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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 21, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. we the jury in the above entitled matter as to count one, unintentional second degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. derek chauvin faces up to a0 years in prison. he'll be sentenced in 8 weeks. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. today we are able to breathe again. president biden has promised to do more to deal with systemic racism and said chauvin�*s conviction was just the start. what is your reaction to the verdict?
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do you believe the conviction of george floyd's killer marks a turning point in america's race relations? do get in touch with us. plans to shake up elite football in europe are in tatters, after fans�* anger forces all six english clubs involved in the breakaway european super league to pull out. a series of texts show borisjohnson offered to "fix" the tax rules to encourage businessman sirjames dyson to make ventilators for the nhs. the coroner in the inquest of a nine—year—old girl says the government should look at setting legally binding targets for pollution in line with world health organization guidelines. the former prime minister, tony blair, says he s worried that the oxford astrazeneca covid vaccine is being "discredited" worldwide because of what he calls "unjustified anxieties" about its safety. tiktok is sued for billions by former children's commissioner for england anne longfield over how it collects and uses children's data.
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hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. civil rights activists in the united states have welcomed the guilty verdict in the trial of a white former police officer who killed george floyd in minneapolis last may, describing the conviction as an historic moment. derek chauvin was filmed kneeling on mr floyd's neck for more than nine minutes during his arrest. the killing sparked huge protests across the us and around the world, and the high profile court case that has followed has been seen as a landmark test of police accountability. speaking immediately after the three guilty verdicts were delivered, one of mr floyd's brothers said: "we are able to breathe, again."
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crowds gathered and celebrated at george floyd square in minneapolis as the three—week trial reached its conclusion. president biden has urged americans to come together to confront systemic racism. here's our north america correspondent, lebo diseko. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. derek chauvin, convicted of two counts of murder, and one of manslaughter. the former policeman led from court in handcuffs. cheering. it was a result many hadn't dared to believe was possible. in these types of cases, you know, justice has not gone in the way of victims when victims are african—americans at the hands of the police. so, to hear that he was guilty on all three of the charges, itjust seemed like a dream. it's a beautiful day, it's a sad day because george floyd isn't here any more with us, but it's a beautiful day,
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because justice was served. mr floyd's family called it a victory for anyone who's ever been pinned down. because he showed me how to be strong. he showed me how to be respectful. he showed me how to speak my mind. i'ma miss him but now i know he's in history. what a day to be a floyd, man. wow. it was a death that shook the world, ripping open america's unhealed wounds on racism and police brutality. but much of the evidence of this crime was not gathered by police. instead, it was the local community who documented it. filming, begging... he's not responsive right now! ..and remonstrating with officers as derek chauvin knelt on george floyd's neck for nearly nine and a half minutes. it was a murder in the full light of day, and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see.
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"i can't breathe. i can't breathe." those were george floyd's last words. we can't let those words die with him. this crime might never have come to trial had it not been for this community, who documented it. trauma collectively relived through the trial. but for now, some relief as people take in the victory. we got that justice, now we got that peace! many here believe that this is not a case of problems solved. rather, an opening for real change, when it comes to how black people are treated by police in america. lebo diseko, bbc news, minneapolis. let's hear a bit more from george floyd's family paying tribute to him.
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his brother philonise floyd also spoke at the news conference after the verdicts were handed down. you have cameras from all around the world to see and show what happened to my brother. it was a motion picture, the world seeing his life being extinguished, and i could do nothing but watch. we have to protest because it seems like this is a never—ending cycle. reverend al always told me we've got to keep fighting. i'ma put up a fight every day, because i'm notjust fighting for george any more — i'm fighting for everybody around this world. i get calls, i get dms, people from brazil, from ghana, from germany — everybody, london, italy, they're all saying the same thing. we won't be able to breathe until you're able to breathe. today, we are able to breathe again. applause.
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after the verdict was delivered, us vice president kamala harris vowed to introduce legislation in george floyd's name which would bolster police accountability. america has a long history of systemic racism. black americans and black men in particular have been treated throughout the course of our history as less than human. black men are fathers and brothers and sons and grandfathers and friends and neighbours. their lives must be valued in our education system, in our health care system, in our housing system, in our economic system, in our criminaljustice system, in our nation, full stop.
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let's cross to cbs news correspondent skyler henry who is in minneapolis. we have heard quite a bit of reaction there but more broadly across the country, what would you say has been the reaction to the verdicts? i say has been the reaction to the verdicts? ~ ., , , ., , ., verdicts? i think many people would sa that verdicts? i think many people would say that yesterday _ verdicts? i think many people would say that yesterday was _ verdicts? i think many people would say that yesterday was bittersweet, | say that yesterday was bittersweet, in that they saw justice for george floyd and his family and also recognising that there was accountability in terms of law enforcement but also realising that a man's life was lost here. we saw many celebrations happening across the country under right here in minneapolis was up we were outside the head of the county government centre when the verdict was read and people, old and young, white and black, all either broke out into tears or cheers with what happened yesterday. i think a lot of people are hopeful this will now spark conversations about law enforcement in the community and how better to improve relationships and also addressing the idea of police
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reform, something that was mentioned by vice president kamala harris, as well as presidentjill biden yesterday, as to what needs to be known nationally to improve police practising, such as banning things like no knock warrants and chokehold, similar to what we saw was practised on george floyd. == was practised on george floyd. —— presidentjoe biden. will it reduce presidentjoe biden. will it reduce some of the fear and suspicion amongst black people across the united states? i amongst black people across the united states?— united states? i think people of colour are _ united states? i think people of colour are certainly _ united states? i think people of colour are certainly hopeful - united states? i think people of colour are certainly hopeful this| colour are certainly hopeful this will spark change. but everyone we spoke to yesterday is certainly aware that change is slow. there is still a hesitation and anxiety, i think, between communities of colour and law enforcement. i certainly think given the most recent news, not too far from here in think given the most recent news, not too farfrom here in brooklyn centre there was another deadly police involved shooting where a police involved shooting where a
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police officer shot and killed a 20—year—old men during a traffic stop just last sunday, right here in a minneapolis suburb. taking that into account, another incident in ohio yesterday, while the verdict was being read, when a 15—year—old girl was shot and killed by police. there is still lots of things happening, things people say needs to be addressed, in terms of how police interact with people of colour and how police interact with the communities they serve. i think this will probably be one of those landmark moments in terms of making that happen. find landmark moments in terms of making that ha en. �* landmark moments in terms of making that hauen. �* , ., ., landmark moments in terms of making that ha en. �* , ., ., ., that happen. and it is not an end to this case because _ that happen. and it is not an end to this case because there _ that happen. and it is not an end to this case because there are - that happen. and it is not an end to this case because there are three i this case because there are three other officers who face trial later this year. other officers who face trial later this ear. . �* , , other officers who face trial later this ear. ., �* , , ., this year. that's right. in terms of derek chauvin, _ this year. that's right. in terms of derek chauvin, the _ this year. that's right. in terms of derek chauvin, the judge - this year. that's right. in terms of i derek chauvin, the judge overseeing the case still has to sentence him, thatis the case still has to sentence him, that is expected within the next eight weeks or so fuzzed up the other three officers in the case, their trial is expected to begin in late august. they are charged with
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aiding and abetting murder. they were there on the scene at the time last memorial day, with the incident with george floyd. it will be interesting to see how this plays out, given that the guilty verdict we saw yesterday with derek chauvin. those officers are expected to have their trial and it will be together, they will not have separate trials for each officer, they will all be together in this trial and that is expected from august 23. imilli together in this trial and that is expected from august 23. will derek chauvin appeal _ expected from august 23. will derek chauvin appeal against _ expected from august 23. will derek chauvin appeal against this - expected from august 23. will derek chauvin appeal against this verdict? | chauvin appeal against this verdict? it is possible. the defence brought that up on the final day of closing arguments. one raising the concerns of the unique exposure and media exposure of this trial, going so far as to talk about how this was the subject of popular tv shows, but also bringing to the spotlight concerns about comments made by a
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california congresswoman who told protesters to be more confrontational if derek chauvin was to be acquitted. thejudge denied the original motion to call for a mistrial but did say the congresswoman�*s words could be grounds for an appeal. i'm sure the defence is already considering drafting appeal letters to the judge so that will remain to be seen. i think what we saw yesterday, and given how many people were waiting with baited breath to see what would happen with the case and with this trial, it goes to show how emotionally aware so many people were with what happened last year. thank you for talking to us. we can speak to a teacher at a community school in minneapolis. what does this verdict mean to you personally? it is
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what does this verdict mean to you personally?— personally? it is a positive victory for my community, _ personally? it is a positive victory for my community, for _ personally? it is a positive victory for my community, for so - personally? it is a positive victory for my community, for so long i personally? it is a positive victory| for my community, for so long we have been, us as black people, we have been, us as black people, we have been, us as black people, we have been killed and it seems like there has been nojustice for us being killed. so to see george floyd and his family celebrate yesterday was awesome.— and his family celebrate yesterday was awesome. ~ ., ., , ., ~ , was awesome. what do you think this does for race — was awesome. what do you think this does for race relations _ was awesome. what do you think this does for race relations in _ was awesome. what do you think this does for race relations in america? i does for race relations in america? it doesn't completely heal all the killing and police brutality, but it is just the beginning. killing and police brutality, but it isjust the beginning. daunte killing and police brutality, but it is just the beginning. daunte wright was killed last weekend. they will have to go through another trial, so hopefully there will be justice for
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him as well. in hopefully there will be 'ustice for him as with hopefully there will be 'ustice for him as wait him as well. in terms of your teaching. _ him as well. in terms of your teaching. i — him as well. in terms of your teaching, i know _ him as well. in terms of your teaching, i know some - him as well. in terms of your teaching, i know some of - him as well. in terms of your. teaching, i know some of your him as well. in terms of your - teaching, i know some of your pupils were watching the derek chauvin trial. how old are your pupils and how did you engage them in conversation about what was unfolding on their screens? the students i _ unfolding on their screens? the students i teach _ unfolding on their screens? the: students i teach are nine unfolding on their screens? ti2 students i teach are nine and ten years old. so i didn't want to overwhelm them because they have been through so much trauma in their life already, just witnessing stuff they shouldn't witness as nine and ten years old. so we started kind of light. i asked them if they have watched any of the trial. we just watched any of the trial. we just watched bits and pieces. we started with the emt and listened to some of her comments. then i turned it off
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and ask the kids, do you know anything about the trial? how do you feel about the trial? some of the kids, they were hoping that this was not going to be another police killing with no justice. not going to be another police killing with nojustice. i can't wait to talk to the kids on monday, because we are on distant learning right now, because they were not sure what the outcome was going to be. so we are in distant learning. i will get to see my kids online this morning, but i will get to see them in person on monday. i can't wait to hear their comments. in person on monday. i can't wait to heartheir comments. it in person on monday. i can't wait to hear their comments. it was great, just watching george floyd's family, seeing that he wasn't killed... he
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was killed for a counterfeit bill, but they got justice was killed for a counterfeit bill, but they gotjustice and that was killed for a counterfeit bill, but they got justice and that was awesome. but they got 'ustice and that was awesome. ., , ., , ., awesome. how interested are your nine and ten-year-olds? _ awesome. how interested are your nine and ten-year-olds? how- nine and ten—year—olds? how interested have they been in the trial, would you say? thea;i interested have they been in the trial, would you say?— interested have they been in the trial, would you say? they are very interested- — trial, would you say? they are very interested. on _ trial, would you say? they are very interested. on a _ trial, would you say? they are very interested. on a scale _ trial, would you say? they are very interested. on a scale from - trial, would you say? they are very interested. on a scale from one . trial, would you say? they are very interested. on a scale from one to | interested. on a scale from one to ten, they are probably at 20. they are so little and so young. i think sometimes as adults we underestimate kids. it's kind of like wejust think they are interested in field games and colouring and playing football, playing with dolls and stuff like that. but they were very well informed for nine and ten—year—olds. well informed for nine and ten-year-olds._ well informed for nine and ten-year-olds. well informed for nine and ten- ear-olds. ., ,, , . ten-year-olds. thank you very much for talkini ten-year-olds. thank you very much for talking to — ten-year-olds. thank you very much for talking to us, _ ten-year-olds. thank you very much for talking to us, we _ ten-year-olds. thank you very much for talking to us, we appreciate - for talking to us, we appreciate your time and for staying up for us. you're welcome.— your time and for staying up for us.
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you're welcome. lacrissha walton, a teacher at a — you're welcome. lacrissha walton, a teacher at a community _ you're welcome. lacrissha walton, a teacher at a community school - you're welcome. lacrissha walton, a teacher at a community school in - teacher at a community school in minneapolis. plans for a european super league are unravelling after all six english football clubs decided to pull out, just days after the competition was announced. manchester city, chelsea, arsenal, liverpool, manchester united and tottenham have all now gone back their decision to take part after a huge backlash from all parts of the game. joe lynskey reports. football's great breakaway lasted less than 48 hours. amid rising anger in the game, all six english clubs lost their nerve. manchester city were first to formally pull out of the european super league. earlier their coach said a closed—shop competition had no integrity. it's not a sport when the relation between the effort and the success — the effort and reward — doesn't exist, don't exist. so it's not a sport. it's not a sport and it doesn't matter if you lose. chelsea fans heard their team would withdraw from outside stamford bridge.
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they'd gathered before a match to add their voice. and the fa says supporters have played their part. in a statement, english football's governing body said it would like to thank the fans for their influential and unequivocal voice. it is a powerful reminder, they say, the game will always be for fans. the prime minister said the clubs' decisions were the right one. earlier, liverpool's players had shown what they thought on twitter. some, including jordan henderson, said, "we don't like it and we don't want it to happen." now the people in the game have got their way. don't forget, football players are fans. they've grown up being fans of football themselves, so they know what it feels like to be a fan, and they understand the connection between the players, the fans, the club. arsenal's statement said they'd made a mistake and they apologise for it. while spurs said they regret the anxiety and upset the move caused.
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at manchester united, ed woodward will leave his role as executive vice chairman at the end of the year — the club say, in a separate move. this has been a climb down from those at the top, but the rest of the game has been unified, and football remains open. joe lynskey, bbc news. here in the uk, the culture secretary, oliver dowden, says football fans should savour their victory after the english clubs pulled out. i think it's a great day for fans, and i think fans of football up and down the country should savour this. it's their victory, they stood up and said, "you can't take our game away from us." but as a government, we stood full square behind them, from sunday night when the story first broke i engaged with the president of uefa, the leaders of the game here, the premier league and the fa, and fans, and the prime minister and i were absolutely clear to those fans, we will stand behind you and do whatever it
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takes to stop this. and it's absolutely right it has been stopped. as secretary of state for culture, just as i would stand up to protect our stately homes or our great works of art, this is as much part of our national heritage and culture and it needed to be protected. earlier our sports presenter, sally nugent, gave us this update. one of the things i think the clubs will need to do pretty quickly this rebuild a certain level of trust between the owners and the fans, and notjust between the owners and the fans, and not just the fans, actually, between the owners and the fans, and notjust the fans, actually, also managers and players too, because one of the most significant things about this development, it started on sunday, and has rumbled on through the last few days, one of the things we discovered is the clubs themselves, the teams, the players, the staff and management, didn't know this was coming, certainly from the people i have been speaking to. in terms of communication there is a lot of work to do. one big step forward that has
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happened in the last hour and a half or so, john w henry, the man who owns liverpool football club, has issued this statement. i owns liverpool football club, has issued this statement.— issued this statement. i want to a iolo . ise issued this statement. i want to apologise to _ issued this statement. i want to apologise to all _ issued this statement. i want to apologise to all the _ issued this statement. i want to apologise to all the fans - issued this statement. i want to apologise to all the fans and - apologise to all the fans and supporters of liverpool football club for — supporters of liverpool football club for the disruption i caused over_ club for the disruption i caused over the — club for the disruption i caused over the past 48 hours. it goes without — over the past 48 hours. it goes without saying, but should be said, that the _ without saying, but should be said, that the project put forward was never _ that the project put forward was never going to stand without the support — never going to stand without the support of the fans. no one ever thought— support of the fans. no one ever thought differently in england. over these _ thought differently in england. over these 48 _ thought differently in england. over these 48 hours you were very clear that it _ these 48 hours you were very clear that it would not stand. we heard you. _ that it would not stand. we heard you. i've — that it would not stand. we heard you, i've heard you. the bbc has seen a series of texts, in which the prime minister offers to "fix" tax rules on behalf of businessman sirjames dyson. in the messages — sent in march last year — borisjohnson assures sirjames that neither his singapore—based company, nor its senior employees would have to pay more uk tax, if they were to make ventilators for the nhs. here's our political
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editor laura kuenssberg. who you know — not just what you know — can matter round here. but revelations about connections between government and business have raised eyebrows of late, and now it's conversations of the prime minister himself under the spotlight. last year, the prominent tory—backing businessman sirjames dyson wanted to help make desperately needed ventilators for the nhs. but his firm wrote to the government asking, if they did, would they have to pay any more tax? official queries and conversations like that are allowed, but the rules for ministers say they have to be transparent, and civil servants should be involved. but in a series of direct text messages between borisjohnson and sirjames, the prime minister promised, "i will fix it tomorrow." the prime minister then said "rishi" — the chancellor — "says it's fixed". pushed again by sirjames — who said in a long message, "i'm afraid we really need a response to our letter," — mrjohnson wrote, "i am first lord of the treasury, and you can take it that we are backing you to do what you need."
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the government told us, at the height of the pandemic, there were genuine fears that we would quickly run out of ventilators, leaving the nhs unable to treat patients and putting many lives at risk. as the public would expect, we did everything we could in extraordinary times. in the end, as he explained to the bbc recently, dyson's offer wasn't taken up. we did it. we got it working between four and six weeks in spite of changing the specification. we were ready to go, ready to produce it, we'd bought the components, and then the cabinet office said they didn't want it, they didn't need it. and in a statement, sirjames insisted that urgent correspondence was only about compliance with the rules as 450 dyson people in uk and singapore worked around the clock, seven days a week, to build potentially life—saving equipment at a time of dire need. he said his company gained no benefit from the project, which had cost it £20 million. but questions are likely to be raised again about whether contacts between politics and powerful businesses are just too close for comfort.
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laura kuenssberg, bbc news. let's get more from our political correspondent iain watson. where does this fit in the lobbying scandal is that we have been reporting on in recent weeks? i reporting on in recent weeks? i think it fits in several ways. first of all, whether government ministers currently are following the rules they should when informing officials of contacts they have had directly with business, in this case boris johnson himself, number ten have not made it clear that he immediately told officials about the contact and nature of the contact with james dyson. this fits into the wider question about lobbying and whether it was correct for the former prime minister david cameron to be contacting the treasury to lobby on behalf of the company for which he worked. he hadn't broken any rules so there are wider questions about whether the rules themselves are adequate. in this case there are
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also questions about whetherjames dyson was given undue influence. at a time there was the so—called ventilator challenge, a desperate need to try to increase the number of ventilators available in the early days of the pandemic, so i think there will be a lot of sympathy for the government trying to work swiftly to increase production. but there were concerns among other companies at the time as to why dyson didn't manufacture ventilators at the time and was given such attention from the government. the third issue is on whether, as dyson would say now absolutely, they did everything above board, they tried to comply with the rules, but they were effectively lobbying for what became a temporary change in tax rules to make sure people from outside the country were not being penalised if they spent more time here helping with the pandemic. there is no provable connection between the two events, but was this effectively lobbying rather than simply discussions about helping out? there are those different aspects of the
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scandal. interestingly enough, a former prime minister, a former labour prime minister at that, today was very understanding of the current prime minister's predicament. this was tony blair. you shouldn't bypass official channels but on the other hand, if there _ channels but on the other hand, if there is_ channels but on the other hand, if there is an — channels but on the other hand, if there is an urgent situation, and i do, there is an urgent situation, and i do. having — there is an urgent situation, and i do, having sat in the prime minister's seat myself, and i know what _ minister's seat myself, and i know what its— minister's seat myself, and i know what it's like to be in the middle of a crisis. — what it's like to be in the middle of a crisis. i_ what it's like to be in the middle of a crisis, i do understand how these _ of a crisis, i do understand how these situations arise. when i was prime _ these situations arise. when i was prime minister i never actually had a mobile _ prime minister i never actually had a mobile phone. i think ithink an i think an interesting aspect of this, tony blair pointing out he didn't have a mobile phone. the question is whether things like the ministerial code, which governs meetings between ministers and outside interests, whether it has actually caught up with the age of electronic communication as well and whether rules need to be tightened on that front. interesting that tony blair said, on that front. interesting that tony blairsaid, even on that front. interesting that tony blair said, even if rules were not followed, we were in the middle of a
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pandemic and perhaps we should give the government a bit of leeway. that is not a view shared by the current labour leadership, who are seeing is that the polling on this issue of what they call tory sleaze is cutting through with voters. they lost in 2019 at the general election and with local elections coming up they will hope to keep the focus on they will hope to keep the focus on the prime minister and the conservatives at prime minister's questions today. join conservatives at prime minister's questions today.— conservatives at prime minister's questions today. iain watson, thank ou. a coroner's report into air pollution in london has concluded that the government should look at setting legally binding limits for particle pollution in line with world health organisation guidelines. the report follows the landmark ruling last year, which found that toxic air contributed to nine—year—old ella adoo—kissi—debrah's death in 2013. ella's case was the first time air pollution was listed as a cause of death. our correspondent richard galpin is here. tell us more about the report. it's a ve tell us more about the report. it�*s a very important report. it's a
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landmark, what's happening today. the coroner, philip barlow, says there are three areas of concern, meaning the public are at risk of illness or death from air pollution. he is concerned about the lack of legally binding air—quality targets which you were talking about, this is absolutely essential and it's obviously going to be looked at and they are keen the government looks at that, and defra in particular. he also says there is a lack of public awareness and people are not aware of the dangers of pollution. there is massive amounts of pollution, if you go into any city in this country, there are multiple vehicles and a lot of pollution being pumped out into the air. so that is really crucial as well, getting that information across to people about the dangers they have particularly if they are walking along the side of the road. they are also saying there is a lack of appropriate
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doctor training, so presumably medics need to be much more aware of dangers from pollution and how it can be treated and what they can do to stop it. if can be treated and what they can do to sto- it. ., ., ., , to stop it. if we had a legally bindini to stop it. if we had a legally binding limits _ to stop it. if we had a legally binding limits on _ to stop it. if we had a legally binding limits on pollution i to stop it. if we had a legally binding limits on pollution inj to stop it. if we had a legally - binding limits on pollution in line with who guidelines, what would it mean in practical terms on the streets of our towns and cities? i streets of our towns and cities? i think that's what campaigners in particular are hoping for, that they will go for the world health organization guidelines which are much more stringent, much tougher than the guidelines in this country. there is a very sick if the difference.— there is a very sick if the difference. . ., , ., ,, difference. richard galpin, thank ou. and difference. richard galpin, thank you- and we _ difference. richard galpin, thank you. and we have _ difference. richard galpin, thank you. and we have some - difference. richard galpin, thank you. and we have some water. difference. richard galpin, thank. you. and we have some water here difference. richard galpin, thank- you. and we have some water here if you. and we have some water here if you need it! i got it ready for you but perhaps too late! as other european countries tighten restrictions again,
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denmark is slowly emerging from a second lockdown which began in december. for many businesses that's contingent on the coronapass. essentially the public will have to show proof of vaccination, proof of earlier infection, or a negative test result within 72 hours for various activities including hairdressers, tattooists and restaurants. adrienne murray sent this from copenhagen. families enjoying a trip to the zoo, but this day out is different. adults have to prove they are corona—free. at the entrance, it's not only tickets that are carefully checked — visitors must show a 'corona pass'. it's a negative test result within the last 72 hours, a certificate of vaccination or proof of previous infection. the extra measures haven't kept visitors away. it makes you feel more safe to know that, well, when there are lots of crowded people together, they have been tested. i think it's part of how life is right now. you have to accept it to keep the infection rates low, and it'sjust what it is. a smartphone app called myhealth gives danes access to their digital health records. this serves as an initial corona pass,
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while a new, more advanced app is expected next month. over the coming weeks, as denmark opens up further, danes will have to show a corona pass to access many other places including restaurants, cinemas and gyms. the rules already apply to hairdressers. after a long lockdown, gitte alsing is happy her salon can open again. it's good because my business had been bound for 3.5 months. i think we should do it for all so we can start everything up and we can be more secure. bars and restaurants are getting ready to welcome guests back. some wonder whether the app will cope with a large volume of users. others are uneasy about policing their customers' health. i was not expecting that i was supposed to be the one actually checking on them, and ifind it also to be overkill at this stage when the vaccination is going ok, the number of deaths is quite low.
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authorities believe coronavirus is now under control. once the over—50s are vaccinated, most of denmark's restrictions are set to be lifted. meanwhile, getting tested is likely to become a part of everyday life. denmark has ramped up testing, and now has one of the highest of any country in the world. we are 5.8 million here in denmark and we have 500,000 tests each day so it is possible for each and everybody to get a test rather quickly. most danes, though, seem willing to accept the corona pass if that means a swifter return to normal life. adrienne murray, bbc news, copenhagen. the headlines on bbc news... justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. we the jury in the above entitled matter as to count one,
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unintentional second degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. today we are able to breathe again. president biden has promised to do more to deal with systemic the president ofjuventus has said the european super league no longer exists without english clubs. six english clubs pulled out after fans' anger over the last 48—hour is. the coroner in the inquest of nine—year—old ella kissi debrah saysthe government should look at setting legally binding targets for pollution in line with world health organization guidelines. president biden has urged americans to come together to confront systemic racism, after a white former police
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officer was found guilty of murdering george floyd. mr biden said the conviction of derek chauvin could be a giant step forward in the march towards justice in america. chauvin had been filmed kneeling on the neck of mr floyd for more than nine minutes during his arrest in the city last may. he faces up to 40 years in jail. jasmine rand is international legal counsel for the george floyd legal team, and represented the case before the united nations. she told me what impact this verdict may have across the united states. the significance of getting justice for george floyd alone isjust tremendous, to have accountability for a police officer that murdered a black man in america is really unprecedented in this past decade and the significance really extends so much beyond this one case. i was actually in the courtroom when they announced the not guilty verdict in
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the trayvon martin case and i was there for the michael brown case and when i heard those words today, guilty, guilty, guilty, for me, it was a sense of vindication not only for the family of george floyd but for the family of george floyd but for the family of george floyd but for the families of trayvon martin and michael brown and all of those families and those black men that died before him.— families and those black men that died before him. i ., ., , , ., died before him. what does this mean now for confidence _ died before him. what does this mean now for confidence in _ died before him. what does this mean now for confidence in the _ died before him. what does this mean now for confidence in the criminal - now for confidence in the criminal justice system, going forward in america? ., , , america? earlier when i first spoke, i said it meant _ america? earlier when i first spoke, i said it meant that _ america? earlier when i first spoke, i said it meant that black _ america? earlier when i first spoke, i said it meant that black lives - i said it meant that black lives matter had, finally in america today. and i think i spoke a little bit soon. it mattered in that moment and tragically at the same time, the jury and tragically at the same time, the jury verdict was announced in the george floyd case, a 15—year—old girl was gunned down by police in ohio. it is a step in the right
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direction but we have a long road to travel to get true equality in america. �* travel to get true equality in america-— travel to get true equality in america. . ., ., ., america. and we have the funeral of daunte wright _ america. and we have the funeral of daunte wright matt _ america. and we have the funeral of daunte wright matt later _ america. and we have the funeral of daunte wright matt later this - america. and we have the funeral of daunte wright matt later this week. | daunte wright matt later this week. —— funeral. president biden has said this is the time now to really tackle systemic racism in your country. what does that mean in practical terms? in practical terms, that means, that mean in practical terms? i�*i practical terms, that means, you know, making sure that this george floyd justice in policing gets passed in congress and enacted so that we can get this massive police reform that we need. we can look at it in a procedural manner. at the prosecutor said sending celtic —— significant in his closing argument, he said the defence tried to convince you that george floyd died because his heart was too big but what you heard throughout this trial was that derek chauvin killed him
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because his heart was too small. until we change the route of the problem, untilwe until we change the route of the problem, until we change our society and a fundamental way, we are going to continuing spiriting this kind of inequities. to continuing spiriting this kind of ineiuities. . .. ~ .., inequities. african-american families will _ inequities. african-american families will still _ inequities. african-american families will still have - inequities. african-american families will still have to - inequities. african-american| families will still have to train their sons, for example, how to behave when they are stopped by police officers, be polite, put your hands on the steering wheel and no sudden movements.— sudden movements. absolutely. i think that conversation. .. - sudden movements. absolutely. i think that conversation... what i sudden movements. absolutely. i think that conversation... what is | think that conversation... what is crazy is that after the trayvon martin case, i had other clients and represented other victims who had the trayvon martin talk without children and one particular case, the son looked at his father and said, what would you do if i ended up said, what would you do if i ended up like trayvon martin? a year later, he was in his shoes and his son was dead due to police violence. a study by harvard says black americans are more than three times more likely than white americans to
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be killed by the police. why? because we have so much structural racism. in america, we don't like to talk about our past and the inequities that have been passed down from slavery but it is a relatively short history, a few hundred years. we have hadjim crow in this past century. segregation. and we have a history of racial injustice and we have to reconcile that at some point to be able to move forward in the future. and i cannot speak without also saying, what is the future ofjustice and what is the future ofjustice and what does that look like because justice is not a guilty verdict after a black man a shot in the back, realjustice, the future of justice in america needs to look like black men living in equality, having equal access to health care, employment, education we cannot set the barfor employment, education we cannot set the bar forjustice so low that it is just to stop black men from
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getting shot in the back. that is not enough. we have to demand true equality throughout society. in just over two weeks' time voters around britain will be heading to the polls. in scotland and wales, there are parliamentary elections whilst in england voters will be choosing who will sit on their local councils. five live s anna foster is on the road this week and will be bringing us an insight in to what voters want from their elected representatives and what local issues will be sending people to the polling stations in these elections. today she s in darlington. anna... yes, this is a really interesting constituency, one of the red wall seat that fell back in 2019. this time around, the local elections... they have a metro mayoral election. backin they have a metro mayoral election. back in 2017, they had the inaugural competition here and it was won by a conservative, which i think surprise a lot of people and what has been interesting is that for some people, that was the start of a swathe of
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the north—east of england starting to turn from red to blue. rachel is with me, a political correspondent, you started your career in darlington at the northern echo. it was a huge, seismic change across this part of the world in 2019, but actually, it started in a small way before that. it actually, it started in a small way before that-— before that. it did indeed. it has been a very _ before that. it did indeed. it has been a very gradual _ before that. it did indeed. it has been a very gradual growth - before that. it did indeed. it has . been a very gradual growth towards the conservative party in the north—east. if you look back to elections — north—east. if you look back to elections as far back as 2005, you will see _ elections as far back as 2005, you will see the — elections as far back as 2005, you will see the start of that growth. you are — will see the start of that growth. you are looking at the overall share of the _ you are looking at the overall share of the vote — you are looking at the overall share of the vote for the conservative party— of the vote for the conservative party in — of the vote for the conservative party in the north—east going from 19% party in the north—east going from i9% in _ party in the north—east going from 19% in 2005 at 225% in 2015 and that last mayor— 19% in 2005 at 225% in 2015 and that last mayor elections —— the last two elections. _ last mayor elections —— the last two elections. it— last mayor elections —— the last two elections, it was 34% and in 2019,
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it was— elections, it was 34% and in 2019, it was 38%~ — elections, it was 34% and in 2019, it was 38%. in elections, it was 34% and in 2019, it was 3896-— it was 38%. in 2017 when the tees valle iot it was 38%. in 2017 when the tees valley got its _ it was 38%. in 2017 when the tees valley got its first _ it was 38%. in 2017 when the tees valley got its first metro - it was 38%. in 2017 when the tees valley got its first metro mayor, l valley got its first metro mayor, there was an element of surprise that it was the conservative candidate winning, but how much do you think the government have capitalised on that in the last couple of years and used it as unexcused to put money into this area? ~ , , ., ,, unexcused to put money into this area? . , , ., ,, ., unexcused to put money into this area? . ,, ., ,, ., ., area? when i speak to labour campaigners. _ area? when i speak to labour campaigners, they _ area? when i speak to labour campaigners, they do - area? when i speak to labour campaigners, they do not - area? when i speak to labourj campaigners, they do not talk area? when i speak to labour. campaigners, they do not talk so much _ campaigners, they do not talk so much about a back seat bounce, they talk about _ much about a back seat bounce, they talk about a _ much about a back seat bounce, they talk about a ben how chin bounce. the conservative party mayor is extremely popular. when you look at the money— extremely popular. when you look at the money being spent in darlington, it is getting 22 million from the towns — it is getting 22 million from the towns fund regeneration cash, which is being _ towns fund regeneration cash, which is being just rooted by different government departments and it is also getting 750 treasuryjobs as part of— also getting 750 treasuryjobs as part of the treasury north announcement from rishi sunak at the last budget. announcement from rishi sunak at the last budiet. , ., , ,, .,
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last budget. there is an expression from america. _ last budget. there is an expression from america, pork— last budget. there is an expression from america, pork barrel- last budget. there is an expression from america, pork barrel politics, | from america, pork barrel politics, which a lot of people say is in play in this region. talk through what that means and how we have seen it here. ., ~' that means and how we have seen it here. ., ,, ., ,., here. pork barrel politics is an american _ here. pork barrel politics is an american phrase _ here. pork barrel politics is an american phrase but - here. pork barrel politics is an american phrase but it - here. pork barrel politics is an american phrase but it refers| here. pork barrel politics is an i american phrase but it refers to when _ american phrase but it refers to when the — american phrase but it refers to when the governing party is channelling public funds into areas which _ channelling public funds into areas which either voted for the party or that they— which either voted for the party or that they want to vote for the party and boris _ that they want to vote for the party and borisjohnson's that they want to vote for the party and boris johnson's first accusations around this in writing to the _ accusations around this in writing to the towns fund and when you look at the _ to the towns fund and when you look at the last _ to the towns fund and when you look at the last tranche of funding announced by rishi sunak, it is £1 billion— announced by rishi sunak, it is £1 billion being shared by 45 different towns _ billion being shared by 45 different towns and when you look at those towns. _ towns and when you look at those towns. 40 — towns and when you look at those towns, 40 of them are represented by conservative mps. there has been a lot of— conservative mps. there has been a lot of questions around whether that is an appropriate use of funds, just exactly— is an appropriate use of funds, just exactly what factors they are looking — exactly what factors they are looking at when they choose such towns. _ looking at when they choose such towns. so — looking at when they choose such towns, so it has been questioned by critical— towns, so it has been questioned by critical opponents, but also by members _ critical opponents, but also by members of the public. it is worth
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notini members of the public. it is worth noting this — members of the public. it is worth noting this darlington _ members of the public. it is worth | noting this darlington constituency is quite a small one but right next you have the sprawling rural constituency of richmond, whose npas rishi sunak. which gives obviously conservatives in this area... it inevitably gives them a certain level of access.— inevitably gives them a certain level of access. that is right. as i was saying. _ level of access. that is right. as i was saying. the _ level of access. that is right. as i was saying, the labour— level of access. that is right. as i was saying, the labour party - level of access. that is right. as i was saying, the labour party is i level of access. that is right. as i - was saying, the labour party is more worried _ was saying, the labour party is more worried about the mayor, because he is linked _ worried about the mayor, because he is linked to— worried about the mayor, because he is linked to bringing in that funding _ is linked to bringing in that funding. the conservatives are seeing — funding. the conservatives are seeing as— funding. the conservatives are seeing as having influence and it is worth— seeing as having influence and it is worth saying that this is a part of the country that does need investment. and when voters here have _ investment. and when voters here have got— investment. and when voters here have got behind borisjohnson, they were looking for a way to change their— were looking for a way to change their story, — were looking for a way to change their story, so when you look at some _ their story, so when you look at some of— their story, so when you look at some of the statistics that sort of indicate _ some of the statistics that sort of indicate what quality of life here might _ indicate what quality of life here might be — indicate what quality of life here might be like, for example child poverty— might be like, for example child poverty is— might be like, for example child poverty is above the national average. _ poverty is above the national average, i think the national average _ average, i think the national average is 31% in the north—east, it is estimated — average is 31% in the north—east, it is estimated to be 37%. in context, that is— is estimated to be 37%. in context, that is like —
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is estimated to be 37%. in context, that is like 11— is estimated to be 37%. in context, that is like 11 kids in a class of about— that is like 11 kids in a class of about 30 _ that is like 11 kids in a class of about 30. and the unemployment rate has remained stubbornly high. it is currently— has remained stubbornly high. it is currently the highest outside london _ currently the highest outside london. i think it is 5.7%. i think voters _ london. i think it is 5.7%. i think voters will— london. i think it is 5.7%. i think voters will look over time to indicators _ voters will look over time to indicators like that to see if that is changing, alongside some of the bil is changing, alongside some of the big headlines that they are reading about— big headlines that they are reading about investment coming into the area _ about investment coming into the area. ., . about investment coming into the area. ., ~' about investment coming into the area. ., ,, about investment coming into the area. ., ~ area. rachel, thank you. a political respondent — area. rachel, thank you. a political respondent at _ area. rachel, thank you. a political respondent at having _ area. rachel, thank you. a political respondent at having to _ area. rachel, thank you. a political respondent at having to post - area. rachel, thank you. a political respondent at having to post uk. i area. rachel, thank you. a political l respondent at having to post uk. the biggest test during the north—east of event will be the by—election in hartlepool. conservatives against labour added could go either way. there was a big brexit—lite in hartlepool last time around. —— a big brexit vote in hartlepool last time around. and you can find out what elections are taking place in your area and see all the candidates by heading to the bbc news wesbite. the headlines on bbc news...
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justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. he faces up to 40 years in jail. he'll be sentenced in 8 weeks. plans for a european super league are in tatters as all six english clubs pull out — the preisdent ofjuventas — one of the italian clubs invovled says the super league can't exist without english clubs. a series of texts show boris johnson offered to "fix" the tax rules to encourage businessman sirjames dyson to make ventilators for the nhs. the former prime minister, tony blair, says he s worried that the oxford—astrazeneca covid vaccine is being discredited around the world because of what he calls unjustified anxieties about its safety and efficacy. i spoke to him a little earlier and he called on the uk government to publish more data about the jab to combat vaccine hesitancy. in different parts of the world, you have got different regulators, some saying it should not be used for over 65, some saying it should not
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be used for under 65 is, we come across several —— several african countries where people are now refusing to take the astrazeneca vaccine and yet when you look at the data that is being published so far, it is a highly effective vaccine, it was hospitalisations, stop debts and reduce them dramatically, and so it is really important to restore the credibility because it is the astrazeneca vaccine along with the johnson &johnson vaccine, that are going to be the workhorse vaccines of the world and what we have learnt i think over the past period is that covid anywhere is potentially covid everywhere, so it really matters if the credibility of one of the great vaccines that we are going to use is undermined in this way, so what we are saying to the government is publish —— you have published a certain amount of data but it should be possible to publish data that very specifically says in respect of pfizer and astrazeneca, here are the
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numbers that have had the vaccine, the first dose, second dose, of those, here are the numbers that have still got covid, here are the numbers that are hospitalised, the numbers that are hospitalised, the number that has died, and i think if those figures are published in the right form, they will be immensely persuasive in showing people wired really is crazy for people to be putting restraints or refusals on the astrazeneca vaccine. brute putting restraints or refusals on the astrazeneca vaccine. we have got restrictions here _ the astrazeneca vaccine. we have got restrictions here for _ the astrazeneca vaccine. we have got restrictions here for under _ the astrazeneca vaccine. we have got restrictions here for under 30s - the astrazeneca vaccine. we have got restrictions here for under 30s in - restrictions here for under 30s in the uk. �* , ., ., the uk. and it is important to realise by _ the uk. and it is important to realise by the _ the uk. and it is important to realise by the way _ the uk. and it is important to realise by the way when - the uk. and it is important to realise by the way when you | the uk. and it is important to i realise by the way when you look the uk. and it is important to - realise by the way when you look at the restrictions for the under 30s, it is a very balanced justification around risk because it is only actually in circumstances of low exposure, which you get when you are in lockdown, the balance of risk is on the data available just in favour of possibly offering a different vaccine for the under 30s. the moment you get to medium or high exposure, that risk balance changes that it
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exposure, that risk balance changes thatitis exposure, that risk balance changes that it is clear that those age groups above 30, astrazeneca is a highly effective vaccine and indeed, i think it is a highly effective vaccine for people under 30 if you look at the full figures. what vaccine for people under 30 if you look at the full figures. what could ha- hen to look at the full figures. what could happen to the _ look at the full figures. what could happen to the goal _ look at the full figures. what could happen to the goal of _ look at the full figures. what could happen to the goal of herd - look at the full figures. what could i happen to the goal of herd immunity if there continues to be hesitancy towards vaccines like this? i think that the drive _ towards vaccines like this? i think that the drive towards _ towards vaccines like this? i think that the drive towards herd - towards vaccines like this? i think . that the drive towards herd immunity would be slow but even if you get herd immunity here in the uk for example, the real risk is that in countries like india, one and a quarter billion people, they have had several hundred variants of covid—19 circulating, just in the last few months. those are by the way... most of them are completely insignificant but some of them may be mutations against which the vaccines will be less effective. then you have got the whole of africa that we need to get vaccinated. you have got large population centres in the world which need to get vaccinated and the
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overwhelming probability because the vaccines are much more expensive is that those countries will be using the vaccines of which astrazeneca is one. you cut away at that credibility and your risk is that you get mutations against which vaccines more generally are ineffective and that of course will affect us in the uk. indeed you have affect us in the uk. indeed you have a situation where only noticed polling, the majority of people in france a they will not take the astrazeneca vaccine. this is absolutely crazy with no justification at all.- absolutely crazy with no 'ustification at all. �* ., _ ., justification at all. boris johnson was archly _ justification at all. boris johnson was archly asked _ justification at all. boris johnson was archly asked about - justification at all. boris johnson l was archly asked about publishing such stats at the downing street press conference yesterday. he said, we simply don't know that data. but we simply don't know that data. but we do have that data, don't we? why do you think there is a reluctance to put it out there? i
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do you think there is a reluctance to put it out there?— do you think there is a reluctance to put it out there? i am really not sure what the _ to put it out there? i am really not sure what the answer _ to put it out there? i am really not sure what the answer to _ to put it out there? i am really not sure what the answer to that - sure what the answer to that question is, victoria. we have been trying to get this data in what i have said is a clear form. trying to get this data in what i have said is a clearform. in israel, where they have now vaccinated body much the population, they do present it in the form that i am describing and we have been trying for weeks, it is the reason we delayed the paper was to try and work out whether there was a way to get this data, and so for example, you can bury it away in some of the nhra data, our data around... if people self—report the side—effects of vaccines, that data is there. both for pfizer and astrazeneca and it is very good actually for both vaccines, but i have not... i am not clear why the government feels it cannot publish the data. surely it must have a damned if they don't have it, by the way, they should have it, by the way, they should have it, by the way, they should have it, because in the end you have to be careful how you publish data and you have to have experts looking
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at it to make sure that it is put out in a way that informs and does not mislead but i think the most decisive thing would be just a table just a table that says after two doses of astrazeneca vaccine, here is the number that still has covid, here is the neighbour hospitalised and the number that have died and when you compare that to the unvaccinated operation, you will find there is a dramatic and positive difference will stop you can then use those figures around the world. the brazilian government is now in talks with vaccine manufacturer pfizer to by 100 million doses. we have been reporting from vaccination centres around the world this week.
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it has been a little bit of a slow day at this vaccine centre in the heart of sao paulo. people are coming into be vaccinated over the age of 67 and health care workers, they are coming to get the astrazeneca and the chinese vaccine, the vaccines available in brazil. the person vaccinating shows before he puts in the jab that it is full. there were some videos circulating online that seemed to suggest that empty shots were going into arms most of the vaccine goes in... and once that is done, proof one of —— of an empty syringe. translation: i am delighted. i have a new granddaughter and i was really worried about being with her. now i am very happy. it has been a terrible year. we need to be free of it. they have been problems with this vaccine campaign, political problems, but better not talk about
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it. perhaps the slow day is rather echoing the slow vaccination drive in brazil was only 11% or so of resilience have received their first dose and just over 4% with both doses. this is the a country with the second highest death toll. many people blame the government and president bolsonaro, who received proposals for tens of millions of pfizer doses last year but said no. his critics say because of his anti—vaccine, antivirus control stance. translation: we had tv programmes and whatsapp messages that distort information and spread fear. one of those sources of misinformation is the president. if you have power, people listen to what you are saying. when the world says you should be vaccinated and president bolsonaro says you should not, it is a contradictory message. unfortunately, they are rolling out
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campaign, it is not reaching the speed that we would like to. we need to receive more from the federal government. the lack of doses is a lack of hope to end this pandemic soon. and we need help for these people and we need a vaccine to protect them. a salvage operation is underway at the university of cape town's historic library — after it was badly damaged by fire. the 200—year—old library housed unique collections of african books and archives — including more than 85,000 items. courtney bembridge reports. this is all that's left of cape town university's historic library. the reading room has been gutted, and thousands of rare books, dictionaries and films have been lost. it was horrifying.
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it was a deep—seated sadness that this had to happen because there are some things that are irreplaceable. the fire started on the slopes of table mountain at the weekend, and soon swept across the university campus. smoke billowed from the roof of the library as firefighters tried to limit the damage, while the mayor spelled out what was at stake. this one is a major problem for us. it's a library with lots and lots of old, ancient valuables in the library. the library's collections include unique manuscripts, and the personal papers of prominent south africans dating back to the 18th century, as well as photographs and anti—apartheid pamphlets. it's thought some items may have been saved by five steel doors, which were triggered by the fire alarm and stopped the fire spreading further. library workers are trying to salvage what they can but water damage is making that difficult. courtney bembridge, bbc news. the queen is marking her 95th birthday today in private, four days after the funeral of her husband, the duke of edinburgh. there will be no public celebrations as she continues to observe two weeks of mourning
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until friday and no photograph celebrating the day is expected to be released this year. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. if you are looking for some significant rainfall in the forecast, well, there isn't any as we head up towards the weekend. a few of us will see some showers at times, but that's about it. it's going to stay mostly dry. there will be quite a bit of sunshine as well, but frosty by night. high pressure is dominating our weather today. we've got this weak weather front sinking southwards. all it's doing really is bringing a band of cloud and also some spots of rain here or there, nothing significant. and as it continues to journey southwards it will brighten up behind it, so some sunshine for northern england, sunny spells across northern ireland and some sunshine for scotland. this cloud in the far north could produce the odd shower in the northern isles as we go through the afternoon.
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highest temperatures likely to be in the south—west at 16 or 17. here too we are not immune to some showers as we go through the course of the afternoon in particular. as we head into the evening, a lot of those showers will tend to fade. we'll see some patchy mist and shallow fog form across the east midlands, parts of eastern england. we hang onto that cloud, toppling around the area of high pressure across the northern isles. these are our overnight lows but across north—east england, parts of scotland, we could see them slip to —4, even —5, so there will be a widespread frost tonight. a cold start tomorrow, any mist and fog will quickly disperse in the strong spring sunshine. breezy across the english channel and coastlines adjacent to it. a breeze coming in from the north sea will make it feel cooler along the north sea coastline. as you can see from these white circles, which indicate the strength of the wind, well, we are talking very light breezes. this cloud across the north of scotland producing the odd spot of rain at times. here we've got highs of 12 degrees,
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17 in liverpool and 17 in cardiff. as we move from thursday into friday, we still have high pressure firmly in charge of our weather. it drifts perhaps just a little bit further east. still breezy across the english channel and across parts of the south—west of england, but we remain with settled conditions. a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine, some fairweather cloud developing as we go through the course of the day, and temperatures between 11—14. we could see an 18 somewhere, though. the weekend, largely dry, still that strong sunshine and still the risk of overnight frosts.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11... justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. he faces up to 40 years in jail. he'll be sentenced in eight weeks. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. today we are able to breathe again. president biden has promised to do more to deal with systemic racism and said chauvin's conviction was just the start. plans for european super league are in tatters as all six english clubs pull out. the president ofjuventus — one of the italian clubs involved — says the super league can't exist
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without english clubs. a series of texts show boris johnson offered to "fix" the tax rules to encourage businessman sirjames dyson to make ventilators for the nhs. the coroner in the inquest of nine—year—old ella kissi debrah says the government should look at setting legally binding targets for pollution in line with world health organisation guidelines. good morning and welcome to bbc news. civil rights activists in the united states have welcomed the guilty verdict in the trial of a white former police officer, who killed george floyd in minneapolis last may, describing the conviction as an historic moment. derek chauvin was filmed kneeling
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on mr floyd's neck for more than nine minutes during his arrest. the killing sparked huge protests across the us and around the world, and the high profile court case that has followed has been seen as a landmark test of police accountability. speaking immediately after the three guilty verdicts were delivered, one of mr floyd's brothers said: "we are able to breathe, again." crowds gathered at george floyd square in minneapolis as the three—week trial reached its conclusion. president biden has urged americans to come together to confront systemic racism. here's our north america correspondent, lebo diseko. we, the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. derek chauvin, convicted of two counts of murder, and one of manslaughter. the former policeman led from court in handcuffs. cheering
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it was a result many hadn't dared to believe was possible. in these types of cases, you know, justice has not gone in the way of victims when victims are african—americans at the hands of the police. so, to hear that he was guilty on all three of the charges, itjust seemed like a dream. it's a beautiful day, it's a sad day because george floyd isn't here any more with us, but it's a beautiful day, because justice was served. mr floyd's family called it a victory for anyone who's ever been pinned down. because he showed me how to be strong. he showed me how to be respectful. he showed me how to speak my mind. i'ma miss him but now i know he's in history. what a day to be a floyd, man! wow. it was a death that shook the world, ripping open america's unhealed wounds on racism and police brutality.
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but much of the evidence of this crime was not gathered by police. instead, it was the local community who documented it. filming, begging... he's not responsive right now! ..and remonstrating with officers as derek chauvin knelt on george floyd's neck for nearly nine and a half minutes. it was a murder in the full light of day, and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see. "i can't breathe. i can't breathe." those were george floyd's last words. we can't let those words die with him. this crime might never have come to trial had it not been for this community, who documented it. trauma collectively relived through the trial. but for now, some relief as people take in the victory. we got that justice, now we got that peace! many here believe that this is not
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a case of problems solved. rather, an opening for real change, when it comes to how black people are treated by police in america. lebo diseko, bbc news, minneapolis. let's hear more from george floyd's family. his brother philonis floyd spoke at the news conference after the verdicts were handed down. you have cameras from all around the world to see and show what happened to my brother. it was a motion picture, the world seeing his life being extinguished, and i could do nothing but watch. we have to protest because it seems like this is a never—ending cycle. reverend al always told me we've got to keep fighting. i'ma put up a fight every day, because i'm notjust fighting for george any more —
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i'm fighting for everybody around this world. i get calls, i get dms, people from brazil, from ghana, from germany — everybody, london, italy, they're all saying the same thing. we won't be able to breathe until you're able to breathe. today, we are able to breathe again. applause. after the verdict, us vice president kamala harris vowed to introduce legislation in george floyd's name which would bolster police accountability. america has a long history of systemic racism. black americans and black men in particular have been treated throughout the course of our history as less than human. black men are fathers and brothers and sons and grandfathers
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and friends and neighbours. their lives must be valued in our education system, in our health care system, in our housing system, in our economic system, in our criminaljustice system, in our nation, full stop. the verdict has been met with relief by many in minneapolis. the bbc has been speaking to some local residents to hear their reaction. murder one — committing a felony — we find the defendant guilty. cheering. that's everything. praise the lord. so we're glad that we got the verdict, so that starts the process of the healing for some of our community. it does not start
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the process of healing for all, but it starts the process of healing for some so that we can finally breathe just a little bit to know that we got at least somebody in our corner to say, "we're not going to stand for this." so thank you for the justice, for the jurors, for the people that showed and stood there and recorded, for the people that got up there and said something and didn'tjust stand back and keep their mouths closed. i did not expect this, i didn't think they was going to do it. idid! i had no faith they was going to do it. i did, i had faith.| i'm glad they did. thank you to them. i had faith. i'm just happy that this happened because i have two boys who are black and for this to happen, i'm glad it happened, unfortunately to someone else, so that we can get the ball rolling to try and make some progress to do right because george floyd is somebody's dad, he's somebody's son, he's somebody's uncle.
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it could easily have been my son, it could easily have been my daddy, it could easily have been my brother. so i'm so happy that this tragic turn of events had to happen for something to change. all sing hymn. a little later we're going to speak to gary o'donoghue, who in minneapolis for us. the owners of liverpool have joined arsenal and tottenham in apologising for their involvement in the collapsed european super league. all six english clubs pulled out last night following a backlash from fans, players and the government. and in the last hour, the president ofjuventus said the super league 'can't exist�*
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without the english clubs — and one of the spanish clubs athletico madrid have withdrawn from the league. joe lynskey reports. football's great breakaway lasted less than 48 hours. amid rising anger in the game, all six english clubs lost their nerve. manchester city were first to formally pull out of the european super league. earlier their coach said a closed—shop competition had no integrity. it's not a sport when the relation between the effort and the success — the effort and reward — doesn't exist, don't exist. so it's not a sport. it's not a sport and it doesn't matter if you lose. chelsea fans heard their team would withdraw from outside stamford bridge. they'd gathered before a match to add their voice. and the fa says supporters have played their part.
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in a statement, english football's governing body said it would like to thank the fans for their influential and unequivocal voice. it is a powerful reminder, they say, the game will always be for fans. the prime minister said the clubs' decisions were the right one. earlier, liverpool's players had shown what they thought on twitter. some, including jordan henderson, said, "we don't like it and we don't want it to happen." "now the people in the game have got their way." don't forget, football players are fans. they've grown up being fans of football themselves, so they know what it feels like to be a fan, and they understand the connection between the players, the fans, the club. arsenal's statement said they'd made a mistake and they apologise for it. while spurs said they regret the anxiety and upset the move caused. at manchester united, ed woodward will leave his role as executive vice chairman at the end of the year —
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the club say, in a separate move. this has been a climb down from those at the top, but the rest of the game has been unified, and football remains open. joe lynskey, bbc news. culture secretary oliver dowden says football fans should savour their victory after the english clubs pulled out. i think it's a great day for fans, and i think fans of football up and down the country should savour this. it's their victory, they stood up and said, "you can't take our game away from us." but as a government, we stood full square behind them, from sunday night when the story first broke i engaged with the president of uefa, the leaders of the game here, the premier league and the fa, and fans, and the prime minister and i were absolutely clear to those fans, we will stand behind you and do whatever it takes to stop this. and it's absolutely right it has been stopped. a secretary of state for culture, just as i would stand up
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to protect our stately homes or our great works of art, this is as much part of our national heritage and culture and it needed to be protected. i'm delighted it has been. earlier we heard from the liverpool fc owner, john henry, who made this apology to his club's fans. i want to apologise to all the fans, supporters of liverpool football club for the disruption i caused in the last 48 hours. it goes without saying that should be said that the project forward was never going to stand without support from the fans. no one ever thought differently in england. over these 48 hours you are very clear it would not stand. we heard you, i heard you. i want to apologise tojurgen klopp, billy, the players, and everyone he worked
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so hard at covid to make the fans proud, they love their club and work to make you proud of every single day. i know the entire lfc team has the expertise, leadership and passion necessary to rebuild trust and help us move forward. more than and help us move forward. more than a decade ago, when we signed up for the challenges associated with football, commentary dreams of what you dream job, football, commentary dreams of what you dreamjob, and football, commentary dreams of what you dream job, and we have worked hard to improve your club. —— we dreams of what he dream of. we are trying to work in your club's best interest, even when we make mistakes. in this endeavour i let you down. i am sorry. i alone am
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responsible for the negativity brought forward the last couple of days. it is something i will never forget. it shows the power and have an rightly will continue to have. just to repeat the breaking line from madrid, atletico madrid becoming the latest club to abandon the ship any project. the club said the ship any project. the club said the competition they had signed up for was no longer what would be played. players and coaching staff were happy with their decision. that seems to reflect views from players and coaching staff in the premier league. only three now remaining, by my calculations. we are madrid, barcelona and juventus. juventus said without the english clubs it is not a seed telly. it seems a matter
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of time before they pull out as well. —— a super league. the headlines on bbc news... justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. he faces up to 40 years in jail. he'll be sentenced in 8 weeks. president biden has promised to do more to deal with systemic racism and said chauvin's conviction was just the start. plans for a european super league are in tatters as all six english clubs pull out. the president ofjuventus — one of the italian clubs invovled says the super league can't exist without english clubs. a coroner's report into air pollution in london has concluded that the government should look at setting legally binding limits for particle pollution in line with world health organisation guidelines.
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the report follows the landmark ruling last year, which found that toxic air contributed to nine year—old ella adoo—kissi—debrah's death in 2013. ella's case was the first time air pollution was listed as a cause of death. our correspondent claire marshall has been following this case throughout. morning two years. i know you had been speaking to allah's man. she very much want the government to take on recommendations from the coroner, doesn't she. == take on recommendations from the coroner, doesn't she.— take on recommendations from the coroner, doesn't she. -- mum. i have s-oken coroner, doesn't she. -- mum. i have spoken to _ coroner, doesn't she. -- mum. i have spoken to her — coroner, doesn't she. -- mum. i have spoken to her for _ coroner, doesn't she. -- mum. i have spoken to her for years. _ coroner, doesn't she. -- mum. i have spoken to her for years. she - coroner, doesn't she. -- mum. i have spoken to her for years. she said - spoken to her for years. she said she felt relieved. she was not happy because she had lost her daughter and are still dealing with the grief of that. you can see the traffic on the south circular and taste pollution in the air. that was one of the key issues occur the coroner
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picked up on today. the level of particulate matter from exhausts really are toxic and have a real effect on people's health. and i was a healthy girl and suddenly she started to develop asthma. she was on a ventilator for macro times. her mother has been fighting to find out what happened to her and waiting for what happened to her and waiting for what the coroner decided. —— four times. what the coroner decided. -- four times. ~ ., what the coroner decided. -- four times. . ., ., ., ., times. we all need to change and do our bit. times. we all need to change and do our bit- we — times. we all need to change and do our bit. we saw— times. we all need to change and do our bit. we saw during _ times. we all need to change and do our bit. we saw during the _ times. we all need to change and do| our bit. we saw during the pandemic, the first— our bit. we saw during the pandemic, the first lockdown, when there were no cars. _ the first lockdown, when there were no cars, nitrogen dioxide dropped 70%~ _ no cars, nitrogen dioxide dropped 70%~ air— no cars, nitrogen dioxide dropped 70%. air pollution is now back to pre—pandemic levels. we cannot go on. pre—pandemic levels. we cannot go on we _ pre—pandemic levels. we cannot go on we all— pre—pandemic levels. we cannot go on. we all need to drive less. this is about—
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on. we all need to drive less. this is about emissions and particulate matter— is about emissions and particulate matter from diesel. i feel finally there _ matter from diesel. i feel finally there is— matter from diesel. i feel finally there is a — matter from diesel. i feel finally there is a result and i will continue _ there is a result and i will continue campaigning. it is always about— continue campaigning. it is always about saving lives. all children have _ about saving lives. all children have a — about saving lives. all children have a right to breathe cleaner, no matter— have a right to breathe cleaner, no matter where they live or where they come _ matter where they live or where they come from — matter where they live or where they come from. , , �* ., matter where they live or where they come from-— come from. this isn't a legally bindini come from. this isn't a legally binding report _ come from. this isn't a legally binding report the _ come from. this isn't a legally binding report the coroner - come from. this isn't a legally binding report the coroner has come from. this isn't a legally - binding report the coroner has made. it is recommendations. the government must respond within 56 days to what he said. they had to say what they are doing about this. if they are not doing anything then why? someone who has been following this from the beginning is the chief executive of asthma uk and the british land foundation. what is your reaction to the news? == british land foundation. what is your reaction to the news? -- lung. we think they _ your reaction to the news? -- lung. we think they should _ your reaction to the news? -- lung. we think they should act _ your reaction to the news? -- lung. we think they should act as - your reaction to the news? -- lung. we think they should act as a - we think they should act as a wake-up— we think they should act as a wake—up call for government that they need —
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wake—up call for government that they need to take urgent action. we do need _ they need to take urgent action. we do need bolder clean air laws which enshrine _ do need bolder clean air laws which enshrine in— do need bolder clean air laws which enshrine in law world health organization targets. we need to do more _ organization targets. we need to do more to— organization targets. we need to do more to raise public awareness of air pollution and help people get local air— air pollution and help people get local air pollution information close — local air pollution information close to — local air pollution information close to them. that is what people are craving — close to them. that is what people are craving so they can take steps to protect — are craving so they can take steps to protect themselves. the coroner talks about — to protect themselves. the coroner talks about health professionals having _ talks about health professionals having a — talks about health professionals having a key role to play. not once was rosamond told air pollution may be a contributing factor to her daughter's poor health. we would like to— daughter's poor health. we would like to see — daughter's poor health. we would like to see more done in that area. strange _ like to see more done in that area. strange that was not raised article when she was struggling with breathing difficulties. no medical officials did either. absir breathing difficulties. no medical officials did either.— officials did either. air pollution is indivisible. _ officials did either. air pollution is indivisible. sometimes - officials did either. air pollution | is indivisible. sometimes people underestimate how toxic to how it
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can be _ underestimate how toxic to how it can be it — underestimate how toxic to how it can be. it exacerbates existing lung conditions _ can be. it exacerbates existing lung conditions and contribute to new lun- conditions and contribute to new lung conditions. we need a big change. — lung conditions. we need a big change. a _ lung conditions. we need a big change, a seismic shift in how we talk about— change, a seismic shift in how we talk about air pollution. health officials — talk about air pollution. health officials are a big part in that. do ou officials are a big part in that. you think officials are a big part in that. drr you think the government will do enough? it will take an incredible overhaul of legislation to stop the television being emitted. deletion is the biggest _ television being emitted. deletion is the biggest environmental - television being emitted. deletion l is the biggest environmental threats we face _ is the biggest environmental threats we face. we have known the damage caused _ we face. we have known the damage caused by— we face. we have known the damage caused by air pollution. —— television. _ caused by air pollution. —— television. we are calling on the government to act. we need a decisive — government to act. we need a decisive act of political will to .et decisive act of political will to get it— decisive act of political will to get it over the line and we hope the government will step up to the plate — government will step up to the late. ., , , , ., government will step up to the late. ., , ,, ., ., plate. the thorny issue of how you do it. plate. the thorny issue of how you do it- clean _ plate. the thorny issue of how you
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do it. clean air— plate. the thorny issue of how you do it. clean air sense, _ plate. the thorny issue of how you do it. clean air sense, to - plate. the thorny issue of how you do it. clean air sense, to push - do it. clean air sense, to push traffic to areas where poverty is more prevalent? it is difficult to know how to do it? you more prevalent? it is difficult to know how to do it?— know how to do it? you need a comprehensive _ know how to do it? you need a comprehensive package - know how to do it? you need a comprehensive package of- know how to do it? you need a - comprehensive package of different measures. fantastic information so people _ measures. fantastic information so people can — measures. fantastic information so people can understand how to protect themselves. we ultimately need to take some cars of the road. we need to encourage cleaner, greener ways of travelling. this will make a positive — of travelling. this will make a positive difference. people are dying — positive difference. people are dying well there is in action. let's take note — dying well there is in action. let's take note of this report and be decisive — take note of this report and be decisive in_ take note of this report and be decisive in your follow—up. the decisive in your follow-up. the government — decisive in your follow-up. the government has _ decisive in your follow—up. ti2 government has said it will look at the report from the coroner and how to take this forward. stages say they are investing a lot in mtf television strategies. they have the environment bill coming up. on a specific note of what has been said today that we have yet to have details on how they will respond to
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it. the bbc has seen a series of texts, in which the prime minister offers to "fix" tax rules on behalf of businessman sirjames dyson. in the messages, sent in march last year, borisjohnson assures sirjames that neither his singapore—based company, nor its senior employees would have to pay more uk tax, if they were to make ventilators for the nhs. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. who you know — not just what you know — can matter round here. but revelations about connections between government and business have raised eyebrows of late, and now it's conversations of the prime minister himself under the spotlight. last year, the prominent tory—backing businessman sirjames dyson wanted to help make desperately needed ventilators for the nhs. but his firm wrote to the government asking, if they did, would they have to pay any more tax? official queries and conversations like that are allowed, but the rules for ministers say they have to be transparent, and civil servants should be involved. but in a series of direct text
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messages between borisjohnson and sirjames, the prime minister promised, "i will fix it tomorrow." the prime minister then said "rishi" — the chancellor — "says it's fixed". pushed again by sirjames — who said in a long message, "i'm afraid we really need a response to our letter," — mrjohnson wrote, "i am first lord of the treasury, and you can take it that we are backing you to do what you need." the government told us, at the height of the pandemic, there were genuine fears that we would quickly run out of ventilators, leaving the nhs unable to treat patients and putting many lives at risk. as the public would expect, we did everything we could in extraordinary times. in the end, as he explained to the bbc recently, dyson's offer wasn't taken up. we did it. we got it working between four and six weeks in spite of changing the specification. we were ready to go, ready to produce it, we'd bought the components, and then the cabinet office said they didn't want it, they didn't need it. and in a statement, sirjames insisted that urgent correspondence
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was only about compliance with the rules as 450 dyson people in uk and singapore worked around the clock, seven days a week, to build potentially life—saving equipment at a time of dire need. he said his company gained no benefit from the project, which had cost it £20 million. but questions are likely to be raised again about whether contacts between politics and powerful businesses are just too close for comfort. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. let's get more from our political correspondent iain watson. two very different takes on the exchange. later calls it jaw—dropping. the government says it can be shown by the extenuating circumstances of the pandemic. there is quite a discussion ranging. there is quite a discussion ranging. there is an issue — is quite a discussion ranging. there is an issue of _ is quite a discussion ranging. there is an issue of whether _ is quite a discussion ranging. there is an issue of whether ministerial. is an issue of whether ministerial rules were breached by the prime
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minister because those rules were not suspended just because there were a pandemic. wilson suggested he would have to inform officials about contacts with sirjames dyson. downing street did not say whether they informed officials or whether they informed officials or whether they were informed later on. then there is the wider issue about business and government. we saw that with david cameron and greensill. he did not break lobbying rules but there are calls for the rules to be changed. in this case, we know rules were changed about tax status. we do not know if that has anything to do with contacts that james dyson had with contacts that james dyson had with the prime minister that we know theissue with the prime minister that we know the issue was discussed very clearly with the text that has just been set out by laura. there is some sympathy
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for the prime minister from out by laura. there is some sympathy for the prime ministerfrom a previous prime minister, a previous labour prime minister at that. tony blair did seem to think when he spoke to the new channel earlier, in the midst of a national crisis, perhaps we should give the prime minister some leeway. you shouldn't bypass official channels, but on the other hand, if there is an urgent situation, and i do — having sat in the prime minister's seat myself and i know what it's like to be in the middle of a crisis — i do understand how these situations arise. when i was prime minister i never actually had a mobile phone! interestingly, as tony blair points out, he did not have a mobile phone so there is no way you can go back in time and look at those records. perhaps it is faithful senior ministers not to have that form of communication. there is questions about whether rules should be
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updated and current electronic communications as well as what used to be physical meetings between government ministers and outside interests. the current labour leadership i can tell you does not share the view of tony blair on there. he seemed to be relatively relaxed about what had occurred last year. slater said they would be making an issue of contact between government and the government's friends and supporters, what they call tory sleaze. —— labour said. friends and supporters, what they call tory sleaze. —— laboursaid. i would expect at pmqs in just under an hour, keir starmer would be going very strongly on this issue, very strongly on borisjohnson does make contact with business interests, to. we will bring you prime minister questions live here at 12 o'clock. downing street has scrapped plans to launch white house—style press conferences fronted by the prime minister's press
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secretary, allegra stratton. the government was criticised for spending more than £2.5 million on the press briefing room in downing street, which will continue to be used. labour has accused borisjohnson of wasting taxpayers' money. the queen is marking her 95th birthday today in private, four days after the funeral of her husband, the duke of edinburgh. there will be no public celebrations as she continues to observe two weeks of mourning until friday and no photograph celebrating the day is expected to be released this year. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello. as we go through the next few days and nights, it will be mostly dry and sunny by day. by night it will be cold with some frost. at the minute we had a week where front living across england and wales producing the odd spot of rain. —— weather front. producing the odd spot of rain. —— weatherfront. writing up for northern england, scotland and
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northern ireland with some sunshine. —— brightening up. temperatures falling away rapidly in the evening. we could see patchy mist and fog in the east midlands and eastern england. it will be potentially cold tonight. a frosty start to the day tomorrow. the mist and fog should lift quite rapidly. a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. we see across the english channel and along the north sea coastline. more clap coming in across the north of scotland with the odd spot of rain. top temperatures in the west of devon team. —— more cloud. hello this is bbc news, the headlines. justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. he faces up to 40 years in jail. he'll be sentenced in 8 weeks. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history"
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for america and justice has been done for their brother. today we are able to breathe again! yeah! president biden has promised to do more to deal with systemic racism and said chauvin's conviction was just the beginning after an outpouring of anger, plans for a european super league are in tatters. spain's atletico madrid also withdraws from the european super league. a series of texts show boris johnson offered to "fix" the tax rules — to encourage businessman sirjames dyson to make ventilators for the nhs. the coroner in the inquest of nine year old ella kissi debrah says the uk government should look at setting legally binding targets for pollution in line with world health organisation guidelines. sport and a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre, good morning. following the withdrawal of the six premier league sides, two more clubs — spanish team atletico madrid and italy's inter milan — have pulled out of the european superleague.. earlier, juventus chairman andrea agnelli admitted the project cannot proceed. agnelli was one of the chief architects of the super league plans, and resigned his position as chairman of the european clubs association on sunday. and was realistic about why it couldn't go ahead. to be frank and honest no, i wouldn't be talking so much about whether that project has gone. i remain convinced of the beauty of that project, the value of the pyramid, the creation of the best competition in the world but no i don't think that project is now up
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and running. well the fallout continues in england with many answers now expected of the owners of the six clubs who signed up to the league. liverpool ownerjohn w henry initially wasn't forthcoming when the bbc apprached him in boston but he did later apologise to fans in a video released by the club.... i want to apologise to all the funds and supporters of liverpool football club for the disruption i caused over the past 48 hours. ed goes without saying but should be said that the project put forward was never going to stand without the support of the fans. no one ever thought differently in england. over these 48 as you were very clear it would not stand. we heard you, i heard you. the withdrawal by the english clubs from the proposed super league has been hailed by many a result of fan power but the former liverpool and england playerjohn barnes, believes stopping the super league won't necessarily end the dominance of the richest
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clubs in the top flight. this has been going on since 1992. after that what football wanted multimillionaires running the clubs and when they come when we expect them to understand the nature of football, it has the other way around. football has to understand the nature of big business which is about money based on finances and nothing else and this is when we are caught in between the two very happy for these multi—billionaire owners to own our clubs but we want them to do what they say that is not how they became millionaires, they made they became millionaires, they made the decision is based solely on finance so we have to get the right balance. this is a power struggle between the elite groups, uefa, fifa, sky and those who run football and a new group who want to take over and it is the right to exploit football and the message so now the fans have one, at ticket prices going to be less? are they going to be able to get tickets? well share prices go down? are we going to get
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more for them. the winners are the status quo which is been football for years. and — team gb will face canada, chile — and the hosts japan — in their women's football tournament group, at this summer's tokyo olympics. the side will led by interim england coach hege riise — after phil neville departed for the mls in america earlier this year it'll be gb�*s second appearance at the tournament — and will begin with japan against canada at the sapporo dome on the 21stjuly. that's all the sport for now but don't forget the first round of the world snooker championship continues with live coverage on the bbc sport website shaun murphy is up against mark davis while three times world champion mark williams takes on england's sam craigie.. that's bbc dot co .uk slash sport thank you. president biden has urged americans to come together to confront systemic racism, after a white former police officer was found guilty of murdering george floyd. mr biden said the conviction
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of derek chauvin could be a giant step forward in the march towards justice in america. chauvin had been filmed kneeling on the neck of mr floyd for more than nine minutes during his arrest in the city last may. he faces up to 40 years in jail. our correspondent gary o'donoghue is in minneapolis. last night gary people reacted with huge relief to those guilty verdicts that the jury gave. i wondered this morning as people in minneapolis and across the us and the world analyse the importance of this verdict, what are your thoughts on that? you are right, there was jubilation are your thoughts on that? you are right, there wasjubilation notjust here in george floyd square where he died on memorial day last year but
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the court house when i was hundreds of people there really very happy and content with those verdicts. a carnival atmosphere, and content with those verdicts. a carnivalatmosphere, it and content with those verdicts. a carnival atmosphere, it could have been so different if it had not gone that way. that moment is something this community and a sense has a right to celebrate. the difficulty of course is as president obama has put it true justice will require much more. whilst this is a moment that the issue is what flows from this moment in terms of legislation, that seems pretty difficult to do nationally in this environment in congress. there are moves by individual states and police departments to make changes to redirect funding in some cases and to change the way they operate. the difficulty is the wound is an incredibly deep, notjust because of george floyd but dozens, hundreds of incidents going back years and years
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and the issue of healing the racial divide in this country is one that will take a lot more than one case. a lot been talked around the issue of police accountability. and people saying there needs to be a root and branch review of what is going on with policing from recruitment through to training and onwards. yes and some of that as a starting to happen in some municipalities. they are starting to change their training, some are looking at the ways in which police are protected through various kinds of liability legislation. all those sorts of things can change but the attitude change that was required as the one you cannot legislate for, you cannot necessarily trained for, it has to come through the generations in some way. there is a hope this will be
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one of those galvanising moments that spurs people on to actually do that. the question as it is a banal thing to say but we cannot know whether this moment means so much until time has passed and that is what many black people in this country would say as we have run out of time, we keep dying at the hands of time, we keep dying at the hands of police officers, how much longer do we have to wait. that flipping of george floyd was 's dying words i can't breathe into the reaction we saw yesterday from his family and others saying we can now breathe, thatis others saying we can now breathe, that is a powerful rallying cry going forward. it is and joe biden said those should not be george floyd's last once, they should echo on from now and there is no question that this issue is at the centre of the thinking in this white house. joe biden and an address to the
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nation, that is an incredibly significant moment and he has made some promises and particularly the left of his party will expect him to deliver on those promises. racial inequity as a central part of his platform, has been a central part and he has talked about it notjust in terms of policing but health and the economy and education, in terms of climate justice, all these areas where race was once put off to the side as a separate issue, joe biden is saying the race is integral to all these other issues and medical needs to deal with and fix. —— these issues are medicare needs to deal with. —— america needs to deal with. jasmine rand is international legal counsel for the george floyd legal team, and represented the case
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before the united nations. earlier she told victoria derbyshire what impact this verdict may have across the united states.. the significance of getting justice for george floyd alone isjust tremendous, to have accountability for a police officer that murdered a black man in america is really unprecedented in this past decade and the significance really extends so much beyond this one case. i was actually in the courtroom when they announced the not guilty verdict in the trayvon martin case and i was there for the michael brown case and when i heard those words today, guilty, guilty, guilty, for me, it was a sense of vindication not only for the family of george floyd but for the families of trayvon martin and michael brown and all of those families and those black men that died before him. what does this mean now for confidence in the criminal justice system, going forward in america?
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earlier when i first spoke, i said it meant that black lives mattered, finally in america today. and i think i spoke a little bit soon. it mattered in that moment and tragically at the same time, the jury verdict was announced in the george floyd case, a 15—year—old girl was gunned down by police in ohio. it is a step in the right direction but we have a long road to travel to get true equality in america. and we have the funeral of daunte wright later this week. he was shot last week in a routine encounter with a police officer. president biden has said this is the time now to really tackle systemic racism in your country. what does that mean in practical terms? in practical terms, that means, you know, making sure that this george floyd justice in policing gets
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passed in congress and enacted so that we can get this massive police reform that we need. we can't look at it in a procedural manner. at the prosecutor said a significant in his closing argument, he said the defence tried to convince you that george floyd died because his heart was too big but what you heard throughout this trial was that derek chauvin killed him because his heart was too small. until we change the root of the problem, until we change our society in a fundamental way, we are going to continuing this kind of inequities. african—american families will still have to train their sons, for example, how to behave when they are stopped by police officers, be polite, put your hands on the steering wheel and no sudden movements. absolutely. i think that conversation... what is crazy is that after the trayvon
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martin case, i had other clients and represented other victims who had the trayvon martin talk with their children and one particular case, the son looked at his father and said, what would you do if i ended up like trayvon martin? a year later, he was in his shoes and his son was dead due to police violence. a study by harvard says black americans are more than three times more likely than white americans to be killed by the police. why? because we have so much structural racism. in america, we don't like to talk about our past and the inequities that have been passed down from slavery but it is a relatively short history, a few hundred years. we have hadjim crow in this past century. segregation. and we have a history of racial injustice and we have to reconcile that at some point to be able
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to move forward in the future. and i cannot speak without also saying, what is the future ofjustice and what does that look like because justice is not a guilty verdict after a black man is shot in the back, realjustice, the future ofjustice in america needs to look like black men living in equality, having equal access to health care, employment, education we cannot set the bar forjustice so low that it is just to stop black men from getting shot in the back. that is not enough. we have to demand true equality throughout society. more now on one of our top stories. in the last hour, the president ofjuventus said the super league 'can't exist�* without the english clubs — all six have withdrawn from the league — together with spain's atletico madrid, and the italian side inter milan. let's go live to spain now. joining me from valencia is the spanish footballjournalist, journalist, guillem balague
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i wrote a list this morning of the clubs who were still in the super league, it was a pretty short, just for names and since then atletico madrid have dropped out. it isn't very super any more and presumably only a matter of time before the remaining few dropout as well. we don't remaining few dropout as well. - don't know because the ones at left at stanley competition, g aventis, a barcelona real madrid at the forefront, this is a vision and idea that started with juventus who with the right analysis thanks football has to go to another level but they have reached the wrong conclusion. juventus at the moment and debating what to do. barcelona don't have an intention just yet of putting a public note, the talking about the position because the ad talking to
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everybody right now and i would imaginejuventus be the last to see the got it wrong. in a imagine juventus be the last to see the got it wrong-— the got it wrong. in a statement from atletico _ the got it wrong. in a statement from atletico madrid _ the got it wrong. in a statement from atletico madrid they - the got it wrong. in a statement from atletico madrid they say i the got it wrong. in a statement| from atletico madrid they say for club harmony between all the groups that make up the red and white family especially our fans at is essential that we take this step to leave the super league idea but if they can so much about the fans how did they misjudge what the fans would think in the first place? thea;r would think in the first place? they were all thinking _ would think in the first place? they were all thinking not _ would think in the first place? ti2 were all thinking not so much would think in the first place? ti21 were all thinking not so much of their pocket even though the honours were but about the future of the game and the future of the clubs. nobody wants to listen to this but a lot of the analysis that was done to reach the wrong conclusion is right, there are a lot of things that have to change. interestingly la liga is going to have a press conference tomorrow in which they will they will debate everything juventus said
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with football like young fans are disappearing from the game, less money from television. la liga is saying it is not like that, we will hear of them but in any case the feeling out there is that there is a debate to be made about where the business of football have to go and number to a few and going to do that you better talk to the fans and players and coaches and media and everybody else because we are in this together and a lot of us including the media felt completely out of it and it was not a surprise that it was fast and angled the fans went to the streets because football thatis went to the streets because football that is a lifestyle. in spain in 90 minutes of a game we discuss it but thatis minutes of a game we discuss it but that is not so much action from the fans behind it but at the end of all this it may well be that lobbying from the fans are something they have to think of.— have to think of. what has the reaction been _ have to think of. what has the reaction been from _ have to think of. what has the reaction been from fans - have to think of. what has the reaction been from fans they i have to think of. what has the i reaction been from fans they are today and spin? in spain. irlat
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reaction been from fans they are today and spin? in spain. not much. i am iioin today and spin? in spain. not much. i am going to — today and spin? in spain. not much. i am going to go _ today and spin? in spain. not much. i am going to go to _ today and spin? in spain. not much. i am going to go to the _ today and spin? in spain. not much. i am going to go to the barcelona . i am going to go to the barcelona game tomorrow and able see what there are people outside protesting, they will not do it, we don't come to the streets to protest, be go—to the bar and discuss it. it is not a lifestyle and which football has to be part of everything that happens, in spain it is different there is a distance but quite clearly there is a general consensus that that was right, it isjust a general consensus that that was right, it is just perhaps an a general consensus that that was right, it isjust perhaps an spain more than in england people are saying there was a reason for all this and actually is it interesting if you have a lot ofjuventus, manchester united and barcelona more often than not this is not a people want to hear but deep down they are trying to attract a lot of fans that are not local fans, trying to attract a lot of fans that are not localfans, they don't trying to attract a lot of fans that are not local fans, they don't count some much these days. it
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are not local fans, they don't count some much these days.— some much these days. it has happened _ some much these days. it has happened remarkably - some much these days. it hasj happened remarkably quickly, some much these days. it has - happened remarkably quickly, we some much these days. it has happened remarkably quickly, we saw this push for the super league, the big teams eyeing up the prize of more money for them and a lot of these teams obviously are in debt, significant amounts of data so as there a thought that perhaps some of there a thought that perhaps some of the billionaire business people who own these teams haven't got what they wanted, might they be tempted to withdraw their money and if that is another buyer out there so the team on. ., , , , ., team on. there are still plenty of mone to team on. there are still plenty of money to be _ team on. there are still plenty of money to be made _ team on. there are still plenty of money to be made at _ team on. there are still plenty of money to be made at the - team on. there are still plenty of. money to be made at the champions league is going to be revamped and i think this pressure the super league founders have put and may even mean more money and more control. still interesting for them to be part of this but we are talking mostly about the england model because in spain barcelona and real madrid and owned by season—ticket holders and theory
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that actually we have to get to hear the season—ticket holders and a few board of barcelona won something through the assembly they get it. in the case of method the event going to consult anyone, mostly it has been fans saying we like this, we like the idea, the european cup idea and the 50s, started by the president of madrid. they are happy to push on with the game but in terms of business yes they want more money and will continue pushing in different ways to do so. the prospect — different ways to do so. the prospect of _ different ways to do so. the prospect of a _ different ways to do so. the prospect of a super - different ways to do so. the prospect of a super league, kicked out of touch completely or maybe see the idea evolve into some sort of other competition that the football bodies and clubs are actually happy with? ., ., ~' bodies and clubs are actually happy with? ., ., ,, ., ., , .,
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with? look at the teams left on the west, as with? look at the teams left on the west. as it — with? look at the teams left on the west, as it three? _ with? look at the teams left on the west, as it three? ever— with? look at the teams left on the west, as it three? ever be - with? look at the teams left on the west, as it three? ever be a - with? look at the teams left on the west, as it three? ever be a nice i west, as it three? ever be a nice summer tournament with the three of them but that is about it. the push now is for more, it will always be remembered this is a capitalist system in which the rich want more money and what the right to distribute the money the way they want without uefa and the middle. the battle will continue but right now what he will go with as a champions league with more games that are supposed to bring more money and in the case ofjuventus the insistence on an idea he thought it would bring 4 billion euros to football to the pyramid, to women's football to the pyramid, to women's football as well, it was never explained how but that is that interest out there for a different format in the future. now it has lost prestige and authority to gather everyone together to do an
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alternative competition. thank you, good to talk to you. i don't think a three teams makes a summer tournament. brazil has the world s second—highest death toll of the pandemic ? but its vaccination programme has been slow, with president bolsonaro coming under a lot of criticism for mismanaging procurement and rollout. the brazilian government is now in talks with vaccine manufacturer pfizer to buy 100 million doses. mark lowen reports from sao paulo there's been a little bit of a slow day here at this vaccine centre in the heart of sao paulo, as people come in to be vaccinated who are over the age of 67 and who are health care workers. they are coming to get to the coronavac from china — the two vaccines available in brazil. the interesting thing is that the person vaccinating shows, before she puts in the jab, that it is full, because there were some videos circulating online
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that seemed to suggest that empty shots were going into people's arms. the vaccine goes in... and once done, proof of an empty syringe. translation: i'm delighted. i've got a new granddaughter and i was really worried about being with her. now i'm very happy. it's been a terrible year. we need to be free of it. there have been problems with this vaccine campaign, political problems, but better not to talk about it! well, perhaps the slow day is rather echoing brazil's low vaccination drive. only 11 or so percent of brazilians have received their first dose, and just over 4% have received both doses, and this in a country with the second highest death toll of the pandemic — more than 375,000 dead. many people blame the government of president bolsonaro, who received proposals for tens of millions of pfizer doses last
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year but said no, his critics say because of his anti—vaccine, anti virus control stance. translation: we have tv programmes i and whatsapp messages that distort i information and spread fear. one of those sources of misinformation is the president. if you have power, people listen to what you are saying. when the world says you should be vaccinating and bolsonaro says you shouldn't, it's a contradictory message. unfortunately, the rolling out campaign, it's not reaching with the speed we would like to. we need to receive more from the federal government. a lack of doses is a lack of hope to end this pandemic soon, and we need hope for these people, and we need a vaccine to protect them. we'll be live in the commons at midday
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for prime minister's questions — lobbying and football expected to be some of the topics discussed. our political correspondent iain watson is at westminster. the watson is at westminster. prime minister personai involved the prime minister personally involved in this lobbying discussion. that's right, i think what people see from labour as a generalising from the specific with boris johnson's text exchanges generalising from the specific with borisjohnson's text exchanges with james dyson, whether that is too coarse innovation ship between ministers and those in business and whether those business people are getting access other people could only hope for but they will try to widen this out and talk more generally about what they call tory sleaze, effectively infer that the government has one rule for ministers and mates and another for everyone else and i think they will be raising notjust howjames dyson has been treated during the pandemic
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with the discussion of the tax rules but how front line staff have been treated and the health service by the government. they will be trying to generalise this issue but also from what the picking up during the campaigns for local elections as some of the voters they lost at the 2019 general election seem to be concerned about this issue of whether there is one rule for the government and one for them so that is why labour will be focusing pretty relentlessly on this pm q but also keep that focus as much as possible and the key weeks ahead. i think the primary stubble pushback from this, talk about what he was doing during the pandemic —— the prime minister will push back and might even invoke a former labour prime minister and his defence because tony blair pointed out having sat in the ministerial chair himself as a labour prime minister that the situation is at times of national crisis can be difficult so he was suggesting when he spoke to
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the bbc earlier that perhaps the government could be given some leeway even of the rules that govern these contacts are important. we might see a conservative prime minister using early but payments stop to attack to be that of the opposition. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol dry and sunny by day over the next few night but call with frost. some shells this afternoon and the south—west, here the highest temperatures, but brightening for northern england and scotland and northern ireland where some sunshine. temperatures falling quite rapidly as we go through the evening, sharon is also fading, we could see patchy mist and fog across the east but it is going to be cold,
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potentially —4 across parts of north—east england and scotland. a frosty start to tomorrow, the mist and fog lifting rapidly and a lot of dry weather and sunshine, breezy across the english channel and adjacent coastlines, breezy as well on the north sea coast line but more cloud in the north of scotland with the odd spot of rain. top temperatures out to the west of 17.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. he faces up to 40 years in jail. he'll be sentenced in 8 weeks. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. plans for european super league are in tatters as all six english clubs pull out — the preisdent ofjuventas — one of the italian clubs involved says the super league can't exist without english clubs. a series of texts show boris johnson offered to "fix" the tax rules to encourage businessman sirjames dyson to make ventilators for the nhs. and we'll be live in the house of commons
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for prime minister's questions in a few moments which is likely to be dominated by those lobbying revelations. let's take you live to the house of commons. very best wishes to her majesty the queen on her 95th birthday. last night's that it ends minneapolis delivered justice for the family of george floyd. thought of the whole house remain with them. i welcome the decision taken by the six english football teams not to join a european super league. the announcement was the right result of that full—time is, clubs and communities across the country. this morning i had meetings with ministers and will have further such meetings later today.— ministers and will have further such meetings later today. thank you. may i extend my — meetings later today. thank you. may i extend my good _ meetings later today. thank you. may i extend my good wishes _ meetings later today. thank you. may i extend my good wishes to _ meetings later today. thank you. may i extend my good wishes to the - meetings later today. thank you. may| i extend my good wishes to the queen today? _ i extend my good wishes to the queen today? i_ i extend my good wishes to the queen today? i know it must be a difficult
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time _ today? i know it must be a difficult time she — today? i know it must be a difficult time. she will be surrounded by friends — time. she will be surrounded by friends and family. i know the prime minister— friends and family. i know the prime minister is _ friends and family. i know the prime minister is a — friends and family. i know the prime minister is a supporter of basic income — minister is a supporter of basic income. given many areas and 24 other— income. given many areas and 24 other councils around the united kingdom — other councils around the united kingdom have expressed a desire to run pilot— kingdom have expressed a desire to run pilot schemes to enhance all knowledge, the prose and the consequent will the prime minister consider— consequent will the prime minister consider facilitating any pilot schemes in the united kingdom and consider— schemes in the united kingdom and consider any research into basic income? — consider any research into basic income? if— consider any research into basic income? ,., consider any research into basic income? ., ., ., income? if so, what? i am grateful to the honourable _ income? if so, what? i am grateful to the honourable member- income? if so, what? i am grateful to the honourable member for- income? if so, what? i am grateful to the honourable member for his l to the honourable memberfor his support for a uk wide proposal. i trust he understands the irony of that when you consider that his party, as i understand it, is hell—bent on calling and
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irresponsible referendum on breaking up irresponsible referendum on breaking up the united kingdom. mr irresponsible referendum on breaking up the united kingdom.— up the united kingdom. mr speaker, as we come — up the united kingdom. mr speaker, as we come out _ up the united kingdom. mr speaker, as we come out of— up the united kingdom. mr speaker, as we come out of lot _ up the united kingdom. mr speaker, as we come out of lot down - up the united kingdom. mr speaker, as we come out of lot down under i up the united kingdom. mr speaker, as we come out of lot down under to| as we come out of lot down under to the summer, many will be concerned about the body image. there are 125 million people who suffer from eating disorders and 1.2 million using steroids. the equalities commission issued a report on body image. they concluded that fixated with unachievable body images were having a detrimental impact. with the prime minister consider all options, including labelling digitally altered images to help deal with issues raised on body image? mi; deal with issues raised on body imaie? g ., ., , image? my honourable friend is raisin a image? my honourable friend is raising a very — image? my honourable friend is raising a very important - image? my honourable friend is raising a very important point. i j raising a very important point. i think he and the house is aware of the pressure young people in particular can deal as a result of the dot images and as part of the
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online advertising, the consultation with the online advertising programme, we will look at what we can do and respond to the report from the select committee in due course. ., ,, ,, ., from the select committee in due | course-_ can from the select committee in due i course-_ can i course. now sir keir starmer. can i 'oin the course. now sir keir starmer. can i join the prime _ course. now sir keir starmer. can i join the prime minister _ course. now sir keir starmer. can i join the prime minister in _ course. now sir keir starmer. can i join the prime minister in wishing i join the prime minister in wishing her majesty very happy day? the last few weeks have been a time of incredible anguish and we all send the royal family best wishes. about the royal family best wishes. about the verdict on the george lloyd case, justice in case. as an arsenal season ticket holder, can ijoin him in his comments about the european super league which would have destroyed football. we need to get on with the other changes that are necessary. and i send my condolences to the family of frankjed? he was a much loved member of the house and the other place and highly respected
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as a labour minister. a great internationalist and campaigner for peace and human rights. he will be sadly missed. what does the prime minister think will be the right thing to do if he receives a text message from a billionaire conservative supporter, asking him to fix tax rules? mr conservative supporter, asking him to fix tax rules?— to fix tax rules? mr speaker, festival l _ to fix tax rules? mr speaker, festival i echo _ to fix tax rules? mr speaker, festival i echo the _ to fix tax rules? mr speaker, festival i echo the right - to fix tax rules? mr speaker, - festival i echo the right honourable gentleman's remarks about frank judd. in response to the question, if he is referring to the request from james dyson, i make no apology at all in doing everything i possibly could. i think any prime minister would in no circumstance is. to secure ventilators of people in this country, saving lives and roll out a ventilator procurement which the labour—controlled public accounts committee said was a
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benchmark for procurement. mr speaker, let's be clear what the texts show. the prime minister was lobbied by a well businessmen and close friend for a change in tax rules. the prime minister responded, i will fix it. after discussion with the chance, who everybody seems to be lobbying these days, the prime minister texted his friend to say it is fixed. how many others the prime minister's personal number has he given preferential treatment to? i recall the right honourable gentleman the time saying that we should do everything that we could to get more ventilators and indeed he congratulated the roll—out of the ventilator. he said well done to everyone involved for the ventilator
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challenge. if i can reminder has what we were facing in march last year. we had a new virus capable of killing people in ways we did not understand that only way to help them was to intubate them and put them was to intubate them and put them on ventilation. we had 9000 ventilators in this country and killed 22,000 as a result of the ventilator challenge. i think it was the entirely right thing to do, to let middle potential makers are ventilators at that time, mr speaker. way, so does the former leader of the labour party, tony blair. , , ., , leader of the labour party, tony blair. _ ._ ., leader of the labour party, tony blair. _ ., , , , blair. -- by the way. i am surprised the prime — blair. -- by the way. i am surprised the prime minister _ blair. -- by the way. i am surprised the prime minister brings _ blair. -- by the way. i am surprised the prime minister brings up - blair. -- by the way. i am surprised| the prime minister brings up former leader since it was his friend, dave, he was the heart of much of this. as it the businesses stepped up this. as it the businesses stepped up during the pandemic. the differences they did not have the chance to text the prime minister asking him to six the tax situation.
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that is the difference. the heart of the scandal are people plasma jobs and wasted taxpayer money. take for example the thousands ofjobs at liberty steel that are on the line. in hartlepool, in rotherham and elsewhere, following the collapse of greensill capital. he has done nothing to help steelworkers. is is literally one rule for days who have a number of the prime minister and anotherfor a number of the prime minister and another for everyone else? he a number of the prime minister and another for everyone else?- another for everyone else? he calls it a scandal- — another for everyone else? he calls it a scandal. he _ another for everyone else? he calls it a scandal. he voted _ another for everyone else? he calls it a scandal. he voted for _ another for everyone else? he calls it a scandal. he voted for the - it a scandal. he voted for the changes we brought in. he called our ventilator challenge an outstanding success and i he was completely right. this meant get on and delivers full people in distress. —— for people. i am concerned for the
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families of steelworkers up and down the country, that is why the business secretary has been meeting with unions and with the management of liberty steal repeatedly the last few days. it was under the last labour governmentjobs in steel fell by more than 50% and output fell by more than 50%. we have a 5 million tonne pipeline of which is still massive infrastructure investments. we intend to use our new freedoms and the brexit to make sure that procurement goes to richest companies. procurement goes to richest companies-— procurement goes to richest com-anies. ., , companies. you say you believe in british steel, _ companies. you say you believe in british steel, is _ companies. you say you believe in british steel, is something? -- i british steel, is something? —— british steel, is something? —— british companies. the british steel, is something? -- british companies.— british companies. the prime minister is — british companies. the prime minister is boasting - british companies. the prime minister is boasting to - british companies. the prime | minister is boasting to friends british companies. the prime - minister is boasting to friends that he is the first lord of the treasury and we can give you the backing you need. he will not give their workers in steel the backing they need stop
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tax breaks will make, that is the main currency of this conservative government. if that is not the case, prime minister, can you tell me if one of the 3 million self—employed people, who have been excluded from government support for over a year and faced bankruptcy, it may text the prime minister to ask for a tax break so they can survive, but he changed the rules for them as well? mr speaker, this government has supported the self employed with more than £14 billion throughout the pandemic. that is part of a vast package of support for jobs pandemic. that is part of a vast package of support forjobs and livelihoods across the country. we continue to do everything take. i think you should take back what you said about the ventilator challenge. he attacks it now and our efforts to get more ventilators at are very difficult times for this country, in
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the same way, mr speaker, in which he opportunistically attacked the vaccine task force at a critical moment, which he will recall. we take tough decisions necessary to protect people in this country and get things done. if i protect people in this country and get things done.— protect people in this country and get things done. if i had to correct the prime minister _ get things done. if i had to correct the prime minister for _ get things done. if i had to correct the prime minister for everything l get things done. if i had to correct i the prime minister for everything he the prime ministerfor everything he gets wrong, i would be here all day. i take it that is a noun in answer to the question about 3 million. there we have it. there is to the 3 million. —— a closed door to the 3 million. —— a closed door to the 3 million. it shows the cronyism the heart of his government. let me try another way. heart of his government. let me try anotherway. it's heart of his government. let me try another way. it's an nhs nurse, prime minister, who has been working on the front line during the pandemic had the prime minister's phone number, would they get a pay rise theyto obviously deserve? i am
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aroud of rise theyto obviously deserve? i am proud of what _ rise theyto obviously deserve? i am proud of what the _ rise theyto obviously deserve? i am proud of what the government has done to support the nhs throughout this pandemic with record investments and another 92 billion we put in to support the nhs throughout the pandemic. what we are doing it last year taking in the bursaries of £5,000, plus the £3000 on top to help with training and the costs of childcare. at 12 .8% increase on starting salary in the last couple of years. above all this is a government that is helping nurses and helping the profession by recruiting more than ever before. there are already 50,000 more people in the nhs this year than last year, the speaker, and 10,600 more nurses. —— mr speaker. that is what i would say to the nurses i have spoken to in the last three days and we. the prime minister _ in the last three days and we. ti2 prime minister would know how
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insulted the nhs front line is. they did not get a text from the prime minister, they got kicked in the teeth. mr speaker, there is a pattern to this government. the prime minister is fixing tax breaks for his friend. the chancellor is pushing the treasury and meeting greensill by the health secretary. everyday are new allegations about this conservative government stops dodgy ppe deals, tax breaks for mates. the health secretary and shares in a company delivering nhs services. sleaze, sleaze, sleaze. it is all on his watch. with this scandal now firmly centred on him, how and did he expect people to believe he is the person to clean up this mess? i
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believe he is the person to clean up this mess?— this mess? i will tell you why this government _ this mess? i will tell you why this government is — this mess? i will tell you why this government is doing _ this mess? i will tell you why this government is doing the - this mess? i will tell you why this government is doing the right - this mess? i will tell you why this i government is doing the right thing right time. the difference between us and the labour party is, i am afraid, sparingly of the. we get on with taking tough decisions to protect the people in this country and take the country forward. we take tough decisions to procure tens of thousands of ventilators in record time, which apparently he now opposes. we put forward tougher sentences for rapists and violent women as he opposes on a three line whip, mr speaker. a stick at, we take tough decisions to stick up for the fans of our national game. this government gets on with delivering on people plasma priorities, mr prime minister stop back in 2019 the government gave the labour council
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in bradford hundreds of thousands of pounds to carry out a feasibility study for a bypass. it pounds to carry out a feasibility study for a bypass.— pounds to carry out a feasibility study for a bypass. it was due to re hort study for a bypass. it was due to report any _ study for a bypass. it was due to report any ultimate _ study for a bypass. it was due to report any ultimate 2019. - study for a bypass. it was due to report any ultimate 2019. year. study for a bypass. it was due to | report any ultimate 2019. year on from april 2020, there was no sign of it. with the prime minister intervened to ensure this vital infrastructure project is delivered? seeing how we can break away our constituencies from bradford council to set up a unitary authority to deliver for our constituents. mr speaker, on the second point, i am sure the relevant minister will be happy to meet and consult him. on his point about the ship a bypass, the matter is with bradford council. —— shipley bypass.
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the matter is with bradford council. -- shipley bypass-— -- shipley bypass. let's go to the leader of the _ -- shipley bypass. let's go to the leader of the snp. _ -- shipley bypass. let's go to the leader of the snp. can _ -- shipley bypass. let's go to the leader of the snp. can i - -- shipley bypass. let's go to thej leader of the snp. can i associate m self leader of the snp. can i associate myself with _ leader of the snp. can i associate myself with the _ leader of the snp. can i associate myself with the remarks - leader of the snp. can i associate myself with the remarks of - leader of the snp. can i associate myself with the remarks of the i leader of the snp. can i associate . myself with the remarks of the prime minister and the leader of the opposition under queen's90 birthday and the justice we have seen in the george floyd case? this morning's revelations around interference in covid contracts are incredibly serious. whether it is cash for questions or whatever, people know it is the same old story. this is how the tories did the prime minister is very hard scandal stop —— hauser tories to government. if he has nothing to hide and will he publish all personal exchanges on these contracts before the end of
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these contracts before the end of the day? these contracts before the end of the da ? , these contracts before the end of theda? , ., the day? there is absolutely nothing to conceal about _ the day? there is absolutely nothing to conceal about this. _ the day? there is absolutely nothing to conceal about this. i _ the day? there is absolutely nothing to conceal about this. i am - the day? there is absolutely nothing to conceal about this. i am happy . the day? there is absolutely nothing to conceal about this. i am happy to | to conceal about this. i am happy to share all the details with the house, as i said then with my officials immediately, mr speaker. it is thanks to that immediate action we have been able to roll out, not only with ventilator challenge that also to help the people of the whole united kingdom to get access in record times for the vaccines on which we all depend. same for rolling out ppe, mr speaker. we have had to let that incredible speed. it is sometimes necessary to act decisively to get things done. ibis necessary to act decisively to get things done-— necessary to act decisively to get thins done. �* , ~ , things done. as the prime minister sa s, things done. as the prime minister says. there — things done. as the prime minister says. there is _ things done. as the prime minister says, there is nothing _ things done. as the prime minister says, there is nothing to _ things done. as the prime minister says, there is nothing to see - things done. as the prime minister says, there is nothing to see here. | says, there is nothing to see here. published. let's have transparency.
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—— publish them. last march the prime minister and chancellor had all the time and ability picks contracts but did not have any time to support the millions of self—employed. those 3 million people didn't have david cameron or ajames dyson people didn't have david cameron or a james dyson to text the prime ministerfor them. they were a james dyson to text the prime minister for them. they were on their own and left behind by this prime minister. it tory text book contract scandal is growing more serious with every revelation. the prime minister was keen to initiate an enquiry into predecessor david hammond slow to commit to the public and comprehensive enquiry into himself and his own government. —— david cameron. iie himself and his own government. -- david cameron.— david cameron. he said we had all the time in — david cameron. he said we had all the time in the _ david cameron. he said we had all the time in the world. _ david cameron. he said we had all the time in the world. as - david cameron. he said we had all the time in the world. as the - david cameron. he said we had all. the time in the world. as the house will recall, at the end of march last year, there pandemic is taking a very fast to me had lacked very
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fast as people up and down the country understand. i thought his dog made a more sensible contribution just dog made a more sensible contributionjust now dog made a more sensible contribution just now than he did stop —— had to act very fast. farmers have worked tirelessly to give us world—class british food throughout the pandemic. in return, the welsh labour and liberal democrat government has given them a slap in the face with the policy which will do nothing for water quality with water companies dumping thousands of tonnes of sewage into rivers. does the prime minister agree this demonstrates welsh labour's absolute contempt for rural areas like mine? she labour's absolute contempt for rural areas like mine?— areas like mine? she is right. agriculture — areas like mine? she is right. agriculture is _ areas like mine? she is right. agriculture is devolved - areas like mine? she is right. agriculture is devolved in - areas like mine? she is right. i agriculture is devolved in wales. areas like mine? she is right. - agriculture is devolved in wales. if people want to send a clear signal and a change in the way farmers are
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treated, i hope they will vote conservative in the welsh assembly elections in a week's time. vote for a party championing agriculture that leaves in it. i a party championing agriculture that leaves in it. ., , , ., a party championing agriculture that leaves in it. , ., ., , ., leaves in it. i was proud to put on the uniform _ leaves in it. i was proud to put on the uniform of— leaves in it. i was proud to put on the uniform of the _ leaves in it. i was proud to put on the uniform of the crown - leaves in it. i was proud to put on the uniform of the crown and - leaves in it. i was proud to put on the uniform of the crown and to i the uniform of the crown and to serve with tens of thousands of men and women from our armed forces and our police and protecting the entire community in northern ireland from the ravages of terrorism during a troubled past. the prime minister gave a commitment in his election manifesto to introduce legislation to protect those men and women from vexatious prosecutions. will the prime minister and by and on other commitment? i prime minister and by and on other commitment?— commitment? i thank my right honourable _ commitment? i thank my right honourable gentleman - commitment? i thank my right honourable gentleman very - commitment? i thank my right - honourable gentleman very much, testable, for his service. i know the whole house will agree and i
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want to say, put on record by the way, my thanks to the former ministerfor way, my thanks to the former minister for veterans way, my thanks to the former ministerfor veterans for all way, my thanks to the former minister for veterans for all that he did to help with improving the lot of veterans across our country. we have protect many veterans with the overseas operations ill. there is more to be done in the case of veterans in northern ireland, of the northern ireland conflict, and we will be bringing forward further measures are in due course. since 2019, clyde _ measures are in due course. since 2019, clyde valley _ measures are in due course. since 2019, clyde valley has _ measures are in due course. ’5 “ic2 2019, clyde valley has benefited from significant investment, including reinstating the rail line. —— lies. it demonstrates the commitment to build back better. can i congratulate my friend on his
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drive and commitment in helping areas that have been it for so long? will he devote his county health areas realise their full potential? i would like to offer my right honourable friend a chance to visit us. i am sure he will receive a warm welcome. we us. i am sure he will receive a warm welcome. ~ , us. i am sure he will receive a warm welcome. . , ., , ., ., ., welcome. we stood on the seafront at bl he and welcome. we stood on the seafront at blythe and looked _ welcome. we stood on the seafront at blythe and looked out _ welcome. we stood on the seafront at blythe and looked out by _ welcome. we stood on the seafront at blythe and looked out by their- welcome. we stood on the seafront at blythe and looked out by their wind i blythe and looked out by their wind farms will be built in the north sea. thanks for his help and his leadership, we are seeing blythe valley and many other part of the north east. green industrial revolution, delivering high wage and high skilled jobs across our country.
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high skilled 'obs across our count . ., , .. high skilled 'obs across our count . ., , ,, , ., high skilled 'obs across our count . ,, ,~�* country. last week, hundreds of gmb as country. last week, hundreds of gmb gas engineers — country. last week, hundreds of gmb gas engineers were _ country. last week, hundreds of gmb gas engineers were sacked _ country. last week, hundreds of gmb gas engineers were sacked for - gas engineers were sacked for refusing to sign a new contract can expect them to work harder and get paid less. fire and hire abuses are spreading three workplaces like a virus. the government has called it unacceptable and refuse to take action to ban it was that i am giving the prime minister the chance to show us where it stands. will he commit here and now to give proposals to end this in next month's queen's speech? yes or no? i repeat what i said about that kiss. if she would be kind enough to send me details about the case she raises, i would me details about the case she raises, iwould be me details about the case she raises, i would be happy to take it up. raises, i would be happy to take it u n _ ., ~' raises, i would be happy to take it up. ., " , ., raises, i would be happy to take it up. thank you, mr speaker. access to su herfast up. thank you, mr speaker. access to superfast broadband _ up. thank you, mr speaker. access to superfast broadband is _ up. thank you, mr speaker. access to
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superfast broadband is critical - superfast broadband is critical today. many people cannot access it. while the question is essential viewing my critics may struggle to what it swimming at home this evening seminars is catching up on the masterchef final. there's my right honourable friend share my ambition that everyone should have access to superfast broadband just as people have access to water and electricity? mi; as people have access to water and electrici ? g ., ., ., , , electricity? my honourable friend is entirely right- _ electricity? my honourable friend is entirely right. that _ electricity? my honourable friend is entirely right. that is _ electricity? my honourable friend is entirely right. that is why - electricity? my honourable friend is entirely right. that is why we i electricity? my honourable friend is entirely right. that is why we have | entirely right. that is why we have massively accelerated the roll—out of superfast broadband and coverage of superfast broadband and coverage of reliable broadband with just 9% when the government to pay that. it will be 60% by the end of year and we're dragging it up across the whole country, unleashing the potential of the entire uk. dar; potential of the entire uk. day after day. _ potential of the entire uk. day after day. we _ potential of the entire uk. day after day, we see _
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potential of the entire uk. d21: after day, we see more potential of the entire uk. t�*i21 after day, we see more corruption coming to light. day after day i speak to more desperate constituents who are excluded from this meant�*s support of the people who have lost livelihoods and homes. businesses built up over the years unable to put food on their tables. it seems all they needed was a number of prime minister and chancellor. i am ashamed on behalf this country. will the prime minister and chancellor now take the course of my constituents in cardiff north and meet with me and then to discuss how they can rebuild their lives after losing so much? mr they can rebuild their lives after losing so much?— they can rebuild their lives after losing so much? mr speaker, i am aroud of losing so much? mr speaker, i am proud of the _ losing so much? mr speaker, i am proud of the roll-out _ losing so much? mr speaker, i am proud of the roll-out of _ losing so much? mr speaker, i am proud of the roll-out of the - proud of the roll—out of the ventilators, 30,000 we delivered. i am proud of it and proud the decisions we take. criticised by the labour party to roll out vaccines at record speed. i am proud we did what
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we did to support people in the country throughout the pandemic and overall package of billions of pounds. we will bounce back all the better and all the stronger because of the strong economy we ensure this country had going into the crisis, which would have been impossible, mr speaker, undera labour which would have been impossible, mr speaker, under a labour government. that is what she should tell her constituents. i that is what she should tell her constituents.— that is what she should tell her constituents. ., , , , . constituents. i was deeply concerned at the weekend _ constituents. i was deeply concerned at the weekend following _ constituents. i was deeply concerned at the weekend following reports i constituents. i was deeply concerned at the weekend following reports in i at the weekend following reports in the sunday express that the statue of the great united states president ronald reagan, which once stood in grosvenor square has been removed and remains at a public site stop i know that the prime minister will agree with me that president reagan was a true friend to the united kingdom, who alongside margaret thatcher, ended the cold war and supported britain in the liberation of the falkland islands. now our
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american friends have moved to a new embassy in wandsworth, with the prime minister agree with me the statue of president reagan should be moved to a more prominent location in parliament square to visitors at home and across the globe can view this remarkable man? you home and across the globe can view this remarkable man?— home and across the globe can view this remarkable man? you have 'ust heard an honourable i this remarkable man? you have 'ust heard an honourable memberi this remarkable man? you havejust| heard an honourable member saying she was ashamed of her country. it is no wonder people take that kind of attitude. i he is entirely right in what he says about president reagan. he was a very distinguished president. i think it is down to the greater london authority. i think he has to appeal to the current mayor of london. let's hope there is a new one. ., ~' of london. let's hope there is a new one. ., ~ 1 ., y of london. let's hope there is a new one. ., , i. , . of london. let's hope there is a new one. ., y . ~ one. thank you very much, mr speaker- _ one. thank you very much, mr speaker. polio, _ one. thank you very much, mr speaker. polio, a _ one. thank you very much, mr speaker. polio, a disease i one. thank you very much, mr speaker. polio, a disease that| one. thank you very much, mr- speaker. polio, a disease that kills
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and names children has been eliminated in all but one region in the world due to the incredible work of global polio eradication initiative stopped in 2019, uk international development secretary pledged £400 million to the programme. he said to do otherwise would risk the chance to thousands of new polio cases every year. with the prime minister now reassure the house he will honour that commitment? —— will the prime minister? commitment? -- will the prime minister? , ., commitment? -- will the prime minister?— minister? yes, global polio eradication _ minister? yes, global polio eradication initiative - minister? yes, global polio eradication initiative has i minister? yes, global polio i eradication initiative has been backed by one point three £7 billion in uk aid since 1995. there are many proud successes at that programme and polio across the planet, very largely ranks to the help of the british taxpayer has been almost eliminated. i
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british taxpayer has been almost eliminated. ., british taxpayer has been almost eliminated-— british taxpayer has been almost eliminated. ., , ., ., eliminated. i am pleased that common sense has prevailed _ eliminated. i am pleased that common sense has prevailed and _ eliminated. i am pleased that common sense has prevailed and all— eliminated. i am pleased that common sense has prevailed and all six - sense has prevailed and all six english clubs have now committed to withdrawing from the european super league does my right honourable friend agree that if we are to protect the beautiful game further, football clubs must put fans at the heart of decision—making? yes. football clubs must put fans at the heart of decision-making?- football clubs must put fans at the heart of decision-making? yes, i do, mr speaker- — heart of decision-making? yes, i do, mr speaker- i — heart of decision-making? yes, i do, mr speaker. i inked _ heart of decision-making? yes, i do, mr speaker. i inked one _ heart of decision-making? yes, i do, mr speaker. i inked one of— heart of decision-making? yes, i do, mr speaker. i inked one of the - heart of decision-making? yes, i do, mr speaker. i inked one of the most| mr speaker. i inked one of the most worrying features about european super league proposals if they would have taken super league proposals if they would have ta ken clubs super league proposals if they would have taken clubs that take their names from great famous british towns and cities from, and turn then just into global brands that no relations to the fans, the communities gave them life and gives them the most love and support. in my view that was totally wrong. not given the lack of competition. we were to root and branch
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investigation into the governance of football and what we can do to promote the role of fans in that. the prime minister will be aware that opinion polls can pin you to show a majority in favour of scottish independence. we have in lumbered with a prime minister who thinks £1 spent in croydon is more valuable than £1 spent in strathclyde? i valuable than £1 spent in strathclyde?— valuable than £1 spent in strathclyde? valuable than £1 spent in strathcl de? .. ., valuable than £1 spent in strathcl de? ~' ., , ., , strathclyde? i inked what the people of scotland need _ strathclyde? i inked what the people of scotland need is _ strathclyde? i inked what the people of scotland need is an _ of scotland need is an administration in scotland that spends taxpayers money in scotland better and more wisely. —— i think. the results of the scottish national party are dismal. they are failing on education, crime and their taxation policies. no wonder all they can talk about is another irresponsible referendum breaking this country. referendum of breaking up this count . ,.,
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country. recycling is one way in which we can — country. recycling is one way in which we can all— country. recycling is one way in which we can all individually i country. recycling is one way in i which we can all individually tackle the climate crisis. will he join me in congratulating west sussex county council on recycling 53% of their household waste, a level that is almost double that of neighbouring brighton council? mi; almost double that of neighbouring brighton council?— brighton council? my honourable friend draws _ brighton council? my honourable friend draws attention _ brighton council? my honourable friend draws attention to - brighton council? my honourable friend draws attention to a - brighton council? my honourable i friend draws attention to a valuable and important point, which is across the country these conservative councils that keep your council tax low, overwhelmingly, deliver better services, such as recycling. and he is absolutely right to lord the efforts of the conservative led council in west sussex.- efforts of the conservative led council in west sussex. let's go to karl turner- _ council in west sussex. let's go to karl turner. in _ council in west sussex. let's go to karl turner. in a _ council in west sussex. let's go to karl turner. in a recent _ karl turner. in a recent conservative _ karl turner. in a recent conservative party i karl turner. in a recent i conservative party political broadcast the home secretary claimed that only conservative police and crime commissioners were responsible for increasing police officer numbers. yet humberside's police and
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crime commissioner, keith hunter, has put well over 500 additional officers on our streets since 2016, the largest proportionate increase in the country. and he was doing so well before the government pledged to reverse their own cuts. so will the prime minister take this opportunity to do the decent thing and congratulate keith hunterfrom taking humberside police from the worst performing force to one of the best in his time as police and crime commissioner. mr best in his time as police and crime commissioner.— commissioner. mr speaker, i'm afraid, i don't— commissioner. mr speaker, i'm afraid, i don't wish _ commissioner. mr speaker, i'm afraid, i don't wish to _ commissioner. mr speaker, i'm afraid, i don't wish to be, i commissioner. mr speaker, i'm afraid, i don't wish to be, to i afraid, i don't wish to be, to sound, you know, like a sticklerfor accuracy here, mr speaker, but since becoming a humberside pcc, which is my normal position, mr speaker, as you know, since becoming humberside
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pcc in 2016, the force has recorded 434 officers, these 129 has been recruited as part of the government's drive, and mr hunter himself praised the government's police recruitment strategy, saying the government's target has lifted numbers in humberside above 2000. so i think it would be fair to say that mr hunter's efforts, however laudable they may be, would have been impossible without the determination of this government to recruit more police officers and put them out on the street.— recruit more police officers and put them out on the street. thank you, mr speaker- _ them out on the street. thank you, mr speaker- 0n _ them out on the street. thank you, mr speaker. on my _ them out on the street. thank you, mr speaker. on my right _ them out on the street. thank you, | mr speaker. on my right honourable friend visited the west midlands earlier this week to meet with our brilliant mayor, andy street, was he aware that the mayor has increased by seven fold the investment in transport, and we now have 108 new shiny carriages for the cross city line? what advice does my right honourable friend have for my constituents in the royalton of sutton coldfield on masix? the ball
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is on the penalty — sutton coldfield on masix? the ball is on the penalty spot! _ sutton coldfield on masix? the ball is on the penalty spot! mr- sutton coldfield on masix? the ball is on the penalty spot! mr speaker! not onl is is on the penalty spot! mr speaker! not only is he _ is on the penalty spot! mr speaker! not only is he rolling _ is on the penalty spot! mr speaker! not only is he rolling out _ is on the penalty spot! mr speaker! not only is he rolling out 50 - is on the penalty spot! mr speaker! not only is he rolling out 50 new. not only is he rolling out 50 new stations, mr speaker, with 150 miles more of track, linking up communities across the west midlands, delivering ball —— job opportunities, delivering growth and hope for the west midlands, that is why i think the people of the west midlands should vote for another term for mayor andy street. let’s term for mayor andy street. let's brini on term for mayor andy street. let's bring on the _ term for mayor andy street. let's bring on the goalkeeper, john spellar~ — bring on the goalkeeper, john spellar~ |_ bring on the goalkeeper, john s-ellar. , ., . ., spellar. i shall decline that invitation _ spellar. i shall decline that invitation is _ spellar. i shall decline that invitation is midlands i spellar. i shall decline that l invitation is midlands voter. spellar. i shall decline that i invitation is midlands voter. the prime minister said earlier he would news —— use new freedoms to make sure they by british steel. over the past year the difficulties with ppe and vaccine production is demonstrated very clearly the risk of neglecting british productive —— production capacity. let alone the impact on the prosperity of levelling up agendas. so prime
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minister, will you instruct government ministers, civil servants and other public bodies that when purchasing goods and services, they must by british first? yes. purchasing goods and services, they must by british first?— must by british first? yes, of course, must by british first? yes, of course. mr— must by british first? yes, of course, mr speaker. - must by british first? yes, of course, mr speaker. and i must by british first? yes, of| course, mr speaker. and look must by british first? yes, of i course, mr speaker. and look at must by british first? yes, of - course, mr speaker. and look at what we are achieving. since the ppe crisis began, since the pandemic began, we have turned things around. we have procured 32 billion items a ppe. 85% of it can now be made in this country, which was completely impossible before the pandemic. look at what is happening. we have got the valneva factory in scotland. we have got now have access in teesside. it is going to be absolutely indispensable for our future success. —— nova vacs. those investments will not only help us to project our country against pandemics for the future, they will help us to drive jobs and prosperity for the long term across the whole of the uk.
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pmqis pm q is coming to a conclusion and not unexpected that keir starmer would go on lobbying more specifically around this exchange of text between the prime minister and the businessmenjames dyson in which the businessmenjames dyson in which the prime minister offers to fix the tax rules on behalf ofjames dyson so that now has singapore —based company zero senior employees would have to pay more tax in the uk if they were to make ventilators for they were to make ventilators for the nhs. keir starmer asking how many other people with the prime minister was my personal number has he given preferential treatment to. borisjohnson said he would make no apology at all for shifting heaven and earth to secure ventilator supplies, back at the start of the pandemic. ian watson watching all of that closely and the prime minister said he would share all his private
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communications on covid contacts with the house. it didn't come out with the house. it didn't come out with the house. it didn't come out with the main exchanges with keir starmer but ian blackford asked about the text contracts during the pandemic and whether the prime minister would share details of that, how he had fix things for other companies and the prime minister and response seem to suggest that information and form would be forthcoming he said that is nothing to conceal, i am happy to share details with the house and share details with the house and share them with my officials immediately. this is interesting when it comes to the questions are owned james dyson because downing street so far has not said whether in the line with the ministerial rules the prime minister had shared was private text messages with officials or shed them very quickly with his officials are far more
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recently. it would appeal the prime minister the suggesting perhaps officials were told about those contacts but one thing we should be clear about is the question from ian blackford was about contracts and end the end no contract was signed with dyson, they said they spent 20 million pose developing a ventilator but in the end the cabinet office told them it was not required. whether that is covered by the answer remains to be seen. it may raise more questions than it answers but death there is a willingness to talk about covid contracts and to show greater transparency from the government then that will be particularly interesting because on one hand they will cite the fact they had to work very quickly amidst a crisis and expect sympathy for that one of the key attacks from labour has been what they call conservative cronyism and whether some contact and friends are people and government will not simply being
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lobbied but also the beneficiary of contracts which the government handed out and a hurry. again perhaps the government trying to go on the front foot and say we can justify exact point happened. that is an interesting development more widely keir starmer wanted to pen the accusation on borisjohnson that there was one rule for him and one rule for everyone else and that is the kind of issue coming up and labour focus groups and the run—up to local elections so they want to try to establish that very clearly in the minds of voters, hence keir starmer�*s emphasis today on cronyism. let's bring you some breaking news — the queen has issued a statement on her 95th birthday she says i have on the occasion of my 95th birthday received many messages of good wishes which i very much appreciate. the queen still observing this two—week period of
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mourning after the death of prince philip. let's speak to our royal correspondent sarah campbell. this the first statement that the queen has released since the death of prince philip was announced. released in the last over, she goes onto say that whilst as a family we had an apd of great sadness that has been a comfort to us all to see and hear the tributes paid to my husband from those within the uk, the commonwealth and around the world. my commonwealth and around the world. my family and i would like to thank you all for the support and kindness shown to us in recent days, we have been deeply touched and continue to been deeply touched and continue to be reminded that philip had such an extraordinary impact on countless people throughout his life. that statement released today on the queen's 95th birthday. i think we saw over the ask of weeks since the
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death of prince philip was announced there has been an extraordinary reaction, here in the uk but also around the world, tributes from so many people, presidents prime minister is ordinary people. throughout the run—up to his funeral on saturday we from all his children and some grandchildren and all statements or interviews they all mentioned the tributes and how much comfort they were giving to the family during that period of great sadness. the queen here for the first time shedding the same sentiment. i am sure she and the family must be reflecting on how they had been hoping to celebrate they had been hoping to celebrate the duke of edinburgh back 100 birthday and a real sense of the appreciation of those messages of sympathy. the duke would have been 100 engine, plans would have been a
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foot how to celebrate that and he famously did not like a facility would not have wanted anything but the family would have wanted to celebrate such a milestone. this came through very clearly in the run—up to the funeral and all the comments from members of the family that they appreciated so much the flannels that were left, the tributes, —— the flowers that were left, people do had met the duke of edinburgh are a recipient of a gold awards, such a breadth of tributes both young and old. family members made that clear how much it meant to them over the past week and the queen here for the first time adding to that sentiment. clearly still apd of mourning, for the royalfamily although nationally and stopped on the day of the funeral, he had for the day of the funeral, he had for the royal family at contenders for
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two weeks until friday which will be two weeks until friday which will be two weeks until friday which will be two weeks since the death of prince philip was announced. more now on one of our top stories. and earlier this morning, the president ofjuventus said the super league �*can�*t exist�* without the english clubs — all six have withdrawn from the league — together with spain�*s atletico madrid, and the italian side inter milan. earlier i spoke to the spanish footballjournalist guillem balague, and i started by asking him if it�*s only a matter of time before the remaining super league clubs drop out. we don�*t know because the ones at left in the competition, juventus, a barcelona real madrid at the forefront, this is a vision and idea that started withjuventus who with the right analysis thanks football has to go to another level but they have reached the wrong conclusion.
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juventus at the moment are debating what to do. barcelona don�*t have an intention just yet of putting a public note, talking about the position because they say talking to everybody right now and i would imagine perez be the last to see the got it wrong. in a statement from atletico madrid they say for club harmony between all the groups that make up the red and white family especially our fans it is essential that we take this step to leave the super league idea. but if they care so much about the fans how did they misjudge what the fans would think in the first place? they were all thinking not so much of their pocket the owners were but about the future of the game and the future of the clubs. nobody wants to listen to this but a lot of the analysis that was done to reach the wrong conclusion is right, there are a lot of things that have to change.
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interestingly la liga is going to have a press conference tomorrow in which they will they will debate everything perez said with football like young fans are disappearing from the game, less money from television. la liga is saying it is not like that, we will hear of them but in any case the feeling out there is that there is a debate to be made about where the business of football have to go and number two if you are going to do that you better talk to the fans and players and coaches and media and everybody else because we are in this together and a lot of us including the media felt completely out of it and it was not a surprise that it was in england the fans went to the streets because football that is a lifestyle. in spain in 90 minutes of a game
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we discuss it but that is not so much action from the fans behind it but at the end of all this it may well be that lobbying from the fans are something they have to think of. what has the reaction been from fans today in spain. not much. i am going to go to the barcelona game tomorrow and able see what there are people outside protesting, they will not do it, we don�*t come to the streets to protest, we go to the bar and discuss it. it is not a lifestyle nd in which football has to be part of everything that happens, in spain it is different there is a distance but quite clearly there is a general consensus that that was right, it isjust perhaps in spain more than in england people are saying there was a reason for all this and actually is it interesting if you have a lot ofjuventus,
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manchester united and barcelona more often than not this is not what people want to hear but deep down they are trying to attract a lot of fans that are not local fans, they don�*t count some much these days. the super league project no has very few teams remaining in it. a coroner�*s report into air pollution in london has concluded that the government should look at setting legally binding limits for particle pollution in line with world health organisation guidelines. the report follows the landmark ruling last year, which found that toxic air contributed to nine year—old ella adoo—kissi—debrah�*s death in 2013. ella�*s case was the first time air pollution was listed as a cause of death. earlier this morning, our environment correspondent claire marshall spoke to ella�*s mum, rosamund she said today she felt relieved, she kind of said, you can�*t i can really feel happy because after all, she�*s lost her daughter. she�*s still dealing with the grief of that.
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they live not far from where i�*m standing now, which is the south circular. and you can just see the traffic here. you can kind of taste the pollution in the air. and that was one of the key issues that the coroner picked up on today, because the level of particulate matter from exhausts that you can see behind me really are toxic and they can have a real effect on people�*s health. and this is what happened to ella. she was a healthy girl. and then suddenly she started developing asthma and she ended up three years of suffering, of ending up on a ventilator four times on numerous trips to hospital. and ella�*s mum has been fighting to find out what happened to her and now waiting for what the coroner has decided now. and i spoke to her a short time ago. we all need to change. we all need to do, however, what we saw during the pandemic, didn�*t we? the first one, the first lockdown, when there were no cars, nitrogen dioxide dropped 70%.
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air pollution now is now back to pre pandemic levels. we can�*t keep on going on. we all need to drive less, all of us. this is about emissions and particulate matter, which is from diesel. i feel finally there�*s a result. there�*s a result. and i�*m going to continue. campaigning is always going to be about saving lives for me. and all children have a right to breathe clean air no matter where they live or where they come from. so this isn�*t actually a legally binding report that the coroner has made, it�*s recommendations, but the government must respond within 56 days to what he said. and they�*ve got to say what they�*re doing about this. and if they�*re not doing anything, then why? so it�*s going to be very, very difficult for the government to avoid doing anything, i would have thought. brazil has the world s second—highest death toll of the pandemic ?
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but its vaccination programme has been slow, with president bolsonaro coming under a lot of criticism for mismanaging procurement and rollout. the brazilian government is now in talks with vaccine manufacturer pfizer to buy 100 million doses. we ve been reporting from vaccination centres around the world this week. today, we re in sao paulo, with our correspondent mark lowen. there�*s been a little bit of a slow day here at this vaccine centre in the heart of sao paulo, as people come in to be vaccinated who are over the age of 67 and who are health care workers. they are coming to get to the coronavac from china — the two vaccines available in brazil. the interesting thing is that the person vaccinating shows, before she puts in the jab, that it is full, because there were some videos circulating online that seemed to suggest that empty shots were going into people�*s arms. the vaccine goes in... and once done, proof of an empty syringe.
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translation: i'm delighted. i�*ve got a new granddaughter and i was really worried about being with her. now i�*m very happy. it�*s been a terrible year. we need to be free of it. there have been problems with this vaccine campaign, political problems, but better not to talk about it! well, perhaps the slow day is rather echoing brazil�*s low vaccination drive. only 11 or so percent of brazilians have received their first dose, and just over 4% have received both doses, and this in a country with the second highest death toll of the pandemic — more than 375,000 dead. many people blame the government of president bolsonaro, who received proposals for tens of millions of pfizer doses last year but said no, his critics say because of his anti—vaccine, anti virus control stance. translation: we have tv programmes
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i and whatsapp messages that distort i information and spread fear. one of those sources of misinformation is the president. if you have power, people listen to what you are saying. when the world says you should be vaccinating and bolsonaro says you shouldn�*t, it�*s a contradictory message. unfortunately, the rolling out campaign, it's not reaching with the speed we would like to. we need to receive more from the federal government. a lack of doses is a lack of hope to end this pandemic soon, and we need hope for these people, and we need a vaccine to protect them. as other european countries tighten restrictions again, denmark is slowly emerging from a second lockdown which began in december. for many businesses that�*s contingent on the coronapass. essentially the public will have
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to show proof of vaccination, proof of earlier infection, or a negative test result within 72hrs for various activities including hairdressers, tattooists and restaurants. adrienne murray sent this from copenhagen. families enjoying a trip to the zoo, but this day out is different. adults have to prove they are corona—free. at the entrance, it�*s not only tickets that are carefully checked — visitors must show a �*corona pass�*. it�*s a negative test result within the last 72 hours, a certificate of vaccination or proof of previous infection. the extra measures haven�*t kept visitors away. it makes you feel more safe to know that, well, when there are lots of crowded people together, they have been tested. i think it's part of how life is right now. you have to accept it to keep the infection rates low, and it'sjust what it is. a smartphone app called
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myhealth gives danes access to their digital health records. this serves as an initial corona pass, while a new, more advanced app is expected next month. over the coming weeks, as denmark opens up further, danes will have to show a corona pass to access many other places including restaurants, cinemas and gyms. the rules already apply to hairdressers. after a long lockdown, gitte alsing is relieved her salon can open again. it�*s good because my business had been bound for 3.5 months. i think we should do it for all so we can start everything up and we can be more secure. bars and restaurants are getting ready to welcome guests back. some wonder whether the app will cope with a large volume of users. others are uneasy about policing their customers�* health. i was not expecting that i was supposed to be the one actually checking on them,
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and ifind it also to be overkill at this stage when the vaccination is going ok, the number of deaths is quite low. authorities believe coronavirus is now under control. once the over—50s are vaccinated, most of denmark�*s restrictions are set to be lifted. meanwhile, getting tested is likely to become a part of everyday life. denmark has ramped up testing, and now has one of the highest of any country in the world. we are 5.8 million here in denmark and we have 500,000 tests each day so it is possible for each and everybody to get a test rather quickly. most danes, though, seem willing to accept the corona pass if that means a swifter return to normal life. adrienne murray, bbc news, copenhagen.
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now it�*s time for a look at the weather. after yet another thrust in scotland a glorious day has forward but plenty of sunshine, not like that across the uk. the plenty of sunshine, not like that across the uk.— plenty of sunshine, not like that across the uk. the same weather s stem across the uk. the same weather system that _ across the uk. the same weather system that brought _ across the uk. the same weather system that brought us, - across the uk. the same weather system that brought us, the i across the uk. the same weather i system that brought us, the northern ireland cloud only in yesterday�*s impacting parts of anyone and wales. a frustrating day here but there is more rain falling from the cloud because there barely any rain left on the weather front and behind it a new edge of high—pressure building in promising plenty of dry weather staying with us and the coming days. the recent satellite pictures is the contrast, between conditions and the west midlands and highlands of scotland. plenty of sunshine in scotland. plenty of sunshine in scotland through the rest of the day, sunny spells in northern ireland, brightening more widely across northern england and indeed when you have the cloud breaks and that, may be a shower and south—west
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england and wales, a brisk north—easterly wind coming in from the north sea holding temperatures down, maybe eight or nine and some spots, 16 or 17 and the south—west. generally feeling:, plenty clear skies overnight and that translates into another widespread frost. temperatures down to —4 —5 in the coldest parts of scotland and northern england as we start tomorrow. he does the new area of high pressure across the uk, may be an early mist and fog patch soon cleaning and after the chilly and frosty start temp gers will head up and plenty of sunshine, some cloud across the north and a few showers was during the day and an easterly wind across particularly england and wales will be noticeable but on the north sea coast to purchase a bit higher and some spots getting towards 17. 3000 evening plenty of dry and clear weather with the
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exception of northern scotland again on friday a bit more cloud and the chance of catching a shower on a spot of rain whereas elsewhere we continue with sunshine, still quite breezy and southern england and wales and the english channel into northern ireland but temperatures heading up a few degrees, 18 or 19 on friday. high pressure staying with us this weekend, plenty of sunshine and still chilly nights with the risk of frost.
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the european football super league has collapsed — after all six english teams and several european sides pull out. after a furious backlash from fans, a number of clubs have now apologised for their actions. i want to apologise to all the fan supporters of liverpool football club for the disruption i caused over the past 48 hours. it goes without saying but should be said that the project put forward was never going to stand without the support of the fans. we�*ll be looking at the impact of fan power on the billionaire bosses. the other main stories this lunchtime: after derek chauvin is found guilty of murdering george floyd, his family hail the verdict as a turning point —
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and president biden promises it�*sjust the start.

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