening, if you're going to be alfresco, the sunshine until sunset. high pressure still close by over the weekend, but more of an easterly breeze starting to filter in, and that will turn things gradually cooler as the weekend goes on, particularly across eastern areas where eventually there'll be cloud, especially on sunday but gradually clearing. the best of the sunshine and the warmth will continue to be across the western side of the uk, and throughout this weekend, it stays dry.
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this is bbc news. president biden tells world leaders they face a "moral imperative" to replace their polluting fossil fuels with clean, greener technologies. the white house is re—engaging in the climate challenge after four years in which the united states had vacated the stage. mr biden says he will cut us emissions by 52% by 2030, throwing down the gauntlet to 40 heads of state who joined him ina virtualsummit. this is the decisive decade. this is the decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis. a roller—coaster week in minneapolis — from the conviction of derek chauvin to the funeral of 20—year—old daunte wright, another black man shot dead after a routine traffic stop over

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