Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 22, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders and pledges to cut america's carbon emissions by at least half. we are here at the summit to discuss how each of us, each country can set higher climate ambitions that will in turn create good paying jobs, advance innovative technologies, and help vulnerable countries adapt to climate impacts. china's president xijinping reiterates his promise to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060 and says he looks forward to working with the international community, including the united states. the government has apologised for the failure to properly commemorate black and asian soldiers
2:01 pm
who died fighting for britain. driving tests get the green light in england and wales — but there's a backlog of hundreds of thousands. 4,000 fans and no social distancing — the brit awards will be the first major indoor music event to trial the return of audiences. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. president biden has pledged that the us will aim to at least halve its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, compared with 2005 levels. the president is hosting 42 global leaders at a two day virtual summit aimed at tackling climate change — his adminstration is hoping
2:02 pm
that other big polluters will follow its lead. in the last hour, president biden told the summit about the industrial innovations he saw as key to the united states meeting its targets. i want to build a critical infrastructure to produce and deploy clean technology, both those we can harness today today and those that we'll invent tomorrow. i talked to the experts and i see the potentialfor a more prosperous and equitable future. the signs are unmistakable. the science is undeniable. but the cost of inaction just keeps mounting. the united states isn't waiting, we are resolving to take action. not only our federal government, but our cities and other states all across our country, small businesses, large businesses, large corporations, american workers in every field. i see an opportunity to create millions of good paying,
2:03 pm
middle—class union jobs. i see line workers laying thousands of miles of transmission lines for a clean, modern, resilient grid. i see workers capping hundreds of thousands of oil and gas wells, that need to be cleaned up, and abandon coal mines that need to be reclaimed. putting a stop to the methane leaks affecting the health of our communities. i see auto workers building the next generation of electric vehicles and electricians installing nationwide 500,000 charging stations along our highways. i see the engineers and construction workers building new carbon capture and green hydrogen plants to forge cleaner steel and cement and produce clean power. i see farmers deploying cutting—edge tools to make soil of our heartland
2:04 pm
the next frontier in carbon innovation. by maintaining those investments and putting these people to work, the united states sets out on the road to cut greenhouse gases in half by the end of this decade. that was part of what president biden has had to say at the start of that summit. borisjohnson welcomed president biden�*s commitment to cutting emissions, saying that the uk wants to work internationally to tackle climate change. i'm really thrilled by the game changing announcement thatjoe biden has just made and i'm very proud that the uk is doing the same. we were the first country to pass legislation for near zero. —— net zero. we have the biggest offshore wind capacity still, i think of any country in the world. the saudi arabia of wind as i never tire of saying. we are halfway to net zero.
2:05 pm
we have carbon emissions are lower than at any point since the 19th century. we are ending support for fossil fuels overseas and doubling our international climate finance. and we are actually speeding up because we see the obligation as colleagues have just pointed out for developed countries to do more. we are legislating to deliver 78% of the reductions needed to reach that goal by 2035 and as host of cop26, we want to see similar ambitions around the world. and we are working with everybody from the smallest nations to the biggest emitters to secure commitments that will keep change to within 1.5 degrees. i think we can do it. to do it we need the scientists and all of our countries to work together to produce the technological solutions that humanity is going to need.
2:06 pm
whether it is carbon capture and storage or solving the problems of cheap hydrogen delivery or getting to jet zero flying, net zero flying to make sure we can roll out evs properly. making sure that our homes stopped emitting such prodigious quantities of c02, moving to sustainable domestic living. we can do this together across the world and it's going to mean the richest nations coming together and exceeding the $100 billion commitment that they already made in 2009. i stress how important that is. china's president xi urged respect for nature, and said the environment must be protected to support sustainable development. translation: we must be committed |to harmony between man and nature. |
2:07 pm
second, we must be committed to green development. green mountains are gold mountains. to protect the environment is to protect productivity and to improve the environment is to boost productivity. the truth is as simple as that. we need to make sure that a sound environment is there to buttress sustainable economic and social development worldwide. let's discuss this summit and what it might achieve. adrienne buller is a senior research fellow at �*common wealth�* — a think tank which wants to transform the economy in the face of the climate crisis. very good afternoon. we have had some bold commitments already from president biden and others. what do you make of that strategy? is this what you want to hear? definitely. this is really _ what you want to hear? definitely. this is really significant _ what you want to hear? definitely. this is really significant summit i what you want to hear? definitely. this is really significant summit in | this is really significant summit in advance of the much larger cop26 later this year. the kinds of pledges and comments that come out of this summit will be really
2:08 pm
significant for how that conference proceeds, and whether or not it is a success. we need to approach the challenge with the skill it needs. hearing from both borisjohnson, as well as president biden that there are significantly higher levels of ambition is really important. particularly as the us and the uk are cumulatively really significant in terms of global emissions. they are also really well positioned in terms of our economies and economic strength to take faster and deeper strides towards this. but i think one thing that will be really important is whether or not these kinds of bold plans and statements are matched with credible concrete plans, which is something we have yet to see. plans, which is something we have et to see. �* , plans, which is something we have yet to see-— yet to see. because some of the fiuures yet to see. because some of the figures are _ yet to see. because some of the figures are eye _ yet to see. because some of the figures are eye watering. - yet to see. because some of the figures are eye watering. is - yet to see. because some of the figures are eye watering. is it i figures are eye watering. is it actually achievable? realistically, what are the key areas that we start with? i what are the key areas that we start with? ~' ., ., ., , with? i think there are two really im ortant with? i think there are two really important things _ with? i think there are two really important things here. _ with? i think there are two really important things here. one - with? i think there are two really important things here. one is . with? i think there are two really. important things here. one is that the uk has made by our own
2:09 pm
accounting a lot of rest on cutting emissions from electricity for example. unfortunately that is the easy step, as it were. going forward, i think there are two really important things that global powers like the uk and us really need to push. 0ne powers like the uk and us really need to push. one is a transition plan away from fossil fuel production. we simply cannot do this by hoping that somewhere down the line we are going to have tech solutions to capture carbon or circuit out of the air. the simplest and most affecting thing we can do is invest any transition away from fossil fuels. is invest any transition away from fossilfuels. that is invest any transition away from fossil fuels. that is too important for the us, in particular, fossil fuels. that is too important forthe us, in particular, is fossil fuels. that is too important for the us, in particular, is one of the world's biggest oil and gas producers. forthe the world's biggest oil and gas producers. for the uk, we have the north sea and we have not ended production there. the other really important thing here that will make all these commitments credible is that 2020 was supposed to be the year within the paris agreement that the world's wealthy developed nations met their commitment for
2:10 pm
$100 billion per year climate financing for emerging or lowering economies. that has not been met yet. this year is really significant for actually bringing the world's wealthy nations together to recognise their role in burden sharing. when it comes to climate, no country is in ireland. without meeting those commitments and without assisting other countries in decarbonising —— no country is an island. nobody will meet this challenge. fist island. nobody will meet this challenge-— island. nobody will meet this challenue. �* challenge. at the most basic level, if someone — challenge. at the most basic level, if someone is _ challenge. at the most basic level, if someone is watching _ challenge. at the most basic level, if someone is watching this - if someone is watching this thinking, what can i do? are you talking about life operating through solar, wind energy, is that the sort of thing you are talking about? definitely. absolutely moving our energy systems away from fossil fuels is the bread and butter of tackling the climate crisis. a lot of that will come at this stage from changing the way that we heat our homes. a lot of these things also
2:11 pm
have benefits in terms of lower air pollution levels and better health and cities. down the line, cheaper bills, whether it is driving your car and its operating costs or heating your home. a lot of these things for the average person viewing, we do not have a tonne of options right now because fossil fuels are so embedded in the economy. what we need is really clear transition plans at national government level. for example, the north sea, making sure we enter production there while still providing jobs for those communities and everyone working in that industry. and also helping to share the costs of this transition. there are a lot of benefits to be had from it, but ultimately people on lower incomes, whether that is within the uk or distributed around the world, generally have a much lower contribution to carbon emissions and resource use. it is not necessarily fair that those with the broadest shoulders would pay the same amount
2:12 pm
when they are ultimately emitting far more than those on lower incomes. governments have a really big role to play in ensuring that fairness and justice are at the heart of this transition. notjust because it is the right thing to do but because it will be absolutely necessary to succeed in doing so. 0k, adrienne buller, thank you very much. we are going to talk more about that summit after quarter past. right now we will turn to our other main story here today. this morning the government made a formal apology for the failure to properly commemorate the deaths of tens of thousands of black and asian service personnel who fought for the british empire during the first world war. the commonwealth war graves commission found that more than 115,000 casualties weren't given headstones, because of "pervasive racism". paul adams reports. at cemeteries and plots around the world their sacrifice is commemorated with dignity and attention.
2:13 pm
names inscribed so that we may remember. but not all names. tens of thousands of black and asian soldiers fought and died for britain, but when it came to marking their sacrifice it was done differently, or collectively, or not at all. it was, says the government, a terrible mistake. mr speaker, on behalf of the commonwealth war graves commission and the government both of the time and today, i want to apologise for the failures to live up to their founding principles all those years ago and express deep regret that it's taken so long to rectify the situation. more than a year after setting up a special committee, the organisation responsible for maintaining war graves has issued a formal apology. it's found that entrenched prejudices and the pervasive racism of imperial attitudes were to blame. the committee's report found that at least 116,000,
2:14 pm
and perhaps as many as 350,000 of those who died serving the forces of the then british empire, remain un—commemorated. the vast majority of african, indian or egyptian origin. the commonwealth war graves commission says it's taking action to correct the wrongs of the past. this research report is welcome. it's sober, very, very disappointing reading, but actually it gives us the ability now, now we know the numbers and the areas to look, we can start the searches properly and we can pick up on the failings of the past and ensure that we act today to put those right. the commission says it will implement all ten of the committee's detailed recommendations. it will search for more names, adopt third—party memorials, and build new commemorative structures in collaboration with communities involved. the mp david lammy presented the channel a documentary that triggered the commission's report.
2:15 pm
it's right and proper that the commonwealth war graves commission and the ministry of defence consult appropriately in situ in those countries and ask those countries and those communities what they would like to see properly commemorate their war dead. at the chattri memorial in sussex, the names of fallen indian soldiers are recorded. these men were not forgotten. the commission says it's determined to fulfil its original promise, to commemorate equally all those who died in both world wars. paul adams, bbc news. the investigation which lead to this apology was prompted by david lammy s channel a documentary, unremembered, which revealed how over 100,000 africans who died serving britain during world war i, were denied the honour of individual graves. a key contributor to the documentary
2:16 pm
was professor michelle barrett, from queen mary university of london. shejoins me now. good afternoon. you have conducted a huge amount of research in this area, i know. explain some of what you have over the years uncovered. what the reasons were at the time for not giving people proper memorials. i think you have to think back to 1917. although the war graves commission project of equality in treatment after death was very progressive for the time, it does seem to us now very unlikely that that would have included equal treatment for the subject peoples of imperial rule. and it did not. so thatis imperial rule. and it did not. so that is a very important general factor. �* ,., that is a very important general factor. �* ., that is a very important general factor. ., ., , factor. and so what actually happened — factor. and so what actually happened on _ factor. and so what actually happened on a _ factor. and so what actually happened on a practical- factor. and so what actually i happened on a practical level? factor. and so what actually - happened on a practical level? if someone fell in the line of duty and
2:17 pm
obviously had to be buried, what actually happened? what obviously had to be buried, what actually happened? what happened is that they decided... _ actually happened? what happened is that they decided... obviously - actually happened? what happened is that they decided... obviously there l that they decided... obviously there are many examples, it is a bit complicated. they decided, for example, there is a memorial in what is now iraq, which had the names of over 30,000 indians who had died in the mesopotamian campaign. 0n over 30,000 indians who had died in the mesopotamian campaign. on that memorial, they engraved the names of the white british l officers and ranks and the names of the indian officers, but the names of the indian rank and file, of which there were about 30,000, were simply put in printed registers are not put on the memorial at all. that is one example. another example which i looked at was what happened in east africa. where instead of commemorating those who had died
2:18 pm
individually, or even by numbers of them, what they decided to do was put up three statues, effectively, in the three principal towns of the region to commemorate with general inscriptions what they thought was probably around 50,000 africans who had died. we now know that that number was much higher. but they thought they were commemorating 50,000 africans with these three statues. �* ., . 50,000 africans with these three statues. �* . . ., ., statues. and the fact that we have had that formal _ statues. and the fact that we have had that formal apology _ statues. and the fact that we have had that formal apology this - had that formal apology this morning, how important, how significant is that? i morning, how important, how significant is that?— significant is that? i think it is actually very _ significant is that? i think it is actually very significant. - significant is that? i think it is actually very significant. i - significant is that? i think it is. actually very significant. i think it is a huge step forward. very pleased that this has happened. 0ne pleased that this has happened. one of the things that has been much discussed around this is whether it was the imperial war graves commission themselves who were responsible or whether it was the colonial authorities who were responsible. i would just like to
2:19 pm
point out that that is a bit of a... fabian were much then and now. was of the opinion that as far as native memorials were concerned, that was a political question and one where they should find out what the individual colonial authorities, colonial governments wanted and act in alignment with that. so it is not really true that there is an opposition between what the war graves commission was doing and what the colonial authorities wanted. they were much more closely entwined than that. it is they were much more closely entwined than that. , , , ., than that. it is very interesting to hear from you- — than that. it is very interesting to hear from you. thank _ than that. it is very interesting to hear from you. thank you - than that. it is very interesting to hear from you. thank you so - than that. it is very interesting to l hear from you. thank you so much than that. it is very interesting to - hear from you. thank you so much for your time this afternoon. i appreciate it is a broad and complicated topic. we appreciate your time. thank you very much for now.
2:20 pm
the two—day virtual summit headed by president biden has been talking about that today out of washington. it is a virtual summit in the run—up to the summit in glasgow which is due in november. some big commitments put forward by president biden in the last couple of hours. then similarly from the uk and from president xijinping of then similarly from the uk and from president xi jinping of china. there is a lot of talk about what might be achieved over the next couple of days. ed miliband is labour's shadow secretary for business, energy and industrial strategy and hejoins us now. good afternoon. good to be with you. a ve bi good afternoon. good to be with you. a very his promise — good afternoon. good to be with you. a very big promise already _ good afternoon. good to be with you. a very big promise already from - a very big promise already from president biden. is it realistic, is it appropriate? it is president biden. is it realistic, is it appropriate?— it appropriate? it is definitely very welcome _ it appropriate? it is definitely very welcome and _ it appropriate? it is definitely very welcome and it - it appropriate? it is definitely very welcome and it is - it appropriate? it is definitely i very welcome and it is definitely it appropriate? it is definitely - very welcome and it is definitely a big move. if you think where we were just a few months ago with president trump wanting to get out of the 2015 paris climate accord, you have now
2:21 pm
got president biden firmly in it, and coming up with the biggest cut in global emissions that we have seen from the united states. dare i say it, even though it is very good news, there are still too big obstacles we face. 0ne news, there are still too big obstacles we face. one is it is still probably not enough. the world is not doing enough. just to get this in your viewers mind is, we have got to have global emissions in the next ten years if we are going to keep global warming to one and a half degrees, which is the very, very dangerous tipping point. we are already at a tipping point, but it would be even more dangerous. the first problem is even with this boldness, it is probably not enough. secondly, we need to match the targets with delivery. with the actual substantive policy, that to be fair to president biden he has got a $1 trillion climate investment plan for the next ten years. he is certainly doing that. it is very good news, it is very welcome, but
2:22 pm
we are not there yet. i good news, it is very welcome, but we are not there yet.— good news, it is very welcome, but we are not there yet. i was chatting a little earlier _ we are not there yet. i was chatting a little earlier to _ we are not there yet. i was chatting a little earlier to a _ we are not there yet. i was chatting a little earlier to a researcher- we are not there yet. i was chatting a little earlier to a researcher in - a little earlier to a researcher in all of this from a think tank who said the fundamental point is that nations have to get away from fossil fuels. you're not going to even think about hitting these targets if you do not do that. that has to be led by government, doesn't it? that is about leadership if that is going to happen. is about leadership if that is going to ha en. ., . is about leadership if that is going to hauen. ., . ., , to happen. correct. that is completely _ to happen. correct. that is completely right. - to happen. correct. that is completely right. if - to happen. correct. that is completely right. if you . to happen. correct. that is. completely right. if you take to happen. correct. that is- completely right. if you take what we are doing or not doing here in the uk, we have got what is a relatively ambitious target by international standards, but if you look at the sort of substantive questions of what we are actually doing, we have announced a phase—out date for petrol and diesel cars, which is too important, by 2030, but we are not really taking the measures here at home to make that possible, eitherfrom consumers or for manufacturers. if you look at what the government is seeing on a green recovery, investing in the green recovery, investing in the green economy of the future, they are not stepping up. they are putting forward one 60th of what
2:23 pm
president biden is doing. they're parting with a new coal mine in cumbria. we do need a decisive move away from fossil fuels, as well as these targets. it is happening to some extent but not nearly enough. it is quite a big commitment from the uk, isn't it? cutting carbon emissions by 78% by 2035. is your understanding that there is a clear strategy to do that question mark thatis strategy to do that question mark that is a big percentage cut. mr; that is a big percentage cut. ij�*i understanding that is a big percentage cut. ij�*i1: understanding is that is a big percentage cut. m1 understanding is there is that is a big percentage cut. ii1: understanding is there is not a clear strategy to do that and that is exactly the problem. if you look at what the independent climate change committee, the body that recommended this cut, actually said, they said if you're going to do the 78% reduction by 2035, then half of the cars sold in the uk need to be electric within four years from now, ljy electric within four years from now, by 2025. we need a national investment programme in home insulation to cut carbon emissions andindeed insulation to cut carbon emissions and indeed cut people's bills. i am afraid the government is actually cutting the money for home
2:24 pm
insulation. and we need 50 billion of public and private investment per year from 2030 to make this happen. so the targets are there in the uk, but the delivery is not. by urging for the government and the prime minister, in particular, is match the targets, match those targets that you set out with delivery. make sure it happens. if we do this, the other thing to say to your viewers, if we do this, we cannot only avoid climate disaster, we can create better lives for people. let's not forget the centrality of this, better jobs forget the centrality of this, betterjobs for forget the centrality of this, better jobs for people, forget the centrality of this, betterjobs for people, improving air quality by cleaning up our roads in terms of emissions on our roads, better green spaces. all of these can contribute to improving people's lives and doing right by the planetary emergency that we face. [30 planetary emergency that we face. do your party might be empowered by the time we get to that date and boris johnson is talking about today. but then what will you do? will you be
2:25 pm
able to see it through question what would you be able to deliver everything you have just talked about? i everything you have 'ust talked about? , ., ., about? i will be determined to do so. the fundamental _ about? i will be determined to do| so. the fundamental fundamental comes down to this, in an emergency or not? i regard it as an emergency. it is an emergency that might seem a theoretical, although i am speaking to you from my constituency in doncaster where we had terrible floods in 2019, that was the second time that some people in this area had been flooded within ten years. these were supposed to be won in 100 year events. i cannot tell you definitively that is because of climate change, but i know it is much more likely to happen as a result of climate change and it will happen much more frequently as a result of climate change and with greater intensity. so it is an emergency, we do have to act. i think we can act, but we do need much greater boldness. this is now... covid has rightly been the focus for the last year and we have got to continue to see that through,
2:26 pm
but after that, climate is the absolutely central task we face. we can recover from the covid economic crisis and tackle the climate crisis by investing in the green economy. ed miliband, thank you. we willjust talk a little bit more about covid because we must reflect on the situation in india. this week it is really in desperate circumstances around covid. india has registered around 315,000 new cases of coronavirus in the past 2a hours. as the second wave batters india, hospitals are running out of oxygen. the bbc�*s mayuresh konnur reports?from mumbai. the state of maharashtra is recording the highest number of coronavirus cases in india. hospitals are running out of oxygen and some are telling patients to source their own supply. a bbcjournalist went through this with his father.
2:27 pm
translation: when the hospital ran out of oxygen, i brought two cylinders from a nearby government covid centre. i tried to get to cylinders from the local municipality. we saw a van carrying oxygen cylinders on the road. we asked them to give us some. thankfully, the driver of the van agreed. hospitals also moved patients after oxygen supplies ran out. but such is the demand some hospitals are refusing to admit new patients. this doctor is caring for 27 covid patients. last week was horrible. many patients need more oxygen support because of the new mutated strain of the virus. even a 20—year—old needs support. such a demand was not expected. the government is stunned. i know four or five patients who died because oxygen was not available.
2:28 pm
the situation at oxygen refilling plants is also critical. this plant in central maharashtra is working around the clock. yet, they are not able to meet the demand. translation: in normal times, we supply 100—150 cylinders every day, and the same for industrial purposes. we work 6—7 hours, but now industrial sales are banned, and the government is asking us to produce 700 cylinders every day for hospitals. that is a huge task. maharashtra is forcing oxygen supplies from across india, —— maharashtra is sourcing oxygen. and has also called on the indian air force to help.
2:29 pm
but the state government can only do so much. and as the other states declare oxygen emergencies, maharashtra is far from alone. new figures reveal coronavirus was no longer the leading cause of death in either england or wales last month. of death in england or wales last month for the first time since october. office for national statistics data shows that covid—19 was the third leading cause of death in both countries in march, accounting for 9.2% of all deaths registered in england and 6.3% in wales. scottish labour has launched its manifesto for the holyrood election next month. the party is pledging to increase free childcare to 50 hours a week for every youngster. labour also says it will guarantee a job for every young person in scotland. focusing on the impact of covid, the party's leader anas sarwar called for the country to unite behind a national recovery plan. imagine what we could achieve if we put aside those things that we
2:30 pm
disagree on and focused on the things we agree on. imagine if we obsessed about education in the next parliament. imagine if we is obsessed about the nhs in the next parliament. imagine if we obsessed aboutjobs and the economy in the next parliament. imagine we obsessed about eradicating child poverty in the next parliament. imagine we obsessed about challenging the climate emergency in the next parliament. just imagine the kind of scotland we could build together. anas sarwar at the manifesto launch for next month's elections. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. plenty of sunshine out there today. tomorrow just a slow increase in cloud from the east over the weekend. it's not clear blue sky everywhere. there is a bit of high cloud here and there, so a little bit hazy. there is an area of cloud just running across the north
2:31 pm
of scotland, may produce a shower in shetland. there is warmth though in that strong april sunshine after the chilly start. there is a brisk easterly wind through the english channel, channel islands, far south—west of england, so you will notice that if you are on a coast exposed to that. it is cooler than elsewhere but it will hold off a frost tonight, whereas elsewhere there will be another frost settling in for many of us. not quite as cold as last night but still another chilly start in the morning. and just a repeat tomorrow. still the brisk wind across southern most areas into the south—west. still some cloud in northern scotland, more patchy cloud elsewhere in scotland. somehow high cloud turning the sun hazy. the winds for the most part are light but brisk in the south and south—west, and tomorrow is looking warmer, some may even get up to 20. and icy hello and icy , this is bbc news. the headlines: president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with a pledge to cut
2:32 pm
america's its carbon emissions by at least half. the government has apologised for the failure to properly commemorate black and asian soldiers who died fighting for britain. driving tests get the green light in england and wales — but there's a backlog of hundreds of thousands. and — 4,000 fans and no social distancing — the brit awards will be the first major indoor music event to trial the return of audiences. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. fans are the most important aspect of the game, and it was a mistake to plan to join the european super league. that's according to the arsenal manager mikel arteta who's confirmed that both the owner stan kroneke and ceo of the club
2:33 pm
vinai venkatesham have apologised to him over the failed bid to form a super league. arteta says it has been a warning to owners that fans must never be forgotten. this has given big lessons and shows the importance of football in the world. it shows that the soul of this sport belongs to the fans and that's it. during this pandemic, for a year we have been trying to sustain this industry with no fans in the stadium, but when the fans had to come out and talk, they have talked really loud and clear and they have sent the strongest message ever sent in the football world. every club has done the right thing, so that's a massive statement for the history of football. manchester united manager 0le gunnar solskjaer had to persuade a group of protestors to leave united's training ground earlier today. the club confirmed a group was able to access the site to protest
2:34 pm
against the club's owners the glazers' involvement in the european super league. meanwhile, the global athlete group has called the international olympic committee "archaic" after they pledged to enforce a rule which blocks athletes from taking part in political protest. protests such as taking a knee will still be banned at this years olympic games. the ioc consulted more than 3,500 athletes. 67% of whom said they wanted to keep the olympic podium free of protests, while 70% were keen to avoid on—field demonstrations. poppy cleall will start at number eight for england women's six nations final against france on saturday, pushing captain sarah hunter to the bench. cleall was hailed by the england head coach as one of the best players in the world after her performance in the red roses win over scotland earlier this month. hunter has been struggling with a neck injury and emily scarratt will replace her as captain. former british and irish lions captain sam warburton has backed
2:35 pm
england forward maro itoje to lead the side against south africa this summer. coach warren gatland has various leadership candidates to choose from, including wales captain alun wynjones, but the man who led the last two lions tours believes the england man is the best choice. he is one of the players who will be guaranteed. i was extremely impressed with the 17 as well. given his age and the other captaincy candidates, there is the question of whether the pressure will get to him. and win will be up there, but i would probably go with itoje. former world champion shaun murphy has drawn level against mark davis
2:36 pm
at the world snooker championship. murphy, who won the title in 2005, has gone seven froames to six up in the second round. first to 13 frames will progress to the next round. davis has never got further than the second round. meanwhile on the other table, ronnie 0'sullivan has just started his match against anthony mcgill in the second round, where 0'sullivan is currently leading 3—1. you can watch both games on the bbc website and app. and british cyclist simon yates is still in the leaders jersey at the tour of the alps — he's just finished third on stage four, to extend his lead to 58 seconds with one stage to go. that's all the sport for now. more sport to come after three o'clock. more about that climate summit. president biden has opened a major
2:37 pm
virtual climate summit by pledging to reduce us emissions by more than half from 2005 levels within nine years. he said action was a "moral and economic imperative". well, most emissions are produced by big companies around the world, but what can individuals do if they want to play their part? its all down to your carbon footprint, as our reality check correspondent chris morris reports. sometimes it's hard for an individual to know where to start with climate change. it's such a big subject, how can one person actually make a difference? well, one way and it's not necessarily easy, is to look at how you can reduce your own personal carbon footprint. the carbon footprint refers to the total amount of greenhouse gases released into the earth's atmosphere as a result of the activities of an individual or an organisation. remember, greenhouse gases trap heat inside the atmosphere and that's over heating the planet,
2:38 pm
so if you want to work out your own carbon footprint, you need to know the amount of greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide, you are responsible for creating. it's a difficult thing to measure precisely and there are different definitions about how best to calculate it, but roughly speaking there is the direct impact of using energy when we travel or to power our homes, and there is the indirect impact of the energy used to create all the things we use or consume. in the developed world in particular, transport is a big part of your carbon footprint. cutting down on the use of petrol or diesel cars and taking fewer flights is one of the most effective ways of reducing it. the place you live also contributes to your personal footprint. it is important to make sure that your home is heated or cooled efficiently and is well insulated. the more you can use sustainable energy like solar and wind power, the more you cut your emissions.
2:39 pm
the stuff we use at home also adds to the problem. all that plastic, metal and cardboard takes a lot of energy to produce and dispose of. so recycling can help reduce your carbon footprint but not as much as how you travel or eat and cool your home. then there is your diet. above all, red meat makes your carbon footprint bigger because cows produce so much methane and other greenhouse gas. a huge numbers of trees are cut down to create pastures on which cattle can graze. in the developing world, polluting stoves are a real problem too, so it's important to try to replace them with more efficient methods of cooking. but overall, people in poorer countries produce far smaller amounts of greenhouse gases than people in richer countries to do. so if you look atjust what a country produces, the average amount of carbon dioxide emissions per person in the united states
2:40 pm
is about 16.1 tonnes per year. in china it is 7.1 tonnes and in the uk it's about 5.5 tonnes. but in the democratic republic of the congo, it's only 0.03 tonnes, while in qatar, which has a really small population but produces so much oil and gas, it's 38.6 tonnes. that's just production. it doesn't take into account all the other thing we talked about, how much you consume. but obviously the more money you have, the more you tend to consume, so if people in richer countries really want to reduce their carbon footprint, they need to make huge changes in their lifestyles. it can be done and new technologies to make things greener are coming on stream all the time. but it is a reminder that the declared aim in many countries of going carbon neutral by the middle of this century means a revolution in the way we live.
2:41 pm
rising temperatures are having a direct impact on marine life. 0ur correspondent sophie long visited an ocean community in california, which has felt the impact of climate change. this surprise visit by a young white shark to the cold waters of the central california coast brought a clear message. things are changing, fast. about 2014, we started to see juveniles in monterey bay and we were very surprised. what we didn't know then what we know now is that 2014 ushered in a series of marine heatwaves, so that was an astounding result of oceanic changes caused by climate change and what impact they have on species. whales are also changing their migration habits, which means fishermen have had to cut their season short to avoid entanglements. this year we didn't open up until well after the new year, and in the future, we're
2:42 pm
going to have to have to deal with this every year, we're going to have to wait for the whales to migrate south and when they begin to migrate north, we're going to have to end our season early also. so that has a financial impact? yeah, it has a direct financial impact, cos the season used to be eight months out of the year, and now, realistically, you have a one or two—month season. the amount of wildlife in the water can distract from the threat they face. those that work on it welcome the fact they have a president who is listening, but they want to make sure their voice is heard. there's just a lot of uncertainty and a lot of unknowns around the future of our oceans, and i think from a commercial fisherman perspective, we don't want to be forgotten in the conversations around the future of our ocean. we want to make sure that we have a seat at the table in terms of those conversations, and also know that we have a lot to contribute. we spend more time on the water than anyone else. barking. while there are vocal members
2:43 pm
of this ocean community, others adopt a wait—and—see policy. what people feel passionately here is that if the oceans are properly protected, they can stop suffering from climate change, and start supplying more solutions to it. when it comes to global warming, the ocean and its inhabitants have literally been taking the heat. which is fine for hardy generalists like jellyfish. they may be beautiful and important, but they're not good to eat. the united states no longer has a leader determined to go against the flow on environment issues. now it's retaking its seat at the head of the summit table, people here are optimistic that they'll be able to leave an ocean in which future generations can prosper. sophie long, bbc news, monterey bay. the most senior civil servant at the treasury, sir tom scholar, has told mps that he received text messages and a phone call from the former prime minister david cameron about the company
2:44 pm
greensill capital. his comments come as the row about lobbying continues. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo gave this update from westminster. this was the first in a series of what are going to be a few parliamentary inquiries into greensill capital and issues of lobbying in westminster. greensill now a collapsed firm. the former prime minister, david cameron was employed by the company to lobby on their behalf and today, sir tom scholar, the top official at the treasury confirmed david cameron got in touch with him last march as well as contacting other ministers, saying he engaged with david cameron because they used to work together. ultimately the treasury didn't decide to give greensill to go ahead to be involved in government
2:45 pm
schemes. sirtom to be involved in government schemes. sir tom said they had persistent approaches from the company but defended officials�*s dealing with the company as entirely appropriate. borisjohnson has launched his own enquiry into greensill and david cameron's activities too. the church of england has been told to include at least one candidate from a black or minority ethnic background whenever it shortlists for bishops or other senior roles. it's one of nearly 50 recommendations made by the archbishops�* anti—racism task force, which was set up last year. harry farley reports. the history of the church of england is tied up in the history of empire and colonialism. many black and ethnic minority people in the church feel that baggage. things began to be said to me in a one—to—one situation such as, "your english is not very good." "i don't like your preaching." justin welby himself has admitted the church has a race issue. there is no doubt when we look
2:46 pm
at our own church that we are deeply institutionally racist. let's just be clear about that. it was said to the bishops a couple of years ago and it's true. but this report says the church has alarmingly moved backwards in some areas. nowjohn sentamu has retired, dr guli francis—dehqani is the only ethnic minority senior bishop. the report recommends that all shortlists for seniorjobs should include at least one ethnic minority candidate. decisive steps should be taken to tackle a legacy of the church's role in the slave trade. and there should be racialjustice officers in every diocese to oversee the report's implementation. i think there's a real appetite for change. i think people are wanting to stop this broken record and to start again. and that's what our christian hope is, isn't it?
2:47 pm
that is what we as christians believe, yes, there was good friday there is easter. there is resurrection. there is hope. but the church has been apologising for racism for 30 years, with little change. some fear this report will be no different. in the bible it says you judge people by their fruits, right? and what they produce. and actually for over 100 years it hasn't produced any fruit when it comes to race relations. there are similar challenges for other faiths. the board of deputies published its report today on the experiences of black and minorityjews. it makes 119 recommendations and the chief rabbi says the exclusion of anyone because of the colour of their skin was a collective failure for which we all must take responsibility. harry farley, bbc news.
2:48 pm
now to a different topic here today. driving tests resumed today in england and wales after being parked in december because of the pandemic. and a backlog built up during lockdown — of around 450,000 cancelled tests. i will be talking to a driving instructor in just a moment. i will be talking to a driving instructor injust a moment. first, here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. sometimes, it takes a few attempts before things line up. but learner drivers have rarely had to wait this long to get a test. i've had my test cancelled i think eight times by this point, but i've kind of lost count. i live quite literally in the middle of nowhere with the nearest bus station being about a mile or two away. it's almost impossible to get around
2:49 pm
or go anywhere without asking someone else to give me a lift. the last car driving tests for non—key workers was before christmas. the delay has had an impact on instructors too, many of whom haven't been able to work. you've still got overheads to cover for the cars, you've got to pay for the cars and the insurances and all that sort of stuff. and also, it's been very frustrating for a lot of the pupils that you teach. effectively, it's three and a half, four months since they've last been in a car. and to have that break when you're a fairly inexperienced driver is quite difficult for a lot of them. but the wait is almost over. there are currently over 400,000 people waiting for a car test in britain. more examiners are now working weekends, extra people have been recruited, and some have been brought back out of retirement. even the boss is now taking some of the tests. waiting time varies around the country, because it depends on how many other people are in the queue, and how many examiners we've got
2:50 pm
in any given location. so it can vary quite a bit. i think the key thing there is that we will add more test appointments each week as time moves on. no one knows how long it will take to clear the backlog, so l plates may need to stay on far longer than many would like. caroline davies, bbc news. a driving instructor. pin binning is a driving instructor in wolverhampton and also somewhat of a youtube and tiktok star. good afternoon. good afternoon. great to have _ good afternoon. good afternoon. great to have you _ good afternoon. good afternoon. great to have you with _ good afternoon. good afternoon. great to have you with us. - good afternoon. good afternoon. l great to have you with us. thinking about talking to you has made me feel quite nervous as if i am about to take a listen. i wonder how your students if they have a test this week and they haven't had lessons for such a long time.—
2:51 pm
for such a long time. exactly. it's a situation _ for such a long time. exactly. it's a situation that _ for such a long time. exactly. it's a situation that a _ for such a long time. exactly. it's a situation that a lot _ for such a long time. exactly. it's a situation that a lot are - for such a long time. exactly. it's a situation that a lot are in. - for such a long time. exactly. it's a situation that a lot are in. they| a situation that a lot are in. they have found these early test dates but haven't been able to practice. they haven't fully got the skills so we are trying to get as many lessons in as possible and its extra pressure knowing that if they do fail, they will not get another test date for another five or six months. what are you advising them? how are you trying to help them deal with their nerves?— you trying to help them deal with their nerves? more practice, more ractice. their nerves? more practice, more practice- that's — their nerves? more practice, more practice. that's the _ their nerves? more practice, more practice. that's the main - their nerves? more practice, more practice. that's the main thing - their nerves? more practice, more| practice. that's the main thing they can do is practice as much as possible, so we are trying to get in as many lessons as we can. helping them with the online videos as well. tell me about that. you will have had big chunks of the pandemic where you are not allowed to work. that is tough times for you. what have you been doing instead? like tough times for you. what have you been doing instead?— been doing instead? like you mentioned. _
2:52 pm
been doing instead? like you mentioned, putting - been doing instead? like you mentioned, putting on - been doing instead? like you | mentioned, putting on content been doing instead? like you - mentioned, putting on content on tiktok for learners. put content online that they can watch and refresh their memories so when they do get back to lessons, they have as much information as they can have. we are just showing a little bit of it now, so these are videos. i was going to describe some of these but i'm not. iwilljust going to describe some of these but i'm not. i willjust give people bad advice. you don't want me in your car. what happens? do people subscribe? what have reactions been? it wouldn't occur to me to look at a video to brush up my driving skills. to be honest, i wanted to help as many learners as i could. basically, i started doing these mock driving tests on youtube where i film to learn is taking a mock driving test and educating people on the faults they were making. that really took
2:53 pm
off for me. i was getting messages every week, telling me how those videos have really helped learners understand what they need to do to pass their driving test and how to avoid faults. like i said, it's a good feeling for me as an instructor to help thousands of people rather than one person at a time in a car. brilliant. so someone can log on, when you say it is a mock test, is it a full test?— when you say it is a mock test, is it a full test? yes. people come in from all over— it a full test? yes. people come in from all over the _ it a full test? yes. people come in from all over the uk _ it a full test? yes. people come in from all over the uk and _ it a full test? yes. people come in from all over the uk and we - it a full test? yes. people come in | from all over the uk and we filmed the whole test and then, i obviously edit the videos, educate people on the faults that have been made, how they could have avoided them. if it was a serious fault or a minor fault which they can get away with on the test. all they do is to subscribe to my channel and all the content is
2:54 pm
therefore them free of charge. fantastic. how are you feeling about getting back to normal and having students in the car properly again and doing it all for real? i am students in the car properly again and doing it all for real?— and doing it all for real? i am so ha - and doing it all for real? i am so happy and _ and doing it all for real? i am so happy and relieved, _ and doing it all for real? i am so happy and relieved, like - and doing it all for real? i am so happy and relieved, like many i happy and relieved, like many instructors. 0bviously financially we were not getting much help apart from a few grants. they were just covering our living costs and a lot of instructors were struggling. we are just happy to be of instructors were struggling. we arejust happy to be on of instructors were struggling. we are just happy to be on the road now and doing what we love doing, helping learner drivers pass their tests. �* , , helping learner drivers pass their tests. �* ,, ,, helping learner drivers pass their tests. �* , , , ., ., helping learner drivers pass their tests. �* ,, ., , helping learner drivers pass their tests. ., ,, ., tests. bless you. that is brilliant. lovel to tests. bless you. that is brilliant. lovely to talk _ tests. bless you. that is brilliant. lovely to talk to _ tests. bless you. that is brilliant. lovely to talk to you. _ tests. bless you. that is brilliant. lovely to talk to you. thank - tests. bless you. that is brilliant. lovely to talk to you. thank you. | lovely to talk to you. thank you. finally allowed to get back to work. the brit awards are to go ahead with a live audience of 4,000 people. the music awards next month will be the first major indoor test event in the governments programme looking into how large scale events can welcome back crowds. people won't have to socially distance, but will have to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test. 0ur entertainment correspondent
2:55 pm
colin paterson explains how it will all work. # i was getting kind of used to being someone you loved # but now the day bleeds # lewis capaldi at last year's brit awards at london's o2 arena. when the 2021 event happens next month at the same venue, an audience of 4000 people will be allowed in to watch the likes of dua lipa... and arlo parks perform. she is delighted at getting the chance to perform in front of a live crowd. , , . ., ., , , crowd. every musician has been in the same boat _ crowd. every musician has been in the same boat and _ crowd. every musician has been in the same boat and when - crowd. every musician has been in the same boat and when we - crowd. every musician has been in the same boat and when we do i crowd. every musician has been in| the same boat and when we do get crowd. every musician has been in i the same boat and when we do get out there and play at events such as these, it will be even more monumentally special. 2,500 tickets will be given to front line key workers from the greater london area. the ballot for these opens at midday today.
2:56 pm
those in the crowd will not have to socially distance or wear a mask once in the venue, but will have to provide a negative lateral flow test to be allowed in. they will also be asked to take a test afterwards .itis . it is seen as another important step of audience is returning. when you come to music, it is about being a social human being. you are getting close to people, the dancing, sweating, going on people's shoulders. that's part of being a human being. but shoulders. that's part of being a human being-— shoulders. that's part of being a human bein. �* ., i. , human being. but not everyone feels that enough — human being. but not everyone feels that enough has _ human being. but not everyone feels that enough has been _ human being. but not everyone feels that enough has been done _ human being. but not everyone feels that enough has been done to - human being. but not everyone feelsj that enough has been done to ensure grassroots venues will be opening in june 21. irate grassroots venues will be opening in june 21. ~ ., grassroots venues will be opening in june21.~ . ., , _ grassroots venues will be opening in june21. . �* , grassroots venues will be opening in june21. . �* june 21. we are happy the brits are taking place. _ june 21. we are happy the brits are taking place. it _ june 21. we are happy the brits are taking place, it is _ june 21. we are happy the brits are taking place, it is a _ june 21. we are happy the brits are taking place, it is a key _ june 21. we are happy the brits are taking place, it is a key event i june 21. we are happy the brits are taking place, it is a key event in i taking place, it is a key event in the calendar but the issue is for us at the grass roots music venue level. there isn't a great deal that will enable us to open. $5 level. there isn't a great deal that will enable us to open.— will enable us to open. as for the brits, will enable us to open. as for the brits. this — will enable us to open. as for the brits, this will _ will enable us to open. as for the brits, this will be _ will enable us to open. as for the brits, this will be the _ will enable us to open. as for the brits, this will be the first - will enable us to open. as for the brits, this will be the first live i brits, this will be the first live
2:57 pm
music performed at the 02 for more than a year. the ceremony is always a showcase for british music. this year it has a whole added level of importance. colin paterson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller yet another frosty start this morning to add to the long line of frosty start in april so far. there are going to be at least the risk of further frosty nights coming up. are going to be at least the risk of furtherfrosty nights coming up. it stays chilly at night but in the short term, warmer by day. some spectacular views coming in today because actually start came with clear skies and look at this on the satellite picture. barely a cloud in the sky, plenty of sunshine as we have an area of high pressure right across us and that is responsible for this settled and continued dry weather into the weekend. exceptions to the sunshine? maybe a little high cloud here and they are turning
2:58 pm
things touch hazy. we are so seeing cloud pushing into northern areas of scotland. for most daylight wind. through the english channel, gusty winds. pollen levels moderate to high. hay fever sufferers, winds. pollen levels moderate to high. hay feversufferers, it winds. pollen levels moderate to high. hay fever sufferers, it is a tough time. tree pollen out there at the moment. elsewhere tonight, some areas of cloud in northern scotland. breezy in the far south—west. both areas here avoiding the frost. not quite as cold as last night. another frost on the way and a lively meteor shower at the moment. 0ne lucky weather watcher got a view. something probably to be seen under clear skies tonight if you look close enough. tomorrow, a chilly start but again, plenty of sunshine to come during the day. hazy in
2:59 pm
places but there will be one thing that sunshine. away from the wind on the coast. warmer tomorrow, 19 maybe even 20 celsius. if you're planning to be alfresco on friday evening, it continues to be fine until sunset. with that strong sunset, high—pressure moving further to the north and that will bring in a stronger, easterly wind across eastern and southern parts. it continues to be dry. a steady increase in cloud, particularly in the east and it is in the east we will notice temperatures coming down, particularly right on the coast.
3:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines: president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders and pledges to cut america's carbon emissions by at least half. we are here at the summit to discuss how each of us, each country can set higher climate ambitions that will in turn create good paying jobs, advance innovative technologies, and help vulnerable countries adapt to climate impacts. china's president xijinping reiterates his promise to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060 and says he looks forward to working with the international community, including the united states. the government has apologised for the failure to properly commemorate black and asian soldiers
3:01 pm
who died fighting for britain. india reports the biggest daily total of coronavirus infections of any country since the start of the pandemic — with 315,000 new cases. driving tests get the green light in england and wales — but there's a backlog of hundreds of thousands. 4,000 fans and no social distancing — the brit awards will be the first major indoor music event to trial the return of audiences. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. president biden has pledged that the us will aim to at least halve its greenhouse gas emissions
3:02 pm
by 2030, compared with 2005 levels. the president is hosting 42 global leaders at a two day virtual summit aimed at tackling climate change — his administration is hoping that other big polluters will follow its lead. 0ur chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt reports. is this the moment the world comes together and begins to take climate change seriously? that's certainly whatjoe biden is hoping as he welcomes world leaders to his virtual summit. since his inauguration, president biden's climate envoy john kerry has been elbow bumping his way around the world in an effort to raise global ambition on the issue. the united states and china will work together to address the climate crisis. i think this is the first time china hasjoined in saying it's a crisis. the us president kick—started the talks today with ambitious new targets for cutting carbon.
3:03 pm
he said the us will cut emissions in half by the end of this decade as part of its efforts to reach net zero by 2050. that means cutting emissions as much as possible and capturing those that can't be prevented by planting trees or through engineering solutions. the fact the chinese leader xi jinping will be attending is very significant. china and the us don't agree on much at the moment, but have said they will work together on the climate issue. the uk, which also upped ambition on carbon cuts this week, says the world is moving on climate. when we were announced as the cop 26 president, less than 30% of the world economy was covered by a net zero target. we're now at 70%, so we have seen some progress. but what we need to do is to get more progress in terms of near—term emission targets to 2030. but, as greta thunberg says, ambitious targets need to be backed
3:04 pm
up with policies that will actually lead to significant emissions reductions. of course it's a step in the right direction, but if only it was that simple, that we could just invest and put money in things and that would solve the problem. of course that will be required as well but it will take so much more than that. we need to be realistic and see the whole picture. today's meeting is designed to get the world on the right track in the run—up to the big un climate conference the uk is due to host in glasgow in november. the hope is that by getting leaders talking now we're more likely to get really bold commitments from them in november. justin rowlatt, bbc news. president biden told the summit that industrial innovation would be key to the united states meeting its targets. i want to build a critical infrastructure to produce and deploy clean technology, both those we can harness today and
3:05 pm
those that we will invent tomorrow. i talked to the experts and i see the potentialfor a more prosperous and equitable future. the signs are unmistakable. the science is undeniable. and the cost of inaction keeps mounting. the united states is not waiting, we are resolving to take action. borisjohnson welcomed president biden's commitment to cutting emissions, saying that the uk wants to work internationally to tackle climate change. we are working with everybody, from the smallest nations to the biggest emitters, to secure commitments that will keep change to within 1.5 degrees. and i think we can do it. to do it, we need the scientists and all of our countries to work together to produce the technological solutions that humanity is going to need.
3:06 pm
china's president xi urged respect for nature, and said the environment must be protected to support sustainable development. translation: we must be committed to green development. _ green mountains are gold mountains. to protect the environment is to protect productivity, and to improve the environment is to boost productivity. the truth is as simple as that. we need to make sure that a sound environment is there to buttress sustainable economic and social development worldwide. well, adrienne buller is a senior research fellow at common wealth — a think tank which wants
3:07 pm
important is whether or not these kinds of bold plans and statements are matched with credible, concrete plans, which is something we have yet to see. because some of the figures are eye watering. is it actually achievable? realistically, what are the key areas that we start with? i think there are two really important things here. one is that the uk has made by our own accounting a lot of progress on cutting emissions from electricity for
3:08 pm
example. unfortunately that is the easy step, as it were. going forward, i think there are two really important things that global powers like the uk and us really need to push. one is a transition plan away from fossil fuel production and extraction. we simply cannot do this by hoping that somewhere down the line we are going to have tech solutions to capture carbon or suck it out of the air. the simplest and most affecting thing we can do is invest any transition away from fossil fuels. that is really important for the us, in particular, as one of the world's biggest oil and gas producers — if not the largest. for the uk, we have the north sea and we have not ended production there. the other really important thing here that will make all these commitments credible is that 2020 was supposed to be the year within the paris agreement that the world's wealthy, developed nations met their commitment for $100 billion per year climate financing for emerging
3:09 pm
or lower income economies. that has not been met yet. this year is really significant for actually bringing the world's wealthy nations together to recognise their role in burden sharing. when it comes to climate, no country is an island.. without meeting those commitments and without assisting other countries in decarbonising and building resilience, then none of us will succeed in meeting this challenge. at the most basic level, if someone is watching this thinking, what can i do? are you talking about life operating through solar, wind energy, is that the sort of thing you are talking about? definitely. absolutely moving our energy systems away from fossil fuels is the bread and butter of tackling the climate crisis. a lot of that will come at this stage from changing the way that we heat our homes. a lot of these things also have benefits in terms of lower air pollution levels and better health in cities.
3:10 pm
down the line, cheaper bills, whether it is driving your car and its operating costs or heating your home. a lot of these things for the average person viewing, we do not have a tonne of options right now because fossil fuels are so embedded in the economy. what we need is really clear transition plans at national government level. for example, the north sea, making sure we end production there while still providing jobs for those communities and everyone working in that industry. and also helping to share the costs of this transition. there are a lot of benefits to be had from it, but ultimately people on lower incomes, whether that is within the uk or distributed around the world, generally have a much lower contribution to carbon emissions and resource use. it is not necessarily fair that those with the broadest shoulders would pay the same amount when they are ultimately emitting far more than those on lower incomes.
3:11 pm
governments have a really big role to play in ensuring that fairness and justice are at the heart of this transition. notjust because it is the right thing to do but because it will be absolutely necessary to success in doing so. the government has made a formal apology for the failure to properly commemorate the deaths of tens of thousands of black and asian troops who fought for the british empire during the first world war. the commonwealth war graves commission found that more than 115,000 casualties weren't given headstones, because of "pervasive racism". paul adams reports. at cemeteries and plots around the world their sacrifice is commemorated with dignity and attention. names inscribed so that we may remember. but not all names. tens of thousands of black and asian soldiers fought and died for britain, but when it came to marking their sacrifice
3:12 pm
it was done differently, or collectively, or not at all. it was, says the government, a terrible mistake. mr speaker, on behalf of the commonwealth war graves commission and the government both of the time and today, i want to apologise for the failures to live up to their founding principles all those years ago and express deep regret that it's taken so long to rectify the situation. more than a year after setting up a special committee, the organisation responsible for maintaining war graves has issued a formal apology. it's found that entrenched prejudices and the pervasive racism of imperial attitudes were to blame. the committee's report found that at least 116,000, and perhaps as many as 350,000, of those who died serving the forces of the then british empire, remain un—commemorated. the vast majority of african, indian or egyptian origin.
3:13 pm
the commonwealth war graves commission says it's taking action to correct the wrongs of the past. this research report is welcome. it's sober, very, very disappointing reading, but actually it gives us the ability now, now we know the numbers and the areas to look, we can start the searches properly and we can pick up on the failings of the past and ensure that we act today to put those right. the commission says it will implement all ten of the committee's detailed recommendations. it will search for more names, adopt third—party memorials, and build new commemorative structures in collaboration with communities involved. the mp david lammy presented the channel 4 documentary that triggered the commission's report. it's right and proper that the commonwealth war graves commission and the ministry of defence consult appropriately in situ in those countries and ask those countries and those
3:14 pm
communities what they would like to see properly commemorate their war dead. at the chattri memorial in sussex, the names of fallen indian soldiers are recorded. these men were not forgotten. the commission says it's determined to fulfil its original promise, to commemorate equally all those who died in both world wars. paul adams, bbc news. the apology followed an investigation that was launched after david lammy�*s channel four documentary, unremembered. it revealed more than 100,000 africans who died serving britain during world war i, were denied the honour of individual graves. earlier i spoke to professor michelle barrett, from queen mary university of london, who took part in the programme. she is also researched this area for many years. there is a memorial in what is now
3:15 pm
iraq, the basra memorial, which had the names of over 30,000 indians who had died in the mesopotamian campaign. on that memorial, they engraved the names of the white british officers and ranks, and the names of the indian officers, but the names of the indian rank and file, of which there were about 30,000, were simply put in printed registers and not put on the memorial at all. that is one example. another example which i looked at was what happened in east africa. where instead of commemorating those who had died individually, or even by numbers of them, what they decided to do was put up three statues, effectively, in the three principal towns of the region to commemorate with general inscriptions what they thought was probably around 50,000 africans who had died. we now know that that number was much higher. but they thought they were
3:16 pm
commemorating 50,000 africans with these three statues. and the fact that we have had that formal apology this morning, how important, how significant is that? i think it is actually very significant. i think it is a huge step forward. very pleased that this has happened. one of the things that has been much discussed around this is whether it was the imperial war graves commission themselves who were responsible or whether it was the colonial authorities who were responsible. i would just like to point out that that is a bit of a false position because in fact the head of the imperial war graves commission, much venerated within the institution, then and now, was of the opinion that as far as native memorials were concerned, that was a political question and one where they should find out what the individual colonial authorities, colonial governments wanted and act
3:17 pm
in alignment with that. so it is not really true that there is an opposition between what the war graves commission was doing and what the colonial authorities wanted. they were much more closely entwined than that. we will talk more about that story in the next hour. following that formal government apology today. india has registered around 315,000 new cases of coronavirus in the past 24 hours. the state of maharashtra accounts for about a fifth of all cases. as the second wave batters india, hospitals are running out of oxygen. the bbc s mayuresh konnur reports?from mumbai. the state of maharashtra is recording the highest number of coronavirus cases in india. hospitals are running out of oxygen and some are telling patients to source their own supply.
3:18 pm
a bbcjournalist went through this with his father. translation: when the hospital ran out of oxygen, _ i brought two cylinders from a nearby government covid centre. i tried to get two cylinders from the local municipality. we saw a van carrying oxygen cylinders on the road. we asked them to give us some. thankfully, the driver of the van agreed. hospitals also moved patients after oxygen supplies ran out. but such is the demand some hospitals are refusing to admit new patients. this doctor is caring for 27 covid patients. translation: last week was horrible. many patients need more oxygen support because of the new mutated strain of the virus. even a 20—year—old needs support.
3:19 pm
such a demand was not expected. the government is stunned. i know four or five patients who died because oxygen was not available. the situation at oxygen refilling plants is also critical. this plant in central maharashtra is working around the clock. yet, they are not able to meet the demand. translation: in normaltimes, we supply 100-150 cylinders i every day, and the same for industrial purposes. we work 6—7 hours, but now industrial sales are banned, and the government is asking us to produce 700 cylinders every day for hospitals. that is a huge task. maharashtra is sourcing oxygen supplies from across india, and has also called
3:20 pm
on the indian air force to help. but the state government can only do so much. and as the other states declare oxygen emergencies, maharashtra is far from alone. new figures reveal coronavirus was no longer the leading cause of death in either england or wales last month. office for national statistics data shows that covid—19 was the third leading cause of death in both countries in march, accounting for 9.2% of all deaths registered in england and 6.3% in wales. the inquest is continuing into the death of jack merritt and saskia jones, who died in the attack at fishmongers' hall in london in 2019. the hearing has been told that there was prison intelligence that usman khan �*might commit
3:21 pm
an attack�* when he was released from prison. for more let�*s speak now to our correspondent at the inquest zoe conway. what more evidence has been heard today? $5 what more evidence has been heard toda ? �* , , ., what more evidence has been heard toda ? a what more evidence has been heard today? as you say, we have heard a lot more today _ today? as you say, we have heard a lot more today at _ today? as you say, we have heard a lot more today at the _ today? as you say, we have heard a lot more today at the inquest i today? as you say, we have heard a lot more today at the inquest about| lot more today at the inquest about the level of risk that usman khan was considered to pose whilst he was in prison. he served eight years in hmp whitemoor. we heard he was one of the most high—risk prisoners in the country, and at the time of his release, there was intelligence that he might commit a terrorist attack. we also heard there was intelligence linking him to violent incidents in prison, bullying, and forced radicalisation of other prisoners. in april 2018, just eight months before his release, there was an assessment of him that he had not reduced his risk. for the first time, we heard from the organisation
3:22 pm
learning together which organised the event at fishmongers�* hall. we heard from doctor amy buttle, one of the organisers of that programme. she talked about the time that usman khan spent on e—learning together course at the high security prison. she said that usman khan�*s nickname was high—risk can. after he took part in a creative writing course in 2018, he became a peer mentor to other prisoners. providing them with informal support and encouragement. she was asked if she had known then what she knows now about how usman khan�*s level of risk was assessed, which she still have invited him to join the course? she said yes because she was confident in the assessment that the prison probation service had made that he was safe to work with. we also heard more about the organisation of the event. doctor amy ludlow said that they had
3:23 pm
not conducted a risk assessment for the fishmongers�* hall event. the inquest has been told that usman khan travelled alone to london that day from stafford, where he was living. we heard that an officer with the prevent programme, he was one of the people he was managing usman khan in the community, said that he had no issue with him attending the event. but that he could not supply police officers to escort him to london because sending two officers could not be justified. zoe, thank you for now. zoe conway at the inquest into the fishmongers�* hall inquest. the most senior official at the treasury, sir tom scholar, has told mps that he received multiple texts and a phone call from former prime minister david cameron about the company greensill capital, as the row about lobbying — and who gets access to those in power — continues. the permanent secretary to the treasury told the public
3:24 pm
accounts committee mr cameron had spoken to him on the phone and sent him text messages to draw his attention to proposals by greensill to access government backed emergency loans at the start of the pandemic last spring. 0ur political correspondent is leila nathoo. she is following this at westminster. how significant is these comments from a senior civil servant? it these comments from a senior civil servant? , , servant? it is the first time we have heard — servant? it is the first time we have heard from _ servant? it is the first time we have heard from the _ servant? it is the first time we have heard from the most i servant? it is the first time we i have heard from the most senior civil servant at the treasury about his own contact and the department�*s contact with david cameron, who was working as an advisor for greensill capital. as you say, it was connected to greensill�*s to get onto government support programmes to help companies with cash flow problems during the coronavirus pandemic. we heard from two very senior civil servants at the treasury today, which isjust senior civil servants at the treasury today, which is just the first hearing of a series of hearings that are going to happen in
3:25 pm
the coming weeks in parliament about greensill and the activities of david cameron. and about lobbying and influence more widely in westminster. we heard from these officials today about the kinds of contact they had, repeated approaches from the company, persistent was how it was described to try to get on board these government support schemes. in the event, they were not granted access to the support scheme, they were not deemed eligible, despite urging the treasury to change the eligibility criteria. sirtom treasury to change the eligibility criteria. sir tom scholar, the most senior official in the treasury, had this exchange with the chair of the public accounts committee about his conversations with david cameron. i had a... mr cameron spoke to me on the telephone at around about the same _ the telephone at around about the same time and sent me some text messages — same time and sent me some text messages around about the same time,
3:26 pm
end of— messages around about the same time, end of march, beginning of april 2020 _ end of march, beginning of april 2020 as— end of march, beginning of april 2020. as far as i know from the records — 2020. as far as i know from the records i — 2020. as far as i know from the records i have seen, i had no further— records i have seen, i had no further contact after that phone call on — further contact after that phone call on the 7th of april. that was that one conference _ call on the 7th of april. that was that one conference call, - call on the 7th of april. that was that one conference call, but i call on the 7th of april. that was| that one conference call, but you had had — that one conference call, but you had had conversations— that one conference call, but you had had conversations with - that one conference call, but you had had conversations with mr. that one conference call, but you i had had conversations with mr camera or cameron _ had had conversations with mr camera or cameron before _ had had conversations with mr camera or cameron before that _ had had conversations with mr camera or cameron before that point, - had had conversations with mr camera or cameron before that point, just- or cameron before that point, just to be _ or cameron before that point, just to be clean — or cameron before that point, just to be clean ht_ or cameron before that point, 'ust to be cem— or cameron before that point, 'ust to be met.— to be clear. at that point, the conversation _ to be clear. at that point, the conversation was _ to be clear. at that point, the conversation was drawing i to be clear. at that point, the conversation was drawing to i to be clear. at that point, the| conversation was drawing to a retention _ conversation was drawing to a retention proposal that greensill had made and asking us to look at it, had made and asking us to look at it. which— had made and asking us to look at it. which we — had made and asking us to look at it, which we were doing. this had made and asking us to look at it, which we were doing.— it, which we were doing. this is direct contact _ it, which we were doing. this is direct contact between - it, which we were doing. this is direct contact between the i it, which we were doing. this is i direct contact between the former prime minister david cameron, working on behalf of greensill, and the most senior official at the treasury about access to this loan scheme. sirtom treasury about access to this loan scheme. sir tom scholar said the recently engaged with david cameron is because the two used to work but he defended the department�*s approach. he said everything was handled, the dealings with the company were handled entirely appropriately and it was actually
3:27 pm
department�*s responsibility to filter out different lobbying attempts. the defence of the actions of treasury officials there. the bank of england has also just put out a statement detailing repeated approaches that david cameron made on behalf of greensill to the bank, too, in regards to this loan scheme. both the treasury and bank of england are stressing today nothing was changed in response to the greensill lobbying attempts. thank ou for greensill lobbying attempts. thank you for now- _ he�*s the world class footballer who changed the government�*s mind about the importance of school meals. now marcus rashford wants to help families with cheap and simple recipe ideas, and has teamed up with the michelin starred chef tom kerridge to do that. sally nugent has been finding out more. i remember coming to your house one year ago and asking for a cup of tea. and i can remember you looking around for all the bits and pieces
3:28 pm
to make the cup of tea. would you say that maybe the kitchen has not always been your favourite place? it is not that it is not my favourite place, it is just that it�*s not my most familiar environment. but since then, i am glad to say that i have been in there a bit more. i have learned a few new skills. for me, it has just been a journey. and also i suppose a lot of it is about gaining confidence in the kitchen, and then gaining life skills. yeah, exactly, that is the angle. the angle is for, i don�*t know, maybe for an 11—year—old kid, if he moves out of his parents�* home when he is 18 years old, 19 years old, he can know how to cook for himself and eat the right meals. he knows affordable meals and it will be one less thing he has to stress about because he has been doing it for five or six years already. i always go back to my experiences.
3:29 pm
if i could literally go back as a kid, this is the thing that i would learn to do, as well as do what i was doing with my football and stuff. when i went home, i would have loved to have been able to sit down and just learn to cook. so, you have been cooking with tom kerridge, what are your favourite recipes so far? what have you learnt? my favourite recipes to cook where hashbrowns to cook were hashbrowns and i would say the stir—fry one. the chicken stir—fry? yes. i always thought with stir—frys, because it looks like there is so much going on, it is just going to be a nightmare to try and cook, but it was actually really fun. and how did it taste? it tasted all right. if i did it again, it would taste better. i think i would give it a seven out of ten or something. but if i cooked it properly, it would be an eight. marcus is very much of this kind of wanting to learn life skills and new things to put together for him personally, but then we can share that so that it helps so many children learn a life skill which is cooking. you are going to start putting these
3:30 pm
recipes out online, aren�*t you? but also in supermarkets, why was that important to you? a lot of the people we are trying to reach, they do not have access to things like social media and stuff like that, so the smartest way to do it was to make sure they are in local supermarkets that people go to every day. we just wanted to make sure we are hitting as many people and the right people as possible. marcus rashford they are talking about his new scheme he is doing in conduction with tom kerridge. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. plenty of sunshine out there today. tomorrow just a slow increase in cloud from the east over the weekend. it�*s not clear blue sky everywhere. there is a bit of high cloud here and there, so a little bit hazy. there is an area of cloud just running across the north of scotland, may produce a shower in shetland. there is warmth though in that strong april sunshine after the chilly start. there is a brisk easterly wind through the english channel, channel islands, far south—west of england, so you will notice that if you are
3:31 pm
on a coast exposed to that. it is cooler than elsewhere but it will hold off a frost tonight, whereas elsewhere there will be another frost settling in for many of us. not quite as cold as last night but still another chilly start in the morning. and just a repeat tomorrow. still the brisk wind across southern most areas into the south—west. still some cloud in northern scotland, more patchy cloud elsewhere in scotland. somehow high cloud turning the sun hazy. the winds for the most part are light but brisk in the south and south—west, and tomorrow is looking warmer, some may even get up to 20. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders and pledges to cut america�*s carbon emissions by at least half. the government has apologised for the failure to properly commemorate black and asian soldiers
3:32 pm
who died fighting for britain. india reports the biggest daily total of coronavirus infections of any country since the start of the pandemic — with 315,000 new cases. more about the situation in india but right now, all the latest sports news. many of the premier league managers have been giving their news conferences today and they haven�*t held back on their opinion of the collapsed breakaway european super league. everton manager, carlo anchelotti called the failed bid a joke. six clubs in england and another six from italy and spain had been in secret talks to form a super league. anchelotti said the clubs owners hadn�*t put the players or the fans first.
3:33 pm
what can i say? they were young. these 12 clubs were wrong. they didn�*t take into consideration the opinion of the two parts that were really important. 0ne, opinion of the two parts that were really important. one, the players and the managers, and the other parts are the supporters. they didn�*t take into consideration these opinions. anchelotti was real madrid manager for two seasons in spain and the la liga president javier tebas has said the super league, "as it is, is dead". but he admitted he is not likely to punish barcelona or real for their involvement in the failed project. manchester united manager 0le gunnar solskjaer had to persuade a group of protestors to leave united�*s training ground earlier today. the club confirmed a group was able to access the site to protest against the club�*s owners the glazers�* involvement in the european super league. meanwhile, the global athlete group has called the international olympic committee "archaic" after they pledged to enforce a rule which blocks athletes from taking part
3:34 pm
in political protest. protests such as taking a knee will still be banned at this years olympic games. the ioc consulted more than 3,500 athletes, 67% of whom said they wanted to keep the olympic podium free of protests, while 70% were keen to avoid on—field demonstrations. poppy cleall will start at number eight for england women�*s six nations final against france on saturday, pushing captain sarah hunter to the bench. cleall was hailed by the england head coach as one of the best players in the world after her performance in the red roses win over scotland earlier this month. hunter has been struggling with a neck injury and emily scarratt will replace her as captain. former british and irish lions captain sam warburton has backed england forward maro itoje to lead the side against south africa this summer. coach warren gatland has various leadership candidates to choose from, including wales captain alun wynjones, but the man who led the last two lions tours believes the england man is the best choice.
3:35 pm
he is one of the players who will be guaranteed to test out. i was extremely impressed with him, warren will have seen that. given his age, a lot of the other candidates are older, it will be a question of whether it will be a little bit too much pressure to give to him. i go back and forth with him and alun wyn jones. i�*m sure allen will captain games on tours but i will go with itoje. britain�*s simon yates has extended his lead at the tour of the alps to 58 seconds, with one stage to go. the team bike exchange rider looks in good form as he prepares for the giro d�*italia next month. he led up the final climb in the leader�*s green jersey, and freewheeled across the finish line in third place behind pello bilbao of spain. bilbao moves up to second overall, nearly a minute behind yates. former world champion shaun murphy
3:36 pm
is ahead of mark davis in a tight second round match at the world snooker championship. murphy, who won the title in 2005, leads davis by eight frames to seven. first to 13 frames will progress to the next round. we can take you live to the crucible now, on the other table it�*s an all england match with ronnie 0�*sullivan up against anthony mcgill in the second round. 0�*sullivan is currently leading four frames to three. he was four frames two up. you can watch both games on the bbc website and app. that�*s all the sport for now. i�*ll have more for you in the next hour. now we are going to talk about coronavirus but particularly in relation to india. we have been
3:37 pm
reflecting on the situation in india at the moment with that dreadful rise in cases and hospitals really struggling. at 4am on friday, india is added to the travel red list of countries, meaning people who come to the uk from there will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. it comes as india has registered 315,000 new cases of coronavirus in the last 24 hour period. these travel restrictions which come in on friday mean a lot of people are perhaps trapped or trying to get back to the uk and are struggling to do so. let�*s talk to a mother and son caught in that situation. pritha is in kolkata, india, and her son. welcome. you are both
3:38 pm
studying. pritha, how long have you been in kolkata? what are you doing to try to come back? i kolkata? what are you doing to try to come back?— kolkata? what are you doing to try to come back? i was in london last november — to come back? i was in london last november and _ to come back? i was in london last november and then _ to come back? i was in london last november and then i _ to come back? i was in london last november and then i had - to come back? i was in london last november and then i had to i to come back? i was in london last november and then i had to rush i to come back? i was in london last. november and then i had to rush back because of the lockdown and all the news, i was very concerned. we have been here since november and ever since, we have been trying to get back but it�*s been really difficult and very complicated. back but it's been really difficult and very complicated.— back but it's been really difficult and very complicated. once you heard that this travel _ and very complicated. once you heard that this travel change _ and very complicated. once you heard that this travel change was _ and very complicated. once you heard that this travel change was coming i that this travel change was coming in early on friday morning, presumably you have been trying to get a flight? i know you want to come back for your studies. i am
3:39 pm
supposed _ come back for your studies. i am supposed to _ come back for your studies. i am supposed to submit _ come back for your studies. i am supposed to submit my - come back for your studies. i —n supposed to submit my thesis and hurry things up so i can meet my deadline. i was in a hurry to get back, so our tickets were for the 2nd of may but then this announcement came and then ever since we have been trying to get back as soon as possible. but we have been at the loss to get any flights which have good fares, first we can afford or a good connection. it has been impossible to find a flight and we don�*t know what will happen to the flight on the 2nd of may because we haven�*t heard from our airline whether that flight would be on schedule or not. you also have — would be on schedule or not. you also have exams _ would be on schedule or not. you also have exams to _ would be on schedule or not. you also have exams to get back for. would be on schedule or not. you | also have exams to get back for. i was due back on the 6th of may.
3:40 pm
right _ was due back on the 6th of may. right now— was due back on the 6th of may. right now i have been partnered up with many— right now i have been partnered up with many students in the uk but i am not _ with many students in the uk but i am not able to cope with the timings _ am not able to cope with the timings. it has not been possible for me _ timings. it has not been possible for me to — timings. it has not been possible for me to continue because of the situation — for me to continue because of the situation in — for me to continue because of the situation in india. i hope to take my e>
3:41 pm
to follow— and going to the time because i have to follow london times. it's quite a lot of— to follow london times. it's quite a lot of trouble for me, coordinating with them — lot of trouble for me, coordinating with them. , ' . lot of trouble for me, coordinating with them-— with them. very difficult for both of ou in with them. very difficult for both of you in terms _ with them. very difficult for both of you in terms of _ with them. very difficult for both of you in terms of your _ with them. very difficult for both of you in terms of your studies. i of you in terms of your studies. pritha, in terms of the situation where you are, we have been running reports here all week. we have seen desperate images from a lot of urban hospitals in particular that are really struggling. have your family been 0k? what have your experiences been 0k? what have your experiences been like? 50 been ok? what have your experiences been like? ., ., , . been like? so far we have been lucky that none of— been like? so far we have been lucky that none of the _ been like? so far we have been lucky that none of the people _ been like? so far we have been lucky that none of the people from - been like? so far we have been lucky that none of the people from my i that none of the people from my immediate family has been affected and thankfully, my parents and mother—in—law they have all been vaccinated with both doses. my husband got his first dose and we have been very strict, we haven�*t stepped out at all for the last three months. we have been working from home, my husband has been
3:42 pm
working from home, so we have managed to keep ourselves safe but there has been our extended family, friends and just today we heard news of a good friend who lost his son to do, young son, so that has been very disturbing. it�*s really disturbing to go through the news, go through television channels and go through social media posts. people are completely on their known and the completely on their known and the complete apathy of the political class is unbearable, appalling. i have no words. i am out of words when i describe the situation in my country and i feel so unlucky i was born here somehow.— country and i feel so unlucky i was born here somehow. goodness. well, it is horrible — born here somehow. goodness. well, it is horrible to _ born here somehow. goodness. well, it is horrible to see _ born here somehow. goodness. well, it is horrible to see you _ born here somehow. goodness. well, it is horrible to see you clearly - born here somehow. goodness. well, it is horrible to see you clearly so i it is horrible to see you clearly so upset and under these circumstances, it is very good overview to talk to us. i wish you all the best. i hope something does come through for you.
3:43 pm
we appreciate you talking to us. all the best to you and your family. we are glad that you yourselves are well. thank you much indeed. very upsetting stories from india and we are continuing our coverage of the situation there, with many grim milestones that have been met in india over the last few days in relation to the number of coronavirus cases that are consistently being recorded. now the time is 3:45 p:m.. the church of england has been told to include at least one candidate from a black or minority ethnic background whenever it shortlists for bishops or other senior roles. it�*s one of nearly 50 recommendations made by the archbishops�* anti—racism taskforce, which was set up last year. harry farley reports. the history of the church of england is tied up in the history of empire and colonialism.
3:44 pm
many black and ethnic minority people in the church feel that baggage. things began to be said to me in a one—to—one situation such as, "your english is not very good." "i don�*t like your preaching." justin welby himself has admitted the church has a race issue. there is no doubt when we look at our own church that we are still deeply institutionally racist. let�*s just be clear about that. it was said to the college of bishops a couple of years ago and it�*s true. but this report says the church has alarmingly moved backwards in some areas. nowjohn sentamu has retired, dr guli francis—dehqani is the only ethnic minority senior bishop. the report recommends that all shortlists for seniorjobs should include at least one ethnic minority candidate. decisive steps should be taken to tackle the legacy of the church�*s role in the slave trade. and there should be racialjustice
3:45 pm
officers in every diocese to oversee the report�*s implementation. i think there�*s a real appetite for change. i think people are wanting to stop this broken record and to start again. and that�*s what our christian hope is, isn�*t it? that is what we as christians believe. yes, there was good friday but there is easter. there is resurrection. there is hope. but the church has been apologising for racism for 30 years, with little change. some fear this report will be no different. in the bible it says you judge people by theirfruits, right? and what do they produce? and actually for over 100 years it hasn�*t produced any fruit when it comes to race relations. there are similar challenges for other faiths. the board of deputies published its report today
3:46 pm
on the experiences of black and minorityjews. it makes 119 recommendations and the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis says the exclusion of anyone because of the colour of their skin was a collective failure for which we all must take responsibility. harry farley, bbc news. augustine tanner—ihm, as you saw in harry farley�*s piece there, is a trainee priest and joins me now. good afternoon. good afternoon. i know people _ good afternoon. good afternoon. i know people might _ good afternoon. good afternoon. i know people might know - good afternoon. good afternoon. i know people might know you i good afternoon. good afternoon. i i know people might know you because you have been vocal about some tough times you�*ve had in the past, trying to get accepted in certain parishes in some parts of the country. perhaps for those who don�*t know you, you could just explain the problems you have had which i remember you telling at the time. explain what has happened to you and the things you have been told. since
3:47 pm
20131 have been _ the things you have been told. since 2013i have been working _ the things you have been told. 5 “ice: 2013i have been working in the uk. i am originally from chicago and i had just finished my degree in durham university and applying forjobs to be a junior vicar and one particular job down south from durham was a white monochrome working—class parish where they didn�*t think i would be comfortable without actually speaking to me. i am actually speaking to me. i am actually from a white adopted family and a white working class community in america and all the places i have worked have been white working class. it has been really disheartening.— class. it has been really disheartening. class. it has been really disheartenin. ., . , , ., . disheartening. you applied for a role and that _ disheartening. you applied for a role and that is _ disheartening. you applied for a role and that is what _ disheartening. you applied for a role and that is what you - disheartening. you applied for a role and that is what you were i disheartening. you applied for a i role and that is what you were told. it was couched in terms that they were concerned that you would feel comfortable. were concerned that you would feel comfortable-— were concerned that you would feel comfortable. yes. have you ever... not that it — comfortable. yes. have you ever... not that it should _ comfortable. iezs have you ever... not that it should be your comfortable. i2; have you ever... not that it should be yourjob to do the pushing back, but i'm interested whether you pushed back and said, i feel i have a lot to offer, this is
3:48 pm
what i want to do. i don't mean the onus should be on you but i wonder what went through your head. i was shocked this _ what went through your head. i was shocked this was _ what went through your head. i was shocked this was on _ what went through your head. i was shocked this was on paper- what went through your head. i —" shocked this was on paper because as you know, ithought shocked this was on paper because as you know, i thought human rights legislation you wouldn't be allowed to say that but the church of england is not always, is not accounted for everything on the human rights legislation which many want to change. but it was really quite damaging. i think my college didn't really help me through that. they were just like, you didn't really help me through that. they werejust like, you need didn't really help me through that. they were just like, you need to get over it. the institution, the diocese and the bishop basically said, we are sorry you felt that way. said, we are sorry you felt that wa . , ., ., , , said, we are sorry you felt that wa . , , , ~ said, we are sorry you felt that wa. , ,,~ way. oh, my goodness. are you working happily _ way. oh, my goodness. are you working happily somewhere - way. oh, my goodness. are you i working happily somewhere now? way. oh, my goodness. are you - working happily somewhere now? it's working happily somewhere now? it�*s been really hard. it's been a hard
3:49 pm
year being in the pandemic. after july, you usually go and be a junior vicar somewhere and i couldn't find a job. vicar somewhere and i couldn't find ajob. i vicar somewhere and i couldn't find a job. i was couch surfing for the last year and now i have just moved to beautiful manchester which i love. hopefully starting a role here soon but it has been months and months ofjust soon but it has been months and months of just trying soon but it has been months and months ofjust trying to do something and it's been really difficult. {lif something and it's been really difficult. _, , something and it's been really difficult. , ~ something and it's been really difficult. , . . difficult. of course. when you hear this recommendation _ difficult. of course. when you hear this recommendation today, - difficult. of course. when you hear this recommendation today, one . difficult. of course. when you hear| this recommendation today, one of many, but the notion that when shortlists are being drawn up for jobs within the church, there must be at least one candidate who is not white, that is what the recommendation is saying, does that help? i'm curious what your response to that proposal is.— to that proposal is. those are senior posts _ to that proposal is. those are senior posts which _ to that proposal is. those are senior posts which i - to that proposal is. those are senior posts which i am - to that proposal is. those are - senior posts which i am definitely nowhere close to that right now, but it is somewhat of a good thing but it is somewhat of a good thing but it needs to be a culture change. it
3:50 pm
doesn't make sense if you have a union flag in a cassock. he needs to be a culture change, a place where people are psychologically safe to be themselves. the church of england has talked about race a lot. in 1909 when the church of england was in india, there was a person who said, you can't be indian, you have to become a white man to become a minister as a christian. then in 1983, bishop gray and king wrote a report about the plight of racism within england and within britain in the church and outside the church. in 2020, nothing happened with me, the church of england said, sorry, and i was left without a house and and i was left without a house and an income, anything.— an income, anything. from your persoective. _ an income, anything. from your persoective. is _ an income, anything. from your perspective, is the _ an income, anything. from your perspective, is the problem... l an income, anything. from your i perspective, is the problem... the problem doesn't seem to be coming from parishioners, it's the
3:51 pm
gatekeepers to getting a job in the first place. gatekeepers to getting a “ob in the first lace. , �*, ., first place. yes. it's not christianity, _ first place. yes. it's not christianity, it's - first place. yes. it's not| christianity, it's actually first place. yes. it's not - christianity, it's actually the people in authority very much. my issueis people in authority very much. my issue is the prophetic rage that comes from the hebrew scriptures and it's really sad. mi; comes from the hebrew scriptures and it's really sad-— it's really sad. my goodness. august ian, i it's really sad. my goodness. august ian. i could — it's really sad. my goodness. august ian, i could talk _ it's really sad. my goodness. august ian, i could talk to _ it's really sad. my goodness. august ian, i could talk to you _ it's really sad. my goodness. august ian, i could talk to you for _ it's really sad. my goodness. august ian, i could talk to you for so - it's really sad. my goodness. august ian, i could talk to you for so much i ian, i could talk to you for so much longer. i really appreciate you coming on. thank you. i hope things really work out for you in manchester. good to talk to you. let's talk about driving tests. driving tests resumed today in england and wales after being parked in december because of the pandemic. and a backlog built up during lockdown — of around 450,000 cancelled tests . here's our transport correspondent caroline davies.
3:52 pm
sometimes, it takes a few attempts before things line up. but learner drivers have rarely had to wait this long to get a test. i've had my test cancelled i think eight times by this point, but i've kind of lost count. i live quite literally in the middle of nowhere with the nearest bus station being about a mile or two away. it's almost impossible to get around or go anywhere without asking someone else to give me a lift. the last car driving tests for non—key workers was before christmas. the delay has had an impact on instructors too, many of whom haven't been able to work. you've still got overheads to cover for the cars, you've got to pay for the cars and the insurances and all that sort of stuff. and also, it's been very frustrating for a lot of the pupils that you teach. effectively, it's three and a half, four months since they've last been in a car. and to have that break when you're a fairly inexperienced driver is quite difficult for a lot of them. but the wait is almost over.
3:53 pm
there are currently over 400,000 people waiting for a car test in britain. more examiners are now working weekends, extra people have been recruited, and some have been brought back out of retirement. even the boss is now taking some of the tests. waiting time varies around the country, because it depends on how many other people are in the queue, and how many examiners we've got in any given location. so it can vary quite a bit. i think the key thing there is that we will add more test appointments each week as time moves on. no one knows how long it will take to clear the backlog, so l plates may need to stay on far longer than many would like. caroline davies, bbc news. the brit awards are to go ahead with a live audience of 4,000 people. the music awards next month will be the first major indoor test event in the governments programme looking into how large scale events can welcome back crowds. people won't have to socially
3:54 pm
distance, but will have to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson explains how it will all work. # i was getting kind of used to being someone you loved # but now the day bleeds # lewis capaldi at last year's brit awards at london's 02 arena. when the 2021 event happens next month at the same venue, an audience of 4,000 people will be allowed in to watch performances from triple brit nominees dua lipa... # all—night i will riot with you... and arlo parks. she is delighted at getting the chance to perform in front of a live crowd. every musician has been in the same boat and when we do get out there and play at events such as these, it will be even more monumentally special. 2,500 tickets will be given to front line key workers from the greater london area.
3:55 pm
a ballot for these opened at midday. those in attendance will not tab to socially distance or even wear a mask once in the venue, and alcohol and food will be sold. everyone will have to prove they've had a negative lateral flow test to be allowed in and take a test afterwards. it's seen as another important step towards audiences returning to events. when you come out to music, that is about being a social human being. you're getting close to people. the dancing, the sweating, they're going on people pot shoulders, that's part of life, that's part of the fun of being a human being. but not everyone feels that enough is being done to ensure grassroots music venues will be able to open on the 21st, according to the government road map. we are very happy that the brits are taking place, it's a key event in the calendar for artists, but the issue is for us at the grass roots music venue level, there isn't a great deal that we might learn from that event that will enable us to open small venues. as for the brits, this will be
3:56 pm
the first live music performed at the 02 for more than a year. the ceremony is always a showcase for british music. this year it has a whole added level of importance. colin paterson, bbc news. more coming up at four o'clock. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. another frosty start this morning and there are going to be risks of further frosty nights coming up. it stays chilly at night but in the short term getting warmer by day. spectacular views from our weather watchers today because that chilly start came with clear skies. look at this on the satellite picture, barely a cloud in the sky, plenty of sunshine as we have an area of sunshine as we have an area of sunshine right across us and that is responsible for the settled and
3:57 pm
continued dry weather into the weekend. there may be a little high cloud here and they are turning things just a touch hazy. we are seeing an area of cloud pushing on across northern areas of scotland, there may be a shower in shetland but most of the winds are light. windy across the far south—west, these are gusty easterly winds but as for temperatures, warmth in that strong april sunshine. 16, 17 degrees today. pollen levels moderate to high so hay fever sufferers at the moment, it's a tough time, it's tree pollen out there at the moment. tonight are some areas of cloud across northern scotland, breezy in the far south—west and through the channel. both areas here avoiding the frost but for many, although not quite as cold as last night, another frost on the way. and a lively media shower at the moment. 0ne lucky viewer got at the moment. 0ne lucky viewer got a view. something to be seen under
3:58 pm
clear skies tonight if you look close enough. tomorrow a chilly start but again, plenty of sunshine to come during the day. a little bit hazy in places but one thing that sunshine. away from where the wind is blowing into the coast. warm air tomorrow, so 19, maybe even 20 celsius tomorrow. if you're planning to go alfresco on friday, it continues to be fine until sunset. high pressurejust continues to be fine until sunset. high pressure just nosing further to the north over the weekend and that will bring in a stronger easterly wind across eastern and southern parts. he continues to be dry. a steady increase in cloud particularly in the east and it is in the east we will notice temperatures coming down, particularly right along the coast.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders and pledges to cut america's carbon emissions by at least half. we're here at the summit to discuss how each of us, each country can set higher climate ambitions that will in turn create good paying jobs, advance innovative technologies, and help vulnerable countries adapt to climate impacts. china's president xijinping reiterates his promise to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060 and says he looks forward to working with the international community, including america. the government has apologised
4:01 pm
for the failure to properly commemorate black and asian soldiers who died fighting for britain. india's coronavirus cases hit record levels — and as the countryjoins the uk's red list in less than 2a hours, british travellers try desperately to get home. it's been a really complicated situation to manoeuvre, actually. 4,000 fans and no social distancing — the brit awards will be the first major indoor music event to trial the return of audiences. good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. president biden has pledged that the us will aim to at least halve its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, compared with 2005 levels.
4:02 pm
the president is hosting 42 global leaders at a two—day virtual summit aimed at tackling climate change — his adminstration is hoping that other big polluters will follow its lead. 0ur chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt reports. is this the moment the world comes together and begins to take climate change seriously? that's certainly whatjoe biden is hoping as he welcomes world leaders to his virtual summit. since his inauguration, president biden's climate envoy john kerry has been elbow bumping his way around the world in an effort to raise global ambition on the issue. the united states and china will work together to address the climate crisis. i think this is the first time china hasjoined in saying it's a crisis. the us president kick—started the talks today with ambitious new targets for cutting carbon. he said the us will cut emissions in half by the end of this decade as part of its efforts to reach net zero by 2050.
4:03 pm
that means cutting emissions as much as possible and capturing those that can't be prevented by planting trees or through engineering solutions. the fact the chinese leader xi jinping will be attending is very significant. china and the us don't agree on much at the moment, but have said they will work together on the climate issue. the uk, which also upped ambition on carbon cuts this week, says the world is moving on climate. when we were announced as the cop 26 president, less than 30% of the world economy was covered by a net zero target. we're now at 70%, so we have seen some progress. but what we need to do is to get more progress in terms of near—term emission reduction targets to 2030. but, as greta thunberg says, ambitious targets need to be backed up with policies that will actually lead to significant emissions reductions. of course it's a step in the right direction,
4:04 pm
but if only it was that simple, that we could just invest and put money in things and that would solve the problem. of course that will be required as well but it will take so much more than that. we need to be realistic and see the whole picture. today's meeting is designed to get the world on the right track in the run—up to the big un climate conference the uk is due to host in glasgow in november. the hope is that by getting leaders talking now we're more likely to get really bold commitments from them in november. justin rowlatt, bbc news. president biden told the summit about the industrial innovations he saw as key to the united states meeting its targets. i'd like to build, i want to build a critical infrastructure to produce and deploy clean technology. both those we can harness today and those that we'll invent tomorrow. i talked to the experts and i see the potentialfor a more prosperous and equitable future. the signs are unmistakable.
4:05 pm
the science is undeniable. and the cost of inaction keeps mounting. the united states isn't waiting. we are resolving to take action. not only our federal government but our cities and our states all across our country. small businesses, large businesses, large corporations. american workers in every field. i see an opportunity to create millions of good paying, middle class, union jobs. i see line workers laying thousands of miles of transition lines for a clean, modern, resilient grid. i see workers capping hundreds of thousands of abandoned oil and gas wells that need to be cleaned up and abandoned coal mines that need to be reclaimed, putting a stop to the methane leaks and protecting the health of our communities. i see auto workers building the next generation of electric vehicles
4:06 pm
and electricians installing nationwide for 500,000 charging stations along our highways. i see the engineers and the construction workers building new carbon capture and green hydrogen plants to forge cleaner steel and cement, and produce clean power. i see farmers deploying cutting—edge tools to make soil of our heartland the next frontier in carbon innovation. by maintaining those investments and putting these people to work, the united states sets out on the road to cut our greenhouse gases in half by the end of this decade. borisjohnson welcomed president biden's commitment to cutting emissions, saying that the uk wants to work internationally to tackle climate change. i'm really thrilled by the game changing announcement thatjoe biden hasjust made and i'm very proud
4:07 pm
that the uk is doing the same. we were the first country to pass legislation for net zero. we have the biggest offshore wind capacity still, i think of any country in the world. the saudi arabia of wind as i never tire of saying. we are halfway to net zero. we have carbon emissions lower than at any point since the 19th century. we are ending support for fossil fuels overseas and doubling our international climate finance. and we are actually speeding up because we see the obligation as colleagues have just pointed out for developed countries to do more. we are legislating to deliver 78% of the reductions needed to reach that goal by 2035 and as host of cop26, we _ want to see similar
4:08 pm
ambitions around the world. and we are working with everybody from the smallest nations to the biggest emitters to secure commitments that will keep change to within1.5 degrees. i think we can do it. to do it we need the scientists and all of our countries to work together to produce the technological solutions that humanity is going to need. whether it's carbon capture and storage or solving the problems of cheap hydrogen delivery or getting to jet zero flying, net zero flying, to make sure we can roll out evs properly. making sure that our homes stopped emitting such prodigious quantities of c02, moving to sustainable domestic living. we can do this together across the world and it's going to mean the richest nations coming together and exceeding the
4:09 pm
$100 billion commitment that they already made in 2009. i stress how important that is. china's president xi urged respect for nature, and said the environment must be protected to support sustainable development. translation: we must be committed to green development. _ green mountains are gold mountains. to protect the environment is to protect productivity, and to improve the environment is to boost productivity. the truth is as simple as that. we need to make sure that a sound environment is there to buttress sustainable economic and social development worldwide. with me now is the 17—year—old climate justice activist, izzy warren. good to see you. i hope maybe you caught there the words of president xi, prime ministerjohnson, president by then, he says he wants
4:10 pm
to do what he can. [30 president by then, he says he wants to do what he can.— to do what he can. do you believe him? i to do what he can. do you believe him? i think— to do what he can. do you believe him? i think we _ to do what he can. do you believe him? i think we have _ to do what he can. do you believe him? i think we have heard - to do what he can. do you believe him? i think we have heard a - to do what he can. do you believe him? i think we have heard a lot i to do what he can. do you believe l him? i think we have heard a lot of world _ him? i think we have heard a lot of world leaders saying they want to do what they— world leaders saying they want to do what they can, and can is a very important — what they can, and can is a very important there. what we are talking about _ important there. what we are talking about now _ important there. what we are talking about now is an existential threat to humanity. this is no longer about what _ to humanity. this is no longer about what we _ to humanity. this is no longer about what we can— to humanity. this is no longer about what we can do, this is about what we have _ what we can do, this is about what we have to — what we can do, this is about what we have to do. hearing world leaders. _ we have to do. hearing world leaders, particularly hearing from joe biden— leaders, particularly hearing from joe biden and borisjohnson, saying we are _ joe biden and borisjohnson, saying we are going to do what we can do, we are going to do what we can do, we want _ we are going to do what we can do, we want to— we are going to do what we can do, we want to do them what they can do,~~~ _ we want to do them what they can do,... �* , ., we want to do them what they can do,...�* ,, ., we want to do them what they can do,...�* ., . do,... are you worried that there has been — do,... are you worried that there has been a _ do,... are you worried that there has been a lot _ do,... are you worried that there has been a lot of— do,... are you worried that there has been a lot of fine _ do,... are you worried that there has been a lot of fine words - do,... are you worried that there has been a lot of fine words but i do,... are you worried that there i has been a lot of fine words but not a lot of practical suggestions coming from world leaders as to how they are going to go about doing this? for instance, cutting fossil fuel production, which is a huge part of the economies of so many across the world. getting ordinary people to get rid of their cars, getting ordinary people to get rid
4:11 pm
of gas—fired boilers and so on. to think there is enough of reality check? ~ , ,., , ., think there is enough of reality check? ~ , ., a think there is enough of reality check? , ., . check? absolutely not. as you have said, check? absolutely not. as you have said. there — check? absolutely not. as you have said, there are _ check? absolutely not. as you have said, there are a _ check? absolutely not. as you have said, there are a lot _ check? absolutely not. as you have said, there are a lot of _ check? absolutely not. as you have said, there are a lot of words, - check? absolutely not. as you have said, there are a lot of words, and i said, there are a lot of words, and words _ said, there are a lot of words, and words are — said, there are a lot of words, and words are all— said, there are a lot of words, and words are all we have been getting for the _ words are all we have been getting for the past few years. words are great _ for the past few years. words are great but — for the past few years. words are great but only if they are backed up by action _ great but only if they are backed up by action. another set of climate targets, — by action. another set of climate targets, another set of climate promises _ targets, another set of climate promises. if history goes to show anything. but we need to be doing is making sure that there policies, those _ making sure that there policies, those announcements. climate activists — those announcements. climate activists are not asking for another set of— activists are not asking for another set of promises and deadlines, what we are _ set of promises and deadlines, what we are asking for its real action. let's _ we are asking for its real action. let's be — we are asking for its real action. let's be positive for a second. at the end of the day, the chinese and the end of the day, the chinese and the americans, they don't really agree on a lot. 0ne the americans, they don't really agree on a lot. one thing they do seem to agree on is tackling climate change. president xi, we understand
4:12 pm
it is the first time that he has referred to the situation with climate change as a crisis, and he is part of this summit. how important is it that those two countries, the two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases, how important is it that they cooperate? i of greenhouse gases, how important is it that they cooperate?— is it that they cooperate? i think it is extremely _ is it that they cooperate? i think it is extremely important. - is it that they cooperate? i think it is extremely important. we i is it that they cooperate? i think i it is extremely important. we need label— it is extremely important. we need label collaboration to fight this. as we _ label collaboration to fight this. as we have seen with the coronavirus pandemic, _ as we have seen with the coronavirus pandemic, a — as we have seen with the coronavirus pandemic, a global crisis cannot be dealt _ pandemic, a global crisis cannot be dealt with— pandemic, a global crisis cannot be dealt with without cooperation with countries _ dealt with without cooperation with countries and governments. i think it's incredibly optimistic that there — it's incredibly optimistic that there are these summits happening and world _ there are these summits happening and world leaders are treating it as and world leaders are treating it as a crisis _ and world leaders are treating it as a crisis i_ and world leaders are treating it as a crisis. i think it is testament to the work— a crisis. i think it is testament to the work that so many climate activists — the work that so many climate activists i've been doing over the past few— activists i've been doing over the past few years, really bringing this back into _ past few years, really bringing this back into public focus. making it so that they _ back into public focus. making it so that they have to treat it as a crisis. — that they have to treat it as a crisis, they have to treat it as an emergency, _ crisis, they have to treat it as an emergency, and they have to be having _ emergency, and they have to be having these conversations. president biden said that he wants to lead on this stop he has put
4:13 pm
america at the forefront of this. how much time do you think has been lost in the battle against climate change because of, in the words of sam, the laggards like scott morrison of australia and of course former president trump. i morrison of australia and of course former president trump.— former president trump. i think there is a _ former president trump. i think there is a lot _ former president trump. i think there is a lot of _ former president trump. i think there is a lot of time _ former president trump. i think there is a lot of time that - former president trump. i think there is a lot of time that has i former president trump. i think i there is a lot of time that has been lost _ there is a lot of time that has been lost i_ there is a lot of time that has been lost ithink— there is a lot of time that has been lost. i think having world leaders that refuse to acknowledge a scientific reality is incredibly horrible, _ scientific reality is incredibly horrible, particularly when this is a crisis _ horrible, particularly when this is a crisis that— horrible, particularly when this is a crisis that needs global cooperation. forthem a crisis that needs global cooperation. for them to be going on the news, _ cooperation. for them to be going on the news, for— cooperation. for them to be going on the news, for them to be saying in press _ the news, for them to be saying in press conferences that this is not reali _ press conferences that this is not real, this — press conferences that this is not real, this is — press conferences that this is not real, this is a hoax, this isjust the anarchists trying to destroy the economy, — the anarchists trying to destroy the economy, that is incredibly dangerous. that misinformation is incredibly— dangerous. that misinformation is incredibly harmful. i don't think it has set _ incredibly harmful. i don't think it has set us — incredibly harmful. i don't think it has set us back as much as some people _ has set us back as much as some people would like to say, but i think— people would like to say, but i think it — people would like to say, but i think it has set us back. it sets us back— think it has set us back. it sets us
4:14 pm
back in— think it has set us back. it sets us back in trying to convince the public— back in trying to convince the public that climate action is in their— public that climate action is in their best _ public that climate action is in their best interests, that it will make _ their best interests, that it will make the — their best interests, that it will make the world a better place for them _ make the world a better place for them. ~ . ., ,, make the world a better place for them. ~ . ., i. make the world a better place for them. ~ . ., ., them. what do you say to those workin: them. what do you say to those working in _ them. what do you say to those working in west _ them. what do you say to those working in west virginia, - them. what do you say to those working in west virginia, parts i them. what do you say to those i working in west virginia, parts of poland, parts of china, whose livelihoods depend on fossil fuel extraction? what do you say to them about how they are going to survive these changes? irate about how they are going to survive these changes?— about how they are going to survive these changes? we are not trying to take away your _ these changes? we are not trying to take away yourjobs, _ these changes? we are not trying to take away yourjobs, we _ these changes? we are not trying to take away yourjobs, we are - these changes? we are not trying to take away yourjobs, we are not - take away yourjobs, we are not trying _ take away yourjobs, we are not trying to— take away yourjobs, we are not trying to take away your livelihood. at the _ trying to take away your livelihood. at the root — trying to take away your livelihood. at the root of climate justice, there — at the root of climate justice, there needs to be socialjustice, there _ there needs to be socialjustice, there needs to be socialjustice, there needs to be people focused. we need to— there needs to be people focused. we need to be _ there needs to be people focused. we need to be prioritising creating green — need to be prioritising creating greenjobs, and that is what being missed _ greenjobs, and that is what being missed out— greenjobs, and that is what being missed out of these conversations. it is missed out of these conversations. it is not _ missed out of these conversations. it is not a _ missed out of these conversations. it is not a sacrifice we have to makei — it is not a sacrifice we have to make. it _ it is not a sacrifice we have to make, it can have huge benefits for society _ make, it can have huge benefits for society. particularly if we go down the route — society. particularly if we go down the route of creating a new green deal~ _ the route of creating a new green deal~ it _ the route of creating a new green deal~ it will— the route of creating a new green deal. it will improve our economy, it will— deal. it will improve our economy,
4:15 pm
it will improve people's jobs, deal. it will improve our economy, it will improve people'sjobs, make sure that _ it will improve people'sjobs, make sure that everyone has access to a safe _ sure that everyone has access to a safe, secure — sure that everyone has access to a safe, secure greenjob. all of this is not _ safe, secure greenjob. all of this is not about— safe, secure greenjob. all of this is not about making society worse off, it _ is not about making society worse off, it is _ is not about making society worse off, it is about making society better— off, it is about making society better for— off, it is about making society better for all of us. it�*s off, it is about making society better for all of us.— off, it is about making society better for all of us. it's good to talk to you- _ better for all of us. it's good to talk to you. thank _ better for all of us. it's good to talk to you. thank you - better for all of us. it's good to talk to you. thank you for - better for all of us. it's good to i talk to you. thank you forjoining us. the government has made a formal apology for the failure properly to commemorate the deaths of tens of thousands of black and asian troops who fought for the british empire during the first world war. the commonwealth war graves commission found that more than 115,000 casualties weren't given headstones, because of "pervasive racism". paul adams reports. at cemeteries and plots around the world, their sacrifice is commemorated with dignity and attention. names inscribed so that we may remember. but not all names. tens of thousands of black and asian soldiers fought and died for britain, but when it came to marking their sacrifice
4:16 pm
it was done differently, or collectively, or not at all. it was, says the government, a terrible mistake. mr speaker, on behalf of the commonwealth war graves commission and the government both of the time and today, i want to apologise for the failures to live up to their founding principles all those years ago and express deep regret that it's taken so long to rectify the situation. more than a year after setting up a special committee, the organisation responsible for maintaining war graves has issued a formal apology. it's found that entrenched prejudices and the pervasive racism of imperial attitudes were to blame. the committee's report found that at least 116,000, and perhaps as many as 350,000 of those who died serving the forces of the then british empire, remain un—commemorated. the vast majority of african, indian or egyptian origin.
4:17 pm
the commonwealth war graves commission says it's taking action to correct the wrongs of the past. this research report is welcome. it's sober, very, very disappointing reading, but actually it gives us the ability now, now we know the numbers and the areas to look, we can start the searches properly and we can pick up on the failings of the past and ensure that we act today to put those right. the commission says it will implement all ten of the committee's detailed recommendations. it will search for more names, adopt third—party memorials, and build new commemorative structures in collaboration with communities involved. the mp david lammy presented the channel a documentary that triggered the commission's report. it's right and proper that the commonwealth war graves commission and the ministry of defence consult appropriately in situ in those countries and ask those countries and those
4:18 pm
communities what they would like to see properly commemorate their war dead. at the chattri memorial in sussex, the names of fallen indian soldiers are recorded. these men were not forgotten. the commission says it's determined to fulfil its original promise, to commemorate equally all those who died in both world wars. paul adams, bbc news. we have got the latest coronavirus figures. they show that another 18 people have died within 28 days of testing for covid—19, that is within the last 24—hour period. we are also getting the numbers of 2729 new infections confirmed across the uk infections confirmed across the uk in the latest 24—hour period. 18 further deaths in the past 2a hours. and the number of new infections,
4:19 pm
2729. the most senior official at the treasury, sir tom scholar, has told mps that he received multiple texts and a phone call from former prime minister david cameron about the company greensill capital, as the row about lobbying — and who gets access to those in power — continues. the permanent secretary to the treasury told the public accounts committee mr cameron had spoken to him on the phone and sent him text messages to draw his attention to proposals by greensill to access government backed emergency loans at the start of the pandemic last spring. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo gave this update from westminster. it's the first time we've heard from the most senior civil servant at the treasury about his own contact and the department's contact with david cameron, who was working as an adviser for greensill capital. as you say, it was connected to greensill's effort to get onto government support programmes designed to help companies
4:20 pm
with cash flow problems during the coronavirus pandemic, and we heard from two very senior civil servants at the treasury today at the public accounts committee hearing, which isjust the first of a series of hearings that are going to happen in the coming weeks in parliament about greensill, about the activities of david cameron, the former prime minister, and about lobbying and influence more widely in westminster. but we heard from these officials today about the kinds of contact they had, repeated approaches from the company. "persistent," was how sir tom scholar describes the approach by greensill capital to try to get on board these government support schemes. in the event, they were not granted access to the support scheme, they were not deemed to be eligible, despite urging the treasury to change the eligibility criteria. but sir tom scholar, who is the most senior official in the treasury, had this exchange with meg hillier, the chair of the public accounts committee, about his conversations with david cameron.
4:21 pm
i can certainly say that mr cameron spoke to me on the telephone at around about the same time and sent me some text messages around about the same time, this is end of march, beginning of april, 2020. as far as i know from the records i've seen to date, i had no further contact after that phone call on the 7th of april. so that was that one conference i call, but you had had conversations with mr cameron as a representative of greensill on the phone _ and by text before that point? just to be clear. yes, at that point the conversation was drawing to our attention the proposal that greensill had made and asking us to look at it, which we were doing. so this is a direct contact between the former prime minister, david cameron, working on behalf of greensill capital and the most senior official at the treasury about access to this loan scheme.
4:22 pm
sir tom scholar said that the reason he engaged with david cameron is because the two used to work together, but he defended the department's approach. he said everything was handled, the dealings with the company were handled entirely appropriately, and it was actually department's responsibility to filter out different lobbying attempts. so a defence of the actions of treasury officials there. it is worth noting that, actually, the bank of england has also just put out a statement detailing repeated approaches that david cameron made on behalf of greensill capital to the bank, too, in regards to this loans scheme. but again, both the treasury and the bank of england are stressing today that nothing was changed in response to the greensill lobbying attempts. india has registered around 315,000 new cases of coronavirus in the past 2a hours. ?the state
4:23 pm
of maharashtra accounts for about a fifth of all cases. as the second wave batters india, hospitals are running out of oxygen.?the bbc�*s mayuresh konnur reports?from mumbai. the state of maharashtra is recording the highest number of coronavirus cases in india. hospitals are running out of oxygen and some are telling patients to source their own supply. this bbcjournalist went to this with his father. translation: when the hospital ran out of oxygen, i brought two - cylinders from a nearby government covid centre. i tried to get to cylinders from the local municipality. we saw a van carrying oxygen cylinders on the road. we asked him to give us some. thankfully, the driver of the van agreed. hospitals also move patients after oxygen supplies run out. but such is the demand, some hospitals are refusing to admit new patients.
4:24 pm
this doctor is caring for 27 covid patients. translation: last week was horrible. many patients need more oxygen support because of the new mutated strain of the virus. even a 20—year—old needs support. such a demand was not expected. the government is stunned. i know four orfive patients who died because oxygen was not available. the situation at oxygen refilling plants is also critical. this plant in central maharashtra is working around the clock. yet they are not able to meet the demand. translation: in normaltimes, we supply 100 to 150 cylinders i every day and the same for industrial purposes.
4:25 pm
we work six to seven hours, but now industrial sales are banned and the government is asking us to produce 700 cylinders every day for hospitals. that is a huge task. maharashtra is sourcing supplies from across india and has called on the indian air force to help but the state government can only do so much. as the other states to clear oxygen emergencies, maharashtra is far from alone. due to the high number of cases in india, from 4am tomorrow it will be added to the uk's travel "red list" — meaning people who come to the uk from there will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. let's speak now to vick busa and his wife isha —
4:26 pm
they're currently in ghaziabad near uttar pradesh in northern india, where they flew with their two—year—old last month. they've been trying to come back home. thank you forjoining us. tell us what the last few weeks have been like for you? the what the last few weeks have been like for you?— what the last few weeks have been i like for you?— like for you? the last couple of weeks i like for you? the last couple of weeks i have — like for you? the last couple of weeks i have been _ like for you? the last couple of weeks i have been constantly l like for you? the last couple of. weeks i have been constantly on like for you? the last couple of - weeks i have been constantly on the news, when is india going to go on the red list? and the day the announcement happened it was a bit of a panic. people like me who want to go back home tried calling the airlines to see if they could accommodate us before 4am on friday. unfortunately, there were no flights and most of them were sold out anyway. the government has restricted the number of flights that can fly from india. and that can fly from india. and obviously — that can fly from india. and obviously your _ that can fly from india. and obviously your life - that can fly from india. and obviously your life is -
4:27 pm
that can fly from india. and obviously your life is in - that can fly from india. and obviously your life is in the uk, is there anything particularly depressing that you need to get back for? it’s depressing that you need to get back for? �* , ., ., depressing that you need to get back for? v ., ., ah, depressing that you need to get back for?_ ah. 0k. - depressing that you need to get back for?_ ah. 0k. we - depressing that you need to get back for?_ ah, ok, we have| for? it's our home. ah, ok, we have lost the line — for? it's our home. ah, ok, we have lost the line there. _ for? it's our home. ah, ok, we have lost the line there. we _ for? it's our home. ah, ok, we have lost the line there. we were - for? it's our home. ah, ok, we have lost the line there. we were getting | lost the line there. we were getting clearly distraught and very worried parents there, who had their two—year—old, they went over to india and then the rules changed with the rise in infections there, and as a result when they do eventually get back here they will have to quarantine. but getting out of india at the moment is proving a very difficult indeed. if we get the line back, we will try to rejoin them. the united states government has formally advised its citizens not to travel to the uk because of the coronavirus pandemic. until today, the state department was advising us citizens to "reconsider travel" across the atlantic.
4:28 pm
but now the uk has the highest level of risk, level 4, and the guidance is "do not travel". 80% of countries worldwide are now similarly categorised by the united states authorities. the state department says the change doesn't imply a reassessment of the stiuation in the uk — but is simply bringing travel guidance in line with health protection agency advice. new figures reveal coronavirus was no longer the leading cause of death in either england or wales last month. the office for national statistics data shows that covid—19 was the third leading cause of death in both countries in march, accounting for 9.2% of all deaths registered in england and 6.3% in wales. he's the world class footballer who changed the government's mind about the importance of school meals. now marcus rashford wants to help families with cheap and simple recipe ideas. he's teamed up with the chef tom kerridge — and he's been speaking to sally nugent i remember coming to your house a year ago and asking for a cup of tea. and i can remember you looking
4:29 pm
around for all the bits and pieces to make the cup of tea. would you say that maybe the kitchen has not always been your favourite place? it's not that it's not my favourite place, it's just that it's not my most familiar environment. for me, it has just been a journey. and also i suppose a lot of it is about gaining confidence in the kitchen, and then gaining life skills. yeah, exactly, that is the end goal. the end goal is for, i don't know, maybe for an 11—year—old kid, if he moves out of his parents�* home when he is 18 years old, 19 years old, he can know how to cook for himself and eat the right meals. he knows affordable meals and it will be one less thing he has
4:30 pm
to stress about because he has been doing it for five or six years already. i always go back to my experiences. if i could literally go back as a kid, this is the thing that i would learn to do, as well as do what i was doing with my football and stuff. when i went home, i would have loved to have been able to sit down and just learn to cook. so, you have been cooking with tom kerridge, what are your favourite recipes so far? what have you learnt? my favourite recipes to cook where hashbrowns. and the stir—fry one? the chicken stir—fry? yes. i always thought with stir—frys, because it looks like there is so much going on, it is just going to be a nightmare to try and cook, but it was actually really fun. and how did it taste? it tasted all right. marcus is very much of this kind of wanting to learn life skills and new things to put together for him personally, but then we can share that so that it helps so many children learn a life skill which is cooking.
4:31 pm
you're going to start putting these recipes out online, aren't you? but also in supermarkets, why was that important to you? a lot of the people we are trying to reach, they do not have access to things like social media and stuff like that, so the smartest way to do it was to make sure they are in local supermarkets that people go to every day. we just wanted to make sure we are hitting as many people and the right people as possible. sally nugent reporting. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. plenty of sunshine out there today. tomorrow just a slow increase in cloud from the east over the weekend. it's not clear blue sky everywhere. there is a bit of high cloud here and there, so a little bit hazy. there is an area of cloud just running across the north of scotland, may produce a shower in shetland. there is warmth though in that strong april sunshine after the chilly start. there is a brisk easterly wind through the english channel, channel islands, far south—west of england, so you will notice that if you are on a coast exposed to that. it is cooler than elsewhere but it will hold off a frost tonight, whereas elsewhere there will be
4:32 pm
another frost settling in for many of us. not quite as cold as last night but still another chilly start in the morning. and just a repeat tomorrow. still the brisk wind across southern most areas into the south—west. still some cloud in northern scotland, more patchy cloud elsewhere in scotland. somehow high cloud turning the sun hazy. the winds for the most part are light but brisk in the south and south—west, and tomorrow is looking warmer, some may even get up to 20. hello, this is bbc news with clive myrie. the headlines... president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders and pledges to cut america's carbon emissions by at least half. china's president xijinping reiterates his promise to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060 and says he looks forward to working with the international community, including the united states. the government has apologised for the failure to properly
4:33 pm
commemorate black and asian soldiers who died fighting for britain. india's coronavirus cases hit record levels, and as the countryjoins the uk's red list in less than 2a hours, british travellers try desperately to get home. 4,000 fans and no social distancing. the brit awards will be the first major indoor music event to trial the return of audiences. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane. good afternoon. many of the premier league managers have been giving their news conferences today, and they haven't held back on their opinion of the collapsed breakaway european super league. everton manager, carlo ancelotti called the failed bid a joke. six clubs in england and another six from italy and spain had been in secret talks to form a super league. well, the la liga president javier tebas has said the super league, "as it is, is dead."
4:34 pm
but he admitted he is not likely to punish barcelona or real madrid for their involvement in the failed project. ancelotti, who managed real madrid in spain for two years, said the clubs owners hadn't put the players or the fans first. what can i say? they were wrong. these 12 clubs were wrong. because i think they didn't take into consideration take into consideration the opinion of the two parts that were really important. one, the players and the managers, and the other parts are the supporters. they didn't take into consideration these opinions. manchester united manager 0le gunnar solskjaer had to persuade a group of protestors to leave united's training ground earlier today. the club confirmed a group was able to access the site to protest against the club's owners the glazers' involvement in the european super league. meanwhile, the global athlete group has called the international olympic committee "archaic" after they pledged to enforce a rule which blocks athletes from taking part in political protest. protests such as taking a knee will still be banned at this
4:35 pm
years olympic games. the ioc consulted more than 3,500 athletes. 67% of whom said they wanted to keep the olympic podium free of protests, while 70% were keen to avoid on—field demonstrations. england women take on france on saturday in the six nations final, but captain sarah hunter won't be on the pitch for the match. instead, poppy cleall will start at number eight. england head coach simon middleton described cleall as one of the best players in the world after her performance in the red roses win over scotland earlier this month. hunter has been struggling with a neck injury and emily scarratt will replace her as captain. maro itoje has been picked as the best man to captain the british and irish lions against south africa this summer by the former skipper sam warburton. there are several options available to head coach warren gatland, including the wales captain
4:36 pm
alun wynjones, but the man who captained the last two lions tours believes itoje is the best choice. he is one of the players who will be guaranteed to test out. i was extremely impressed with him in 17, warren will have seen that. given his age, a lot of the other candidates are older, it will be a question of whether it will be a little bit too much pressure to give to them to get through a tour like this. i go back and forth with him and alun wynjones. i'm sure alun will captain games on tours but i will go with itoje. britain's simon yates has extended his lead at the tour of the alps to 58 seconds, with just one stage to go. the team bike exchange rider looks in good form as he prepares for the giro d'italia next month. he led up the final climb in the leader's green jersey, and freewheeled across the finish line in third place behind pello bilbao of spain. bilbao moves up to second overall,
4:37 pm
nearly a minute behind yates. former world champion shaun murphy is through to the second round of the world snooker championship after beating mark davis in a tight match. murphy, who won the title in 2005, came back from 4—2 down to beat davis 10—7, finishing off with a break of 131. murphy will play yan bingtao in the last 16. and play has finished for the afternoon session on the other table. it's four frames all between ronnie o'sullivan and anthony mcgill in their all—english second—round contest, after mcgill won the last two frames of the session. that's all the sport for now. let's speak now to vick busa and his wife isha. they're currently in ghaziabad near uttar pradesh in northern india, where they flew with their two year old last month. they've been trying
4:38 pm
to come back home. india is due to go on the ukipper�*s red list for coronavirus infections. -- uk's red list for coronavirus infections. —— uk's red list. thank you both are coming back. iwas —— uk's red list. thank you both are coming back. i was asking you, your life is back here. everything you know pretty much is back here as well. how have you been coping with not knowing if you will get back home in time? it not knowing if you will get back home in time?— home in time? it has been very difficult over— home in time? it has been very difficult over the _ home in time? it has been very difficult over the past _ home in time? it has been very difficult over the past two - home in time? it has been very l difficult over the past two weeks. the last few months have been very difficult for us because we travelled for family and unfortunately i lost my father to covid—19. that's why we travelled here. but now we're trying to get back desperately and we just don't know if we are going fly back because all the flights are getting cancelled and rebooking is taking ages and then we have quarantined. it's like we get into the uk if we
4:39 pm
can and then can't get back home. so it is very unsettling. i’m can and then can't get back home. so it is very unsettling.— it is very unsettling. i'm sorry to hear about _ it is very unsettling. i'm sorry to hear about your _ it is very unsettling. i'm sorry to hear about your father. - it is very unsettling. i'm sorry to hear about your father. just - it is very unsettling. i'm sorry to hear about your father. just tell| it is very unsettling. i'm sorry to i hear about your father. just tell us what about work was not how much of an issue is that for you being away? it has been an issue because we are remote working but the time zones are a challenge because we are having to work in uk time so even now it's like the work time which is nearly about, it's 915 in india. but also, i think focusing on work has been a challenge because of course the family is around here, the little one, she doesn't have nursery, she doesn't have her own schedule. so it has been a challenge. it's a continued challenge. it's a continued challenge. it's a continued challenge-— challenge. it's a continued challenue. , , ., , ., challenge. it 'ust shows how quickly this challenge. itjust shows how quickly this situation _ challenge. itjust shows how quickly this situation can _ challenge. itjust shows how quickly this situation can change? - challenge. itjust shows how quickly this situation can change? it - challenge. itjust shows how quickly this situation can change? it was i this situation can change? it was only ten days or two weeks ago that
4:40 pm
you guys were obviously in india, hopefully being able to get back on a plane and get back to your lives in the uk?— in the uk? yes it is. i'm from mumbai _ in the uk? yes it is. i'm from mumbai originally, _ in the uk? yes it is. i'm from mumbai originally, solar- in the uk? yes it is. i'm from i mumbai originally, solar planning in the uk? yes it is. i'm from - mumbai originally, solar planning to visit my— mumbai originally, solar planning to visit my house in mumbai but as you rightly— visit my house in mumbai but as you rightly said. — visit my house in mumbai but as you rightly said, in the last ten days, things— rightly said, in the last ten days, things have dramatically changed. we cancelled _ things have dramatically changed. we cancelled those plans and now we have to _ cancelled those plans and now we have to come back to the uk and it's what we're _ have to come back to the uk and it's what we're trying to do now. how concerned _ what we're trying to do now. how concerned are _ what we're trying to do now. how concerned are you _ what we're trying to do now. hr>w concerned are you about the situation in india with the rising numbers of infections? record numbers of infections? record numbers that haven't been replicated anywhere else. it’s numbers that haven't been replicated anywhere else-— anywhere else. it's true, it's very concerning- _ anywhere else. it's true, it's very concerning. we _ anywhere else. it's true, it's very concerning. we are _ anywhere else. it's true, it's very concerning. we are trying - anywhere else. it's true, it's very concerning. we are trying to i concerning. we are trying to basically, _ concerning. we are trying to basically, we are imposing self—control, not stepping out unless — self—control, not stepping out unless required. only for essentials. but it's concerning, the cases— essentials. but it's concerning, the cases have — essentials. but it's concerning, the
4:41 pm
cases have been on the rise since the last— cases have been on the rise since the last week or so. we have doubled our masks. _ the last week or so. we have doubled our masks, sanitising hands, following _ our masks, sanitising hands, following all the required protocols, but it's not that great outside — protocols, but it's not that great outside. do protocols, but it's not that great outside. , ., ~ . outside. do you think the indian government _ outside. do you think the indian government and _ outside. do you think the indian government and british - outside. do you think the indian i government and british government could have handled this better? yes. could have handled this better? yes, i think so. could have handled this better? yes, i think so- i— could have handled this better? yes, i think so. i think— could have handled this better? yes, i think so. i think there _ could have handled this better? i2: i think so. i think there was a period of time when we came here, coronavirus didn't seem to exist, there was no cobit, life seemed pretty normal. people even hardly wore masks. so i think it was taking to easily hear and it's as if covid—19 doesn't exist. so it could have taken stronger steps at that time and weight would not have landed in the situation right now. good luck to you and your two—year—old and our condolences for your father passing away. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. thank you.
4:42 pm
very much indeed for 'oining us. thank you-* russia has ordered its troops near the border with ukraine back to its bases, after weeks of tensions. the eu estimates that more than 100,000 russian soldiers had amassed near the border as well as in crimea, which was seized and annexed by russia in 2014. ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky says it welcomes any steps to decrease the military presence and de—escalate the situation. vladimir putin says that russia is ready to host the ukrainian president, for talks in moscow at any time that is convenient for him. president putin has pulled russian troops to their bases from directly being on the border and he is now said that he is ready to host the ukrainian president for talks in moscow at any time that has convenient to him.
4:43 pm
the church of england has been told to include at least one candidate from a black or minority ethnic background whenever it shortlists for bishops or other senior roles. it's one of nearly 50 recommendations made by the archbishops�* anti—racism task force, which was set up last year. harry farley reports. the history of the church of england is tied up in the history of empire and colonialism. many black and ethnic minority people in the church feel that baggage. things began to be said to me in a one—to—one situation such as, "your english is not very good." "i don't like your preaching." justin welby himself has admitted the church has a race issue. there is no doubt when we look at our own church that we are still deeply institutionally racist. let'sjust be clear about that. it was said to the college of bishops a couple of years ago and it's true.
4:44 pm
but this report says the church has alarmingly moved backwards in some areas. nowjohn sentamu has retired, dr guli francis—dehqani is the only ethnic minority senior bishop. the report recommends that all shortlists for seniorjobs should include at least one ethnic minority candidate. decisive steps should be taken to tackle the legacy of the church's role in the slave trade. and there should be racialjustice officers in every diocese to oversee the report's implementation. i think there's a realj appetite for change. i think people are wanting to stop this broken recordj and to start again. and that's what our christian hope is, isn't it? _ that is what we as christians believe. yes, there was good friday but there is easter. - there is resurrection. there is hope. but the church has been apologising for racism for 30 years, with little change.
4:45 pm
some fear this report will be no different. in the bible it says you judge people by theirfruits, right? and what do they produce? and actually for over 100 years it hasn't produced any fruit when it comes to race relations. there are similar challenges for other faiths. the board of deputies published its report today on the experiences of black and minorityjews. it makes 119 recommendations and the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis says the exclusion of anyone because of the colour of their skin was a collective failure for which we all must take responsibility. harry farley, bbc news. the lead singer of the bay city rollers has died at the age of 65. this is a picture from his twitter
4:46 pm
feed announcing his death. it is with profound sadness we announce the death of our father and husband les mckeown. apparently he died suddenly. he was with his band, a fixture of the 19705 pop scene. posters of which plastered on many a teenage bedroom. the news coming through in the last few minutes that he has died, les mckeown, the bay city rollers one of the most successful pop groups of the 19705 in the uk. les mckeown, who has died at the age of 65. in just over two weeks' time voters around britain will be heading to the polls. in scotland and wales there are parliamentary elections whilst in england voters will be choosing who will sit on their local councils. but they'll be particular
4:47 pm
attention to hartlepool because of the by—election — and anna foster is spending the day there for us. twice in one week! blimey! and the sunshine has _ twice in one week! blimey! and the sunshine has been _ twice in one week! blimey! and the sunshine has been out _ twice in one week! blimey! and the sunshine has been out both - twice in one week! blimey! and the sunshine has been out both times, | sunshine has been out both times, what are the chances? haven't been rained on once. everyone will be looking at hartlepool because of this by—election and both labour and the conservatives are absolutely desperate to have this seat. labour because they consider it part of their stronghold, labour since 1974, peter mandelson's old constituency, so they will be desperate to hang onto it but as far as paris jansen and the conservatives are concerned, they see it as a seat —— boris johnson,, they managed to win constituencies in north—east, they had not had for decades. people never thought they could possibly capture and the dead. how people are voting, what is
4:48 pm
driving the decision. georgia is with me. you are 20, studying hospitality and catering at hartlepool college of further education. how will you vote? have you decided?— education. how will you vote? have you decided? yes, i'm going to vote labour, you decided? yes, i'm going to vote labour. doctor— you decided? yes, i'm going to vote labour, doctor williams. _ you decided? yes, i'm going to vote labour, doctor williams. is - you decided? yes, i'm going to vote labour, doctor williams. is at i you decided? yes, i'm going to vote labour, doctor williams. is at the i labour, doctor williams. is at the candid, the _ labour, doctor williams. is at the candid, the party? _ labour, doctor williams. is at the candid, the party? it's _ labour, doctor williams. is at the candid, the party? it's the - labour, doctor williams. is at the candid, the party? it's the party. | candid, the party? it's the party. personally, _ candid, the party? it's the party. personally, i— candid, the party? it's the party. personally, i have _ candid, the party? it's the party. personally, i have always - candid, the party? it's the party. i personally, i have always supported labour _ personally, i have always supported labour but — personally, i have always supported labour but i think they really have an interest — labour but i think they really have an interest in the actual people in the community. it�*s an interest in the actual people in the community.— the community. it's interesting because people _ the community. it's interesting because people say _ the community. it's interesting because people say it's - the community. it's interesting because people say it's too i the community. it's interesting i because people say it's too close to call. in elections before, people would have said absolutely, hartlepool will stay labour, do you feel it might be shakier this time? i don't know, i think... i think people. — i don't know, i think... i think people, labour has been in before and they— people, labour has been in before and they haven't done what they said they were _ and they haven't done what they said they were going to, but... i don't
4:49 pm
know _ they were going to, but... i don't know. i_ they were going to, but... i don't know. iiust — they were going to, but... i don't know, ijust don't trust conservatives. when you look at the two options, i would never, always io two options, i would never, always go for— two options, i would never, always go for labour. two options, i would never, always go for labour-— go for labour. what important for ou when go for labour. what important for you when it _ go for labour. what important for you when it comes _ go for labour. what important for you when it comes to _ go for labour. what important for you when it comes to your- go for labour. what important for you when it comes to your future | go for labour. what important for. you when it comes to your future and hartlepool, thejobs you when it comes to your future and hartlepool, the jobs you you when it comes to your future and hartlepool, thejobs you might you when it comes to your future and hartlepool, the jobs you might get when you finish college, dreams of buying your own house. what things are important to you? i buying your own house. what things are important to you?— are important to you? i want somebody — are important to you? i want somebody who _ are important to you? i want somebody who is _ are important to you? i want somebody who is going i are important to you? i want somebody who is going to... are important to you? i want i somebody who is going to... invest money— somebody who is going to... invest money and — somebody who is going to... invest money and actually fight for the things— money and actually fight for the things that are realistic. things like properjobs, propertraining, things— like properjobs, propertraining, things like — like properjobs, propertraining, things like that. like properjobs, proper training, things like that.— like properjobs, proper training, things like that. when you finished at colle u e, things like that. when you finished at college. do _ things like that. when you finished at college, do you _ things like that. when you finished at college, do you feel _ things like that. when you finished at college, do you feel there i things like that. when you finished at college, do you feel there are i at college, do you feel there are plenty ofjobs? ilat at college, do you feel there are plenty ofjobs?— at college, do you feel there are plenty of jobs? plenty of 'obs? not good 'obs. that ou're plenty of jobs? not good 'obs. that you-re going — plenty of jobs? not good 'obs. that you-re going to h plenty of jobs? not good 'obs. that you-re going to be _ plenty of jobs? not good jobs. that you're going to be secure _ plenty of jobs? not good jobs. that you're going to be secure in i plenty of jobs? not good jobs. that you're going to be secure in and i you're going to be secure in and earn _ you're going to be secure in and earn good — you're going to be secure in and earn good money. jobs where it's a few weeks— earn good money. jobs where it's a few weeks or something. not proper
4:50 pm
'obs few weeks or something. not proper jobs you _ few weeks or something. not proper jobs you are actually going to learn and you _ jobs you are actually going to learn and you might be intojob for a few weeks _ and you might be intojob for a few weeks but — and you might be intojob for a few weeks but then that's it. you don't actually— weeks but then that's it. you don't actually grow or learn anything new. that's _ actually grow or learn anything new. that's really interesting, thank you georgia. actually that is something a lot of people have talked about. this idea of levelling up the north—east of england, there will be so many people watching to see what the result of this by—election will be into weeks' time. the result of this by-election will be into weeks' time.— the result of this by-election will be into weeks' time. thank you for that. be into weeks' time. thank you for that- apologies — be into weeks' time. thank you for that. apologies to _ be into weeks' time. thank you for that. apologies to viewers - be into weeks' time. thank you for that. apologies to viewers for i be into weeks' time. thank you for that. apologies to viewers for the l that. apologies to viewers for the break—up on the picture. you can find out about the elections and where they are taking place in your area by heading to the bbc news website. driving tests resumed today in england and wales, after being parked in december because of the pandemic. and a backlog built up during lockdown of around 450,000 cancelled tests. here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. sometimes, it takes a few attempts
4:51 pm
before things line up. but learner drivers have rarely had to wait this long to get a test. i've had my test cancelled i think eight times by this point, but i've kind of lost count. i live quite literally in the middle of nowhere with the nearest bus station being about a mile or two away. it's almost impossible to get around or go anywhere without asking someone else to give me a lift. the last car driving tests for non—key workers was before christmas. the delay has had an impact on instructors too, many of whom haven't been able to work. you've still got overheads to cover for the cars, you've got to pay for the cars and the insurances and all that sort of stuff. and also, it's been very frustrating for a lot of the pupils that you teach. effectively, it's three and a half, four months since they've last been in a car. and to have that break when you're a fairly inexperienced driver is quite difficult for a lot of them. but the wait is almost over.
4:52 pm
there are currently over 400,000 people waiting for a car test in britain. more examiners are now working weekends, extra people have been recruited, and some have been brought back out of retirement. even the boss is now taking some of the tests. waiting time varies around the country, because it depends on how many other people are in the queue, and how many examiners we've got in any given location. so it can vary quite a bit. i think the key thing there is that we will add more test appointments each week as time moves on. no one knows how long it will take to clear the backlog, so l plates may need to stay on far longer than many would like. caroline davies, bbc news. the brit awards will go ahead with a live audience next month, as part of the government's research into how large scale events can reopen safely in the pandemic. the ceremony will take place in front of 4,000 people inside london's o2 arena on may the 11th. they will not have to socially distance, but must show a negative lateral flow test beforehand.
4:53 pm
our entertainment correspondent colin paterson explains how it will all work. # i was getting kind of used to being someone you loved # but now the day bleeds... lewis capaldi at last year's brit awards at london's o2 arena. when the 2021 event happens next month at the same venue, an audience of 4,000 people will be allowed in to watch performances from triple brit nominees dua lipa... # all night i will riot with you... and arlo parks. she is delighted at getting the chance to perform in front of a live crowd. every musician has been in the same boat and when we do get out there and play at events such as these, it will be even more monumentally special. 2,500 tickets will be given to front line key workers from the greater london area. a ballot for these opened at midday.
4:54 pm
those in attendance will not tab to socially distance or even wear a mask once in the venue, and alcohol and food will be sold. everyone will have to prove they've had a negative lateral flow test to be allowed in and take a test afterwards. it's seen as another important step towards audiences returning to events. when you come on to music, that is about being a social human being. you're getting close to people. the dancing, the sweating, they're going on people pot shoulders, that's part of life, that's part of the fun of being a human being. but not everyone feels that enough is being done to ensure grassroots music venues will be able to open on the 215t, according to the government road map. we are very happy that the brits| are taking place, it's a key event in the calendar for artists, - but the issue is for us at the grass roots music venue level, there isn't a great deal. that we might learn from that event that will enable us i to open small venues. as for the brits, this will be the first live music performed at the 02 for more than a year. the ceremony is always a showcase for british music. this year it has a whole added level of importance.
4:55 pm
colin paterson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. yet another frosty start this morning to add to the long line of frosty start in april so far. gardeners, don't drop your guard just yet. there are going to be at least the risk of further frosty nights coming up. it stays chilly at night but in the short term, getting warmer by day. some spectacular views coming in today because actually start came with clear skies and look at this on the satellite picture. don't see this often. barely a cloud in the sky, high pressure right across us. that is responsible for this settled and continued dry weather into the weekend. exceptions to the sunshine? maybe a little high cloud here and they are turning things touch hazy. we are so seeing cloud pushing
4:56 pm
into northern areas of scotland. maybe a shower in shetland. through the english channel, gusty winds. warmth in the strong april sunshine. pollen levels moderate to high. hay fever sufferers, it is a tough time. tree pollen out there at the moment. end to tonight, some areas of cloud in northern scotland. breezy in the far south—west. both areas here avoiding the frost. although ot quite as cold as last night, another frost on the way. and a lively meteor shower at the moment. pea ked last night. one lucky weather watcher got a view. something probably to be seen under clear skies tonight if you look close enough. tomorrow, a chilly start but again, plenty of sunshine to come during the day. little bit hazy in places but there will be one
4:57 pm
warmth in that sunshine. away from the wind on the coast. warmer tomorrow, 19 maybe even 20 celsius. if you're planning to be alfresco on friday evening, it continues to be fine until sunset. with that strong sunset, high—pressure moving further to the north and that will bring in a stronger, easterly wind across eastern and southern parts. it continues to be dry. a steady increase in cloud, particularly in the east and it is in the east we will notice temperatures coming down, particularly right on the coast.
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines: president biden hosts a virtual climate summit with world leaders, and pledges to cut america's carbon emissions, by at least half. we're here at the summit to discuss how each of us, each country can set higher climate ambitions that will in turn create good paying jobs, advance innovative technologies, and help vulnerable countries adapt to climate impacts. china's president xi reiterates his promise to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060, and says he looks forward to working with the international community, including america. the government has apologised for the failure to properly commemorate black and asian soldiers, who died fighting for britain.

41 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on