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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 20, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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safer, better tomorrow, a powerful tool, because it feels like the entire police fraternity appended to derek chauvin except for this federation of police unions who stuck with him and paid his legal bills. ,, stuck with him and paid his legal bills. ., stuck with him and paid his legal bills. . ., , ., , bills. yeah, the unions have been so owerful bills. yeah, the unions have been so powerful in — bills. yeah, the unions have been so powerful in protecting _ bills. yeah, the unions have been so powerful in protecting police - powerful in protecting police officers, and we should redirect this is the first time the state of minnesota, in the state of minnesota, in the state of minnesota, a white police officer has been found guilty in the killing of a black person in that state, so it is a very big deal, the courts of justice continuing, but it is an important legal moment in the country for subject to list a little bit about the place you're standing in, because we are speaking to you before the verdict was announced and you could have heard a pin drop. it feels different there. from what i'm seeing by you at the moment. it does feel a lot more vibrant, absolutely. you keep hearing every once in a while... the crowd has grown, it has
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definitely doubled in just the last since we've been here. more people want to come and take in scene and honour the place where george floyd died. as i've been telling you all this evening, this is a place for public grief and remembrance, and they asked everybody that comes here to honour that, and especially for any white members of the community who come here to pay attention and listen to the pain and trauma on display here. listen to the pain and trauma on dismay here-— listen to the pain and trauma on display here. larry, thank you so much again _ display here. larry, thank you so much again for— display here. larry, thank you so much again for your _ display here. larry, thank you so much again for your reporting, . display here. larry, thank you so l much again for your reporting, it's been great to have you in the square today and minneapolis during the last three weeks. thank you. let's speak to donald deluca, chief of police... hejoins us now, thank you forjoining me, donald. what message will america's police forces take away from what happened today in that courtroom and minneapolis? it
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shows that we are accountable for actions, that we are not above the law and we must work within policy and do our policy as is explained to us, and people watch what we do. today was the result of a case that was put on the state, it was pragmatic and they spelled the fax out like no other case i've seen in a long time, and justice was served dust of the facts. a long time, and 'ustice was served dust of the facts.— dust of the facts. we've had the death of dante _ dust of the facts. we've had the death of dante right _ dust of the facts. we've had the death of dante right -- - dust of the facts. we've had the death of dante right -- one, - dust of the facts. we've had the i death of dante right -- one, adam death of dante right —— one, adam toledo, a 13—year—old boy killed in chicago, a video of a lieutenant in the us army picked up and pepper sprayed by the police and he had done nothing wrong —— daunte white. it is even one verdict of guilty and years in prison enough, do you think, to send a message to police
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officers that you could be held up accountable like derek chauvin was? that's part of the answer, it comes down to leadership. on those cases you mentioned, some of those acted very swiftly to remove those officers. but i think the real work starts now. what's going to happen over the next six months to a year and police adjustments to reform? what'll take place in a conversation that's more conversational, and they'll let officers know that what you do matters. 100,000 officers in america —— 800,000, the do theirjob for the most part very well for us unfortunately we have the situations that break the trust of the communities and it makes us take a hard look at what are we doing wrong and where we need to go forward. what you make of those people who
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say there can be no good police officers in a police system that is systemically racist? in other words, that the judicial system in america is too broken to try to fix? i’zre is too broken to try to fix? i've been around — is too broken to try to fix? i�*e: been around policing for almost four decades. there are great officers going out there and doing incredible jobs every day, and you don't hear those stories. unfortunately those stories that come to light or when there's breakdowns or mishaps, or officers break the law like you've seen. but the truth is, a lot of hard work goes into conditioning officers, mind and heart set to get them to do the right thing. but there are times like this in the case we witness today where the officer broke the law and they go to jail. but that's not the whole story of policing. there's officers or go out there every day and work very hard, there's police leaders who hold people accountable and make sure that the reforms that need to take place are taking place. and it comes the time now to build trust, we have to work with communities and
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leaders in the communities, and our government to make sure the officers are being trained properly and getting the tools they need to do theirjob properly. i getting the tools they need to do theirjob properly.— theirjob properly. i apologise for interrunting. _ theirjob properly. i apologise for interrupting, we _ theirjob properly. i apologise for interrupting, we are _ theirjob properly. i apologise for interrupting, we are going - theirjob properly. i apologise for interrupting, we are going back. theirjob properly. i apologise for| interrupting, we are going back to minneapolis because the brother of george floyd hasjust minneapolis because the brother of george floyd has just started speaking. thank you, chief. a, iat george floyd hasjust started speaking. thank you, chief. a lot of da s that i speaking. thank you, chief. a lot of days that i prayed _ speaking. thank you, chief. a lot of days that i prayed and _ speaking. thank you, chief. a lot of days that i prayed and hoped, - speaking. thank you, chief. a lot of days that i prayed and hoped, and l speaking. thank you, chief. a lot of days that i prayed and hoped, and i | days that i prayed and hoped, and i was speaking everything into existence. i said was speaking everything into existence. isaid i have was speaking everything into existence. i said i have faith that he will be convicted. it's been a long journey, and it's been less than a year. and the person that comes to my mind is 1955, and to me, he was the first george floyd. emmett till. i was on cnn with deborah watts, and
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shejust brought him back i was on cnn with deborah watts, and she just brought him back to life. people forgot about him, but he was the first george floyd. but today, you have the cameras all around the world to see and show but happened to my brother. it was a motion picture, the world saw his life extinguished. and i could do nothing but watch, especially in that courtroom over and over and over again as my brother was murdered. the times are getting harder every day. ten miles away from here, mr daunte wright — he should still be here. we have to always understand that we have to march, we will have
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to do this for life. we have to protest because it seems like this is a never ending cycle. reverend dale always told me we have to keep fighting. i'll put up a fight every day because i'm notjust fighting for george any more, i'm fighting for george any more, i'm fighting for everyone in this world i get calls, people from brazil, from ghana, from germany, everybody, london, italy, they all say the same thing — we won't be able to breathe until you're able to breathe. today, we are able to breathe again! i told you, we would getjustice. and we're still going to fight for you too. we're going to fight for everybody. thank you all so much forjust giving us this time, because we are
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here and we aren't going anywhere, and i want to thank all the protesters, all the attorneys who've stepped up, all the activists who stepped up, all the activists who stepped up, all the activists who stepped up and many who think they aren't advocates democrat activists, but advocates — thank you for all. because justice for george means freedom for all.— because justice for george means freedom for all. justice for george means freedom _ freedom for all. justice for george means freedom for _ freedom for all. justice for george means freedom for all. _ freedom for all. justice for george means freedom for all. that - freedom for all. justice for george means freedom for all. that was l freedom for all. justice for george i means freedom for all. that was for loomis speaking after the guilty verdict after the trial of derek chauvin, who was found guilty on all three counts of murder and has sensing an eight week's time, but he was remanded in custody and taken away in handcuffs from the jail after the sentence was read, after the verdict
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was read out. that was the jury of 12 people who deliberated forjust 11 hours and came back very quickly with the verdict of guilty. listening to that with us is chief donald deluca, former chief of police in the city of florida. i apologise for interrupting you there to listen to mr floyd. talk to me about the importance of video. we had 44 different witnesses over the course of this trial, but the video we saw was almost a witness in and of itself, perhaps the most powerful witness for the prosecution's case. how important is it that we are now getting video in america of these incidences? i getting video in america of these incidences?— incidences? i think video plays a very important _ incidences? i think video plays a very important role, _ incidences? i think video plays a very important role, and - incidences? i think video plays a very important role, and the - incidences? i think video plays a l very important role, and the trend started maybe 5—10 years ago with the body cameras for law enforcement. states have enacted policy that it is mandatory for all officers to wear it. in american policing, this will be another part of the equipment they wear day in
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and day out. it'sjust of the equipment they wear day in and day out. it's just how soon we will get there — it's important that officers wear body cameras, helps build trust with communities. and build trust with communities. and not 'ust build trust with communities. and not just body _ build trust with communities. and notjust body cameras, of build trust with communities. and not just body cameras, of course, build trust with communities. and notjust body cameras, of course, we had the video as well from witnesses, and i assume going forward we will have more darnell appraisers who fill him in the streets. we know that video can be reduced democrat reintroduced... i am sorry to interrupt, this is terrence floyd, also george floyd's brother. it terrence floyd, also george floyd's brother. ., , . ~ terrence floyd, also george floyd's brother. ., , ., brother. it goes back to when he did that ress brother. it goes back to when he did that press service. _ brother. it goes back to when he did that press service. my _ brother. it goes back to when he did that press service. my family - brother. it goes back to when he did that press service. my family is - brother. it goes back to when he did that press service. my family is a . that press service. my family is a family— that press service. my family is a family that — that press service. my family is a family that will not back down from prayen _ family that will not back down from prayer. and i believe because of prayer. — prayer. and i believe because of prayer. we — prayer. and i believe because of prayer, we got the verdict we wanted~ _
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prayer, we got the verdict we wanted. we got on our knees. some of us stood _ wanted. we got on our knees. some of us stood up _ wanted. we got on our knees. some of us stood up. but we ask the right person. _ us stood up. but we ask the right person. we — us stood up. but we ask the right person, we asked the right one. we said, _ person, we asked the right one. we said. "god. — person, we asked the right one. we said, "god, we needjustice and person, we asked the right one. we said, "god, we need justice and we need _ said, "god, we need justice and we need it_ said, "god, we need justice and we need it now" — said, "god, we need justice and we need it now." and he answered. i'm 'ust need it now." and he answered. i'm just gratefuh — need it now." and he answered. i'm just grateful. i'm grateful that my grandmother, my mother, my aunts get to see _ grandmother, my mother, my aunts get to see history— grandmother, my mother, my aunts get to see history made. i'm even grateful— to see history made. i'm even grateful my brother isn't here, i'm grateful— grateful my brother isn't here, i'm grateful and proud of him. i will salute _ grateful and proud of him. i will salute every day of my life, i'll salute — salute every day of my life, i'll salute him. he showed me how to be strong, _ salute him. he showed me how to be strong, he _ salute him. he showed me how to be strong, he showed me how to be respectfuh — strong, he showed me how to be respectful. he showed me how to speak— respectful. he showed me how to speak my— respectful. he showed me how to speak my mind. i'm going to miss
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him. _ speak my mind. i'm going to miss him. but— speak my mind. i'm going to miss him, but now i know he's in history. what _ him, but now i know he's in history. what a _ him, but now i know he's in history. what a day— him, but now i know he's in history. what a day to— him, but now i know he's in history. what a day to be a floyd, man. applause _ what a day to be a floyd, man. applause. thank you. applause. thank ou. . ~ applause. thank ou. ., ~ . ., thank you. thank you, terrence. now we will hear — thank you. thank you, terrence. now we will hear from _ thank you. thank you, terrence. now we will hear from george's _ thank you. thank you, terrence. now we will hear from george's baby - we will hear from george's baby brother. — we will hear from george's baby brother, rodney— we will hear from george's baby brother, rodney floyd. - we will hear from george's baby brother, rodney floyd. applause. you know what, _ brother, rodney floyd. applause. you know what, i'll— brother, rodney floyd. applause. you know what, i'll say _ brother, rodney floyd. applause. you know what, i'll say this - brother, rodney floyd. applause. you know what, i'll say this first. . you know what, i'll say this first. i'd you know what, i'll say this first. i'd like _ you know what, i'll say this first. i'd like to— you know what, i'll say this first. i'd like to thank— you know what, i'll say this first. i'd like to thank all— you know what, i'll say this first. i'd like to thank all the _ you know what, i'll say this first. i i'd like to thank all the advocates, the activists. _ i'd like to thank all the advocates, the activists, i'd _ i'd like to thank all the advocates, the activists, i'd like _ i'd like to thank all the advocates, the activists, i'd like to _ i'd like to thank all the advocates, the activists, i'd like to thank- i'd like to thank all the advocates, the activists, i'd like to thank the i the activists, i'd like to thank the people _ the activists, i'd like to thank the people that — the activists, i'd like to thank the people that stayed _ the activists, i'd like to thank the people that stayed in _ the activists, i'd like to thank the people that stayed in the - the activists, i'd like to thank the people that stayed in the streets| people that stayed in the streets marching — people that stayed in the streets marching night _ people that stayed in the streets marching night and _ people that stayed in the streets marching night and day. - people that stayed in the streets marching night and day.- people that stayed in the streets marching night and day. people of portland staying — marching night and day. people of portland staying in _ marching night and day. people of portland staying in the _ marching night and day. people of portland staying in the streets - marching night and day. people of portland staying in the streets for| portland staying in the streets for 83 days, it made —— thank you for everyone for making a statement for us in our dark days and dark nights, we had them. we had so many coming in, but you know what, thank each
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and everyone. so many people in grocery stores would walk in, i believe in respecting the elders, i hear them walking up in the grocery store, they'd stop me and recognise me... they were telling you what they experienced as a child, what they experienced as a child, what they saw and what they needed for change. everywhere i go, my brothers 90. change. everywhere i go, my brothers go, we all go, i think the people for the love in the streets, i'm thinking everyone because we couldn't have done this, and this is a victory for all of us. there is no colour barrier on this, this is everyone who's been held down and pinned down. and you know what, people? we stand together in unity. we think ourteam, people? we stand together in unity. we think our team, mr attorney ben crump. the witnesses, donald williams, i'd like to thank the jury, everybody, thank god almighty,
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thank you. we aren't done yet. my brother george is smiling, his beautiful daughter is here, dion, baby, you're so beautiful so smart. you have my heart, baby. thank you for keeping us strong, i know how hard it is, i know how hard it is. i like to thank everyone who helped out, i think thisjury like to thank everyone who helped out, i think this jury for having the hearts and minds since that we all saw these videos, we know these videos made an open and shut case. thejury said guilty videos made an open and shut case. the jury said guilty as charged, we'd like to thank them, everyone that pressed it all. but for george, the slightest —— fight is not over. we will get the george floyd act passed, the act must be passed, it has to be. we will keep pressure on the senate, everybody. thank you all for coming, george, i know he loves
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all y'all. thank you.— all y'all. thank you. applause. next, all y'all. thank you. applause. next. we _ all y'all. thank you. applause. next, we have _ all y'all. thank you. applause. next, we have a _ all y'all. thank you. applause. next, we have a man, - all y'all. thank you. applause. next, we have a man, he - all y'all. thank you. applause. next, we have a man, he and l all y'all. thank you. applause. - next, we have a man, he and george used to— next, we have a man, he and george used to text — next, we have a man, he and george used to text each _ next, we have a man, he and george used to text each other— next, we have a man, he and george used to text each other all— next, we have a man, he and george used to text each other all the - used to text each other all the time — used to text each other all the time. congresswoman - used to text each other all the time. congresswoman sheila i used to text each other all the - time. congresswoman sheila jackson lee, time. congresswoman sheila jackson lee. always — time. congresswoman sheila jackson lee. always used _ time. congresswoman sheila jackson lee, always used to _ time. congresswoman sheila jackson lee, always used to talk— time. congresswoman sheila jackson lee, always used to talk about - lee, always used to talk about houston. — lee, always used to talk about houston, texas. _ lee, always used to talk about houston, texas. back- lee, always used to talk about houston, texas. back then - lee, always used to talk about houston, texas. back then i l lee, always used to talk about. houston, texas. back then i think you called — houston, texas. back then i think you called him _ houston, texas. back then i think you called him wu. _ houston, texas. back then i think you called him wu. we _ houston, texas. back then i think you called him wu. we will- houston, texas. back then i think you called him wu. we will hear. houston, texas. back then i think- you called him wu. we will hear from brandon— you called him wu. we will hear from brandon williams, _ you called him wu. we will hear from brandon williams, we _ you called him wu. we will hear from brandon williams, we like _ you called him wu. we will hear from brandon williams, we like assigned l brandon williams, we like assigned to george — brandon williams, we like assigned to georre. �* . ,, to george. applause. it's a to george. applause. it's a very— to george. applause. it's a very emotional i to george. applause. | it's a very emotional day to george. applause. - it's a very emotional day for me. to george. applause. _ it's a very emotional day for me. i don't _ it's a very emotional day for me. i don't really— it's a very emotional day for me. i don't really have the words. i'm overwhelmed withjoy. but i don't really have the words. i'm overwhelmed with joy. but i want to start by— overwhelmed with joy. but i want to start by saying thank you. first off, start by saying thank you. first off. thank— start by saying thank you. first off, thank you to all you guys advocating, protesting in the middle of a pandemic, advocating, protesting in the middle ofa pandemic, putting advocating, protesting in the middle of a pandemic, putting your lives
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and safety— of a pandemic, putting your lives and safety on the line, we appreciate that, especially since our legal— appreciate that, especially since our legal team, appreciate that, especially since ourlegalteam, ben, appreciate that, especially since our legalteam, ben, tony, justin, curtis. _ our legalteam, ben, tony, justin, curtis. just — our legalteam, ben, tony, justin, curtis. just in _ our legalteam, ben, tony, justin, curtis, just in back here... definitely— curtis, just in back here... definitely thank you to keith ellison— definitely thank you to keith ellison and his team. i think they did an _ ellison and his team. i think they did an amazingjob ellison and his team. i think they did an amazing job from start to finish _ did an amazing job from start to finish all— did an amazing job from start to finish. all of the evidence, all the witnesses. — finish. all of the evidence, all the witnesses, everything proved exactly what we _ witnesses, everything proved exactly what we saw in that video. but yet, we are _ what we saw in that video. but yet, we are still— what we saw in that video. but yet, we are still questioning the decision— we are still questioning the decision of the jury, and i wonder why _ decision of the jury, and i wonder why often — decision of the jury, and i wonder why. often times this system fails us as— why. often times this system fails us as black— why. often times this system fails us as black men and women in america — us as black men and women in america. with all the evidence pointing — america. with all the evidence pointing towards a guilty verdict, we somehow still don't get the guilty— we somehow still don't get the guilty verdict, or in some cases i rot guilty verdict, or in some cases i got my— guilty verdict, or in some cases i got my good friend kenny walker back here - _ got my good friend kenny walker back here - we _ got my good friend kenny walker back here — we don't even get charges. so
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today— here — we don't even get charges. so today is— here — we don't even get charges. so today is a _ here — we don't even get charges. so today is a pivotal moment. for america. — today is a pivotal moment. for america, it's something this country is needed _ america, it's something this country is needed for a long time now. and hopefully— is needed for a long time now. and hopefully today is the start of that — hopefully today is the start of that. when i say a pivotal moment, we need _ that. when i say a pivotal moment, we need change in this broken system — we need change in this broken system it— we need change in this broken system. it was built to a process, it was— system. it was built to a process, it was built — system. it was built to a process, it was built against us. —— oppress. often _ it was built against us. —— oppress. often times— it was built against us. —— oppress. often times we see people who are supposed _ often times we see people who are supposed to protect and serve. supposed to protect and serve. they drew the _ supposed to protect and serve. they drew the total opposite. on the first day— drew the total opposite. on the first day of trial, we had a press conference _ first day of trial, we had a press conference and we kneeled for eight minutes— conference and we kneeled for eight minutes and 40 seconds. and when i rot minutes and 40 seconds. and when i got up _ minutes and 40 seconds. and when i got up and _ minutes and 40 seconds. and when i got up and it— minutes and 40 seconds. and when i got up and it was my turn to speak, i got up and it was my turn to speak, i said _ got up and it was my turn to speak, i said that _ got up and it was my turn to speak, i said that every time i come out here. _ i said that every time i come out here. it's — i said that every time i come out
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here, it's hard. because this is the ekact— here, it's hard. because this is the exact place — here, it's hard. because this is the exact place where they took somebody from me _ exact place where they took somebody from me that i loved. and i absolutely dislike coming here. but i absolutely dislike coming here. but i also _ absolutely dislike coming here. but i also said — absolutely dislike coming here. but i also said that this time it was easy — i also said that this time it was easy we — i also said that this time it was easy. we came for one thing and one thing _ easy. we came for one thing and one thing only— easy. we came for one thing and one thing only - — easy. we came for one thing and one thing only — justice for george floyd — thing only — justice for george floyd. and today, that's what we -ot. floyd. and today, that's what we rot. �* . ,, got. applause. so this - got. applause. so this time, i got. applause. so this time, it | got. applause. - so this time, it wasn't got. applause. _ so this time, it wasn't hard at all. it so this time, it wasn't hard at all. it wasn't — so this time, it wasn't hard at all. it wasn't hard at all. i'm big on faith— it wasn't hard at all. i'm big on faith and — it wasn't hard at all. i'm big on faith and prayer. i had a lot of faith. — faith and prayer. i had a lot of faith. but— faith and prayer. i had a lot of faith. but i_ faith and prayer. i had a lot of faith, but i was also optimistic. we need _ faith, but i was also optimistic. we need police — faith, but i was also optimistic. we need police reform bad. these guys are able _ need police reform bad. these guys are able to — need police reform bad. these guys are able to wear a badge and go out in the _ are able to wear a badge and go out in the field. — are able to wear a badge and go out in the field, which means that they are qualified and trained to do their— are qualified and trained to do theirjob — are qualified and trained to do theirjob at a high level. but when
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you shoot— theirjob at a high level. but when you shoot and kill a man that's running — you shoot and kill a man that's running away from you that doesn't pose a _ running away from you that doesn't pose a threat, either you're not qualified — pose a threat, either you're not qualified and undertrained or it's a choice _ qualified and undertrained or it's a choice and — qualified and undertrained or it's a choice and you want to kill black men _ choice and you want to kill black men and — choice and you want to kill black men and women. it's either one of the other~ — men and women. it's either one of the other. and i think today, keith ellison— the other. and i think today, keith ellison and — the other. and i think today, keith ellison and his team proved that 'ust ellison and his team proved that just because you are the law, you're not above _ just because you are the law, you're not above the law. that just because you are the law, you're not above the law.— not above the law. that is brandon williams, not above the law. that is brandon williams. a — not above the law. that is brandon williams, a nephew— not above the law. that is brandon williams, a nephew of _ not above the law. that is brandon williams, a nephew of george - not above the law. that is brandon l williams, a nephew of george floyd. just a couple of hours after we heard that verdict of guilty in the case of derek chauvin. it was a three week long trial, he was on charges of murder and manslaughter. we heard from 45 witnesses and watched hours of video that was filmed much of that by bystanders and police cameras themselves. our north america correspondent, lebo diseko looks back at the key moments in the trial. it was a death that shook the world. i cannot breathe!
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ripping open america's unhealed wounds on racism and police brutality. but much of the evidence of this crime was not gathered by police. instead, it was the local community who documented it. filming, begging... he's not responsive right now! ..and remonstrating with officers as derek chauvin knelt on george floyd's neck for nearly nine—and—a—half minutes. among them, the teenager without whom there may never have been a trial. it was a video filmed on her mobile phone that was seen around the world. a minor at the time, her face was not shown in court. when i look at george floyd, i look at... i look at my dad. i look at my brothers, i look at my cousins, my uncles. because they are all black. many nights, i stayed up apologising and... and apologising to george floyd for not doing more.
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you going to choke him like that? when their efforts to intervene failed, several members of this community reported what they'd seen. at some point did i you make a 911 call? that is correct, i did call the police on the police. all right. and why did you do that? because i believe i witnessed a murder. derek chauvin's job was to police and protect this community. but so damning was the bystanders footage, along with the police body camera video, that his fellow officers turned against him. to continue to apply that level of force to a person proned out, handcuffed behind their back — that, in no way shape or form, is anything that is by policy
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or training, and it is certainly not part of our ethics or our values. the defence had argued that george floyd's poor health and drug use had caused his death. but that was undermined by evidence by a pulmonary doctor. a healthy person subjected to what mr floyd was subjected to would have died as a result. witness after witness spoke of the trauma they still experienced today. these bystanders documented an experience that, for many african—americans, is as familiar as it is painful. while this verdict may exceed what some thought might be possible, questions still remain about the value of a black life in america today. lebo diseko, bbc news, minneapolis. before we wrap up, let's go back to larry who's been at george floyd
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square on this extraordinaire day. you've been there for more than this day, you've been covering this trial for three weeks, it's been such an emotional time around the country but i imagine particularly there in minneapolis. what's it been like covering it?— covering it? there's a lot of emotion. — covering it? there's a lot of emotion. i _ covering it? there's a lot of emotion, i think _ covering it? there's a lot of emotion, i think that's i covering it? there's a lot of emotion, i think that's the l covering it? there's a lot of- emotion, i think that's the best way to describe it. i've seen so many tears here notjust in the coat room but outside of it too. —— courtroom. i've met people like gwen, the mother of a man who was killed in new york. and when her son was on the ground, he also said he couldn't breathe. i've met the cousin of emmett till, emmett till was wrongfully accused 55 years ago of offending a white woman and was killed because of their at. people have been coming here in solidarity with the floyd family, and they all say that america has not changed that much. there's been progress but there's still a lot to do to dismantle racism and white supremacy
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in the many ways that it exposes itself in the ordinary lives of black americans.— itself in the ordinary lives of black americans. ~ �* , ., black americans. we've been hearing that from many _ black americans. we've been hearing that from many members _ black americans. we've been hearing that from many members of- black americans. we've been hearing that from many members of the i black americans. we've been hearing | that from many members of the floyd family, saying that they usually never get justice family, saying that they usually never getjustice but this was just one case, and now they need to keep the struggle for justice one case, and now they need to keep the struggle forjustice going forward. borisjohnson has tweeted, "i was appalled by the death of george floyd and welcome this verdict. my thoughts tonight are with george floyd's family and friends." i'm only reading the prime minister's tweet because this was a case that didn't just minister's tweet because this was a case that didn'tjust get attention in this country — perhaps something that marked it out from other previous cases with the fact that it ricocheted right around the world as well, didn't it? ricocheted right around the world as well. didn't it?— well, didn't it? george floyd has become a name _ well, didn't it? george floyd has become a name that's _ well, didn't it? george floyd has| become a name that's recognised well, didn't it? george floyd has i become a name that's recognised all around the world. my family in kenya has been asking me about this and what is the likelihood of getting a guilty verdict. so has been the reaction and i've been getting comments while covering this from
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people in asia and latin america who are interested in this. it's not surprising that prime minister boris johnson is putting on a statement so soon after this. because that video was so powerful and resonated with people around the world, and it seems in this case at least of the jury seems in this case at least of the jury agreed with them. there is still the possibility of an appeal, so i don't think that's completely gone. and thejudge so i don't think that's completely gone. and the judge admitted that representative maxine waters's it may give them grounds for an appeal at some stage, so as not all done. larry, thank you forjoining us from minneapolis. as the attorney general of minneapolis said, this is not justice, justice would be full restitution. this accountability in the case of george floyd, accountability because derek chauvin was found guilty on all three charges of murder and was led away from the courtroom in handcuffs. he will be going to jail. thanks for watching the special coverage from
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washington. hello. the weather is not expected to change very much over the next few days. the kind of weather where strong spring sunshine can make it feel quite warm by day, but at night, clear skies can still allow it to get cold and frosty. but it will remain mostly dry through the rest of the week. now, on the earlier satellite image, you can see this stripe of cloud here. this is a weakening weather front, not much rain left on it, but certainly more in the way of cloud as this sinks down across england and wales through the first part of wednesday. also some mist and murk and low cloud lapping onto some southern coasts of england, so a bit of a grey start for parts of england and wales, even with the odd spot of rain. but it will brighten up with some sunny spells into the afternoon. scotland and northern ireland having a sunny but chilly and keeping hold of some sunshine
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through the day. just more in the way of cloud and maybe the odd shower getting into shetland. quite a breezy day for many, and where you're exposed to that breeze along the east coast, temperatures may only get to eight, nine or 10 degrees. temperatures may only get to eight, highest temperatures may only get to eight, temperatures across highest temperatures likely to be across the far southwest at 16—17 c, but here there could just be the odd afternoon shower. and he showers will fade through the evening, and through the night into the early hours of thursday, you can see long, clear spells across the country, allowing it to get cold. where you see the blue on the map is where we expect temperatures below freezing, but quite widely there'll be a touch of frost to take us into thursday morning. but for the end of the week, high pressure really will assert its influence right on top of the british isles, just around the southern flank of that high, we will have some quite brisk winds blowing across the channel islands, also affecting some southern and eastern coasts. but as you can see, largely cloud free skies to start thursday, i think we will see a bit of patchy cloud bubbling up through the day,
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but generally speaking quite a lot of sunshine. highest temperatures in the west at 15—17 c, but for eastern and southern coasts, particularly where we have that breeze in the south, it's going to feel on the chilly side. still quite windy towards the south and southwest on friday, a bit of cloud across scotland squeezing out the odd spot of rain, but elsewhere it's dry it with long spells of sunshine. a bit warmer by this stage, 17—18 c in some western areas. as we head into the weekend, it stays largely dry, more of that strong sunshine by day but still the chance of some frosty nights.
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this is bbc news. i'm tim willcox with special coverage of the trial of derek chauvin for the killing of george floyd. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. a jury decides he acted illegally when arresting george floyd in may of last year — he could face up to 40 years injail. mr floyd's supporters welcome the verdict outside the court. the question now — will the jailing of george floyd's killer change america's approach to policing and race relations?

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