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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  April 21, 2021 12:00am-12:30am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm tim willcox with special coverage of the trial of derek chauvin for the killing of george floyd. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. a jury decides he acted illegally when arresting george floyd in may of last year — he could face up to a0 years injail. mr floyd's supporters welcome the verdict outside the court. the question now — will the jailing of george floyd's killer change america's approach to policing and race relations?
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk —— hello and welcome to bbc news. the former police officer derek chauvin has been found guilty of two charges of murder and one of manslaughter in the death of george floyd, the african—american man he violently arrested last may. the historic outcome at a court in minneapolis comes after a three—week trial seen a landmark test of police accountability and a pivotal moment in us race relations. a warning that you may find some of the images this report from our north america correspondent nick bryant upsetting. history turns on these kind of moments. and in the trial of derek chauvin, it wasn't just america yearning to know the outcome but also the wider world. on the second day of its deliberations, thejury delivered its verdict. verdict, count one.
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we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. verdict, count two. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count two, third—degree murder, perpetrating an eminently dangerous attack, find the defendant guilty. verdict, count three. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count three, second—degree manslaughter, culpable negligence creating an unreasonable risk, find the defendant guilty. i can't breathe! the most emotive evidence presented during the trial was the video of george floyd's killing... ..pictures that showed the brutality of the white police officer, sound that revealed how george floyd uttered the words "i can't breathe" almost 30 times... i cannot breathe. ..shocking video that, in the midst of a global pandemic, went viral. police brutality — a disease america has never cured. even as the jury was considering its verdict, protesters congregated outside the court.
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not since the trial of oj simpson has a verdict been the focus of such concentration and concern. and it even brought about an extraordinary presidential intervention, joe biden describing how he'd telephoned the floyd family last night. they're a good family, and they're calling for peace and tranquility no matter what that verdict is. i'm praying the verdict is the right verdict, which is... i think it's overwhelming in my view. minneapolis looks like a garrison town. the boots of 3,000 members of the national guard are on the streets. cities across america are boarding up, in the knowledge this verdict will reverberate throughout the land. the spot where george floyd was killed felt early on this morning like the eye of a brewing storm. for activists, this whole area has become a landmark of inequality, a haunting reminder of america's racial breach. will this guilty verdict
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calm the angry mood? will it bring a sense ofjustice? nick bryant, bbc news, minneapolis. george floyd's brother philonise said the truck had brought back heartbreaking memories of.— brought back heartbreaking memories of. today, you have cameras all — memories of. today, you have cameras all around _ memories of. today, you have cameras all around the - memories of. today, you have cameras all around the world i memories of. today, you have. cameras all around the world to see and show what happened to my brother. it was a motion picture, the world seeing his life extinguished, and i could do nothing but watch. especially in that courtroom, over and over and over again, as my brother was murdered. times, they getting harder every day. ten miles away from here, mrwright, daunte wright, here, mrwright, daunte wright, he should still be here. we
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have to always understand that we have to march, we will have to do this for life. we have to protest because it seems like this is a never—ending cycle. reverend al always told me, we got to keep fighting. i am going to put up a fight every day because i am notjust fighting for george any more, i am fighting for everybody around this world. i get calls, i get dmc, people from from ghana come from germany, everybody, london, italy, all saying the same thing — we want to be able to breathe until you are able to breathe —— i get dms. today, we are able to breathe again. i told you, we'll get justice, breathe again. i told you, we'll getjustice, and we we'll get justice, and we
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still, we'll getjustice, and we still, we are going to fight for you too. we are going to fight for everybody. thank you also much forjust giving us this time. because we are here and we are not going anywhere and we are not going anywhere and i want to thank all the protesters, all the attorneys who stepped up, all the activists who stepped up and many who think they are not activists but advocates. thank you all, becausejustice activists but advocates. thank you all, because justice for george means freedom for all. george means freedom for all. george floyd's brother, philonise. this is what minnesota attorney general keith ellison had to say after the verdict was announced. since the investigation and prosecution of this case began last may, everyone involved has pursued one goal — justice. we pursued justice wherever it led. when i became the lead prosecutor for the case, i asked for time and patience to review the facts, gather evidence and prosecute for the murder of george floyd
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to the fullest extent the law allowed. i want to thank the community for giving us their time and allowing us to do our work. that long, hard, painstaking work has culminated today. i would not call today's verdictjustice, however, because justice implies true restoration. but it is accountability, which is the first step towards justice. and now, the cause of justice is in your hands — and when i say your hands, i mean the hands of the people of the united states. george floyd mattered. he was loved by his family and his friends. his death shocked the conscience of our community, our country, the whole world. he was loved by his family and friends. but that isn't why he mattered. he mattered because he was a human being — and there is no way we can
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turn away from that reality. the people who stopped and raised their voices on 25 may 2020 were a bouquet of humanity — a phrase i stole from my friend, jerry blackwell. a bouquet of humanity. 0ld, young, men and women, black and white. a man from the neighbourhood just walking to get a drink, a child going to buy a snack with her cousin, an off—duty firefighter on her way to a community garden — brave young women, teenagers, who pressed record on their cell phones. why did they stop? they didn't know george floyd. they didn't know he had a beautifulfamily, they didn't know he had been a great athlete, and they didn't know he was a proud father or that he had people in his life who loved him. they stopped and raised
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their voices, and they even challenged authority, because they saw his humanity. they stopped and they raised their voices because they knew that what they were seeing was wrong. that was the attorney general of minnesota, keith ellison. we are going to go to larry madowo, butjust before i do that, we are expecting joe biden to give a statement in a moment, larry, so i mightjust have to cut across you. and just listening to the attorney general there, accountability, not justice, general there, accountability, notjustice, along week to go for the people behind where you are now, i imagine. —— a long way to go. are now, i imagine. -- a long way to 90-— are now, i imagine. -- a long way to go. absolutely, they are ha - way to go. absolutely, they are happy with _ way to go. absolutely, they are happy with the _ way to go. absolutely, they are happy with the verdict - way to go. absolutely, they are happy with the verdict in - way to go. absolutely, they are happy with the verdict in this i happy with the verdict in this case but they say there is a lot more work to be done, because that one case does not fix the wider problems within the justice system, as even president 0bama said in his statement, but i'm here at george
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—— george boyd square, a collective sigh of relief, because the verdict was unexpected, and getting three guilty verdicts within 11 hours was all missed entirely a surprise to many people here. want to get reaction from antonio williams, an activist. you are a black man in america. how are you feeling right now? i feel good, how are you feeling right now? ifeel good, but how are you feeling right now? i feel good, but there how are you feeling right now? ifeel good, but there is how are you feeling right now? i feel good, but there is to work— i feel good, but there is to work to— i feel good, but there is to work to be done... in i feel good, but there is to work to be done...- work to be done... in our economic— work to be done... in our economic system, - work to be done... in our economic system, in - work to be done... in our economic system, in our| economic system, in our criminal_ economic system, in our criminaljustice - economic system, in our criminaljustice system, | economic system, in our. criminaljustice system, in economic system, in our- criminaljustice system, in our nationp — criminaljustice system, in our nation,. because _ criminaljustice system, in our nation,. because of— nation,. because of smartphones, - nation,. because of smartphones, so. nation,. because of. smartphones, so many nation,. because of— smartphones, so many americans have _ smartphones, so many americans have now— smartphones, so many americans have now seen _ smartphones, so many americans have now seen the _ smartphones, so many americans have now seen the racial- have now seen the racial injustice _ have now seen the racial injustice that _ have now seen the racial injustice that black- have now seen the racial- injustice that black americans have — injustice that black americans have known_ injustice that black americans have known for— injustice that black americans have known for generations, i injustice that black americans i have known for generations, the racial_ have known for generations, the racial injustice _ have known for generations, the racial injustice that _ have known for generations, the racial injustice that we _ have known for generations, the racial injustice that we have - racial injustice that we have fought— racial injustice that we have fought for— racial injustice that we have fought for generations, - racial injustice that we have | fought for generations, that racial injustice that we have - fought for generations, that my parents — fought for generations, that my parents protested _ fought for generations, that my parents protested in _ fought for generations, that my parents protested in the - fought for generations, that myj parents protested in the 1960s, that millions _ parents protested in the 1960s, that millions of _ parents protested in the 1960s, that millions of us, _ parents protested in the 1960s, that millions of us, americans. that millions of us, americans of every— that millions of us, americans of every race, _ that millions of us, americans of every race, protested - that millions of us, americans of every race, protested last i of every race, protested last summeh _ of every race, protested last summer. here's— of every race, protested last summer. here's the - of every race, protested last summer. here's the truth i of every race, protested last. summer. here's the truth about racial_ summer. here's the truth about racial injustice. _ summer. here's the truth about racial injustice. it _ summer. here's the truth about
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racial injustice. it is— summer. here's the truth about racial injustice. it is not- racial injustice. it is not just— racial injustice. it is not just a _ racial injustice. it is not just a black _ racial injustice. it is not just a black america - racial injustice. it is not- just a black america problem or a people — just a black america problem or a peorrie of— just a black america problem or a people of colour— just a black america problem or a people of colour problem. - just a black america problem or a people of colour problem. it. a people of colour problem. it is a problem _ a people of colour problem. it is a problem for— a people of colour problem. it is a problem for every - is a problem for every american _ is a problem for every american. it- is a problem for every american. it is- is a problem for everyl american. it is keeping is a problem for every - american. it is keeping us from fulfilling — american. it is keeping us from fulfilling the _ american. it is keeping us from fulfilling the promise _ american. it is keeping us from fulfilling the promise of- fulfilling the promise of liberty— fulfilling the promise of liberty and _ fulfilling the promise of liberty and justice - fulfilling the promise of liberty and justice for. fulfilling the promise of. liberty and justice for all. and — liberty and justice for all. and it _ liberty and justice for all. and it is _ liberty and justice for all. and it is holding - liberty and justice for all. and it is holding our- liberty and justice for all. i and it is holding our nation hack— and it is holding our nation back from _ and it is holding our nation back from realising - and it is holding our nation back from realising our- and it is holding our nation back from realising our fullj back from realising our full potentiah _ back from realising our full potential. we _ back from realising our full potential. we are - back from realising our full potential. we are all- back from realising our full potential. we are all a - back from realising our fullj potential. we are all a part back from realising our full. potential. we are all a part of george — potential. we are all a part of george floyd's _ potential. we are all a part of george floyd's legacy, - potential. we are all a part of george floyd's legacy, and i potential. we are all a part ofl george floyd's legacy, and our 'ob george floyd's legacy, and our job now— george floyd's legacy, and our job now is _ george floyd's legacy, and our job now is to— george floyd's legacy, and our job now is to honour— george floyd's legacy, and our job now is to honour its - george floyd's legacy, and our job now is to honour its and i george floyd's legacy, and our job now is to honour its and to| job now is to honour its and to honour— job now is to honour its and to honour him _ job now is to honour its and to honour him. thank— job now is to honour its and to honour him. thank you, - job now is to honour its and to honour him. thank you, and l job now is to honour its and to . honour him. thank you, and now it is— honour him. thank you, and now it is my— honour him. thank you, and now it is my great _ honour him. thank you, and now it is my great honour— honour him. thank you, and now it is my great honour to - it is my great honour to introduce _ it is my great honour to introduce the _ it is my great honour to introduce the president| it is my great honour to . introduce the president of it is my great honour to - introduce the president of the united — introduce the president of the united states, _ introduce the president of the united states, joe _ introduce the president of the united states, joe biden. -
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today, a jury in minnesota found _ today, a jury in minnesota found former minneapolis police officer _ found former minneapolis police officer derek chauvin guilty on all counts in the murder of george _ all counts in the murder of george floyd last may. it was a murder— george floyd last may. it was a murder in— george floyd last may. it was a murder in the full light of day and it— murder in the full light of day and it ripped the blinders off for the — and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see the systemic— for the whole world to see the systemic racism the vice presidentjust referred systemic racism the vice president just referred to. systemic racism the vice presidentjust referred to. the systemic— presidentjust referred to. the systemic racism that is a stain on our— systemic racism that is a stain on our nation's soulful sub that— on our nation's soulful sub that knee on the neck of justice _ that knee on the neck of justice for black americans. the — justice for black americans. the found fear and trauma, the pain, _ the found fear and trauma, the pain, the — the found fear and trauma, the pain, the exhaustion that black and brown americans experience every— and brown americans experience every single day. the murder of george — every single day. the murder of george floyd launched a summer protests— george floyd launched a summer protests we had not seen since
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the civil— protests we had not seen since the civil rights era in the 60s, _ the civil rights era in the 60s, protests that unify people of every — 60s, protests that unify people of every race and generation, in peace _ of every race and generation, in peace and with purpose, to say enough, enough, enough of the senseless killings. today, today's — the senseless killings. today, today's verdict is a step forward _ today's verdict is a step forward. ijust spoke with the governor— forward. ijust spoke with the governor of minnesota, and i also — governor of minnesota, and i also spoke with george floyd's family— also spoke with george floyd's family again. remarkable family of extraordinary courage. nothing can ever bring their brother, _ nothing can ever bring their brother, their father back, but this can — brother, their father back, but this can he _ brother, their father back, but this can be a giant step forward _ this can be a giant step forward in the march toward justice — forward in the march toward justice in— forward in the march toward justice in america. let's also be clear— justice in america. let's also be clear that such a verdict is also — be clear that such a verdict is also much _ be clear that such a verdict is also much too rare. for so many
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people. — also much too rare. for so many people. it — also much too rare. for so many people, it seems like it took a unique — people, it seems like it took a unique and extra ordinary convergence of factors, a young woman with a smartphone camera, — young woman with a smartphone camera, a — young woman with a smartphone camera, a card that was traumatised, traumatised witnesses, a murder that lasts almost — witnesses, a murder that lasts almost ten minutes in broad daylight, for the whole world to see — daylight, for the whole world to see -- _ daylight, for the whole world to see —— a crowd of traumatised witnesses. officers standing — traumatised witnesses. officers standing up and testifying against a fellow officer instead of disclosing ranks. which — instead of disclosing ranks. which should be commended. a 'ury which should be commended. a jury who — which should be commended. a jury who heard the evidence, carried — jury who heard the evidence, carried out their civic duty, in the _ carried out their civic duty, in the midst of an extra ordinary— in the midst of an extra ordinary moment, under extraordinary pressure. for so many, — extraordinary pressure. for so many, it— extraordinary pressure. for so many, it feels like it took all of that— many, it feels like it took all of that for the judicial system to deliver a just, just basic accountability. we saw how
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traumatic and exhausting just watching the trial was for so many— watching the trial was for so many people. think about it, those — many people. think about it, those of— many people. think about it, those of you are listening, think— those of you are listening, think about how traumatic it was — think about how traumatic it was for— think about how traumatic it was for you. you were not there, — was for you. you were not there, you _ was for you. you were not there, you did not know any of there, you did not know any of the people for stub but it was difficult _ the people for stub but it was difficult. especially for the witnesses. who had to relive that — witnesses. who had to relive that day _ witnesses. who had to relive that day. it is a trauma. on top — that day. it is a trauma. on top of— that day. it is a trauma. on top of the _ that day. it is a trauma. on top of the fear so many people of colour— top of the fear so many people of colour live with every day, when — of colour live with every day, when they go to sleep at night and pray— when they go to sleep at night and pray for the safety of themselves and their loved ones — themselves and their loved ones. again, as we saw in this trial, _ ones. again, as we saw in this trial, from _ ones. again, as we saw in this trial, from the fellow police officers _ trial, from the fellow police officers who testified, most men — officers who testified, most men and _ officers who testified, most men and women who wear the badge — men and women who wear the badge serve their communities honorably, but those few who failed — honorably, but those few who failed to — honorably, but those few who failed to meet that standard must — failed to meet that standard must he _ failed to meet that standard must be held accountable, and they— must be held accountable, and they were _ must be held accountable, and they were today, one was. no one should be above the law,
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and today's verdict send that message, but it's not enough. we can't — message, but it's not enough. we can't stop here. in order to deliver— we can't stop here. in order to deliver real _ we can't stop here. in order to deliver real change and reform, we can— deliver real change and reform, we can and _ deliver real change and reform, we can and we must do more to reduce — we can and we must do more to reduce the _ we can and we must do more to reduce the likelihood that tragedies like this will ever happen— tragedies like this will ever happen and occur again. to ensure _ happen and occur again. to ensure the that black and brown people. — ensure the that black and brown people. or— ensure the that black and brown people, oranyone, so they don't— people, oranyone, so they don't fear— people, oranyone, so they don't fear interactions with law enforcement. they don't have — law enforcement. they don't have to _ law enforcement. they don't have to wake up knowing that they— have to wake up knowing that they can _ have to wake up knowing that they can lose their very life in the — they can lose their very life in the course ofjust living their— in the course ofjust living their life _ in the course ofjust living their life. they don't have to worry— their life. they don't have to worry about whether their sons or daughters will come home after— or daughters will come home after the _ or daughters will come home after the grocery store run or just— after the grocery store run or just walking down the street or driving — just walking down the street or driving their car, playing in the — driving their car, playing in the park. _ driving their car, playing in the park, orjust sleeping at home — the park, orjust sleeping at home. and this takes the knowledge and confronting, head on, systemic racism and the racial— on, systemic racism and the racial disparities that exist in policing and in our criminal justice — in policing and in our criminal justice system more broadly.
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state — justice system more broadly. state and local government and law enforcement needs to step up, law enforcement needs to step up. but — law enforcement needs to step up, but so does the federal government. that's why i've appointed leadership of the justice _ appointed leadership of the justice department that i have, that is— justice department that i have, that is fully committed to restoring trust between law enforcement and the community they are — enforcement and the community they are sworn to protect the buyer — they are sworn to protect the buyer have complete confidence in the _ buyer have complete confidence in the attorney general, general— in the attorney general, general garland's leadership and commitment for to buy also nominated two keyjustice department nominees, anita gupta — department nominees, anita gupta and krista clark, who are entirely— gupta and krista clark, who are entirely qualified nominees. they— entirely qualified nominees. they have the skill necessary to advance our in ministration cosmic— to advance our in ministration cosmic priorities, to root out unconstitutional policing and
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reform — unconstitutional policing and reform our criminaljustice system, _ reform our criminaljustice system, and they deserve to be confirmed — system, and they deserve to be confirmed to —— our administration's priorities. we also _ administration's priorities. we also need _ administration's priorities. we also need congress to act. george _ also need congress to act. george floyd was murdered almost _ george floyd was murdered almost a year ago. there is meaningful police reform legislation in his name, you just— legislation in his name, you just heard the vice president speak— just heard the vice president speak of— just heard the vice president speak of it, she helped write it, legislation to tackle systemic misconduct in police departments, to restore trust between — departments, to restore trust between law enforcement and people — between law enforcement and people they are entrusted to serve — people they are entrusted to serve and protect, but it should _ serve and protect, but it should not take a whole year to .et should not take a whole year to get this— should not take a whole year to get this done. my conversations with the — get this done. my conversations with the floyd family, i spoke with— with the floyd family, i spoke with him _ with the floyd family, i spoke with him again today, i assured them _ with him again today, i assured them we — with him again today, i assured them we are going to continue to fight— them we are going to continue to fight for the passage of the george — to fight for the passage of the george floyd justice in policing act, so i can sign it into— policing act, so i can sign it into law— policing act, so i can sign it into law as— policing act, so i can sign it into law as quickly as possible. there is more to do. finally, — possible. there is more to do. finally, it _ possible. there is more to do. finally, it is— possible. there is more to do. finally, it is the work we do every— finally, it is the work we do every day— finally, it is the work we do every day to change hearts and minds — every day to change hearts and minds as— every day to change hearts and minds as well as laws and policies _ minds as well as laws and policies. that's the work we
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have — policies. that's the work we have to _ policies. that's the work we have to do. only then willful justice — have to do. only then willful justice and full equality be delivered all americans. and that's— delivered all americans. and that's what ijust discussed with— that's what ijust discussed with the _ that's what ijust discussed with the floyd family. the guilty _ with the floyd family. the guilty verdict does not bring back— guilty verdict does not bring back george, but through the family's— back george, but through the family's pain, they are finding purpose. _ family's pain, they are finding purpose, so george's legacy will not — purpose, so george's legacy will not be just about his death— will not be just about his death but about what we must do in his— death but about what we must do in his memory. i also spoke to gianna. — in his memory. i also spoke to gianna, george's young daughter again~ _ gianna, george's young daughter again. when i met her last year. — again. when i met her last year. we _ again. when i met her last year, i've said this before, and — year, i've said this before, and george's funeral, i told her how— and george's funeral, i told her how brave i thought she was, — her how brave i thought she was, and _ her how brave i thought she was, and i sort of knelt down to hold — was, and i sort of knelt down to hold her hand. i said, daddy's _ to hold her hand. i said, daddy's looking down on you, he's _ daddy's looking down on you, he's so — daddy's looking down on you, he's so proud. she said to me then, — he's so proud. she said to me then, never— he's so proud. she said to me then, neverforget he's so proud. she said to me then, never forget it, he's so proud. she said to me then, neverforget it, "daddy change — then, neverforget it, "daddy change the world." i told her this— change the world." i told her this afternoon, daddy did
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change _ this afternoon, daddy did change the world. let that be his legacy, and legacy of peace, _ his legacy, and legacy of peace, not violence, of justice. _ peace, not violence, of justice, peaceful expression, inevitable and appropriate, violent _ inevitable and appropriate, violent protest is not. and there _ violent protest is not. and there are _ violent protest is not. and there are those who will seek to exploit the raw emotions of the moment, agitators and extremists who have no interest in social— extremists who have no interest in socialjustice. who seeks to carry— in socialjustice. who seeks to carry out— in socialjustice. who seeks to carry out violence to destroyed property, fan the flames— destroyed property, fan the flames of division, to do everything to stop this country positive — everything to stop this country positive march towards racial justice — positive march towards racial justice will become count up and succeed. this is home for this— and succeed. this is home for this country to come together. to unite — this country to come together. to unite as _ this country to come together. to unite as americans —— this is a _ to unite as americans —— this is a time _ to unite as americans —— this is a time. there can never be any— is a time. there can never be any safe _ is a time. there can never be any safe harbour for heat in america _ any safe harbour for heat in america i_ any safe harbour for heat in america. i said it many times, the battle _ america. i said it many times, the battle for this love this nation _ the battle for this love this nation has been a constant push
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and pull— nation has been a constant push and pull for more than 240 years— and pull for more than 240 years -- _ and pull for more than 240 years —— the battle for the soul— years —— the battle for the soul of— years —— the battle for the soul of this nation. a tug—of—war between the american ideal. _ tug—of—war between the american ideal. that — tug—of—war between the american ideal, that we are all created equal. — ideal, that we are all created equal, and the harsh reality that— equal, and the harsh reality that racism has long pawn is a part — that racism has long pawn is a part -- — that racism has long pawn is a part. —— long torn us apart at our— part. —— long torn us apart at our lrest— part. —— long torn us apart at our best american ideal wins out~ — our best american ideal wins out so— our best american ideal wins out. so we cannot leave this moment— out. so we cannot leave this moment or look away thinking our work— moment or look away thinking our work is done. we have to look— our work is done. we have to look at — our work is done. we have to look at it. _ our work is done. we have to look at it, we have to look at it as — look at it, we have to look at it as if— “ as we —— as we did for those nine minutes— —— as we did for those nine minutes and 29 seconds. we have to listen — minutes and 29 seconds. we have to listen i— minutes and 29 seconds. we have to listen. i can't breathe, i can't — to listen. i can't breathe, i can't breathe. those were george _ can't breathe. those were george floyd's last words. we can't _ george floyd's last words. we can't let— george floyd's last words. we can't let those words die with him — can't let those words die with him we _ can't let those words die with him. we have to keep hearing those — him. we have to keep hearing those words. we must not turn away, — those words. we must not turn away, we — those words. we must not turn away, we can't turn away. we have _ away, we can't turn away. we have a _ away, we can't turn away. we have a chance to begin to change _ have a chance to begin to change the trajectory in this
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country _ change the trajectory in this country. it's my hope and prayer— country. it's my hope and prayer that we live up to the legacy _ prayer that we live up to the legacy. may god bless you, but may god — legacy. may god bless you, but may god bless george floyd and his family. thank you for taking _ his family. thank you for taking the time to be here. this— taking the time to be here. this can _ taking the time to be here. this can be a moment of significant change. thank you. this— significant change. thank you. this can — significant change. thank you. this can be a moment of significant change, the final words from president biden there, preceded by kamala harris, the vice president, but a powerful stephen for the president, said that he had spoken to the floyd family again today, after the verdict, but also talking about the systemic racism in america, that black and brown americans experience every single day, talking about the killing, the murder of george floyd, it was a murder in full light of day, and it rips the blinkers off the systemic racism that is a stain on our nation's soul.
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such a verdict, he said, was much too rare today. it must stop here for tub we can come we must do more to stop together this ever happening again. —— we can, we must. we can now speak to professor sonia gipson rankin from the university of new mexico's school of law, an expert in the study of racial inequality and violence. how significant is today's verdict? , , ., how significant is today's verdict? , , verdict? this is a very... sorry, — verdict? this is a very... sorry, this _ verdict? this is a very... sorry, this is _ verdict? this is a very... sorry, this is heavy. - verdict? this is a very... | sorry, this is heavy. this verdict? this is a very... i sorry, this is heavy. this is verdict? this is a very... - sorry, this is heavy. this is a heavy time, right? 2021, a jury convicted derek chauvin for the video taped, convicted derek chauvin for the videotaped, public execution and murder of george floyd, but in 1992, ajury in and murder of george floyd, but in 1992, a jury in los angeles failed to convict four police officers for the videotaped beating of rodney king, and in 1955, a jury failed to convict
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two persons in the murder of emmett sonia —— emmett till in mississippi for some today, it is... how our criminaljustice for some today, it is... how our criminal justice system sees black americans and treats them stopping and going forward, how will this change, do you think, the policing in america? and the sense of accountability? so few american police officers are ever charged, let alone convicted, of murder. charged, let alone convicted, of murder-— charged, let alone convicted, of murder. you are absolutely riuht. i of murder. you are absolutely right. i believe _ of murder. you are absolutely right. i believe we _ of murder. you are absolutely right. i believe we are - of murder. you are absolutely right. i believe we are going l right. i believe we are going to continue to see across the nation come happening at the local numinous —— local municipality, and as we heard from president biden advice prison harris, the federal level, different standards for policing in the united states. for us in new
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mexico, police community was just changed as it relates to their ability to not be held accountable for certain things —— police immunity. we are going to squash this habit in jurisdictions across the nation, as people start to look more deeply at policing, and what police are called for, when police should be called, and the type of spots they are to give. and the type of spots they are to rive. , , ., and the type of spots they are to rive, , ., ., ., to give. just a final thought, because we _ to give. just a final thought, because we are _ to give. just a final thought, because we are running - to give. just a final thought, because we are running out| to give. just a final thought, i because we are running out of time, but president biden talked about the bravery of the 17—year—old girl who shot that video on her phone which just exposed what had happened in that case. do you think that is going to be a feature now in american society, where more police officers are going to be filmed as they deal with arrests?— filmed as they deal with arrests? ~ , ,., , .,. arrests? absolutely, in fact, what she — arrests? absolutely, in fact, what she did _ arrests? absolutely, in fact, what she did was _ arrests? absolutely, in fact, what she did was so - arrests? absolutely, in fact, what she did was so brave . arrests? absolutely, in fact, l what she did was so brave and arrests? absolutely, in fact, i what she did was so brave and i encourage everyone to keep her and herfamily in your thoughts and herfamily in your thoughts and prayers for their safety and prayers for their safety and for their own well—being, but police interactions have been videotaped but police interactions have been video taped for decades
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and decades in the united states, but we are going to have to start to see is laws in certain states... have to start to see is laws in certain states. . .— have to start to see is laws in certain states... 0k. professor rankin, certain states... ok. professor rankin, l— certain states... 0k. professor rankin, i have _ certain states... 0k. professor rankin, i have to _ certain states... 0k. professor rankin, i have to stop - certain states... 0k. professor rankin, i have to stop you - rankin, i have to stop you there, we are out of time. thank you very much. hello. the weather is not expected to change very much over the next few days. the kind of weather where strong spring sunshine can make it feel quite warm by day, but at night, clear skies can still allow it to get cold and frosty. but it will remain mostly dry through the rest of the week. now, on the earlier satellite image, you can see this stripe of cloud here. this is a weakening weather front, not much rain left on it, but certainly more in the way of cloud as this sinks down across england and wales through the first part of wednesday. also some mist and murk, and low cloud lapping onto some southern coasts of england. so a bit of a grey start for parts of england and wales, even with the odd spot of rain, but it will brighten up with some sunny spells into the afternoon. scotland and northern ireland
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having a sunny but chilly start, and keeping hold of some sunshine through the day. just more in the way of cloud and maybe the odd shower getting into shetland. quite a breezy day for many, and where you're exposed to that breeze along the east coast, temperatures may only get to 8—10 celsius. highest temperatures likely to be across the far southwest at 16—17 celsius, but here, there could just be the odd afternoon shower. any showers will fade through the evening, and through the night into the early hours of thursday, you can see long, clear spells across the country, allowing it to get cold. where you see the blue colours on the map, that's where we expect temperatures below freezing, but quite widely there'll be a touch of frost to take us into thursday morning. but for the end of the week, high pressure really will assert its influence right on top of the british isles. butjust around the southern flank of that high, we will have some quite brisk winds blowing across the channel islands, the south west of england, also affecting some southern and eastern coasts. but as you can see, largely cloud—free skies to start thursday, i think we'll see a bit of patchy cloud bubbling up through the day, but generally speaking, quite a lot of sunshine.
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highest temperatures in the west at 15—17 celsius, but for eastern and also southern coasts, actually, particularly where we have that breeze in the south, it's going to feel on the chilly side. still quite windy down towards the south and the southwest on friday. a bit of cloud across scotland maybe squeezing out the odd spot of rain, but elsewhere it's dry with long spells of sunshine. a bit warmer by this stage, 17—18 celsius in some western areas. and as we head into the weekend, it stays largely dry, more of that strong sunshine by day but still the chance of some frosty nights.
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this is bbc news.
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i'm tim willcox with special coverage of the trial of derek chauvin for the killing of george floyd. we, thejury, in the above entitled manner, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. a jury decides he acted illegally when arresting george floyd in may of last year. he could face up to 40 years injail. mr floyd's supporters welcome the verdict outside the court. the question now — will the jailing of george floyd's killer change america's approach to policing and race relations? hello, and welcome back. the former police officer derek chauvin has been found

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